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JULY 4–10, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 33 NO. 1 | PITCH.COM

✪ BOOM TOWN:

Where to see Fourth fireworks

The

Masalas’ restaurant redo

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KID

a

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✪ REINCARNATED:

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STAYS

ª in

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✪ SKYFALL:

Stan Glazer’s Ferris wheel fail

PICTURE

Craig Glazer has lived  the American dream. Are you listening, Hollywood? BY David Hudnall


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Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Danny Alexander, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

NOW YOU SEE IT,NOW YOU DON’T The mystery of Merriam’s missing Municipal Court money B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

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A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Tessa Canon

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

THE KID STAYS IN THE PICTURE

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Page Olson, Brooke Swenson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

Craig Glazer’s life ought to be a movie. Says Craig Glazer.

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

BY DAV I D H U D N A L L

6

S ECON D CHAN CES

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

OP’s Masalas is reborn — with a much bigger menu.

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

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QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE THE KANSAS CITY THAT NEVER WAS … FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY STREETSIDE MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

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NANCY JO SALES talks The Bling Ring in her new book. EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS — and a spontaneous wedding — at Crossroads KC. Shatto’s APPLE PIE MILK hits store shelves.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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QUESTIONNAIRE

CALLIE ENG L AND Hometown: Jefferson City, Missouri

Owner and founder of Rawxies

“The best advice I ever got …” Is tattooed on my forearm: “We receive what we believe.” If you plan for failure, you’ll most likely get it.

Current neighborhood: West Plaza What I do (in 140 characters): I own and operate a living-foods company that manufactures and distributes prepackaged food throughout the United States.

The worst advice: “Liquor before beer, you’re in the clear.” All lies.

What’s your addiction? Lipstick, brightly

My dating triumph/tragedy: While living in

What lessons from art school still apply? Design

can be used as a tool for creating positive change (Tyler Galloway). Credit is currency (Paul Diamond). An T afternoon nap will allow A INE ONL .COM for two workdays in one H C PIT (Steve Whitacre).

MORE

Q&As

What’s your game? As of late, I’ve become obsessed with kickboxing. What can I say, nothing feels quite as good as beating the crap out of something on a daily basis. Hello, stress reliever. What’s your drink? By day: green juice or an Americano. By night: dirty martini on the rocks or gin and tonic.

Where’s dinner? Usually at my office. Which means, Green Acres deli. When I’m coming up for air, I like Tannin, the Westside Local and Café Gratitude. (The latter requires takeout.)

California, I snagged myself an extremely driven professional skateboarder. We both had a dream and went for it. He never let me lose sight of the end goal, and I’m thankful for what I was able to learn from someone with such serious hustle in a dog-eat-dog environment. #triumph

ASHLEY JONES-WISNER

colored anything, loud music, fermenting foods, Fast Company, and the GIOGO Girls (Google it).

My sidekick: Polo, my miniature poodle.

What’s on your KC postcard? The people. After almost two years of living in the Bay Area, I realized that what makes a city is not always its offerings but rather its citizens. Kansas City has some of the best people around!

everywhere — but rather it’s the amount of progressive, forward-thinking investors.

“In fi ve years, I’ll be …” Still living my dream, except with a (much needed) personal assistant … and a maid.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” They attracted Google Fiber.

“I always laugh at …” Bad design.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” They didn’t

“I’ve been known to binge watch …” Workahol-

build the stadiums downtown.

“Kansas City needs …” More professionals

and/or local businesses willing to invest in young companies. The momentum behind the start-up community in Kansas City is great, but without financial support, it could be short-lived. The main attraction of the coast for start-ups isn’t the wealth — that’s

ics. I don’t get why I love something so stupid, but I do.

“I can’t stop listening to …” Spotify. It’s on my computer, it’s on my TV and it’s in my car. Pretty sure it’s the best $10 I spend each month. “I just read …” The most recent issue of

Afar.

My brush with fame: New York City, 2 a.m., or-

dering from a food truck, when I was spotted by two Rawxies fans and asked for an autograph. I felt so ridiculous, but I felt even more ridiculous standing at a food truck, in 5-inch heels, after a long night of wedding cocktails. Hey, I never said I was perfect!

My 140-character soapbox: Find your healthy balance and roll with it. Mine is green juice, hot-pink lipstick and dirty martinis — I’ll never pretend otherwise. Drop the dogmatic thinking. My recent triumph: Having Rawxies awarded “Top 6 Vegan Products for 2013” at this year’s Expo West in Anaheim, California — 2,500 companies and 75,000 attendees. I couldn’t have been more flattered!

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BUY

NEWS

NOW YOU SEE IT, NOW YOU DON’T

BY

S T E V E VOCKROD T

LOCAL

The mystery of Merriam’s missing Municipal Court money

M

erriam Municipal Court clerk Fabiola Cruz was arrested June 27, 2011, for allegedly embezzling from the public trust. The Johnson County District Attorney’s Office issued a press release announcing that the 35-year-old Cruz was tagged with five felony charges: one for stealing more than $100,000 and the other four for computer crimes. However, the charges were quietly dropped before a scheduled preliminary hearing, and the case was closed June 4, 2012. Now Cruz is suing Merriam and several of its employees, including the city administrator and the police chief. First, some history. Cruz, who immigrated from Mexico in 1988 and became a naturalized U.S. citizen, started working for Merriam in 2002. In her lawsuit, she claims that she had a clean personnel file and never ran into trouble at work. That was, until September 1, 2010, when she was summoned to a meeting with Merriam’s city administrator, Phil Lammers, Former Merriam court clerk Fabiola Cruz and its human resources director, Karen Kline. is suing the city and others. Lammers and Kline had questions about “What I can say is, the city’s trackingwhether she was stealing company time. system problems made it impossible for us They asked Cruz to prove that she had worked full days on the dates in question or to resign to move forward with the prosecution,” Howe by the end of the week. So Cruz resigned in tells The Pitch. Lammers parrots Howe. September 2010, and nothing seemed to hap“I think he believed that because the recordpen until April 2011. keeping process we had could be compromised That’s when city officials began investigat— those aren’t his words, [they’re] mine — he ing missing Municipal Court funds — mostly chose not to prosecute,” court fines — with an eye Lammers says. toward Cruz as the culprit. But Lammers still beCity and police officials “What I can say is, lieves that the money went paid Cruz a visit at her somewhere. home to ask about more the city’s tracking“It appeared that there than $300,000 that had was money missing,” Lamgone unaccounted for from system problems mers says. the Municipal Court, dating The city’s insurance comback to 2007. Then a funny made it impossible pany seems to have agreed. thing happened. Cruz’s Travelers Insurance cut a lawyer asked for evidence for us to move $250,000 check, the policy showing that his client was limit, for the employeein the wrong. forward with fidelity claim after reviewInstead of providing ing the city’s audit and the computer codes, paymentthe prosecution.” insurance company’s own by-type records, ledgers forensic audit. and bank statements, the Cruz wouldn’t speak city produced self-made without her attorney’s permission; lawyer journal entries showing the money that was Brian McCallister did not return several calls supposedly missing and statements from Cruz’s co-workers that she was living beyond from The Pitch to discuss his client’s case. Cruz spent a year out on bond before her means. charges were dropped. No one else has been Merriam either botched the evidence against Cruz or never had it to begin with. Johnson popped for the same crime. County District Attorney Steve Howe seemingly had little choice but to boot the charges. E-mail Steve.Vockrodt@pitch.com

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Craig Glazer's life ought to be a movie. Says Craig Glazer.

The Kid

STAYS

— in the —

CHRIS MULLINS

Pictur e 6

� B Y D A V I D H U D N A L L� the pitch

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T

he phone rang, and Craig Glazer stubbed out a Marlboro Ultra Light in the ashtray on his desk. He hit the speaker button. “It’s a hundred for the cab,” a man said. “A hundred?” Glazer answered in his low, gravelly voice. He picked the phone up from its cradle and crammed it between his left ear and shoulder. “You gotta be kidding me. That’s a $40 ride. I mean, there’s no way it’s a hundred.” He listened for five seconds, rolled his eyes, then hung up without speaking again. Glazer was sitting in his cluttered, unglamorous office at Stanford and Sons, the Legendsarea comedy club that he owns. He had been talking, as he often does, about The King of Sting, the memoir he co-wrote, which a company called Skyhorse Publishing put out in 2008. It chronicles Glazer’s years as a “sting artist” in the early 1970s, posing as law enforcement and robbing drug dealers in Arizona. (The book is subtitled The Amazing True Story of a Modern American Outlaw. Used copies are plentiful on Amazon for $0.01, plus shipping and handling.) Turning the story into a movie is a goal that has occupied him on and off since sometime in the 1980s. Now, as he enters his twilight years — he’s 60 — it has become his dominating passion. He believes that such a movie would corroborate his long-held core belief: that he is a legendary rogue who deserves to be more famous. “Anyway,” he said, “we tried to write the script based off the whole book, but it just didn’t work. There was just too much there. It was too episodic. So, with the movie, it opens with me getting arrested for stinging people in Arizona. Then it takes you through my years as a special agent for the attorney general in Kansas, and on from there.” Glazer’s younger brother, Jeff Glazer, opened the door, and the laughter of the Friday-night club crowd flowed in. (Comedian Brian Dunkleman, of American Idol fame, was working the theater, about 10 feet from Glazer’s office.) Jeff, the general manager at Stanford and Sons, runs the club’s day-to-day operations while Glazer handles the marketing and the talent. They share the office, and they tend to bicker. “Look what the cat dragged in,” Jeff said, and behind him walked a curvy blonde who looked to be in her early 30s — tall, tight jeans, ample makeup. Glazer stood and scanned the room for a chair, but there was nowhere for her to sit. “Why don’t you get a drink and watch Dunkleman, and we’ll wrap up in here,” Glazer suggested. She left the room, and Glazer’s eyes bulged behind his tinted prescription glasses — too much light gives him headaches — and he shook his head as though really blown away by something. He explained that the woman was a former flame he hadn’t seen in more than a year. She had called him out of the blue earlier in the day,

and he told her to come to the club, assuring her that he would pay for the ride. “She used to be a 9,” he said. “Now she’s, like, a 6. Unbelievable.” Jeff cracked open the door. “I can’t deal with this girl out here,” he said. “You’ve got to come — ” “Please, just … we’re almost done,” Glazer said, shooing him out. Glazer went on: “I mean, you don’t know, you’ve never met her before. I’m in shock over here. She used to be smokin’. But she’s always been big into the booze” — he brought his thumb to his mouth and lifted up his pinky — “and I guess it’s caught up to her finally. That’s just unbelievable. I’m legitimately shocked right now.” He returned to the topic of the movie, his movie. “Anyway, it’s been a 30-year trek, when you add it all up. I’d be willing to bet there isn’t a script in Hollywood that’s been bouncing around as long as The King of Sting — or Outlaws, as it used to be called. But lately, I’ve been thinking maybe it’s good it’s taken this long. Back in the ’80s, I kind of made a living on the story from options and advances. But, of course, the picture never got made. And maybe if it had happened back then, it would have been a bad thing. Maybe now that I’m older, I can really appreciate the situation. I mean, it’s been the carrot in front of my nose for three decades now. “But now it’s at the point where I just want to get the monkey off my back. And it’s looking like it’s finally going to happen. We have the financing. We have a director: Robert Lorenz, who’s been first assistant director to Clint Eastwood on a bunch of his movies. He recently directed Trouble With the Curve. We have a script. It’s by Dan Gordon, who did the screenplays for Wyatt Earp and The Hurricane. The last chip that needs to fall into place is getting a big actor attached to one of the two lead roles. And we’re very close on that, too.” Jeff opened the door again. “Unless I’ve lost my mind, isn’t that the girl from the — “ “Yes, Jeff, will you please leave me alone? I’m trying to do this interview.” Glazer pulled his glasses up and rested them on his forehead. He rubbed his hands over his face and leaned back in a gesture of exhaustion. “Craig needs to be a younger guy, so I’m thinking maybe somebody from the Twilight movies for that role,” he said. “We need an older, established guy for Woodbeck.” (Don Woodbeck was Glazer’s sting partner.) “Personally, I like Jeremy Renner for the part. What do you think of Jeremy Renner? Hurt Locker? The Town?” The woman returned with a drink for Glazer. She walked it around to his side of the desk, handed it to him and said, “I forgot to do something.” She bent down and kissed him on the lips. Glazer returned the kiss with the

expression of someone whose dog had just wakened him from a nap by licking his face. “We’re about done,” he told her. “Couple minutes, I’ll come out there.” She left again, and Glazer took his time through a number of topics: his regular appearances on Johnny Dare’s radio show; the absurdities of America’s drug laws; how he was one of eight people whom the comedian Jimmie Walker thanked in his autobiography, Dyn-O-Mite! It was a typically stream-of-consciousness outpouring from a man who winds stories of sexual conquests around recollections of business success tied to ruminations on fame. Sometimes five minutes pass before he attempts to circle back to his original point. Sometimes 45 minutes whir by, and Glazer finds that he has lost the trail. “Lots of people around here don’t know, but Stanford and Sons basically launched the careers of Larry the Cable Guy and Lewis Black,” Glazer said. He paused to listen to a muffled noise outside the door. He held up one index finger and cocked his ear. The door flew open. “Get her out of here,” Jeff said. “She flicked a cigarette at a customer. I don’t want her in the building. She’s nuts. I’m calling security.” The woman re-entered. Glazer looked at her, turned up his palms and said, “What are you doing?” “What?” the woman said, feigning surprise. “Nothing.” “Why can’t you just sit down and be quiet?” Glazer said. “What did you do?” “There was a drunk girl out in the hallway, and I said, ‘You like Craig’s brother, don’t you?’ And she’s like, ‘What the fuck do you have to say about it?’ And I’m like, ‘Nothing, I just thought that maybe you liked Craig’s brother.’ Oh, my God. And she’s like, ‘Well, you’re a dumb bitch,’ and I’m like — I mean, Craig, the bartender and three of your waitresses saw it. I just backed off. It was, like, crazy, though. I was just trying to hook your brother up with this chick.” “He’s not interested,” Glazer said. “He has a girlfriend.” “Well, fine, I get that now,” she said. “This is what you get for owning a bar. Crazy people.” Jeff addressed his brother: “Who the hell is she that she can come in here and dictate anything or say anything about what’s going on here?” “I didn’t dictate shit,” the woman said. “You come in here and throw a cigarette on a customer,” Jeff started. “She got in my face and was calling me a cunt, and I flicked a cigarette at her chest. Big deal. What is your problem?” “My problem is you,” Jeff said. “Why are you here?” “I can’t do this,” Glazer said. “Why am I here? Why are you talking to

“She used to be a 9. Now she’s, like, a 6. Unbelievable.”

me like I’m some fuckin’ stranger? Because I’m fuckin’ not. You didn’t just fuckin’ meet me yesterday. I’ve known Craig 15 years in the making.” “I don’t want her near the crowd, Craig,” Jeff said. He left. “I have to seat the late-show crowd now,” Glazer told the woman. “Will you just stay in here and be quiet?” A line of guests for the 9:45 show had formed near the entrance to the theater, and Glazer spent the next 10 minutes assigning them to their seats. When he was done, the venue was about three-quarters full — “pretty good considering it’s been raining all day,” he said. Glazer sat down in a chair in the back row and shook his head, a little tired. Jeff came over. “I just caught her snooping around on your Facebook,” he said. Glazer sighed and then got up and walked along the side of the theater, disappearing backstage. A few seconds later, he stepped onto the stage, took the microphone, heard scattered applause. “We got a great show for you guys tonight.”

T

ype “Craig Glazer” into the The Kansas City Star’s database, and the newspaper returns 360 articles from 1993 through 2011. The stories in which Glazer’s name appears range from Westport shootings to Chiefs pep rallies to federal cocaine indictments. The aggregate portrait that emerges is of a local celebrity with diverse interests, questionable ethics and big ideas. His father, Stanford Glazer, could be described in the same terms. The elder Glazer opened Stanford and Sons in 1975 in Westport and ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Kansas City in 2003 and 2007. In The King of Sting, Glazer reserves most of his sarcasm and scorn for his dad, whom he regards as an absent and cruel figure during his youth. (Stan called Craig “Larry Lardbutt” as a child and referred to Jeff as “Little Hitler.”) Glazer grew up here, attending Shawnee Mission East High School. At Arizona State University, he met Woodbeck and embarked on a life of crime. The first 100 pages of The King of Sting detail this period of Glazer’s life, though beyond Glazer’s word, the truth is hard to verify. As the book tells it, he and Woodbeck (a laconic Vietnam vet, the Butch Cassidy to Glazer’s Sundance Kid) spent a couple of years in Arizona dealing weed, robbing pernicious drug dealers and living as outlaws. When the lifestyle got too hot — Glazer claims that there was a $5,000 bounty on his head — he returned to Kansas City. It was then that the Kansas Attorney General’s Office came knocking. They’d heard about Glazer’s exploits in Arizona and wanted his help as an undercover narcotics agent. (This part of the story checks out; Glazer worked under Kansas Attorney General Vern Miller, who at the time was ramping up drug busts to build his résumé before a run for governor.) Glazer, 20 years continued on page 8

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The Kid Stays in the Picture continued from page 7 old at the time, has claimed that he was the nation’s youngest special agent. In typical action-movie fashion, Glazer recruited his old partner, Woodbeck, to assist him. Quickly, the lines of legality blurred, dubious tactics were employed, and Glazer and Woodbeck were eventually arrested for trying to frame two men on a coke buy at a motel in Merriam. Glazer has always insisted that he and Woodbeck were the ones who got framed, but they were both convicted of conspiracy to distribute cocaine. Glazer appealed and was eventually given probation instead of jail time. Around this time, Glazer began working at his father’s restaurant, Stanford and Sons. The place had become one of KC’s hot spots, and Glazer liked the glamour. He didn’t like the grunt work, though. “In the late ’70s, I was the Kansas City Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever,” he writes in The King of Sting. “By day working seventy hours a week at a dead-end job at my father’s restaurant, by night enjoying a life of rotating disco balls and rotating girlfriends.” When his probation ended, Glazer decided that it was time to make a movie based on his adventures. He put together a treatment for his life story — he was 28 at the time — and fired it off to hundreds of Hollywood agents. One agent bit, and in 1981 Glazer successfully optioned his story to CBS Theatrical Films for $300,000. He tracked down Woodbeck, and the two went off to conquer Hollywood.

this Outlaws story, which I related to because I grew up in South Texas and was familiar with the strange phenomenon of high school buddies getting involved in the pot-smuggling trade in Mexico. … I had a friend in high school who was shotgunned on the road for getting involved in Mexican gang stuff. So I knew this type of stuff happened, that there was still this kind of Wild West in America. But these New York and L.A. guys just weren’t buying it.” York and Glazer later worked on a handful of other scripts together, but none ever went into production. “I spent too much time in L.A. chasing bimbos, going to Hollywood parties, staying up until 4 in the morning drinking, hanging with celebrities,” Glazer said. “I was hanging first crossed paths with Craig sometime in the early ’80s,” said Sal Manna, a former out with guys like Sonny Landham, Mickey journalist who later co-wrote The King of Sting. Rourke, Gary Busey, and acting like I was one “He was trying to be a Hollywood player, of them. But I wasn’t like them. They had cais how I’d describe Craig in reers in the industry. I just those years. He was really had this story that wasn’t “I spent too much time in going for it. He was involved even made yet. with writers, producers, di“I got so much publicity L.A. chasing bimbos, rectors, actors — trying to for that story. I was on the going to Hollywood get into the movie industry Today show. Entertainment just like many thousands of Tonight did a two-part speparties, staying up until 4 others.” cial. Hollywood really ate up in the morning drinking, Not everyone found his what we were doing because hanging with celebrities.” story charming. In a 1981 we were these authentic Kansas City Times editorial, cowboy outlaw types. And Arthur Brisbane criticized Hollywood has a way of perGlazer’s sting tales: “However entertaining petuating the party lifestyle we were living. this Robin Hood movie might be, though, it But ultimately, I hadn’t made it yet. I was too might be a better idea to make a movie about busy living the life of a celebrity without really Glazer’s exploits after the Robin Hood period. having the goods to back it up.” Wouldn’t it be more interesting to learn how Glazer tried his hand at acting; worked for Glazer, working as an undercover officer for a B-movie company, buying songs from bands the state of Kansas in 1974, managed to frame to place in films; and, along with Woodbeck, two black men even as his sidekick Woodbeck gradually backslid toward crime. was caught literally holding the bag? That’s a In 1982, Woodbeck was killed in a bloody much more interesting story, and it’s certifiably shootout in a hotel room after a cocaine deal true, as numerous court hearings will attest.” went bad. In 1984, Glazer was busted for Dan York, a vice president of production at money laundering. He served four years in Universal Pictures during Glazer’s swashbuckvarious California prisons. When he was reling Hollywood days, said, “Craig pitched me leased, in 1988, he stuck around Hollywood,

I als.com! e d h c t i p y m u o Thank y ey, I was n o m h c u m o s I saved ck! u D r. M y u b o t able - Dylan

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In the prison yard, post-moneylaundering conviction


working on more scripts. A few were optioned but never made. “It was just disappointment after disappointment,” Glazer said. “And eventually, everything dried up. Dan [York] looked at me one day and said, ‘Look, you’re talented, but sometimes you gotta do something else to make your dreams come true.’ So I flew back to Kansas City in 1990. My dad was about to give the Stanford and Sons restaurant to my brother, Jeff, and I came back to help run it.”

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think it’s fair to say I have the most recognizable voice in the city,” Glazer said one Wednesday morning about a month ago. His Macho Man Randy Savage–on-valium voice is a constant on local airwaves. He records advertising spots for Stanford and Sons (always closing with his “Think about it!” catchphrase) and shows up as a radio guest on 98.9 the Rock, Mix 93.3 and Q104, alongside whatever comic is performing at Stanford and Sons that weekend. He’s a regular around local TV stations, too. On another recent morning, at KSHB Channel 41, he introduced himself to an attractive young woman working there as “the most controversial media figure in the city,” then asked her if she was single. She mentioned a fiancé. He replied that he’d written a book about his life as an outlaw and that he’d bring her a copy of it the following week. On this Wednesday, though, his black Lotus sports car was parked next to the entrance of Entercom’s Mission offices, and Glazer was waiting with comedian Nick Vatterott to go on Johnny Dare’s morning show. Glazer sipped coffee and explained his media routine. “We do Dare on Wednesdays, and sometimes we also do 610 Sports on Wednesdays,” he said. “Thursdays we used to do Channel 5 TV, but they canceled that show [KCTV’s Better Kansas City]. Friday we’ll do NBC 41, and sometimes WDAF Channel 4. And we always do Mix 93.3, Q104 and Alice 102. And if it’s a black comic, we might do Hot 103 Jamz. There are occasions on Fridays where I’ll do five or six shows: four radio, two TV.” One of Dare’s assistants came over and asked Vatterott what he wanted to talk about during the interview. Vatterott said he wanted

Calling shots in the Entertainment Tonight dressing room. to make fun of Matthew “Mancow” Muller, the Kansas City-born, Chicago-based morning DJ syndicated in some small U.S. markets. “Johnny doesn’t like Mancow,” the assistant said. “They don’t get along. He doesn’t even like it when people mention him.” Vatterott suggested that he talk about bad morning DJs in general. He got the OK. Inside the studio, Vatterott and Glazer took their spots in front of microphones across from Dare as the host talked his way into the segment. After some chitchat with Vatterott, Dare brought Glazer into the conversation. Glazer plays a heightened version of himself on Dare’s show — raunchier and a little racist, in the mold of Archie Bunker. Glazer told a story about having sex with a woman he met on Grindr, the website on which people post their locations in the hopes of finding some nearby individual who wants to hook up. “You’re just one big herpe,” Dare said. The actor Rick Schroder (Lonesome Dove, NYPD Blue) called in during Vatterott’s segment. He and Dare spoke for 10 minutes about a new, unscripted show that Schroder is involved with, in which he’s teamed with the U.S. Army to depict military life. Glazer was not impressed. “A little over the top,” he said on the air, after Schroder hung up.

“How is your book selling?” Dare shot back. “Why are you bringing up the book?” “Because you’re trying to demean Rick Schroder.” “I wasn’t demeaning him.” “It’s always ‘big me, little you’ with him [Glazer],” Dare told his audience. “You are going to be the guy whose greatest regret in life is that you didn’t get your movie, about you, made. … You know you’re never going to get this movie made.” Glazer’s tone changed. “Well, I’m not going to get into it, but we’re just about there.” But before the segment was over, Glazer had brought Dare, Vatterott and every 98.9 listener up to speed on the progress of the film. In the parking lot afterward, discussing Dare and his show, Glazer said, “Look, credit to Johnny: He’s the most successful media personality in the history of the city. But is he a friend?” He paused and let a wounded look register briefly on his face. “You know, would a friend say that he hopes your movie never gets made?”

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are and Glazer’s relationship perhaps owes its chill to the deterioration of their business venture. In 2004, as Stanford and Sons faced a lawsuit from its Westport landlord, the Glazer brothers and Dare opened a hard-

rock-and-barbecue club together in the space. Johnny Dare’s, as it was called, filed for bankruptcy less than a year later. “It was a great idea at the wrong location,” Glazer said. “Our salaries were way too high. The space was too small. Johnny tried to get involved with running it, which led to a million arguments. Once it wasn’t doing so hot anymore, he wouldn’t be there. For him, it was just like, ‘Well, I’ll just move on and keep doing radio, no big deal.’ So I think ultimately our relationship was damaged as a result.” (Dare didn’t return phone calls for this story.) The closing of Dare’s was Glazer’s final bow in Westport, where he had seen his 1990s success in that district dry up. For a few years after his 1990 return to Kansas City, Glazer kept an apartment in Los Angeles. But by 1994, he had begun to import a bit of Hollywood to KC. The Glazer brothers had taken over Stanford and Sons and had gone after a younger crowd, adding a dance club and a pool room. A few years later, Stanford’s Comedy Club — which Stan had opened at a different Westport address and still owned — closed, and Glazer moved it back above the original Stanford and Sons. The dance-club version of Stanford and Sons had begun attracting local star athletes, and now the comedy club was booking national celebrities. The address was again one of the hottest spots in Kansas City, a place to see Chiefs and Royals players, comics on their way up, beautiful women and rich men. From 1990 to 1995, food and liquor sales nearly doubled. Glazer became a vocal cheerleader for Westport as an entertainment district. Along with Bill Nigro, another Westport merchant and property owner, he spearheaded Chiefs pep rallies and car shows there. Playboy Playmates and Chiefs players would attend. “I suppose Craig was kind of a ringleader for a lot of fun stuff in Westport in those years,” Nigro recalled recently. “Some of the more outstanding press we got for our events definitely happened because of Craig. I’d probably say that a lot of the behind-the-scenes stuff of organizing the events was more on my plate. But we had great times there in the ’90s in Westport.” Glazer’s name appeared constantly in the Star, in Hearne Christopher Jr.’s city-gossip column and Jeffrey continued on page 10

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hunt.’ He said, ‘Get a dog and date around.’ And that’s what I’ve done. I would have to be hospitalized if this dog died.” Glazer maintains a rotating cast of girlfriends, all apparently comfortable with open relationships and being discussed on Johnny Dare’s show. Earlier in the evening, one of his girlfriends — a tall, muscular, AfricanAmerican woman known to listeners of Dare’s show as “Chocolate Becky” — had stopped by. Now she looked tired and annoyed. She retreated into Glazer’s bedroom. During his 1980s Hollywood days, in Glazer’s account, he dated a number of beautiful, semi-famous actresses, including Priscilla Barnes (who replaced Suzanne Somers in Three’s Company) and Sandahl Bergman, a KC native who played opposite Arnold Schwarzenegger in Conan the Barbarlazer is now a columnist on the local blog ian. There were Penthouse models, including Tony’s Kansas City, where his writing is increasingly nostalgic and reflective. Sometimes an on-again, off-again with Christine Dupree, that means self-congratulatory navel gazing the centerfold in the Penthouse that had about the cost of fame. Sometimes it’s a tribute Madonna on the cover. to black women. And sometimes it’s a tender “In the ’90s, when I was in Westport, it Father’s Day tribute to 81-year-old Stan. was a situation where I literally couldn’t “He caps the night off for us,” Tony Botello, keep up with all the women,” Glazer said. the founder of Tony’s Kansas City, said in June. “I’d be hanging out with Johnny Damon, Joe “I’ve always been focused on starting the news Montana, Pauly Shore. There were women cycle in the morning, so we post Craig’s stuff at everywhere. At the end of the night, you end the end of the day — kind of a ‘thought for the up with one or two of them. I don’t own a day’ type of thing. I just think he’s an interestnightclub anymore, so there’s not as many ing guy with unique insights and a pretty wide of those types of nights anymore.” breadth of knowledge.” Stan, with whom Glazer is once again close, On the last Monday in June, Glazer was said, “I think getting older bothers him more sitting on a white-leather than most people. He’s a couch in the living room of dapper guy and he likes dat“I think getting older ing younger women, and I his Fairway condo, wearing And 1 basketball shorts that think he’s afraid aging is gobothers him more nearly reached his ankles, ing to slow him down.” than most people.” and a matching white And Glazer knows where his 1 shirt. His friendly dachsbachelor lifestyle is headed: hund, Junior, was resting “I can work out all I want. I beside him. A DVD of Champions Forever, a can take testosterone. But at some point, you boxing documentary that he produced after gotta look at what’s coming next.” being released from prison in the 1980s, sat Chocolate Becky emerged from the bedon his mantel. A Playboy peeked from a stack room and started to gather her things. “Why of magazines on the coffee table. won’t you just make yourself a drink and hang Glazer has no children. He has been en- out with us,” Glazer said. She mixed a screwgaged a couple of times but married only once. driver and sat at a table 10 feet away, keeping It was 2003. She was 22, and he was 47. They her back to Glazer. divorced in 2008. Glazer returned again to his point. “Once in a while, I regret it,” Glazer said. “That’s why the movie is so important to “It would be hard to find someone like me,” he said. “If I could just walk onto the Connie again. But the thing of having someset of The King of Sting, if we could just get one in your space all the time — I just don’t that movie made, I could lay down and go to think I’m built for it. I don’t want to go to sleep and never wake up after that. The movie Grandma’s house and do midnight Mass on is all that’s left for me. Because I’ve already Christmas Eve. Connie’s sister was married to done everything else. I’ve been a gunfighter, this Mexican guy. She invites their family over I’ve been a special agent, I’ve been in jail, I’ve one day, and all of a sudden there’s 20 Mexican been on the front page, I’ve slept with all the kids running around here in my living room. women, I’ve hung with the celebrities, I’ve It’s like, ‘Fuck, I don’t want to do this. I want written a book, I’ve had a nightclub, I’ve got to watch the Raider game.’ the top comedy club. “A couple years ago, I went to a psycholo“People can say all they want about Craig gist because I was feeling weird about getting Glazer, but, fuck, the guy has been in the spotdivorced,” Glazer said. “He said, ‘I know you. light for four decades now. Forty years, and this I know you’ve dated beautiful women. You Glazer guy just won’t go away!” wouldn’t be satisfied with Miss Universe. You get bored. You’re a hunter and you want to E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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Flanagan’s sports-oriented gossip column. “He was great for the column,” Christopher told The Pitch. “He’s this outrageous guy who has the top comedy club in town. He gets bigname guys. He flies close to some celebrities. He’s a sportsaholic who’s friends with a lot of athletes. He’s an older guy with an appetite for quite younger women. And he loves to kiss and tell. He’s just a character, and he really loves the magic of journalism, and he’s been very good at worming his way into the local media limelight.” Glazer later wrote columns for KC Confidential, the blog that Christopher started after being laid off by the Star in 2008. The men parted company last year because, according to Christopher, “He writes really long and he would get up at the crack of dawn and furiously type up a column. But spellcheck can’t check names or facts. He eventually just became too exhausting to edit.” Long before that break, though, courts and the rule of law interfered with Glazer’s ability to manipulate his own press. In 1998, Stan sued Glazer and Jeff, alleging that they’d reneged on an agreement to pay him $5,000 a month in exchange for ownership of the comedy club. But it was an oral agreement, and Stan lost the lawsuit. “They’re my ex-sons now,” Stan told the Star at the time. “Their greed cost them their father.” Despite living in the same Plaza high-rise — the Sulgrave — Glazer and Stan didn’t speak for two years. To spite his sons, who were planning to open a Stanford’s offshoot in Overland Park, Stan opened his own comedy club in Overland Park and called it Stanford Glazer’s Comedy Club. It lasted about a year; Glazer and Jeff’s OP Stanford and Sons made it seven years before the brothers moved it to the Legends. In 2000, Glazer began taking shots in Christopher’s column at then-Mayor Kay Barnes and floating the idea of his own mayoral run. “I would get on the air or I’d be in Hearne’s column saying, ‘I turned Westport around. I can turn all of Kansas City around,’ ” Glazer said. But in September 2001, Glazer was indicted by a federal grand jury and charged with conspiracy to distribute Ecstasy, marijuana and cocaine. He pleaded guilty. Federal prosecutors acknowledged that he was mostly sharing the drugs with friends and girlfriends, not buying in large quantities to distribute and not selling. Glazer got off with three years’ probation, a $5,000 fine and three months at a halfway house. “You have to understand, during that period, Stanford’s was the most happening spot in the city,” Glazer said. “I’d have athletes and celebrities hanging out in my office, and we’d do blow, just like a lot of entertainers do blow. It was my business to entertain people. Most people in the industry at that time were doing exactly what I was doing. Yes, it was criminal because the stuff ’s ille-

gal. But I wasn’t involved in any clandestine operations.” He blames Barnes for his bust. “I would be on Dare, exaggerating 10-to-1 about my party lifestyle to be funny, and I think law enforcement thought, ‘Who the fuck does this guy think he is? This guy went to prison and clearly hasn’t learned his lesson.’ “They tapped my phone for a year and got nothing. They had no evidence. They busted a couple of low-level dealers that had sold me a couple of bags over time. I mean, why even indict me? So, do I think I was indicted because people wanted to knock me out of the mayor’s race? Yes. Do I think I’d have won? Yes. It’d at least have been close.”

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WEEK OF JULY 4–10 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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PAG E

BIG WHEEL Stan Glazer’s Ferris wheel fail

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FILM From Captain Jack to Tonto: Depp in The Lone Ranger

28 PAG E

MUSIC Five years of big-band liberation

T H U R S D AY | 7. 4 | BOOM CITIES

We wouldn’t be doing our job if we didn’t remind you that, technically, fireworks are illegal in a majority of the KC area’s cities. Fortunately, many of them offer free displays. We recommend that you sit back, save your money, and let the Man handle tonight’s entertainment. Independence Day Celebration at Oak Grove Park (Northeast 76th Street and North Troost, Gladstone). The free annual event begins at 7:30 p.m. with a patriotic concert, then segues to fireworks at dusk. See gladstone.mo.us.

FIRST FRIDAY HIT LIST Independence Day means a number of Crossroads galleries are taking July 5 off, but there’s no shortage of intriguing shows this First Friday. At FrontSpace (217 West 18th Street), St. Louis’ Sage Dawson presents her Natural Disasters, a set of colorful, cartographic-style drawings that give expression to burned-out homes and abandoned objects, focusing on the Augusta, Georgia, hilltop neighborhood of Summerville. Plenum Space (504 East 18th Street), open tonight and then only by appointment, brings Timothy Wagner from St. Louis, where he is involved in community events and helping other artists get their works out there. His multimedia two-dimensional work reflects landscapes of Europe and the American West in unexpected, abstract ways. Another one-night-then-appointments show worth seeing in the heat is at Beggar’s Table (2010 Baltimore). The Space or the Aggregate, by Brandon Briscoe and Jackson County’s Fourth of July Celebration at Longview Lake, Shelter No. 13 (11100 View High Drive). Find carnival games and rides, a drop-in salute to veterans by Skydive KC, and a performance by country-rock band Blackjack Billy. Gates open at 6 p.m. Admission is free, but parking costs $5. See jacksongov.org. KC RiverFest at Berkley Riverfront Park (south bank of the Missouri River between the Christopher S. Bond and Heart of America bridges). Gates open at 4 p.m. with free admission until 5 (then it costs $5, except for children 12 and younger, who get in free). The celebration has two stages of local music, including Antennas Up, Shades of Jade, Funk

FRIDAY

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riday First F . erupts

“Volcano” by Sage Dawson, at FrontSpace

Jaime Rovenstine, is about creating visual dilemmas through ideas of containment and the congregation of forms. Todd Weiner Gallery (115 West 18th Street) shows a triumvirate of power sculptors: Steve Pistone, with a new set of wrapped-wire works on view, is now exploring ceramics, too; John Northington continues to push massive woodblock forms to new expressions — including with fire; and Dave Root’s wooden constructs complement these nicely. Pi Gallery may be a distant memory, but Jody Wilkins still curates. Main Street Gallery is above Anton’s Tap Room (1610 Main) and this month features new work by Annie Woodfill in a multimedia, site-specific installation that, the artist writes, is partly a look at “contingency and contextual beauty derived from the phenomena of excess in American life.” And Czar Bar (1531 Grand) presents artist and educator Emily Eileen Patterson, who’s not interested, she writes, in making pretty things. Beauty is another matter, though, and she wants you to see it in all its “yummy flamboyance.” — TRACY ABELN

Syndicate, and Four Fried Chickens and a Coke. Fireworks begin at 10 p.m. See kcriverfest.com. Fourth of July Fireworks at Great Mall of the Great Plains (20700 West 151st Street, Olathe). No frills, just pure pyro at 9:30 p.m. See olatheks.org/parksrec. Star Spangled Spectacular at Corporate Woods (8717 West 110th Street, Overland Park). This event offers live music from Atlantic Express, country singer Matt Snook, and the American Legion Band of Greater KC. Full vendor services (including beer) are available. Gates open at 4 p.m., and parking and admission are free. Fireworks begin at continued on page 14

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KKFI Presents

The Almanac Trail Concert Tour Recreating the music of the historic 1941 Almanac singers, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Lee Hays

Starring:

Rik Palieri, George Mann, and Bob & Diana Suckiel Performing some of the greatest labor songs ever written

Saturday JULY 20

IBEW Local 124 301 E 103rd Terr, KCMO

Dinner & Social Hour 6pm Concert 7pm Tickets:

www.kkfi.org

$15 concert $30 dinner & concert

FRIDAY

7.5

s e stick ether sh See wh . ding the lan

continued from page 13 9:40 p.m. See starspangledspectacular.org. Fourth of July Celebration in Historic Downtown Parkville (parking lot, south end of Main Street, off Missouri Highway 9). Festivities begin Wednesday, July 3, from 6 to 10 p.m. On Thursday, the carnival runs from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; the community parade starts at 10 a.m., going south on Highway 9, from 63rd Street; and the fireworks go off over the river at 9:45 p.m. See parkvillemo.org.

INDEPENDENT BREWS

There’s no feeling more American than that connected with drinking beer and eating barbecue while standing around in a parking lot. Spend your Fourth with the folks from Big Rip Brewing Co. (216 East Ninth E R O M Avenue, North Kansas City), who open their joint up for a parkingT A INE ONL .COM lot party from 4 to 11 H PITC p.m. Their neighbor Kansas City SmokeShack BBQ sells food, cover band Amendment 21 offers tunes, and the brewery gives mini tours. “We will likely have the Hefeweizen, Brown Ale, Pale Ale, and possibly one or two others, depending on how busy it is the weekend before,” says Josh Collins, Big Rip’s beer chancellor. Admission is free to the parking-lot party, located near the corner of Ninth Avenue and Swift. For more information, see bigripbrewing.com.

EVENTS

F R I D AY | 7. 5 | REBOUND SPORTS

This week, Municipal Auditorium (301 West 13th Street, 816-513-5000) is ground zero for the country’s best in what’s commonly referred to as “T & T.” The U.S. Trampoline & Tumbling Championships continue with the preliminary rounds of the junior and senior elite divisions from 1:50 to 8:30 p.m. One-day passes for the weeklong competition cost $16. See usagym.org and click “Events” for more information. 14

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S AT U R D AY | 7. 6 | SILVER ON THE HILL

The property that now houses the Strawberry Hill Museum and Cultural Center (720 North Fourth Street, Kansas City, Kansas, 913-371-3264) was an orphanage for almost 80 years before it was acquired by the Strawberry Hill Ethnic Cultural Society. Now it stands as a proud testament to the rich Slavic heritage in KCK. Starting today (and every Saturday and Sunday through July), the museum celebrates its 25th anniversary with exhibitions from local painters Mike Savage and Geri Stewart, and a cooler giveaway to the first 25 visitors. Marijana Grisnik, a CroatianAmerican artist, has painted a special piece for the anniversary that is now on permanent display. It’s on view today from noon until 5 p.m. See strawberryhillmuseum.org.

DRINKING IN THE NAME OF

With organizations such as KC Crew, summer shut-ins no longer have an excuse to be antisocial. Alongside mydrinkon.com, KC Crew hosts Merica’s Birthday Bash, a five-bar pub crawl at Martini Corner from noon to 6 p.m. Besides access to $4 bomb shots and $2.75 Bud Light bottles, participants get two drink tickets, a koozie and a chance to hang out guilt-free in the recommended outfit of jorts and America-themed T-shirts. Tickets cost $5. Registration is between noon and 2 p.m. at Tower Tavern (401 East 31st Street, 931-9300). See kc-crew.com and click “Events.”

S U N D AY | 7.7 | HOT ON THE TRAIL

The course description for the sixth annual Psychedelic 5k: the Fire Version lists the trails as being “rocky, rooty, and hilly” and “not ‘sissy’ groomed.” “This is a rough bridle trail with loose, sharp rocks and roots,” says race organizer and Kansas City Trail Nerd leader Ben Holmes. “It also has over 1,000 feet of elevation change for its short 3.1-mile length.” Holmes claims that the average finish time is more than 30 minutes, but anyone one can


S AT U R D AY | 7.6 |

maintenance. From noon to 2 p.m. today, the public can skate for $7 on either the indoor ice rink or the outdoor roller rink. Skate rental for traditional roller skates, inline or ice skates is an additional $3. See kcicecenter.com.

T U E S D AY | 7. 9 | WHAT A FEELING

SPIN CITY

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n a city where the mic is king, the DJ is a loyal servant to its followers. And to the weekend beat. Name: Paul DeMatteo DJ alias: DJ Paul DeMatteo, aka PDM Hometown: Born in Los Angeles, moved to KC when I was 4 years old. Currently living in Longfellow Heights. Previous residencies: Kabal, Aura, F**kin’ A! at Czar Bar, We Love Techno with Jeffrey Bass at Czar Bar. Current residencies: Gossip with Adam Forrester, Jeffrey Bass and Scott Kaiser at Reserve Bar in the Ambassador Hotel. Beat vehicle: Serato, Traktor, CDJs, 1200s. Description of set: Deep sexy, groovy party music. Current top five: “Reverse Skydiving” by Hot Natured featuring Anabel Englund, “It’s You (MK Mix)” by FCL, “Easier to Hide (Original Mix)” by Maya Jane Coles, “Beams of Light (Alexis Raphael Remix)” by Miguel Campbell, “Do It Now” by Dubtribe Sound System Gossip with Paul DeMatteo, Jeffrey Bass, Adam Forrester and Scott Kaiser happens Saturdays from 9:30 p.m. to close at the Reserve Bar in the Ambassador Hotel (1111 Grand, 816-298-7700). There is no cover charge. complete it. Test your agility and dexterity today at 9 a.m. “We have hikers, and little kids with their parents do this as a nice hike in the woods as well, so you don’t have to be a trail runner or ‘world class’ to enter,” Holmes says. Race-day registration costs $30; be at Shelter No. 2 at the Wyandotte County Lake Park (91st Street and Leavenworth Road, Kansas City, Kansas) by 7:30 a.m. See psychowyco.com.

M O N D AY | 7. 8 | SKATE AWAY

Remember the roller rink of your childhood? The smell of popcorn and preteen feet? The reflection of the disco ball bouncing off the bumpers? An afternoon trip to the Kansas City Ice Center (19900 Johnson Drive, Shawnee, 913-441-3033) might not be a flashback to 1985, but it does conjure up memories. The facility is reopening after two weeks of

Who can forget the story of 18-year-old Pittsburgh girl Alex Owens: welder by day and an exotic dancer by night? We didn’t make that one up — it’s the plot of the 1983 sleeper hit Flashdance. At 8 p.m., Flashdance, the Musical opens at Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, 816-363-7827) and runs through Sunday, July 14. Tickets cost $10–$135; see starlightkc.com.

C.R.E.A.M.

Google Fiber is changing KC. Are you in the know when it comes to “the cloud,” the Nexus 7 and the capabilities of one-terabyte storage? Get more information when Google Fiber reps drop by Loose Park (5200 Pennsylvania) with free ice cream for a Fiberhood Celebratory Event. They may even answer tough questions like, “Why won’t my Google Fiber DVR record nine shows instead of eight?” Hang out from 6 to 8 this evening and find out more about Google’s information autobahn. See fiber.google.com, click “Cities” and scroll down to “Upcoming Events.”

W E D N E S D AY | 7. 10 |

SCREAMING GREATNESS

This year, Norway is celebrating the 150th birthday of native son and Modernist painter Edvard Munch. The highlight is Munch 150, a presentation of 220 of his works produced by Oslo’s National and Munch museums. This once-in-a-lifetime exhibition, featuring “The Scream,” has been turned into a film with an in-depth biography and expert insight. See Munch 150 at 1:30 p.m. at the Tivoli (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222). (It also screens at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 6, and Sunday, July 7.) Tickets cost $10; see tivolikc.com. E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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S TA G E

DRINK FOR THOUGHT

BY

L I Z C O OK

The Death of Cupid doesn’t dilute Lysistrata.

c Furs

li The Psychede ie @ Ind

Tribute Night @ KC Live Block

Cros See more the “promotions” link18th at p sroadon s Su mm er West Street Block Party

Fashion Show

Upcoming Events 7.4 - KC Riverfest Pitch Stage @ Berkley Riverfront Park 7.5 - Cover Me Bad @ KC Live Block 7.6 - Darren Sproles 5K @ Southcreek Office Park 7.9 - Mindless Behavior @ Indie

See more on the “promotions” link at p 16

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upid is on trial at the Living Room this month. It’s a bold move in the city that’s home to Hallmark and Russell Stover, but the Living Room’s third season has been nothing if not bold. Writer and director Kyle Hatley’s folked-up Lysistrata reboot, The Death of Cupid, is a heady cocktail of dick jokes, blues licks and theological angst, brimming with local talent. It’s billed as a “whiskey musical,” a notion that seems a little disingenuous when the first bottle of the stuff doesn’t show up until Act II. But whiskey is a state of mind in Hatley’s Greece, where ambrosia-tippling gods recline in the heat, and a fedora-clad pit orchestra pours out saloon soul. The play opens with narration from the Greek god Khaos, played and sung by the eminently capable Katie Gilchrist. The bloody Peloponnesian War is making new Athenian widows every day, and the women are sick with worry and tired of the violence. When Lysistrata (Megan Herrera) hears of her husband’s death, she bargains with Athenian and Spartan women alike to end the war. Her strategy? Sex. More specifically, no sex. Her assembly swears to a full love embargo until the women’s husbands sign a peace treaty. Fans of Lysistrata know what to expect from here: raunchy riffs, manic men and boners of comic proportions. But The Death of Cupid ramps up the classical comedy’s philosophical stakes. In Hatley’s show, the soldiers aren’t the only ones disputing Lysistrata. Her plan also earns the ire of the goddess Athena, then pisses off Aphrodite and her son, Cupid. When mortals tempt fate, the gods get fussy. Vanessa Severo is equal parts fierce and tender as Aphrodite, flipping deftly between comedic feistiness and tragic sincerity with the speed that Hatley’s script demands. Daria LeGrand plays Cupid as a profane pepper pot who strings together obscenities as fast as he fires his arrows. Strong performances and vocals from Casey Scoggins (Hera) and Zachary Parker (Hades) round out the pantheon. Parker’s underworld number is a highlight of pure spectacle, with excellent choreography and blocking by Severo and Hatley. The show’s most impressive technical feat (and future strike-crew nightmare) is its sandbox set design. The stage is covered in sand, adding texture to the lighting, cushioning the actors’ harder falls, and functioning as a terrestrial weapon when tempers flare. (Contact-lens wearers, you’ve been warned.) Hatley’s script is full of tricky light- and sound-cue-driven gags, and stage manager Alex Murphy calls the show with impeccable

C O U R T E S Y O F T H E L I V I N G R O O M T H E AT R E

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Fussy gods: Daria LeGrand (left) as Cupid and Vanessa Severo (right) as Aphrodite precision. A few of the technical elements are less nuanced — the lighting leans heavily on a general wash of high-saturation magenta, and a cheesy echo effect on Gilchrist’s mic could be dialed back — but the production design bolsters the show’s playful feel. That sense of play is true to the source material, and Hatley has further packed his Cupid with bawdy battle-of-the-sexes humor, including a brief PSA from the men on the medical legitimacy of “blue balls.” As Lysistrata’s army of scantily clad Athenians tease the sex-starved men with low-cut slips and pouty promises, the soldiers, led by Forrest Attaway’s chauvinistic Magistrate, reach their breaking point. Women are fickle, one of the dimwitted soldiers laments. “They’re made of three things: breasts and lies.” Those zippy one-liners are clever, but as the mortals clash with Cupid, the show veers into darker dramatic territory. The farcical elements and weighty philosophical questions about free will and fate make for a tricky tightrope act. As Act II’s tense confrontations unfold, the rimshot antics of previous scenes can start to feel like another dramatic universe, but the ensemble mostly keeps its balance. The musical numbers (given fine direction by Eryn Bates) help. Bittersweet updates of traditional spirituals, such as “There Is a Balm in Gilead,” show off the range of Cupid’s seasoned performers. The Death of Cupid is an ambitious, highenergy laugh machine with unexpected teeth, a testament to this local theater’s talent and willingness to take risks. Come for the clingy costumes and the dick jokes. Stay for the blues and the booze.

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T H E K A N S A S C I T Y T H AT N E V E R WA S …

BIG WHEEL

W

hen Stanford Glazer — restaurateur, comedy-club creator, owner of what he insists was KC’s fi rst Jaguar — ran for mayor in 2007, his campaign floated several futuristic visions. But the one that seemed to resonate most with the public was his plan to build a 55-story Ferris wheel in Richard L. Berkley Riverfront Park. It was to be a giant skyline icon, a project to steal the thunder from St. Louis’ Gateway Arch. And in Glazer’s plan, it would also have generated revenue by charging $20 a person for rides (which would have lasted an hour). No grand scheme goes without ridicule, and so it was for Glazer’s enormous wheel. A Lee Judge cartoon in The Kansas City Star suggested that the would-be politico could see “the end of his political career” from the top of the ride. Glazer lost emphatically to the future mayor, Mark Funkhouser. And though he insisted that his fairground-style idea was merely a proposal, not the whole platform, the wheel has remained central to the memory of that campaign. Glazer’s mantra helped: “Let’s replace the rodents in Berkley Park with retail and the pigeons with people.” Had Glazer’s $100 million plan (which also included restaurants, a lagoon and a towering fountain that would have sprayed water in a heart-shaped pattern into the Missouri) rolled on the river, would it have been a wheel of fortune for the city’s financial coffers? Alas, we’ll never know. Meanwhile, a decade later, there are still more pigeons than people in Berkley Park.

With his would-be skyline icon,

BY

Stan Glazer f lew too close to the sun.

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Kansas City’s riverfront might have been much more festive had mayoral candidate Stan Glazer won the 2007 election and succeeded in building a 55-story Ferris wheel in Berkley Riverfront Park. But Glazer’s loss was the end of that highfl ying idea.

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he timing of We Steal Secrets, filmmaker Alex Gibney’s documentary on WikiLeaks, now seems more up-to-the-minute than anyone could have planned. It probably was no accident that Focus World began issuing the film (in theaters and through video on demand) the same week that one of its major protagonists, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, was set to begin his military court-martial, charged with distributing military and diplomatic intelligence data through Julian Assange’s WikiLeaks website. But not even a Manchurian Candidate true believer would have predicted that a separate government-leak story would break at the same moment, that of PRISM, the National Security Agency’s vast Internet surveillance system for collecting e-mails, phone calls and Internet records from U.S. citizens. Naturally We Steal Secrets doesn’t include CIA leaker Edward Snowden, whose story is still developing and who seems to have no connection to WikiLeaks. But it’s productive to consider Snowden and Manning together. As we wait for the military court’s verdict — the chief charge against Manning (the as-yetunproved “aiding the enemy”) could draw the death penalty or life in the brig — the fact of the Snowden leak could well alter Manning’s fate. That is, the Obama administration, the media and the military have worked in concert to take the larger problem regarding security, secrecy and the right of public access, and give it a human face — in the most negative sense. Focusing on Manning has served to isolate the media outlets that published (and benefited from) Manning’s leak — The New York Times, The Guardian (U.K.) and Der Spiegel (Germany) — from legal responsibility. Gibney (Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room; Taxi to the Dark Side) makes this point in passing as he wonders why Manning alone bears the brunt of the Obama administration’s wrath. Partly, of course, it is because he is a soldier, and military justice is subject to certain legal vagaries. And certainly, prosecuting a soldier for stealing classified material represents a far more solid effort than, say, trying a First Amendment case against the Times for publishing it. Manning himself is an easy target for a stern administration: a gay, left-leaning soldier with a recorded history of clashing with superiors. But Gibney’s film, while clearly sympathetic to Manning, errs by casting the story of WikiLeaks not as a confluence of historical events but as the tale of Manning and WikiLeaks founder Assange as two benighted

FIND MOVIE TIMES P ON

p WIkiLeaks mastermind Assange men bound by fate. We Steal Secrets ends up implicitly equating the two men, but they are far from equal. One of them is under selfimposed “house arrest” in the Ecuadoran Embassy in the U.K., delivering a weekly talk show for the Russian RT News network. And one of them joined the military as an act of near suicidal desperation, was horrified by what he saw, and now may face a firing squad.

ENTER-TO-WIN A COMPLIMENTARY TICKET! LOG ON TO GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND INPUT THE FOLLOWING CODE: PITCHW33Z For more chances to win /43KIXKansasCity and “like” us at at /43KIXKansasCity follow us on This film has been raTed PG-13 for sequences of inTense sci-fi acTion and violence ThrouGhouT, and brief lanGuaGe. Passes are available on a first-come first-served basis. While supplies last. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per person. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. Arrive early! Seating is first-come, first-served, except for members of the reviewing press. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Theater is not responsible for overbooking.

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very so often, a movie comes along that’s so repellent, so ignorant, so baroque in its vileness, it saps your will to ever sit in a theater again. The Lone Ranger, which introduces the masked Western hero of yesteryear’s radio, TV and lunchboxes to the PlayStation generation, is such a production. Gore Verbinski, who directed the first three Pirates of the Caribbean movies, tries here to repurpose that series’ self-aware sweep and cartoon logic, again relying on Johnny Depp. But the actor can’t do much with Tonto, a part that requires him to play holy-fool straight man to Armie Hammer’s dim, dull title character. (Hammer continues to look and sound like a sort of GMO Judge Reinhold, not a topline-ready star.) What’s left is 150 minutes of budget-busting CGI punishment, a migraine machine rather than a thrill ride. Flashbacks start within flashbacks, Helena Bonham Carter and Tom Wilkinson guiltily pick up paychecks, and a bad guy eats a human heart just to see if the ratings board is paying attention. — SCOTT WILSON

4 COLOR

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BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Masalas Authentic Indian Bistro • 7301 West 91st Street, Overland Park, 913-381-1234 • Hours: lunch 11 a.m.–3 p.m. daily, dinner 5:30–10 p.m. daily • Price: $–$$

don’t have much enthusiasm for my own possible reincarnation — really, whose karma is that good? — but I’m all for the reincarnation of restaurants. Last week in this space, for instance, I made note of R Bar’s highly commendable reincarnation as Voltaire. And this week, I offer Masalas Authentic Indian Bistro, an Overland Park restaurant reborn after a five-year run as Masalas Authentic Indian Diner. There’s a world of difference, you know, between a diner and a bistro — or so the new Masalas wants you to understand. The place looks the same as it did before, but the spiral-bound menu’s 18 pages now provide what the restaurant’s new owner, Shashi Bommireddy, insists is the most comprehensive selection of Indian cuisine in the city. Bommireddy told me last week: “People come into the restaurant and ask me, ‘Do you serve Northern or Southern Indian cuisine?’ I tell them that I only serve authentic Indian cuisine. I have dishes that American diners have never heard of before.” Not everything is obscure. One of the first listings on the menu (which is printed in a font that’s so difficult to read, I first thought they must be temple rubbings from Konark) is, in fact, pretty familiar: tomato soup. But Bommireddy, a native of Hyderabad, a region famous for its biryani dishes, is a charismatic salesman. Talk to him during your meal at Masalas, and he may convince you that you’re not in a Kansas suburb but in Mumbai. The first Masalas was known for the story, perhaps apocryphal, of its initial owner — a young, Indian-born software executive — who bought out the original tenant (chef Max Chao, who now cooks at Nara) and supposedly spent a small fortune gutting the freestanding building to create Masalas in 2008. When Bommireddy bought the place, last December, it had been closed 14 months. He did some cleanup work and decided to keep the name. (The customers liked it, he says.) Six months in, the lunch traffic is good, and Bommireddy is trying to rebuild dinner business. His plan has some interesting wrinkles. A couple of the servers I saw working the dining room on my visits to the restaurant might have been swiped from an Old Country Buffet. They were funny and attentive but relatively clueless about Indian cuisine, authentic or otherwise. “A pakora is kind of like a samosa,” one of them told me. “It’s all fried, you know?” The starter selections are dominated by the deep-fried, including crispy battered pakoras (heavy on the spinach) and medu vada, two

ANGELA C. BOND

I

liquor license, but he’s months away from serving booze. I asked for tonic water or club soda, and my server suggested that I jog across the parking lot to Whole Foods. This is how I came fried-lentil-batter doughnuts that were dry and to order a Sprite, which the server brought me heavy, like a couple of auto parts. in a chilled can. The appetizers and the complimentary A friend of mine that night was craving paper-thin (but wildly peppery) papadums are an ice-cold Kalyani Black Label beer with presented with an array of chutneys: creamy his butter chicken (“A very common dish,” tomato, a soothing mint, a bland coconut that Bommireddy half-chided) but settled for wacould pass as Cream of Wheat, a syrupy tamater instead. Still, he raved about the chicken. rind. I asked Bommireddy why I could find no Bommireddy wasn’t wrong onion chutney at his tables. to sniff at it — this is the “No one eats onion chutney Masalas Authentic chicken potpie of Indian cuiin India,” he told me. “You Indian Bistro sine, and his kitchen makes it realize it goes bad after two Pakoras............................$6.89 with the kind of tomato sauce hours? And the smell!” Deconstructed samosa $8.89 designed to comfort diners Chutneys are to be used Gobi–65 ......................... $10.89 wary of unfamiliar textures with less flavorful dishes, if Mysore Masala dosa ..... $9.75 and spices. you ask Bommireddy, and Lamb vindaloo ...............$13.99 Butter chicken ..............$12.89 Bommireddy seems more many of his creations don’t proud of his five biryani rice require them. That includes dishes, all prepared Hyderthe Gobi–65 — fried cauliabadi-style. “It’s a blending of Mughlai and flower fritters slathered with a fiery red-chili Andhra Pradesh styles of cooking,” he told me. sauce — or his “deconstructed samosa,” which But what does that mean? Well, it’s dominated is best described as a smashed traditional by tomatoes, tamarind, garlic and onion, and, samosa pastry smothered in a pasty chana for my taste, it’s heavy on the mutton. masala and sprouting little baby samosas. It’s I love biryani, but I was here for things not definitely artistic, but count me among those found on other local Indian menus. For exwho still value construction in their food. ample: a lamb vindaloo prepared, according I was eating these exotic inventions with a beverage I almost never drink: soda. Why not, to the menu, “Portuguese style.” Vindaloo, a standard offering on Indian I figured, given that Bommireddy serves only menus, turns out to be a word derived from a presweetened iced tea. He has applied for a

The menu at Masalas ranges from the traditional to more exotic Indian cuisine.

beloved Portuguese dish called carne de vinha d’alhos (meat marinated in vinegar, sugar, ginger, chiles and spices). Unaware of this at the table that evening, I asked the waitress about the Portuguese connection. She sighed. “I’d ask the guys in the kitchen,” she said, “but there’s kind of a language barrier.” The vindaloo was delicious, even if it had to overcome a slightly too-chewy lamb. I preferred the vegetarian Hyderabadi Khatti dal, satisfying and fragrant with ginger and garlic. At one meal, I ordered dosa — the delicate crepe made from rice and lentils and fi lled, in this instance, with potatoes and a good chutney — and it was brought to the table crisp and golden and rolled up like a sacred papyrus from the tomb of Menkaure. It held together well enough to dip in the hot sambal, a soupy condiment made with garlic and chiles. Bommireddy is planning to introduce a new menu, with even more dishes, later in the summer. (And he promises to change the type so that it’s easier to read.) It’s a bold idea, given that the current menu is almost like reading the Upanishads. But that’s Bommireddy: ambitious. “There is no other Indian restaurant in Kansas City like mine,” he said. Not in this life, anyway.

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Gartner and his fiancée, Jill Myers (a former Hallmark art director who opened a catering company 11 years ago), has brought life to the former R Bar space (1617 Genessee) in the West Bottoms. (See The Pitch’s June 27 review, “Who’s Your Dada?”) The menu, prepared by Gartner, changes weekly and has featured a coriander-crusted lamb chop and Vietnamese chicken wings. Happy hour goes from 4 to 6 p.m. with cocktails made by Ryan Miller, formerly of the Boot, and designed by bar manager Jamie Zoellner. There also are bar snacks: house-made pickles, root-vegetable chips and beef jerky. Voltaire is open 4–10:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. When The Pitch reviewed Mio: an Italian Trattoria (4800 West 135th Street, Suite 170, Leawood) last October, we noted that chef-owner Julian Viso had the makings of a model that could be replicated: notably, the pizza dough. Viso’s second restaurant, Mio: an Italian Pizzeria (4800 West 135th Street, Leawood), opened in June. Though the pizza dough has been used as flatbread at the trattoria, it gets the star treatment at the pizzeria. The pizzas range from 8 to 14 inches, and there’s a Mia Mio deal: a two-topping 8-inch pie with soup or salad for $10. Gluten-free crust is available for $2 more. For nonpizza eaters, there’s a bruschetta bar as well as baked pastas. Mio: an Italian Pizzeria is open 11 a.m.–10 p.m. daily. Beignet, the second restaurant from Bryan and Monica Merker, who opened Nica’s 320 in the Crossroads in 2011, has gone into the former Sushi By Me space in the City Market (307 Main). It serves sweet and savory beignets, cornbread pancakes and chicory-spiced coffee. Beignet is open 8 a.m.–4 p.m. daily. Waldo now has a Pickleman’s Gourmet Café (7442 Wornall). The Columbia import offers 18 sandwich choices served on white or wheat Italian rolls, plus soups, salads and pizzas. Pickleman’s is open 11 a.m.–midnight Sunday–Thursday and 11 a.m.–3 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Which Wich has opened at 554 Westport Road. The sub shop has more than 50 kinds

pitch.com

ANGELA C. BOND

Voltaire, the bar and restaurant from Wes

of “wiches” (the signature is the Wicked, with five meats and three cheeses), available on bread or lettuce wraps. Which Wich is open 10:30 a.m.–11 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 10:30 a.m.–midnight Friday, 11 a.m.–midnight Saturday and 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday. Potbelly Sandwich Shop, which has a cult following in Chicago, opened at 4725 Broadway on the Plaza. Potbelly is open 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday–Thursday and 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Barley’s Brewhaus is now pouring cold ones at 5041 West 135th Street in Leawood. The brewpub has a pair of patios and a horseshoe-shaped bar with three stainless-steel beer towers that hold 66 taps. The KC Hopps– run restaurant is open 11 a.m.–midnight Sunday, 11 a.m.–12:30 a.m. Monday–Thursday, and 11 a.m.–1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. A little less than two years after closing in the Northland, Italian Gardens to Go (7335 West 119th Street, Overland Park) returns. John David DiCapo, the son of restaurateur Carl DiCapo, has brought his family’s pizza by the slice, sandwiches, buckets of pasta, family-style lasagna, and Italian cookies and cannoli to Johnson County. And they’re available via a drive-thru. The restaurant is open 11 a.m.–9 p.m. daily. The Big Biscuit, which already had four locations in the metro, opened in the former

Voltaire: open for dinner Chubby’s at 6332 Northwest Barry Road last month. The restaurant is open 6:30 a.m.– 2:30 p.m. daily. Shot Stop (7439 Broadway) opened in June in the space previously occupied by Point Loco, Taco Factory and the Sweet Guy. The shots range from the Broken Down Golf Cart (melon, amaretto and cranberry) to the Hulk Hogan (coconut rum, pineapple, grenadine, an energy drink, and orange juice). The Manhattan import, open 11 a.m.–1:30 a.m. daily, has $2 beers and shots every day. Overtime Sports Bar & Grill opened last week in the former Paddy O’Shay’s space at 11300 West 135th Street (135th Street and Nieman) in Overland Park. The sports bar has 50 beers on tap and 36 TVs throughout the dining room. This is a new venture from Mike and Tanya Stolyar, owners of the Roxy, who have installed a 30-foot bar. So you should have plenty of room while you’re trying to make up your mind about what beer to order.

CLOSINGS

There have been rumors swirling around the restaurant community for weeks about the Beacon: A Kansas City Tavern, at 5301 Main. continued on page 24 The 14-month-old


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continued from page 22 restaurant had reportedly seen business partners depart (including Whitten Pell, who was the managing partner, proprietor and the public face of the venue when it first opened, and who left last year) and employees quit since the spring. A handwritten sign, dated June 26, 2012, is taped to the front door: “Temporarily Closed.” The Beacon replaced an ill-fated restaurant, Jack Gage, that closed in June 2011. Whitten Pell tells The Pitch: “The principals that took over the restaurant did not follow through on the committment they made to the board. We were going to close the Beacon last October to avoid all of the issues that happened to Jack Gage and now appear to be happening to the Beacon.” Pell says several of the Beacon employees walked out. A source close to the restaurant says the venue is also currently without a liquor license. Jerry’s Bait Shop (302 Southwest Main) has closed in Lee’s Summit. Konrad’s Kitchen and Tap House, which has a lunch pizza buffet, has opened in the space. DelHi Southern Cuisine Buffet has closed at 8055 State Avenue in Kansas City, Kansas. The soul-food buffet served fried chicken, homemade cornbread, stewed greens and yams. One of the most beloved soul-food buffets in Kansas City, Papa Lew’s Soul Delicious — a culinary icon at 2128 East 12th Street for more than three decades — closes July 7. “After 31 and a half years, it was time to give it up,” owner Dorriss Lyman (the widow of the restaurant’s founder, Lewis Lyman Sr.) tells The Pitch. Lyman says they have no plans to sell the restaurant to another restaurant operator. “Marvin [Lyman, her son,] has plans for doing something special on the last day,” she says. “But he hasn’t even told us all the details yet.” The Gaf (7122 Wornall) poured its last Guinness in May. The Waldo pub closed after eight years in the former Romanelli Grill space. The Gaf was a place to get shepherd’s pie, catch a soccer match, or sit out on the patio with a whiskey and watch the traffic on Wornall.

Jerry's Bait Shop Lee’s Summit: gone fishin’.

ON THE WAY

BRGR Kitchen + Bar is expected to open this

month in the former Fran’s Restaurant space (11 East 14th Street) in the Power & Light District. It’s the second location for the burger joint, owned and operated by Bread & Butter Concepts — the team behind Urban Table, Gram & Dun and the forthcoming Taco Republic. Diners can pick from a variety of regionally influenced burgers, including the Jucy Lucy, with cheese stuffed inside the patty; buildyour-own macaroni and cheese; and tater tots, truffle fries and rings. Kiss is hoping to be on your lips and in your stomachs. Rock & Brews, a beer-garden concept from Kiss’ Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons, is opening in Overland Park’s Prairiefire development (135th Street between Nall and Lamar) in early 2014. The outdoor patio “captures the excitement of your favorite classic rock concert performances in a family friendly environment.” Pie Five Pizza Co., and its promise of a 9-inch custom pie made in five minutes, will open in the former iEats location (13366 Metcalf, Overland Park) by the end of summer. The fast-casual pizza joint serves cookie pies alongside its cheese-laden brethren, which can be made with a choice of four crusts (gluten-free is $2 extra), 21 toppings and seven sauces. Chuy’s, an Austin chain known for big portions and a family-friendly environment, takes over the former Figlio space (209 West 46th Terrace) this autumn. Figlio closed earlier this year. Novel will open at 815 West 17th Street on July 9. The kitchen there, long the home of Lill’s on 17th, will now be run by chef Ryan Brazeal. A graduate of Johnson County Community College and a former sous chef at Momofuku, Brazeal moved back to Kansas City from New York to open his own contemporary American restaurant.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

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For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

26

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STREETSIDE

U.S.A. TODAY

One last Fourth of July display, a Mother of a party, and more

B Y D AV ID HUDN A L L A ND L E S L IE K IN S M A N

M

ore than any other current group, Fourth of July has woven itself into the tapestry of the town; it is hard to imagine Lawrence without Fourth of July,” we wrote back in May, in a review of the band’s recent album, Empty Moon. That praise now reads like a jinx: Brendan Hangauer, the band’s songwriter and frontman, is moving to San Francisco, and Fourth of July is more or less hanging it up after a decade. “It was just kind of the right time,” Hangauer says. “My aunt runs a print business in San Francisco, and they had an opening. My brother, Zach, works for her — it’s kind of a family operation. I think everybody in the band was kind of ready for a change. I’ve been in Lawrence for a really long time.” Hangauer is moving soon — “I’m on the college-town schedule where the leases are all up August 1,” he says — but will continue performing and recording. He has half an album’s worth of songs done, and plans to work with some fellow Lawrence expats living in the Bay Area. “I don’t know if I’ll still call it Fourth of July or what,” he says. “Dri [Adrianne Verhoeven] and her husband are out there. He produced her Extra Classic album, and it sounds so great and full and lush, so I’m hoping to work a little with them. The general idea right now is to try to bring Dri’s voice into my songs, start playing shows out there, work with people I know.” We Midwesterners have a chance to see Fourth of July before the move, at its annual namesake July 4 show at the Replay. The quartet will kick it off by playing its debut album, Fourth of July on the Plains, all the way through. “We’re going to play for, like, two hours probably,” Hangauer says. “We’re going to play basically every Fourth of July song. And we’ll rotate guests in — Suzie [Suzannah Johannes] will do a few songs. It’ll be kind of a free-for-all.” The following evening, July 5, Hangauer performs a solo set in Kansas City, at 1819 Central (as does 1,000,000 Light Years, the electronic project of Hangauer’s brother, Patrick Hangauer). “We’ve been really lucky in Lawrence all these years,” Hangauer says. “But San Francisco is just a way bigger market. If we could have the success in San Francisco that we’ve had in Lawrence, a lot more people would hear the music.”

A

request posted on kcdiy.info two years ago for a last-minute venue space on Independence Day became the acting catalyst for the first Mother America Fourth of July block party on the West Side.

pitch.com

Two years later, Rita Brinkerhoff, Tim J. Harte and Ruby Hanson are wrapping up the final details for their third annual block party, to be held Thursday between 4 p.m. and midnight on the north end of the neighborhood, near 16th Street and Madison. Fifteen artists, including Nature Boys, Expo ’70, Metatone and Heartfelt Anarchy, play back-to-back sets. The party is a DIY affair that’s open to anyone who might wander onto the dead-end street (and be respectful of the neighbors). “It’s a block party, so if it’s not fun for the neighborhood, then we don’t want to do it,” Brinkerhoff says. “This year we’re going to give them [the neighbors] our cellphone numbers so they can call us.” In addition to the birth of our nation, the party celebrates a 10-CD boxed-set release by Mother Russia Industries, a record label started by the trio of organizers. The box runs $20 and includes a collector’s bandanna; a limited-edition MRI screen-printed poster; and jams from the Brothers Zoto, DUNGEONMASTER and Blondie Brunetti. “Everyone plays for free, no one gets paid for doing it, and we don’t make any money doing it,” Brinkerhoff says of the party. “We spend lots of money doing it because we think it’s super-fun.”

A

nother band performing at the Mother America shindig is Sneaky Creeps; one of its members, Andrew Erdrich (also one of the founders of Bread KC, the micro-financing organization that supports various local creative endeavors), recently collaborated with arts-andculture zine The Bohemian on a compilation of local music. It’s called the No Coast Compilation, and it’s an excellent survey of Kansas City’s underground music scene. Black House Collective, CS Luxem, Scammers, Dark Ages and Lazy are among the 24 acts represented. Says Erdrich: “I used Midwestern Audio [a

Coastal types: the Bohemian and Fourth of July comp released in 2012 by the Midwest Music Foundation] as a counterpoint when I was putting it together. The bands on that comp already get a lot of exposure locally, and there’s plenty of other great bands in town doing cool stuff that I wanted to throw attention to.” (The Bohemian issue accompanying the No Coast comp came out back in May, but you can still find it at a few places in town, like Prospero’s Books. You can also e-mail the folks at the Bohemian.) Erdrich also shares that the Bohemian is working to start a music festival, tentatively scheduled for October 12 outside the City Ice Arts Building, near 21st Street and Campbell. “We’ve been meeting pretty regularly about it,” he says. “We worked on the budget the other day. The concept is that there’ll be 24 bands in 24 hours. It’ll be mostly local bands, but we want to work some touring bands in there, too. My idea is to include a lot of these bands from the comp, and then bring in two or three bands from out of town that would fit with the local bands but also draw a crowd. Somebody like the Men or a K Records band, maybe.”

S

peaking of the No Coast comp: It features “So Good,” a track from Akkilles, the slowpaced psych-pop project of local dude David Bennett. That song also appears on Something You’d Say, Akkilles’ debut album that was officially released last Tuesday. We’ve had it on our turntable for a few weeks now, though — totally digging its Deerhunter vibes. Bennett has put together a full band, and they’ll party down this Saturday at the Brick to celebrate the release of Something You’d Say. (Joining him are Margo May and the Caves; May also has a new release, a country-tinged collaboration with Doby Watson called Watson and May.) See y’all out there.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com


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MUSIC celebrates five wild years at RecordBar.

BY

L A R R Y K OPI T NIK

LARRY KOPITNIK

FREE JAZZ

The People’s Liberation Big Band

W

hen seeing the People’s Liberation Big Band of Greater Kansas City, it’s very hard to say exactly what will happen on- or, as the case may be, offstage. Just one example: One night, a cellist and a headlamp-donning saxophonist walked into the audience while playing their instruments. Another night, three vocalists — two jazz singers and one opera tenor — simultaneously performed and mocked the music of Kurt Weill. That was the same night that the band performed selections from their score to the 1925 Russian silent fi lm Battleship Potemkin, in celebration of International Workers’ Day. “It’s an aesthetic I’m drawn to,” explains Brad Cox, director — and keyboardist and sometime accordionist — of PLBB, “where things are not necessarily laid out in a clean and tidy manner.” Tenor-sax player Rich Wheeler remembers a show when two older people stopped by, explaining that they loved big-band music and they heard that a big band was performing that night. They didn’t stay too long. That’s because PLBB’s version of big-band music is way out there, a step beyond even Charles Mingus — and the Mingus Big Band certainly tested limits. It can be a raucous cacophony that blurs the line between music arranged and music not so arranged. But it’s music wrapped in a presentation that invites you in with a sense of whimsy. Think Monty Python: absurdity laced with intelligence. Now mesh that sensibility with a collection of some of the most accomplished 28

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musicians in town: bassist Jeff Harsh- Elbow room only: PLBB barger; pianist Roger Wilder; drummer Sam The band doesn’t sound a distinct voice. Wisman; saxophonists Matt Otto, Rich Wheeler and James Isaac; Mike Stover on But it waves a distinct personality. “Duke Ellington’s band was musically very lap-steel guitar; Pat Conway, who studied sophisticated and very entertaining,” Cox percussion in Cuba. Occasionally, woodwind says. “I don’t see why those two things can’t master Mark Cohick — who performs with go together.” just about every theater group in town, as PLBB first came together in December 2006 well as the couldn’t-be-more-staid Kansas City Jazz Orchestra — drops in. And that’s to perform their version of The Nutcracker and just scraping the surface. the Mouse King. Today, the band and that score PLBB isn’t assembled like a modern big accompany an annual performance by the band. It draws its instrumentation cues from Owen/Cox Dance Group. (The dance group’s classic Kansas City bands, built around four artistic director, Jennifer Owen, is Cox’s wife, saxophones, four brass and four rhythm. “Not and the band is still a key component of Owen/ as juggernaut-y, can’t sound Cox’s Nutcracker.) as big ba nd-y,” is how For five years, PLBB has The People’s Harshbarger puts it. been performing on the Liberation Big Band of Over the years, the band fi rst Sunday night of each Greater Kansas City has built a book of more month at RecordBar as part Sunday, July 7, than 50 original composiof the twice-monthly “Jeff at RecordBar tions. And each composer Harshbarger Presents” jazz brings his own voice to the series. band — specifically, his own modern voice. This Sunday, the band celebrates that fifth “We all love old Basie tunes,” Harshbarger anniversary with a special show. The first set says, “but there’s plenty of it.” promises a review of new compositions from Still, the instrumentation isn’t set in stone. the past year, and the second set features On recent outings, PLBB has assumed a more PLBB’s “greatest hits” over the last five years. traditional big-band look to play the arrangeSpecial guest Shay Estes will sing. Expect an ments of visiting guests, such as San Francisco extremely large group of musicians joining trumpeter Dave Scott and New York trombonup to play music they don’t perform anyist Alan Ferber. And the way that PLBB musiwhere else. They’ll be having a blast. Give cians effortlessly glide between the band’s yourself over to their sophisticated dissomonthly eclecticism and the modern yet more nance, and you might, too. traditional guest arrangements speaks to the talent occupying every seat on the stage. E-mail feedback@pitch.com


#4 – The Pitch – 6-27-2013

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7/1/13 5:02 PM


MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J U LY 4 Fourth of July, Hospital Ships: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Matt Stillwell: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand.

F R I D AY, J U LY 5 Red White & Boom with Carly Rae Jepsen, Emblem 3, MKTO, Hot Chelle Rae, and Stefano Langone: 4 p.m. Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight Rd., 816-363-7827. Walter Trout with John Nemeth: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Lucky Tubb: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 6 Anberlin, Stars in Stereo, Campfire OK: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Billy Beale, Them Damned Young Livers, Molly Gene One Whoa-man Band, Coyote Bill Boogies Band, the Bad Ideas, the Rot Gut Ramblers: 7 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

S U N D AY, J U LY 7

Deafheaven

Yeezus hysteria has drowned out some of its hype, but Sunbather, the new album from San Francisco’s Deafheaven, is one of the most critically acclaimed records of 2013. Black metal, post-rock and industrial hums converge and artfully cohere over the course of the one-hour, seven-song album. The show should appeal to fans of such bands as My Bloody Valentine and Godspeed You Black Emperor, as well as fans of dead-serious black metal — provided they can tolerate a larger-than-average indie-rock contingent in attendance. Monday, July 8, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

“Purty Little Love Song” for roughly 15 years of my life) and “Can’t You See.” Friday, July 5, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

Steve Earle & the Dukes

Steve Earle and his band, the Dukes, returned this year with a new record, The Low Highway. It’s another quietly solid roots-rock effort from one of the best songwriters of our time. Here, Earle debuts these new songs alongside cuts from his 15-album back catalog of country-tinged rock gems. Tuesday, July 9, at Crossroad KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

Marshall Tucker Band

Fun fact: There was never a member of the Marshall Tucker Band named Marshall Tucker. They never even had a guy with the last name of Marshall. Or Tucker. Marshall Tucker was the name of a blind piano tuner in their hometown of Spartanburg, South Carolina. Today, only singer Doug Gray remains from the original lineup, but he’s probably enough to carry the band through soulful, breezy Southern-rock hits like “Heard It in a Love Song” (a song I thought was called

John Mayer

John Mayer had to cancel his tour in support of 2012’s Born and Raised in order to have throat surgery. But he’s back on the road now, with a new album set to drop in August. It’s called Paradise Valley, which sounds more like the name of a Jimmy Buffett or a Grateful Dead song than a John Mayer album. On it, he is reportedly moving in a more country direction, which could

F O R E C A S T

30

From left: Steve Earle, John Mayer, and the Appleseed Cast be an interesting look on Mayer and would certainly earn him some crossover dollars. Wednesday, July 10, at Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre (633 North 130th Street, Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400)

The Appleseed Cast, with the Life and Times, and Muscle Worship

The Appleseed Cast is one of only a handful of nationally visible bands from the KC-Lawrence area. Illumination Ritual, the latest from the emo turned post-rock group, is currently enjoying favorable reviews from mainstreammedia outlets. The quartet toured out West this spring, and will be touring the rest of country for much of the rest of the summer, starting with this gig at the Riot Room. They’re joined by the Life and Times and Muscle Worship, two other local acts that incorporate a lot of power and texture into their rock songs. Tuesday, July 9, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

K E Y

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the pitch

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Dirty Dozen Brass Band, SUNU, Adeku: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Gregory Alan Isakov, the Seven Hats, Adam Chiarelli: 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Mobile Deathcamp: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676.

M O N D AY, J U LY 8 Emmure, Born of Osiris, City in the Sea, Conflicts, Damp, Order of Elijah: 5 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Luna Arcade, Vaudeville: 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

T U E S D AY, J U LY 9 Dave Alvin and the Guilty Ones: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Mindless Behavior, OMG Girlz, Coco Jones: 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 10 Marcia Ball: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Invisible World, Jake Briscoe, Eric Murphy: 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

FUTURECAST THURSDAY 11 Jamey Johnson: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District FRIDAY 12 Buckcherry: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District SATURDAY 13 Ian Anderson: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts FRIDAY 19 One Direction: Sprint Center TUESDAY 30 The Postal Service, Mates of State: The Midland

AUGUST SUNDAY 18 Peter Frampton and B.B. King: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts


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Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 4 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Samantha Fish Band, 7:30 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 6

The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Thumpin Thursdays with *thePhantom. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Spinstyles, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Playe, 10:30 p.m.

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. James Isaac Quartet, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Everette DeVan Trio with Dionne Jeroue, 8 p.m.

F R I D AY 5 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bubble Boys, Switchhitter, Brownbackistan, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Ten Thousand One, Striving for Cairo, What I’ve Become, Exeter, 7:30 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

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SPOKEN WORD ALL DAY LONG

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Back Porch Blues Band, 9 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Jason Vivone and the Billybats. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Cold Sweat. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Dwayne Mitchell Trio. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Old Crows, 5:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Danny Cox and friends, 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Fast Johnny Ricker, 8 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Spirit Is the Spirit, Heartscape Landbreak, Volcano Veins, 10 p.m.

DJ

with performances from some of Kansas City’s leading spoken word artists

AND LIVE PERFORMANCES FROM: 2:30pm

3:30pm Nicolette Paige

City in Motion

6:30pm

2:00pm Zanzibar Drummers

River and Prairie Story Weavers

5:00pm 6:30pm

MissConception and the

Victor

6:00pm

Dougherty Vibe Tribe

Mercury Mad

8:00pm

5:30pm

Beth Byrd and

The Flock 7:00pm

9:15pm

Arm the Poor

Phantom Phantastics

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VA R I E T Y Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Ray Lipowski, 8 & 10:30 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m.

DJ

JAZZ/LOUNGE

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RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Tyler Gregory, 8 p.m.

Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. DJ Detec, 10:30 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Gruv with Mike Dileo & Trevor Shaw. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. DJ Mike Scott. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Brock Potucek, 10 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with BMW, 5:30 p.m.; Everette DeVan and Pat Kelly, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jimmy Dykes & the Blisstonians, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Mark Lowrey. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; JLove Band, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Sons of Brasil, 8 p.m.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Strike Back. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Thin Ice. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Cover Me Badd, free.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Noe Palma, 10 p.m.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Dogs of Delphi, In the Shadow, Adam Evolving, Seasons of Pain. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Band Practice. Kelly’s Westport Inn: 500 Westport Rd., 816-561-5800. Wonderfuzz. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Fleshtones & the Living Deads, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Drew Black & Dirty Electric, Robot Monkey Madman, Pescivito, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. The Bubble Boys, ExtraOrdinary, 10 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lil’ Slim Blues Band, 9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m. INGS LIST E AT Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., IN ONL Overland Park, 913-239-9666. M PITCH.CO Crosseyed Cat, 5:30 p.m.; Monsters Inc., 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Justin Andrew Murray, 8 p.m.

MORE

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I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Akkilles, the Caves, Margo May, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Howard Iceberg & the Titanics, Schwervon, 7 p.m.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Soul Clap with Josh Powers. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. DJ Eric Coomes. The Jones Pool: 10 E. 13th St. DJ Highnoone and Vinyl Richey, noon. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Beelzebilly, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Joey Cool, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Heather Thornton, 7 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Art Bentley. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Amber Digby, 8:30 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Darryl White Quartet, 8:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Stan Kessler, Kathleen Holeman & Gerald Spaits. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Cool Breeze Jazz Trio, 7 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands Trio, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Monique Danielle & Rick Bacus, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Jeff Harshbarger, 8 p.m.


VA R I E T Y

VA R I E T Y

The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. UFC #162: Silva vs. Wiedman, 7 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. DJ Dance the Night Away, 9 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders: 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. RedRockKC with Cris Cab, She’s a Keeper, Rev Gusto, 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Ray Lipowski, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Amanda Wish Open Mic, 1-4 p.m.

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo, 6-9 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Ry Kincaid, 10 p.m.

S U N D AY 7 DJ The Jones Pool: 10 E. 13th St. Bass B-Que with Allen Michael, JT Quick, Eric Coomes and DJ Parle, free barbecue, noon. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. KC Dixieland Band, 2 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands stride piano, 7 p.m.; Paul Shinn Trio, 10 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The People’s Liberation Big Band, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Lauren Anderson, 9 p.m. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Bob Harvey, 6 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Fedora, 7 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Phil and Gary, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

T U E S D AY 9 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Soil and Sun, Kellen & Me, Palace. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Black Actress, Pussycat Friction Sauce, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Bring It Back Tuesdays with DJ G Train, 10 p.m. Sol Cantina: 408 E. 31st. St., 816-931-8080. DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Jackie Allen Quartet. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major and her Minor Mood Swings, 7 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

COMEDY/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Trivia Bingo, 10 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia with Matt Larson, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. Rhythm and Booze: 423 Southwest Blvd., 816-221-2669. Geeks Who Drink, 7:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Blue Monday poetry and open mic, 8-10 p.m.

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Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Frank Rardon, 8:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Mike Nicolai, Dead Voices, 9:30 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Joel McNulty.

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. The Jazz Disciples. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

MON: RU RAL GRI T 6PM SAT 7/6 THE CAV // KARAOKE 10P M TUES 7/ MARGO MES, AKKILLES, 9 SOIL AY - 10 PM & FRI 7/12 BLACKBISRUN, KELLEN & D REVUE ME, NANC KNIFE IC’S BDAY JAM SAT 7/13 HEIDI PHIRIME, THE UZI THE F LLIPS BA S, JARED LBUORESCENT, RNDS OND OOTS & STEMS,

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Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Two Headed Cow, special videotaping event, 7:30 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Andy Dewitt.

M O N D AY 8 Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Mothership, Brimstone Crow, Death Valley Wolfriders, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Goods.

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B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. John Paul Drum & Bill Dye, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Outer Minds, 10 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The See, Vinyls, Jake Stanton & the Outback Jake House, 6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. California Wives, My Gold Mask, Field Day Dreams, 10 p.m.

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JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Westport Girlz, 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Queer Bash, 9 p.m. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. Humpday Comedy Night, 9 p.m. Snow & Co.: 1815 Wyandotte, 816-214-8921. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Dan Soder, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

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Bring Lass Overtly Clearer Knowledge You get high, you consume porn (text or vid), and you read Daniel Bergner’s book What Do Women Want? Adventures in the Science of Female Desire. (“It should be read by every woman on earth,” Tracy Clark-Flory of Salon writes. “You want a female Viagra? This book is as close as we have to it.”) Don’t do all three at once, of course, lest you grind the gears off your sex gaskets. But do all three, over a long weekend, and try to relax and listen to your body and allow your erotic imagination to speak to you. And give yourself a break. Some folks need more than three months to bounce back after ending a five-year relationship. Don’t force yourself to date right now if you’re not ready. Get high instead, read Bergner and take in some erotica. And when you’re ready to enter your slutty phase, hang on to your pickiness. In my experience — ahem — picky people are likelier to enjoy their slutty phases and likelier to survive them.

Dear Dan: I have some friends in the Pacific

Northwest. They told me that they sometimes go “clam digging” for their dinner. This phrase has to have a filthy double meaning. It HAS to! But Urban Dictionary had nothin’. Any ideas?

Curious Lad Asking Master Savage Dear CLAMS: A filthy double meaning did leap instantly to mind, but it involves so unspeakable a violation that squeamish and/or sensitive readers might wanna skip to the next letter (or read some other advice column). Here goes: “Clam digging” is something you can find necrophiliacs, who are into chicks, doing with shovels in graveyards in the middle of the night. Moving on … Dear Dan: I’m a newly aware bi-curious woman

newly wed to the man of my dreams. Before our wedding, I hooked up with my first lady crush, and now I’ve opened a Pandora’s box of potential threesomes. My husband is supportive 34

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D A N S AVA G E nine. But a straight guy who messes around with another dude is seen as less masculine. The belief that gay sex is somehow emasculating, and that guys who’ve had gay sex are less manly, is pure homophobia. And this particular kind of homophobia — your particular kind of homophobia — is killing your desire for your boyfriend. Willing yourself to see what was masculine and manly about your boyfriend’s gay-porn experience — he wasn’t afraid to explore his sexuality because, hey, your boyfriend is one of those completely fearless manly man types — might help you get past it. Good luck.

Dear Dan: I’m a 24-year-old woman who just ended a five-year relationship. It sucked. I cried. It was my first breakup, so I’ve felt totally insane for the last three months. Now I’m in the dating world, and I go out with people only to find that we have no physical chemistry. My mother says, “You’re just picky.” How am I supposed to enter my slutty years if I rarely have a physical connection with someone? I’m starting to think I’m broken; the last few years, I’ve felt pretty cut off from my sexuality. I feel like I formed some sort of sexual block. Is there a pill for this? How do I break the dam?

Dear BLOCK: Here’s how you break the dam:

BY

and enjoys the bonus of getting to fulfill all of his MFF fantasies. In addition, my cute (OK, jaw-dropping) gay male friend is attracted to my husband, and my husband is so confidently straight and GGG that he says he would consider engaging in a makeout romp with my gay friend for my pleasure. One of my all-time fantasies has been a bi MMF, so this situation presents itself as another Pandora’s box that I don’t know if I should open. Am I getting in over my head?

Married Life Is Awesome Dear MLIA: If you go for it and it ends badly, then you were definitely getting in over your head. If you go for it and it doesn’t end badly, then you weren’t getting in over your head. The only way to find out for sure which it is — in over? in under? — is to go for it. So go for it. And send pics. Dear Dan: I’m a straight woman in my mid-20s living in San Francisco. I have an amazing boyfriend who I’m sure will be my partner for life. However, he confessed something the other night that has me in a daze. Years ago, when he was much younger and had just moved to the city, he appeared in a gay adult film. He thought he might be bi at the time, he said, but the experience made him realize that he’s not really attracted to men. I would never leave him over this, but I’m having a hard time processing it. When we have sex, I can’t help but think about it, and it’s made it hard for me to get in the mood. I want to get past this.

Confused About Lover’s Indiscretions Dear CALI: You live in San Francisco. If you rule out as a potential partner any straight guy who has appeared in gay porn, you might have to move to another city. Here’s something that might be easier than moving: Change your perspective on the meaning of sex between men. When a straight girl messes around with another girl, no one thinks of her as any less femi-

Dear Dan: I’m a gay man in my mid-20s with an etiquette question. I recently met a crazy-hot guy on an online dating site who seems like a great match: tons of common interests, similar sense of humor, shared life goals. The one thing that has kept me from meeting him: He does porn. He doesn’t acknowledge that he does porn on his profile, but I recognized him. I’m “familiar” with his work. I don’t mind that he does porn, but I’m at a loss for how to broach the subject. I’m worried that if I let on that I recognize him from his work, he might think I’m some crazy stalker. But I also worry that if I play dumb and we do hit it off, it could blow up in my face down the road. What’s the most graceful way to handle this situation?

Pondering Online Romance Netiquette Dear PORN: Here’s how you handle it: You assume he’s not an idiot. A porn star on a gay dating site figures that most of the other guys on the site will be “familiar” with his work. So there’s no need to broach the porn subject because he most likely assumes you (and everyone else he meets via that site) already knows. Don’t stress about it. If you want to ask him out, ask him out. When he mentions his work (perhaps during a convo about your respective careers), tell him that you know his work and you’ve enjoyed it, and let him steer the conversation from there. If he wants to hear about your favorite films, scenes, come shots, etc., he’ll ask. Dear Dan: I am a longtime reader of your column.

Now that the United States Supreme Court has struck down the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s Proposition 8 — struck ’em both down good! — what do you say to people who still think gay marriage should be illegal?

Congrats to You Dear CTY: “You lost; love won. You can get over it and come to the wedding and have some cake or you can fuck the fuck off. Your choice.” Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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CALLING ALL WOMEN!

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The Pitch: July 4, 2013