South Brunswick Magazine - Summer 2016 Edition

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Summer 2016 | www.SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

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Brunswick County’s Haunted History

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n a l h a r v e s t at Folk Art at Mary’s Gone Wild

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Saying Goodbye to Worms and Coffee


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South Brunswick Magazine


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Table of contents

summer 2016 F E AT U R E S

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Denice Patterson

Ghost Walking Touring Brunswick County’s haunted history.

PHOTO BY Time 2 Remember

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Allison Barrett Carter

Mary’s Gone Wild Folk artist Mary Paulsen’s colorful world in Supply.

PHOTO BY Time 2 Remember

60

Jane Hill

Oh Pear!

Greenlands Farm’s pear orchard and Heather Burkert’s kitchen magic.

PHOTO BY Lindsey A Miller

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InstaLove! Meet the creator of #100DaysofNCBrunswick

PHOTO BY Jamie Worley

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Allison Barrett Carter


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68

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In Every Issue 16

publisher’s note

By Justin Williams

18

sbm contributors

89

faces & places

Brunswick Sheriff’s Foundation Diamonds & Denim Charity Ball and Future Generations Golf Tournament

Meet the contributors to South Brunswick Magazine

93

what’s happened

What’s been going on around town

20 what’s happening

112 tide charts

Upcoming events you won’t want to miss

29 business buzz

113 ad index

Keeping up with the local business scene

Tracking the highs and lows at Shallotte Inlet from August to October

Our directory of advertisers

114 capture the moment

A contest for SBM readers. Photo by Joseph Lenz

Departments 35

spirits

Brunswick Beach Sandi Banana By Sandi Grigg

36

what’s cookin’

Smoked Salmon Canapes By Sandi Grigg

39

up north

What’s happening in North Brunswick County

46 nonprofit A Second Helping offers vacationers a way to pay it forward. By Melissa Slaven Warren

68

diversions

Those glimmers of sea glass on the beach have stories to tell. By Sandi Grigg

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around town

Saying goodbye to Worms and Coffee. By Barbara Sammons

84

nature

How much do you know about the function of feathers? By Joe Zentner 10

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Barbara Sammons

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Genie Leigh Photography

Table of contents


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South Brunswick Magazine – Summer 2016 Volume 7, Issue 4 CEO/Publisher: Justin Williams Chief Administrative Officer: Sandi Grigg Editor: Molly Harrison Art Director: Andy Garno Contributing Graphics: Andy Garno

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Contributing Writers: Allison Barrett Carter Denice Patterson Sandi Grigg Barbara Sammons Molly Harrison Melissa Slaven Warren Jane Hill Joe Zentner

PO Box 1361 Leland, NC 28451 (910) 207-0156 info@southbrunswickmagazine.com Reproduction or use of the contents in this magazine is prohibited.

© 2016 Carolina Marketing Company, Inc.

Board certified in urology, Dr. McCarthy is welcoming new patients at the Brunswick Forest office. As a patient of NHRMC Physician Group, you will enjoy seamless connectivity to more than 200 specialists and NHRMC, the region’s top-ranked hospital, through one secure, shared electronic medical record. You can also use NHRMC MyChart to request appointments, email your doctor, view test results and more. nhrmcphysiciangroup.org

South Brunswick Magazine

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Contributing Photographers: Carolyn Bowers John Muus Genie Leigh Photography Barbara Sammons Frank Herzog James Stefiuk Wendy Hunt Time 2 Remember Lindsey A. Miller Jamie Worley

PUBLISHED BY: CAROLINA MARKETING COMPANY, INC.

Dr. Roc McCarthy is Welcoming New Patients at Atlantic Urology - NHRMC Physician Group

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Account Executives: Lee Ann Bolton Wendy Hunt Joe Cipalla George Jacob

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Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. strives to bring correct, accurate information that is published in the magazine. However, Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. cannot be held responsible for any consequences resulting from errors or absences. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. also cannot be held responsible for the services provided by any and all advertisers in our publications. All material in this magazine is property of Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. and may not be reproduced without authorization from the publisher. South Brunswick Magazine – A Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. publication is published four times per year and is distributed to residents and businesses in South Brunswick County, NC, to subscribers and to select areas of New Hanover County, NC and Horry County, SC.

About the cover: Pears don’t get nearly the attention and marketing dollars that apples do, but, in fact, anything you can do with an apple, you can with a pear,” writes Jane Hill in her article about the pear orchard at Greenlands Farm in Bolivia. Hill explores this delicious fruit and introduces readers to the culinary magic that baker Heather Burkert creates with the farm’s annual harvest. See the story on page 60.


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into

CRUISE DEEP POINT MARINA Reader/Advertising Services Subscriptions Want to subscribe to SBM? Subscriptions are $15.99 per year and include 4 issues of SBM. Subscribe safely online using PayPal, credit or debit card at www.SouthBrunswickMagazine.com/subscribe. Call our office at (910) 207-0156 or email us at subscribe@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com to request a subscription.

Back Issues When available, back issues of SBM can be purchased for $5. Call or email us for information. Located along the Cape Fear River in Southport, N.C., Deep Point Marina offers comfortable dockage for both large and small vessels, along with easy ocean, ICW and river access. Slips are available for lease on a daily, monthly and annual basis. The Harbormaster Store, open to the general public as well as marina guests, offers beverages, snacks and ice. Transient boaters and annual slipholders enjoy use of the new swimming pool, shower and laundry facilities. Call 910-269-2380 today, or e-mail 1301 Ferry Road, Southport, NC dpmarina@bhisland.com, or use VHF channel 16. www.DeepPointMarina.com

Letters We welcome your letters and comments about SBM. Send your letters to PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 or email them to info@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com. When sending your letters, keep in mind they may or may not be published in a future issue of SBM. The publisher reserves the right to make the final decision.

Writing Opportunities We are always willing to consider freelance writers and article ideas. Please send suggestions or inquiries to South Brunswick Magazine, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451. Or email us at edit@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

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Change of Address If you move, please submit your new and old address to South Brunswick Magazine at info@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Advertising Interested in advertising in SBM? Please contact us to set up a meeting with an Account Executive. Our main office number is (910) 207-0156, or you can email us at advertise@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Marketing Services Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. provides a wide range of marketing services. This includes advertising design services, custom publications, mailing services and more. Contact our office for additional information or to set up a meeting with a Marketing Consultant.

SouthBrunswickMagazine.com Visit us online at the above website. With any additional questions, call us at (910) 207-0156.


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Publisher’s note

PHOTOs BY Keith Ketchum

At home.

There’s just something about living on the coast, especially in Brunswick County. I recently took a trip to western North Carolina for a quick weekend getaway, and although I appreciated the natural beauty of the mountains, waterfalls and streams, I felt a sense of 16

South Brunswick Magazine

waves, the sand and the natural things that being on the coast brings, but what I appreciate the most around here are the people. Everyone I meet here is generally kind, laid back and has great stories to tell. Speaking of stories, we have several in this issue that I think you will enjoy. You’ll meet one of the area’s most interesting characters – folk artist Mary Paulsen, who operates an art village in Supply called Mary’s Gone Wild. I guarantee you’ll want to go there after reading Allison Barrett Carter’s story about this most unusual place. You’ll learn about two favorite beach finds, sea glass and feathers, as well as about the region’s haunted history. Your stomach is going to rumble after reading about the pear harvest at Greenlands Farm and all the delicious baked goods that Heather Burkert creates from them, and you’ll feel a little nostalgic as we say goodbye to Worms and Coffee. You’ll also meet the people behind the nonprofit A Below: After a quick trip Second Helping, to the mountains, SBM which redirects Publisher Justin Williams vacationers’ and his daughter, Ava, unused food to were ready to return home help hungry to Brunswick County. people in this area. As always, we appreciate that you are reading South Brunswick Magazine. Your feedback is always welcome and appreciated.

completeness when I returned home to the coast. I am happy with where life has taken me and very satisfied with residing in southeastern North Carolina. There is a so much to love about Brunswick County. Yes, we have the

Justin Williams CEO/Publisher Publisher@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com


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contributors

George Jacob

Account Executive

I was born and raised in Baltimore, Md., and have four years of military experience in the U.S. Air Force. My wife, Barbara (a.k.a. Bobbie or BJ), and I moved to Brunswick County with our Shihtzus Gotcha and Gizzmo and are now raising our three girls — Paula, Cheryl and Tiffany — here. My work experiences have taken me from paper distribution to book manufacturing to printing and mailing to now selling advertising for North Brunswick Magazine and South Brunswick Magazine. My hobbies include snow skiing, water skiing, bowling, golf, and trap and skeet shooting. I’m an ambassador for the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce, a member of the Shallotte Rotary Club and an instructor for the First Tee Carolina Leadership Academy.

Melissa Slaven Warren

Contributing Writer

I am a freelance writer and live in Sunset Beach. I earned my BA in English from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and am currently pursuing my Masters in Liberal Studies from UNCW. I have worked a freelance business writer, feature article author, nonfiction essayist, technical editor, entrepreneur, and product and brand manager. My work has appeared in Our State magazine and I am a regular contributor to local publications. In my spare time I enjoy water sports and coastal living with my husband, Bill, and 110 lb. rescue dog aptly named Bear. Visit my website at melissaslavenwarren.com.

Allison Barrett Carter

Contributing Writer

I am a freelance writer who recently relocated to Brunswick County after a decade in Chapel Hill. I love watching my young sons play on the beach as much as possible and paddling the creek behind our house in our kayak. My writing has appeared in many places online, such as New York Times’ Motherlode, Washington Post’s On Parenting, Redbook, Role Reboot and The Good Men Project, as well as in several print anthologies, such as Chicken Soup for the Soul.

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What’s happening

Veterans Committee Grant Program The Committee to Honor America’s Veterans announced the launch of a grant program designed to help veterans, military personnel and their families. Grants will be awarded to existing veterans support organizations in Brunswick County, such as but not limited to Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), American Legion, Elks, Veterans Welcome Home & Resource Center in Little River, Warrior Transition Battalion at Ft. Bragg, and the Wounded Warrior Battalion East at Camp Lejeune. Applicants must be qualified nonprofit (501(c) 3) organizations and must demonstrate that 100 percent of the grant shall go directly to veterans’ needs and provide required financial reports and information. Grants may not be distributed via an umbrella organization. Grants must directly support veterans and may not be used for salaries, staff travel, business expenses or other overhead costs. Each application should request funding for a specific activity or service and detail how the funding will be utilized to achieve the desired outcomes. If an organization wishes to be considered for funding of more than one activity, a separate and complete application is required for each activity. Completed applications must be signed by the CEO/Chief Executive Director (if applicable) and the Board of Directors Chairperson of the organization. Incomplete applications will not be accepted. Organizations may apply for grants in the amounts of $500 to $2,000. Grants shall be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis until the 2016 annual funds ($10,000) are expended. Grants will be awarded at the sole discretion of the committee.

Southport First Friday Gallery Walk

September 2 Wine and appetizers are served at Franklin Square Gallery, Art @ 211 The Ricky Evans Gallery, Lantana’s Gallery and Silver Coast Winery Tasting Room & Gallery. The public is invited to browse and shop the latest creations of local artists. Information: (910) 457-1129

Historical Southport Bicycle Tours

September 3 The North Carolina Maritime Museum at Southport has partnered with the Adventure Kayak Company to offer Historical Southport Bicycle Tours. The guided tour rolls from 8am – 10pm and will wind through live oak canopied streets and along the waterfront, incorporating local history. Participants will pedal past Fort Johnston, homes of Pilots and Blockade Runners, the Brunswick Inn, and the Old Yacht Basin, where several movies have been filmed. The tour is $28 per person, which includes use of bike and helmet. Bring your own bicycle and helmet and join the fun for $20. Space is limited. Advance registration is required. Information: (910) 454-0607

Oak Island Labor Day Surf Off

September 3 All levels of surfers are invited to Oak Island to compete in this annual event. Various age and surf categories will compete throughout the day in 15-minute heats. There will 20

South Brunswick Magazine

also be a stand-up paddle board race for kids and adults. The event begins at 8 am and runs until it ends. Information: (910) 278-5518

Oak Island Art Guild Arts & Craft Festival

September 3 The Oak Island Art Guild Arts & Crafts Festival will feature more than 140 artists and craft vendors who will show and sell their handmade wares. Fine art, pottery, stained glass, needlecraft, Christmas ornaments, woodcarvings, basket weaving, photography, books, posters, jewelry, toys, lawn and garden items will be on sale. Food vendors will be offering a variety of sandwiches, soft drinks, ices and delectables. Information: (910) 398-5555; oakislandartguild.org

Carolina Soul Festival

September 10 In honor of National Self-Improvement Month, Movement Works is proud to promote the first annual Carolina Soul Festival in Calabash on Saturday, September 10. This familyfriendly and pet-friendly event will feature live music, dance performances, health screenings, fitness demonstrations, arts and crafts, tasty food and beverages, a marketplace showcasing local merchants, and health and wellness practitioners to help you learn how to lead and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Admission is $5 and is free to children. Information: carolinasoulfestival.com/home.html

Run Holden Beach

September 10 More than 600 runners will race the second race of the four-race series with the world’s largest series race medals. Entrants can choose a half marathon, 5K and 1 Mile fun run/ walk. Start time is 7 am. Information: runsignup.com/Race/NC/HoldenBeach/RunHoldenBeach

Casino Night

September 10 Ocean Ridge Charities Association (ORCA) and Brunswick Senior Resources, Inc. (BSRI) bring you a night to remember with horse racing, black jack, craps and prizes at the Roulette table. Time is 6:30 to 10:30 pm, and cost is $50 per person. Information: (910) 754-2300; orcharities.org

Purple Feet Festival

September 17 Silver Coast Winery will be hosting its Purple Feet Festival on September 17 to celebrate the grape and help Stomp Out Hunger. The winery is located at 6680 Barbeque Road in Ocean Isle Beach. The Food Bank of Central & Eastern NC, which includes Brunswick County, will be on site for the festival. The goal is to collect 10,000 pounds of dry/canned goods, which equals 8,500 meals. Come enjoy live music by the Imitations along with MC Tony Resse. There will be a variety of arts and craft vendors with a Lucy Look-A-Like contest at 3:30 pm, grape stomping all day, Adopt a Pet, community organizations, Kids Zone and food vendors. Winery tours will be given by the winemaker. Pre-purchase your admission ticket for $7. Admission cost is $8 on the day of the event or $5 if you donate


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What’s happening

six canned/dry goods to the Food Bank of Central & Eastern NC. Ages 12 and younger get in free. Festival hours are 11 am to 5 pm. Bring your lawn chairs and blankets and plan to spend the day. No coolers or pets are allowed. Information: (910) 287-2800, silvercoastwinery.com

North Carolina Rice Festival

September 17 & 18 Visit the beautiful Brunswick Riverwalk at Belville for the North Carolina Rice Festival. The event offers two full days of fun in this beautiful 22-acre park by the Brunswick River. Festival events include live music both days by The Imitations and The Coco Loco Party Band, activities, arts and craft vendors, multiple rice-cooking contests, a kids’ play area, food and agriculture booths, and a beer garden for the adults. Come join the celebration of the history and continued success of rice production in the Brunswick Islands area. This event costs $5 and is free for ages 12 and younger. Information: (910) 795-0292, ncricefestival.com

Seaglass Salvage Market

September 16 to 18 Seaglass Salvage Market is a fun, upscale market experience. It’s a cash and carry market that features quality painted new and used furniture and antiques, handmade items by local artisans and craftsmen and beautiful home decor and accessories, including hand-poured soy candles. You may also find chocolates, local honey, jewelry, vintage items, coastal photography and original art. This market is a unique indoor/outdoor venue where customers can come and enjoy a large variety of items for sale, in a fun, innovative atmosphere. The address is 1987 Andrew Jackson Hwy. in Leland, and hours are Friday 9 am to 3 pm, Saturday 9 am to 5 pm and Sunday noon to 5 pm. Information: seaglasssalvagemarket.com

Brunswick County Intercultural Festival

September 17 The Brunswick County Intercultural Festival will be held on the Odell Williams Auditorium lawn from 10 am to 4 pm. This event is free to attend and is committed to celebrating cultural diversity in all its aspects, while honoring the cultural history of Brunswick County. Festival goers will have the opportunity to learn more about different cultures that are present in and around our county. The festival is packed with numerous cultural performing artists, children’s activities, displays, International Village exhibits about countries and cultures in Africa, South America, Asia, and Europe, vendors, nonprofits, a school poster art contest and ethnic food tasting. Information: (910) 842-6566

Juice, Jazz & Java Gala

September 17 North Brunswick Kiwanis presents the fourth annual Juice, Jazz & Java Gala on September 17 from 6 pm to 10 pm. It will be held at the Leland Cultural Arts Center at 1212 Magnolia Village Way in Leland. The gala will feature a buffet dinner, a wine tasting and live music with the Kickback Band, plus 22

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dancing, a silent auction and a 50/50 raffle. Cocktail attire is requested. Tickets cost $65, and proceeds are used for children’s programs in the community. Information: northbrunswickkiwanis.org

Sunset Beach Paddle Fest

September 24 The second annual Sunset Beach Paddle Fest will feature live music, vendors and unique paddle races and events. Get your kayaks and paddle boards ready! Information: (888) 573-2235; visitsunsetbeachnc.com

Brunswick Forest Arts and Crafts Festival

September 24 The Brunswick Forest Fall Arts & Craft Fair will be at the Brunswick Forest Commercial Area in Leland. The festival will focus on personally created arts and crafts from residents of Brunswick, New Hanover, and Pender counties. Hours will be 10 am to 4 pm, and admission is free. Information: (910) 399-7198

Author Talk with Dr. Doug Tallamy

September 24 Cape Fear Audubon and The Garden Club at St. James will present an Author Talk with Dr. Doug Tallamy, bestselling author of Bringing Nature Home and professor at the University of Delaware. Dr. Tallamy will present a mix of scientific data and humorous anecdotal information about our environment and how we can help preserve it. Tickets will cost $10 and there will be a book signing after the talk. The event begins at 1 pm and plant vendors will be onsite selling native plants that benefit the coastal Carolina ecosystem. Information: capefearaudubon.org

Battleship Alive

September 24 Since 1997, the Living History Crew weekends have been a tradition at the battleship in the program called “Battleship Alive.” The Living History Crew provides insight into the daily life and routine of the crew aboard the USS NORTH CAROLINA by explaining the duties specific to the sailor’s ratings (jobs) and demonstrates activities that occurred aboard the ship. This is a great event for all ages. Hours are 8 am to 5 pm. Information: (910) 251-5797

Sunset at Sunset

October 1 This will be a day of music, crafts and food. There will also be a 5K bridge run and walk at 8 am. The site of Sunset at Sunset is right in front of the Ingram Planetarium on Sunset Boulevard. Admission is free and there’s great food, more than 100 quality vendors and a Kid’s Korner, all from 10 am to 5 pm. Information: (910) 579-6297; sunsetatsunset.com

Run Ocean Isle Beach

October 2 The third annual Run Ocean Isle Beach Half Marathon, 5K and 1 Mile Road Race is a crowd favorite with a beautiful


course. This event takes place on the island on E. 2nd Street across from the Pelicans Perch restaurant and the Museum of Coastal Carolina. Information: coastalraceproductions.com/run-ocean-isle-beach

contest, and children’s rides and amusements. Live musical entertainment, food and arts and crafts vendors will be there both days at Holden Beach’s Pavilion. Admission is free. Information: (910) 523-8523

Shepherds on the Green Golf Tournament

Classic Cars ‘n Rock ‘n Roll

October 17 The Shepherds on the Green Golf Tournament will take place at Cape Fear National Golf Course in Leland. Tickets are $100 and proceeds benefit the Good Shepherd Center’s work with hungry and homeless neighbors in Brunswick County. The event begins at 10 am and includes an afternoon of bridge, mahjong and other games, plus an auction and dinner for golfers. Information: (910) 763-4424

October 29 Join the Cape Fear Cruisers in Southport for their annual Classic Cars ‘n Rock ‘n Roll car show. Enjoy a pancake breakfast, ice cream social, and of course, rock ‘n roll concerts. The entertainment will be on the corner of Bay and Howe Streets and vendors will be there with unique snacks and goods. Information: (910) 471-0771

Pier Fishin’ Festival

October 7 From 8 am to 4 pm, rain or shine, the Pier Fishin’ Festival will take place at the Ocean Crest Pier in Oak Island. This festival honors N.C.’s wounded warriors and disabled veterans. Information: (336) 764-5967

Fall Brawl King Classic

October 7 - 9 The Fall Brawl King Classic brings fishermen and their families together for great food, fun and fishing. Located at the Ocean Isle Fishing Center in Ocean Isle Beach, it truly is a great time to fish the area and join in the competition. Give yourself a shot at winning cash or gift prizes. Information: (910)253-3474

Fall Festival and Haunted Hayride

October 22 Join the fun at the Boiling Springs Lakes Fall Festival and Haunted Hayride. The festival will take place at the Boiling Spring Lakes Community Center on 1 Leeds Road in Boiling Spring Lakes. There will be face painting, games, food, and a spook-tacular haunted hayride. Information: (910) 367-9015

NC Festival by the Sea

October 29 - 30 Kicking off with a parade down the Holden Beach causeway, this 2-day event is the only event where you can walk across the Holden Beach bridge. Enjoy a horseshoe tournament and a sand castle building contest. Children can enjoy face painting, huge kites flying overhead, a costume

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What’s happening

NC Oyster Festival The 36th annual NC Oyster Festival is just around the corner. As always, the festival will feature local oysters and cuisine, arts and crafts, children’s activities, a shag competition, an oyster eating contest, an oyster shucking contest and the delectable oyster stew cook-off. A highlight of the festival is the food, and there is a great variety for every palate, including oysters provided by the Brunswick County Shrine Club, seafood, barbecue, pizza, crab cakes, desserts and specialty beverages. Live music and entertainment are another NC Oyster Festival favorite. Bring your chairs for lawn seating and enjoy the lineup featuring popular beach bands, cover bands and everything in between. Saturday’s performers will be Fat Jack Band, Whitney Layne, Blackwater Rhythm and Blues and Darrell Harwood. Sunday will bring Gary Lowder and Smokin’ Hot, Jim Quick

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and Coastline Band, Coastal Shag Club’s shag competition and The Embers featuring Craig Woolard. Among the many vendor offerings are handmade furniture, stained glass, wood carvings, sculpture, pottery, leather goods and jewelry. As a reminder, no pets will be allowed within the festival grounds; however, service animals will be accepted.

WHEN: Saturday, October 15, 9 am to 6 pm; Sunday, October 16, 10 am to 5 pm

WHERE: 8 East Second Street, Ocean Isle Beach, next to the Museum of Coastal Carolina

COST: $5, free for ages 8 and younger INFO: ncoysterfestival.com Photography: Contributed


What’s happening

contestant for the People’s Choice Award. Additionally, a team of judges will award six other prizes. The show is getting bigger every year, and this year there will be more nautical and maritime vendors and more boats, both in and out of the water. Nautical and maritime demonstrations are planned along the waterfront, and the model boat exhibit will return. The very popular Nauti-kids events will be returning to this year’s show as well. This allows the little sailors to build (with or without help) their own boats and test their seaworthiness. Exhibits from the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher and The Fort Fisher Underwater Archeology Branch will enhance the afternoon activities. A new collectors’ quality poster and special edition T-shirt will be available, and there will be a raffle. New to this year’s show is the addition of food for sale on site.

Southport Wooden Boat Show

At the seventh annual Southport Wooden Boat Show, boats will be displayed in and around the historic Old Yacht Basin and attendees will be able to meet and talk with wooden boat builders and owners and to vote for their favorite boat

WHEN: Saturday, September 24, 10 am to 4 pm WHERE: Old Yacht Basin, W. Moore St., Southport COST: Free INFO: southportwoodenboatshow.com Photography: Contributed

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Business buzz

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce Announces Winners of the Spring 2016 Golden Pineapple Awards Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce awarded 12 local businesses a Golden Pineapple Award for spring 2016. Golden Pineapple Awards are given quarterly to those businesses nominated by their customers for providing consistent and exceptional customer service. “Consistent and exceptional customer service is the foundation of a thriving small business,” said Karen Sphar, executive vice president of the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce.

Purple Onion Café Wins TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence Purple Onion Café has been awarded the TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence. Now in its sixth year, the achievement celebrates the hospitality businesses that have earned great traveller reviews on TripAdvisor over the past year. Certificate of Excellence recipients include accommodations, eateries and attractions located all over the world that have continually delivered a quality customer experience. “We strive daily to please our customers and deliver them the best customer service and quality of food around,” said owner Terry Bland. “Thank you for reviewing us and presenting us with this award!”

Award winners were: Service: Coastline Insurance Associates, Cooper Electric and Laugh & Breathe Yoga Activities & Attractions: Yeah Right Charters and The Adventure Kayak Company Dining: Southport Tea House Professionals: Family Chiropractic Plus, Seth Robbins with Investments by the Sea, Massage Therapeutics by Joanne Duncan A Healing Place for Women, and Seashore Pediatrics. Retail: Lantana’s Gallery & Fine Gifts Nonprofit: Communities in Schools of Brunswick County

Duke Energy Sponsors Southport Wooden Boat Show

Duke Energy has signed on as a primary sponsor of $20,000 to expand and enhance the popular Southport Wooden Boat Show. The Duke Energy sponsorship will help enhance the show and add new educational elements. “We would not have been able to come this far if not for the generous support of all of our sponsors,” SWBS Board Member Rebecca Felton said. Duke Energy’s Brunswick Nuclear Plant is located just 2 miles from Southport and has provided energy to the region for 40 years. Site Vice President Randy Gideon says the show “is one way we come together as a community to celebrate each other, appreciate the industries that have sustained us, and learn about ways to protect and preserve the beautiful area where we live.” The 2016 Southport Wooden Boat Show will be held on September 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Photography: Contributed

Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center Offers Palliative Care Services Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center is pleased to announce that it is now offering palliative care consults for patients through a partnership with Lower Cape Fear Hospice. The palliative care team is available to assess patients, make recommendations, attend family meetings and coordinate care. Palliative care is specialized care for patients with serious, advanced or chronic illnesses and is offered alongside treatment. It is focused on relieving symptoms and defining goals to provide a better quality of life for patients and their families. The new services include expert treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, fatigue and anxiety; emotional and spiritual support, assistance with decision-making and guidance with treatment choices and assistance with advance directives. The palliative care team consists of physicians, advanced practice clinicians and other team members as needed. The benefits of palliative care include quality, comprehensive and patient-centered care; symptom management to prevent a crisis; improved coordination of care among providers and awareness of goals; enhanced communication between patient/family and providers; a fewer readmissions to the hospital.

Novant Health Urology Partners Opens New Carolina Shores Location On May 10 Novant Health Urology Partners opened a third location in the Novant Health South Brunswick Medical Plaza in Carolina Shores. Located at 75 Emerson Bay Road, Suite 102, the clinic offers comprehensive urology care, including management of urologic conditions. Dr. Steven Robbins and Dr. Lydia Laboccetta will now see patients out of the Carolina Shores location in addition to their Bolivia and Southport locations. The physicians will take appointments at the Carolina Shores location on Tuesdays from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Novant Health Urology Partners treats a wide variety of urologic conditions and disorders, including urologic cancers. The clinic offers procedures including vasectomies along with medicinal and surgical treatments for enlarged prostates, incontinence, kidney stone disease, male infertility and other urologic problems. Summer 2016

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Business buzz

Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center Recognizes Volunteers At a recent volunteer appreciation event, Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center leaders recognized the hospital’s 231 volunteers for the 31,031 hours of time – and the vital contributions – they contributed to the hospital in 2015. Traditional volunteers and volunteer chaplains were celebrated with a luncheon at 101 Stone Chimney Place. We’ve gone from 58 volunteers 10 years ago to 231 last year,” said Deborah Rochelle, manager of volunteer services. “In addition, we increased from approximately 10,000 volunteer hours in 2010 to more than 31,000 hours in 2015. The volunteer contribution is remarkable.” Special recognition was given to Marilyn Seidler, who received the President’s Volunteer Service Award. She has 4,249 hours of service and has served at Brunswick Medical Center for 18 years. Three volunteers who contributed the most hours were also recognized: Kay Limon, 5,440 hours; Richard Seidler, 5,120 hours; and Diane Marinella, 4,913 hours. Hospital volunteers hold several fundraising events each year, including uniform, book and jewelry sales, to support special projects at the hospital and outreach to the community. Volunteers use a portion of the funds raised to give scholarships to students who have volunteered at the hospital. Photography: Contributed

Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center Volunteers Award Scholarships At a recent volunteer appreciation event, Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center volunteers presented two $1,250 scholarships to seniors at West Brunswick High School. The scholarships are presented to students who have served as hospital volunteers and want to pursue a degree in a health-related field. This year’s recipients were John McNeill and Savannah Rea. McNeill will study neuroscience at Duke University and plans to become a neurosurgeon. Rea will major in biology and pre-med at East Carolina University and plans to become a trauma surgeon. Both students pursued rigorous academic programs and held leadership roles in sports and other extracurricular activities. They worked during the school year and summer in addition to volunteering at the hospital. McNeill volunteered close to 300 hours over three years at Brunswick 30

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Medical Center, and Rea volunteered more than 100 hours in two years at Brunswick Medical Center. Both students also served as representatives at seminars around the country highlighting outstanding students. Photography: Contributed

Shallotte Storage Holds Ribbon Cutting

On April 27 Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony for its new member Shallotte Storage Space in Shallotte. Now under new management, the facility is open Tuesday through Friday from 9 am to 6 pm or Saturday from 8 am to 12 pm. Photography: Contributed

OrthoWilmington’s Anne Allen, MD, Elected to American College of Sports Medicine Board of Trustees OrthoWilmington is pleased to announce that Joanne (Anne) B. Allen, M.D., a member of its medical staff, has been elected as trustee for medicine on the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Board of Trustees. Dr. Allen is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist who is also fellowship trained in sports medicine. “Being on the board is a huge honor because ACSM is the largest sports medicine organization of professionals in the world,” said Dr. Allen. “As a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician, ACSM was instrumental in shaping my career.” ACSM has more than 50,000 members and certified professionals worldwide and it’s dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to provide educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine. Dr. Allen’s service in ACSM has included membership on the Olympic/Paralympic Sports Medicine Committee, Medical Education Committee, the Women’s Strategic Health Initiative, the Musculoskeletal Advisory Committee and the Weekend Warrior project. She has also participated on the Advanced Team Physician course faculty and the Internal Team Physician faculty, which she recently led to Argentina on behalf of ACSM. Additionally, Dr. Allen has served as a team physician for the United States Sailing


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Business buzz

Team, a previous chief classifier for sailing for the IFDS/ International Paralympic Committee, and on the USOC medical staff to the London, Beijing and Athens Paralympic Games. She is currently team physician for the men’s soccer team at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, where she is on the clinical/research adjunct faculty. Dr. Allen graduated cum laude with dual Bachelor of Science degrees from Duke University and earned her medical degree from Bowman Gray School of Medicine at Wake Forest University. She completed an internship in general surgery at Carraway Methodist Medical Center in Birmingham, Alabama, and her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Alabama Birmingham’s Spain Rehabilitation Center. “I understand the needs of athletes and practitioners, and I recognize the importance of the collaborative efforts of scientists and clinicians,” said Dr. Allen. “As a trustee, I plan to focus on more initiatives to support and grow such teamwork, and to advance the mission of ACSM, from the local grass roots level to the international level.” Photography: Contributed

Healthy Green Solutions Holds Ribbon Cutting

Health primary care medical office building is slated to be in operation in late 2017. The project and the new community received an outpouring of support at both the groundbreaking and a crowded reception after the event. At the construction site, leadership members from Novant Health were joined by many local and regional officials who spoke highly of the project’s goals, the development team and their efforts to bring the community to life in Oak Island. The groundbreaking was kicked-off by Karen Sphar, executive vice president at SouthportOak Island Area Chamber of Commerce. The lineup of guest speakers included Oak Island Mayor Cin Brochure; Brunswick County Commissioner Pat Sykes; Austin Koon, principal of Davis Moore Capital; Chris Maynor of Legacy Community Partners representing Pine Forest Plantation; and guest of honor Shelbourn Stevens, president of Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center. Other guests in attendance included builders, real estate agents and a large number of local residents who had many inquiries about what the project will entail, as well as questions of Novant Health about the services to be rendered at the future 10,000-square-foot clinic. The developers explained that Pine Forest Plantation will feature a planned 50-acre healthcare and medical campus with access to quality care later in residents’ lives. The timeline for Pine Forest Plantation is guided by a sustainable growth plan completed in stages, as the start of a 50-acre healthcare campus is only part of the first stage. Mixed-use retail and commercial development is planned along with the future houses, townhomes, condominiums, assisted living and skillednursing facilities.

Anti-Aging by the Sea Holds Ribbon Cutting

Brunswick County Chamber hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony on June 7 for Healthy Green Solutions to introduce a new product called Pulse Magnetic Therapy devices (PEMF). This device helps to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, reduce stress, increase energy, increase circulation, improve healing, improve detoxification and much more. Dr. Sue Massie, a naturopath from New Jersey who is an expert in applying this technology, was there to answer questions. Photography: Contributed

Novant Health and Pine Forest Plantation Hold Groundbreaking Pine Forest Plantation broke ground with the first building on the property on June 21st. The construction of the Novant 32

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Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce recently held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Anti-Aging by the Sea A Clinic for Wellness. Cynthia N. Frazier MD, FACOG, ABAARM is the founder of Anti-aging by the Sea, A Clinic for Wellness at 1125 N. Howe Street in Southport. She is board certified by the American Board of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Following residency training Dr. Frazier completed a fellowship in MaternalFetal Medicine. She practiced obstetrics and gynecology in Little Rock, Arkansas, for 25 years. Dr. Frazier became interested


in functional medicine after her first child was diagnosed with autism. She attended training through the Autism Research Institute. Realizing that traditional medical training does not emphasize prevention or nutrition she continued to study independently. She enrolled in the American Academy of AntiAging and Regenerative Medicine fellowship program became board certified in 2009. Her areas of expertise are bioidentical hormone balancing, detoxification, micronutrient testing and supplementation, wellness and the prevention of frailty. She believes strongly in preventative strategies and personalized medicine. Dr. Frazier is a Fellow in the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and a member of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine.

Tidal Merchant Holds Ribbon Cutting

Photography: Contributed

ECU School of Dental Medicine Community Service Learning Center Holds Grand Opening

Tidal Merchant owner/buyer Diana Laster and staff celebrated the grand opening for their new store at 6324 E. Oak Island Drive in Oak Island with a Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce ribbon-cutting ceremony. Laster had a dream of opening her own store since she was a child. After growing up in the area and seeing it grow into a nationally known tourism town, there was no question that now was the time to make that dream come true. Tidal Merchant sells apparel, accessories and gifts for women, men and children. In addition they sell outdoor equipment such as kayaks, paddleboards, metal detectors and other things to make any customers visit to the beach extraordinary. Photography: Contributed

The Southern Charm Co. Holds Ribbon Cutting Representatives from East Carolina University and the SouthportOak Island Area, North Brunswick and Brunswick County chambers of commerce recently held a Grand Opening/Open House Celebration for the newly opened ECU School of Dental Medicine Community Service Learning Center in Bolivia. ECU’s Dental Service Learning Centers are facilities that combine clinical education and patient care. Led by faculty members, fourth-year dental students spend clinical rotations and general dentistry residents also hone their skills at the centers. In addition to the Brunswick clinic, other Community Service Learning Centers are delivering care to patients in Ahoskie, Elizabeth City, Davidson County, Lillington, Robeson County, Spruce Pine and Sylva. ECU fourth-year dental students move into a one-year dental residency program at the clinics. The community service learning centers are open to all members of the community and offer comprehensive general dental services for adults, children and special needs patients in a safe, caring and professional setting. Dental insurance, including Medicaid, is accepted. All clinics have the same architectural features and contain 7,700 square feet of space with 16 operatories, state-of-the-art equipment, a wheelchair lift, 3D imaging and an endodontic microscope.

On July 28 the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate a new business to Shallotte, The Southern Charm Co. This boutique offers home decor and women’s clothing. The new business is in a beautifully restored Shallotte home at 110 Shallotte Avenue.

Photography: Contributed

Photography: Contributed

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Spirits

I

Go Bananas

A Caribbean-inspired, rum-enhanced smoothie Story by Sandi Grigg

If you have visited any resort in the Caribbean then you have probably had a version of this cocktail. The tropical locals refer to it as a Dirty Banana, but I prefer to call it a Sandi Banana. The gritty ice bits remind me of sand, so if sand blows in my drink while I’m lying on the beach … well, I just won’t know the difference. Plus, this version shares my name. This drink is similar to a smoothie because it is thick with fruit and ice, but the addition of rum, that sweet enhancement of summer, makes it a cocktail. I took a trip to Cancun with 21 of my friends in 2000 and we drank our weight in a version of this cocktail. Many of us from that trip continue to reunite once a year, and this year I created the Brunswick Beach Sandi Banana for them. Kim, one of my pals, said, “This tastes like our Cancun trip!” Isn’t it funny how a taste can take you back to a moment in time? I think one of the tricks to making this drink superior to the traditional Dirty Banana is that the bananas in my drink are frozen and I use ice cream rather than milk. That way it

stays colder longer and the banana is not just mush. Next time you want to escape to a more tropical state of mind, try this cocktail and let your mind float away. Enjoy!

Brunswick Beach Sandi Banana You will need a blender for this recipe. This recipe makes one drink. Double, triple or quadruple as needed.

1 ounce Bacardi rum 1 ounce banana liqueur (99 Bananas or Crème de Banana) 1 ounce Kahlua ½ cup vanilla ice cream 1 frozen banana 4 ice cubes Combine all ingredients in a blender. Blend for 1 minute or to desired consistency. Serve in a frosted mug. n Summer 2016

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What’s cookin’

One-Bite Wonders

A smoked salmon and avocado combination makes the perfect hors d’oeuvre.

A

Story by Sandi Grigg

PHOTOGRAPHY BY James Stefiuk

A canapé is a small appetizer of a savory or salty topping sitting atop a cracker or toast. The word is French for “sofa,” as the topping sitting on the toast brings to mind people sitting on a couch. Canapés are the perfect start to a cocktail party or dinner party. They have a visual connotation that lends an elegant appeal, and they are easy to eat without a making a mess or needing utensils. For a friend’s 30th birthday my friends and I threw a Southern tea party in her honor. All the girls wore white gloves and big hats, and we set up a table outside with

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punches, pastries, pinwheels and all sorts of dainty finger foods. I wanted to serve something that was unique yet held true to the theme, so I served my Smoked Salmon Canapés. They were a hit, and everyone asked where I bought the spread, but actually, it was homemade. My recipe uses pumpernickel bread because it adds color, is high in fiber and provides a good sturdy “sofa” for the salmon and avocado mixture. Instead of reaching for the ready-made canapés in the grocery store, try this easy recipe to impress your guests. Enjoy!


Smoked Salmon Canapes Makes 20 canapés

4 ounces smoked salmon 1 avocado Pumpernickel bread Dried parsley

For the vinaigrette: ¼ cup white cooking wine ¼ teaspoon rice vinegar 1 teaspoon lemon juice ¼ teaspoon wasabi powder 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots 2 teaspoons honey 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard ½ teaspoon Himalayan salt or sea salt

Mix all the vinaigrette ingredients together except the olive oil. While continuously whisking, slowly drizzle the oil into the vinaigrette. Chop the smoked salmon into small bits and drop in the vinaigrette. Peel and chop the avocado into small chunks and add it to the vinaigrette; gently mix. Cover and refrigerate the salad for 45 minutes. Using a 2-inch round cookie cutter, cut the pumpernickel bread into 20 rounds.

¼ teaspoon ground pepper

Top each pumpernickel bread round with a spoonful of the smoked salmon and avocado salad.

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

Sprinkle with dried parsley for garnish. n

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Up North

North Brunswick Magazine What’s going on in our sister publication are heading out to play kickball, dodgeball, wiffle ball or any number of other sports with Cape Fear Sports, an adult coed social sporting league. Writer Dean Blaine explores this wildly popular social club, founded by Tim Cramer and Clark Shay two years ago. The concept has taken off, and now Cape Fear Sports offers events as many as five nights a week. Human Foosball anyone?

Inc. (POP) and began what she now considers her life mission: to educate the world about the harmful effect plastic has on the oceans. In August 2015 POP began its very first university chapter at UNCW, and the group is finding new and creative ways to protect our waters both locally and globally. Allison Barrett Carter writers about this group and its efforts.

The Brunswick Riverwalk at Belville The Town of Belville has completed phase I of a new project along the Brunswick River, and it includes three walking trails, a fishing pier, an outdoor educational pavilion, a 1,480-foot boardwalk, picnic areas, an observation deck, preserved historical ruins, spectacular water views and plenty of parking. Believe it or not, there’s much more to come. Read Jo Ann Mathews story about this new local attraction and the plans for the future.

Like a Kid Again What are you doing tonight? In Wilmington adults ages 21 and older

beach in Hawaii opened her eyes to the tragedy of plastic pollution in the Earth’s oceans. When she arrived back in Wilmington, Monteleone started the Plastic Ocean Project,

Dead Crow Duo As the owners of the Dead Crow Comedy Room in downtown Wilmington, native North Carolinians Timmy Sherrill and Cole Craven love sharing laughs. Writer Shannon Rae Gentry hangs out with the two funnymen in their club that offers a friendly stage for local, regional and national acts.

Plastic Ocean Project As Bonnie Monteleone was working on her master’s degree at UNC Wilmington, a trip to a remote

Art Utopia Leland Cultural Arts Center has a new director, and she couldn’t be more excited about her role in bringing a variety of arts opportunities to the residents of North Brunswick County. Julianne Scott started in the position in March and has big plans for implementing new, affordable programs in addition to the classes, workshops, speakers, concerts and summer camps at the center. Writer Heather Lowery met with Scott to talk about her plans for the municipally funded center. Summer 2016

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Ghost Walking Local tour companies trek through Brunswick’s haunted history.

T The large swath of land that’s now called Brunswick County is a hotbed of history that includes early Spanish explorers, revolutionary battles, colonial plantation life, Civil War blockade runners, World War II German U-boats off the coast and many more fascinating events. With such a rich history, it is not surprising that many people believe that this area is rife with apparitions, eerie activity and unusual orbs. If you haven’t discovered them on your own, you can follow along with some locals who are sharing Brunswick’s spooky legends. Old South Tour Company in Southport and OIB Ghostwalk in Ocean Isle Beach provide organized walking tours and long-forgotten tales of mystery and intrigue.

STO RY BY

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D e n i c e Patt e rso n

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY

T i m e 2 R e m e m b e r & B arbara S a m m o n s


1821, the work continued. Sadly the work ended, when at the end of the summer and one by one, the girls each died of pneumonia and were laid to rest in the burying ground beside their mother. “To this day, the stone fence remains incomplete,” Boyd says. “Locals still call it the Grove and swear that you can walk through here on a dark summer night and hear the giggles and peals of laughter from the girls as they play games of chase and tag.” The one and a half hour tour includes seven original stories, ranging from the eccentric but true tale of Dr. Dosher’s annual school holiday in which he would remove the tonsils and adenoids of the students for free. “Every local knows that story,” Boyd says. “And some show you their scars to prove it.” There are stops at Old Brunswick County Jail and, of course, Old Smithville Burying Ground. The 2-acre site is home to thousands of former Southport residents — from the 3,000 victims of the yellow fever who were buried in a mass grave to the mother who mourns her dead babies. The tour ends with a stop at the famous Brunswick Inn along the river, with the popular story of the Italian harpist who drowned the night of a ball. “Tony plays tricks on the owners,” Boyd says. “Sometimes guests even hear the faint sound of a harp playing.” “The tour is family appropriate,” Boyd says. “I present the stories in a way that I would want my own child to hear them. Nothing is too morbid. In fact, my son joins the tour quite often.” For the past 14 years, Old South Tour Company has hosted thousands of guests a year, many of whom return with their families every summer. “I have seen some of my regulars grow up from little girls in pigtails to young ladies bringing their teenage friends along,” says Boyd. Previous page: Katie Boyd, founder of Old South Tour Company, leads a Ghost Walk dressed in an antebellum widow’s gown.

“I spent days at the Archives in Raleigh and at the Carolina Room at the Cape Fear Museum in Wilmington. These stories are real and accurate accounts of our local history.” Old South Tour Company Katie Boyd founded Old South Tour Company when she was still a student at UNC Wilmington. A history major, she has a special place in her heart for the antebellum era and focuses her research on her hometown of Southport. Her stories are based on archives and newspaper accounts. “I spent days at the archives in Raleigh and at the Carolina Room at the Cape Fear Museum in Wilmington,” she says. “These stories are real and accurate accounts of our local history.” From Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day, Boyd runs tours six days per week, donning a replica of an antebellum widow’s gown complete with a mourning locket containing an ancestor’s hair. “Hair jewelry was a real way to remember a loved one who passed,” Boyd says, holding her

heirloom piece. “And this little locket has been handed down for generations.” Her Southport Ghost Walk begins at the Whittler’s Bench, where Howe Street ends at the waterfront. As the crowd gathers in the dark night, a solitary figure approaches, walking by the light of a lantern. The walking tour follows Howe Street to Franklin Square Park, circa 1792, where the first historic tragedy is told about a mother who, after a very long winter, promised her daughters a picnic in the park, which she lovingly called “the Grove.” The mother died of consumption that winter, but the three daughters fulfilled her last promise and shared a spring picnic in her honor. That summer, the girls brought old ballast stones from the river and laid a stone fence along the edge of the park to honor her. Townsfolk joined in and on Saturdays during that summer of

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OIB Ghostwalk Farther south in Ocean Isle Beach, Wilburn and Allison Smith turned a hobby into a business. The retired Air Force lieutenant colonel met his wife, a lifelong educator, in Washington, D.C. When they discovered that they had both spent childhood summer vacations at Ocean Isle Beach only two houses away from each other, it only seemed natural that the couple would return here to raise their own children. “This is home for both of us,” Allison says. History buffs and ghost story collectors, the Smiths were invited to give a talk at the Museum of Coastal Carolina one night in 2008. “We were asked to write a chapter on local ghost stories for a book celebrating the 50th anniversary of Ocean Isle Beach,” Allison says. “That turned into a book of our own,” Wilburn adds. The Dead Don’t Like to be Forgotten: Tales of the South Brunswick Islands is a self-published collection of local haunts and legends. In 2011 the couple founded OIB Ghostwalk and began offering tours that summer. On Tuesdays and Thursdays from Memorial Day weekend until Labor Day, the one and a half hour tour begins between Salt’s and the OIB pier and winds its way to the museum and down along the Intracoastal Waterway. “We usually have time for about 15 stories,” Wilburn says. They have collected 40 stories so far and spend a lot of time researching and authenticating a story before adding it to the collection. “People share stories with us all the time,” Allison says. “When someone else shares that same story, then we begin to do the research.” “People have no idea of the vast history of this area,” Wilburn says. “There is so much significant American history right here along this little stretch of coast.” There have been many apparitions on the island over the past half century, from the “Ladies of the Manor” to the “Gray Man” to the lost German sailor from WWII. 42

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“It was really fun when the Ladies of the Manor started showing up,” Allison says. The Colonial plantation–era apparitions have appeared in the Ocean Isle Inn and in private cottages along the beach. “There was a Colonial settlement right here as early as the 1650s,” Wilburn says. “The Gause Plantation produced turpentine and tar from the local pine forests.”

The ghost known as the Gray Man has been spotted from Pawley’s Island to Hatteras. He died in a tragic accident in the late 1700s and later appeared to his fiancé. “This is one of my favorites,” Allison says. “I feel he appears to bring comfort to people.” He has been spotted on Ocean Isle on more than one occasion. Brunswick County has been the site of war action since the Colonial times.

Below: Allison and Wilburn Smith of the OIB Ghostwalk are avid history buffs and ghost story collectors. Their tour begins near the pier in Ocean Isle Beach.


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Novant Health is here for you, so you can get back to things that matter. We offer: Emergency services Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center 240 Hospital Drive, Bolivia • Open 24/7. • View wait times online and in the Novant Health app.

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To speak with a nurse 24/7 who can find the best, most convenient care option for you, call 910-721-CARE (2273) or visit NovantHealth.org/beach.

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“The history books say there was no action off Ocean Isle Beach during WWII,” Wilburn says. “But when we told the story of the apparition of the German soldier walking on our beach and mentioned the German POW camps in Myrtle Beach, one guest remarked that his father had been a guard at the camp.” More recent experiences of the supernatural order have been a hit with the ghostwalk. “People always want to know about the orbs and booms,” Wilburn says. Once, as Wilbur was sharing a story about the mysterious

orange lights, the orbs appeared overhead as if on cue. “We watched in awe as one orb split into four and then moved unlike anything we have ever seen before,” Allison says. And what about the booms that are known locally as the Seneca Guns? “Every local that we’ve talked to with military experience says the boom sounds just like that of a cannon fire,” says Wilburn, who as a military veteran himself, has a theory about that. “There were nearly a dozen known blockade runners that were sunk right here behind the islands,” he says. “Three

“Locals still call it the Grove and swear that you can walk through here on a dark summer night and hear the giggles and peals of laughter from the girls as they play games of chase and tag.”

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of them are in the Shallotte Inlet. There is not a marker or memorial anywhere around to honor the thousands of lives that have been lost right here.” He feels the boom of a cannon may be just one way of the lost souls remind us that they were here. “The dead do not want to be forgotten,” he says. n

Want to go? In addition to scheduled public tours between Memorial Day and Labor Day, Old South Tour Company and OIB Ghostwalk offer private tours all year long. Old South Tour Company (910) 713-2172 facebook.com/OldSouthTourCompany OIB Ghostwalk (910) 221-4387 https://sites.google.com/site/oibghostwalk/ home


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Nonprofit

A Second Helping

Originally a lone crusader, now he not only has the assistance of volunteers from Holden Beach Chapel and This local nonprofit offers vacationers a way to pay Sharon United Methodist it forward with leftover food. Church, but he has also Story by Melissa Slaven Warren PHOTOGRAPHY BY Genie Leigh Photography inspired volunteers to start A Second Helping Ocean Isle Beach program. Spier, 82, was contacted by Ocean Isle Beach residents When Bill Spier started collecting unused, Rebecca Powell and Teresa Garratt earlier in the year. The leftover food from departing vacationers in Holden Beach more women explained they would like to duplicate his Holden Beach than 11 years ago, he had no idea of the trend he would start. project on Ocean Isle Beach. With the foundation set, Before he and his wife, Phyllis, bought a summer home in volunteers were rounded up and the commitment to help the Holden Beach, Spier was a vacationer from Charlotte. Knowing needy was realized. “Once I heard about what Bill was doing, it that many families in Brunswick County live below the poverty was just something I knew I was supposed to do,” Powell says. line and don’t always have the means to put sufficient, healthy Powell and Garratt, and their husbands, Jimmy Powell and food on the table, he realized what a waste it was to throw Neil Garratt, wanted to extend the Second Helping project as away food they didn’t consume during their vacation. So he a way to pay it forward. “The difference in lifestyle between started a program called A Second Helping. 46

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Ocean Isle Beach and other parts of the county are drastically different,” Rebecca Powell says. “We just wanted to remind those fortunate enough to live or vacation at Ocean Isle Beach that others aren’t as lucky.” Between mid-June and Labor Day weekend, a Second Helping at Ocean Isle Beach sets up every Saturday morning from 8 to 11 am. They have two drop off locations on the island Far left: Helping out on to accommodate traffic flow: food drop-off day: Jimmie the east end of the island in the Pendergrass, Mary Payton parking lot of the Museum of Pendergrass, Teresa Coastal Carolina at 21 East Gibson-Garratt, Rebecca Second Street and the west end Powell, Lillie West, Lily at the Cross on First Street just Little, Mary Pendergrass to the right of the pier, staffed and AJ Pendergrass by volunteers Steve and Right: Rebecca Powell Marie Turner. and Jimmie Pendergrass “We accept perishables and Below: Lily Little, nonperishables – anything Mary Pendergrass, AJ that’s unopened,” Powell says. Pendergrass and Mary “Some of our families never get Payton Pendergrass fresh foods like milk, vegetables and even meat, so we’re excited when we can collect those unused items.” The food collected at the Ocean Isle Beach locations are picked by Brunswick Family Assistance and The Food Pantry, which package and deliver the food straight to those in need. June 4 was the official start date of the Ocean Isle Beach location of A Second Helping, and a successful start it was. Volunteers collected enough food to feed 15 families in just three hours. “People genuinely want to pay it forward,” Powell says. A Second Helping has collected more than 170,000 pounds of food since 2005. And with the higher than average unemployment rate in Brunswick County, the number of people needing food services will likely continue to increase until the economy improves, which makes the expansion of A Second Helping in Ocean Isle Beach even more important. Seventeen percent of residents in Brunswick County use the Brunswick Family Assistance (BFA) services. In a typical year, the BFA food bank provides for nearly 5,000 households and 16,434 individuals. According to the BFA, the percentage of Brunswick County residents living below the poverty level, (income of $23,050 for a four-person household) was 17 percent for the period 2009-2013. The national average was 15.2 percent. The poverty rate of children was significantly greater. For children under the age of 18, the poverty rate was 26.3

percent and 29.9 percent for children under the age of 5. The poverty rate for those 65 and older was 5.7 percent. In addition, 67 percent of all children in grades K to 12 in Brunswick County receive free or reduced-cost meals because of low family incomes. Having access to adequate and nutritious food is especially important over the summer months for Brunswick County children because they aren’t getting the free breakfast and lunch every day like they receive when school is in session. “And it’s not just children and families that need the food,” says Garratt. “The county has a large disabled population forced to live on fixed incomes, and they often have to decide between paying a bill or eating.” In addition to the Ocean Isle Beach location, the pay-itforward message of A Second Helping is extending along the southeast coast to Emerald Isle and Topsail Beach, and even to Colorado. “USA Today picked up a story on A Second Helping that was published in the Charlotte Observer, and I heard it inspired someone in Colorado to start their own version,” Spier explains. Summer 2016

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Wrightsville Beach and Carolina Beach have similar collection programs as well. Resort towns along the South Carolina coast like Edisto Beach have also been motivated by A Second Helping’s model to collect food from departing vacationers. A Second Helping also accepts cash donations with 100 percent of the proceeds used to purchase food. Every dollar will buy 5 to 8 pounds of food. So if vacationers and locals alike don’t have leftovers, they can still help make an impact on the community. “We’re thankful to local restaurants, churches, rental properties, and the Ocean Isle Beach concert series for helping us promote the project to visitors,” Garratt says. Spier sets up in the Holden Beach Chapel parking lot just 100 feet from the bridge from 7 am to 12 pm on summer Saturdays. His collection is distributed to the needy through Sharon United Methodist Church and Holden Beach Chapel. He remembers fondly how he came up with the name for the project 11 years ago. “The good Lord just whispered A Second Helping in my ear, and all of a sudden, it came to be,” he says. n

Want to help? Donate the unopened, unexpired food you didn’t use on vacation, or make a donation to help feed the hungry in Brunswick County. A Second Helping Holden Beach 7 am to 12 pm Holden Beach Chapel parking lot, Ocean Boulevard A Second Helping Ocean Isle Beach 8 to 11 am Two locations: Museum of Coastal Carolina parking lot, 21 E. Second Street The Cross on First Street (just to the right of the pier) For more information, see secondhelping.us.

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Mary’s Gone Wild Folk

STO RY BY

artist Mary Paulsen has created a colorful world like no other in Supply.

A l l i so n B arr e tt C art e r

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Time 2 Remember

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Above: Brunswick County native Mary Paulsen created a fascinating folk art garden and doll village in Supply.

Minutes before the Holden Beach Bridge, I pull off into a dusty parking lot. At first, I miss my turn, not knowing what I am looking for. But, gradually, I find my way back to Mary Paulsen’s Mary’s Gone Wild. There is no mistaking I am in the right place. I nose my car’s bumper up to colorful miniature houses built around a huge tree. As I leave my car, my eyes try to take everything in: faded paint, hand-crafted bridges, twinkling Christmas lights, overgrown weeds, antique China plates, furniture left outside for too long, and collected vintage items as far as the eye can see. As I hesitate, a big, friendly voice greets me from behind. Mary Paulsen herself is standing at her mailbox. She gives me a smile that reminds me of my grandmother, one that feels like it was just for me. After I introduce myself, she promptly invites me to come sit with her “under the fans.” Following her, I pass two miniature houses, walk a narrow and sloping wooden walkway, and find an old leather seat by a table laden with yellowed press clippings. 52

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The floor, ceilings and walls of the building we are in, Paulsen’s studio, are painted with beautiful, vivid images. Paulsen seems used to visitors being overwhelmed and gently prods me to sit. I tell her honestly that I didn’t know where to begin. She laughs and starts to ask me the questions. Eventually, we are sharing jokes and chatting like old friends. Surprisingly, getting Paulsen’s life history can require some work. She is cheerful and genuinely interested in those who have come visit her, so doesn’t talk much about herself. Yet she can tell you some things if you listen. Paulsen was born and raised in Sunset Beach. She was one of ten children, right in the middle. “Being in the middle was the worst – you can’t go where the oldest go, but you have to take care of the younger ones,” she says. Her grandmother was a Cherokee Indian from Burgaw and her grandfather was from Germany; her mother was Irish, which is how she got her red hair. As someone who grew up in southern Brunswick County, Paulsen talks about how different it was then, how much quieter: “Oh, back then, you


Above: Paulsen uses the money she raises from the sale of her art and antiques to feed hungry children.

just knew everyone. You knew your neighbors and everyone around you. Now, things are just different. It’s much bigger!” Paulsen says she was a feisty child. One school year she was sent to the principal’s office daily for fighting a bully on behalf of her younger siblings. Eventually, she met and married a local man and together they had two children. Tragically, her husband drowned when her children were 3 years old and 11 months old. “The shock of it killed me,” she says matter-of-factly. This is not a euphemism. Paulsen has been pronounced dead twice in her life, once was after hearing the news of her husband’s death. But even though she was recovering from a tumor and at a slight 76 pounds, Paulsen knew she wasn’t done. She tells how she saw Jesus and he wrapped his arms around her and told her to get back down to Earth. “Oh, I’ve been through some rough times, honey,” she admits. “But the Lord helped me through. Without him, I can do nothing and am nothing. This is not really for me, but for Him.” Paulsen’s faith is evident throughout her property and is a major part of who she is and what inspires her. Upbeat religious music is blared from a boom box, heard throughout

the property. All the proceeds she makes go to various charities, and the primary beneficiary is Feed the Children, which has honored her with numerous certificates and awards throughout the years. Paulsen knows what it is to have struggled and seeks to help. She bought the property that is now Mary’s Gone Wild in 1980. At that time, she moved into the existing house and never even thought of creating art. Instead, she did some dumpster diving. She collected the best pieces she could, cleaned them up and set up a yard sale on the side of the road. She continued to curate found items for years. In 1996 she says, the Lord told her to start building little houses, so she did. She had always been a dollhouse hobbyist and she grew up building and furnishing dollhouses for fun, so when the Lord spoke she listened. Today she has multiple buildings with various themes built entirely by her own hand from reclaimed wood and bottles. She uses a saw, nails and a hammer, she says. There is a schoolhouse, a Christmas building, a library, a boys’ clubhouse, and a miniature house dedicated to Coca-Cola, which has memorabilia and collectible items even the museum of Coca-Cola in Atlanta doesn’t have. Summer 2016

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Above: Mary’s Gone Wild includes numerous small buildings that house her collection of 8,000 dolls, antiques and collectibles, and her famous folk art.

In 1998, Paulsen says, she had her artistic calling, and she delights in telling visitors how it happened. “One day I was standing at my kitchen sink, washing dishes, when I had a vision from the Lord,” she says. “He just showed me what I needed to do with reverse side painting. I went out and told my husband and mother-in-law, who were sitting on the front porch, and they laughed. They were making fun of me! But sure enough, my first piece of art sold the next morning before ten o’clock.” Using primarily reclaimed materials, Paulsen’s work is simple, colorful and contemporary. She will paint on anything, including old surfboards, but her favorite canvases are old glass windows. She loves the way the light shines through. Original art can be bought at Mary’s Gone Wild from $4 up to $4,000. It all depends on the size and scale of the piece.

Paulsen is now one of the leading established folk artists, even if she doesn’t realize it. Her artwork hangs in all 50 states and has gone global. She is included in the Marietta/ Cobb Museum of Art in Georgia as a Folk Art Visionary. She has been the subject of books, multiple documentaries and many news articles. Collectors come from all over. In my wanderings through her space, I unearth a photo of a beautiful woman and her partner sitting in their magazine-ready bedroom, which was decorated solely with Paulsen’s art. I see many other things in my wanderings, too. For this place truly is “wild.” While walking through one of the bottle houses, I find a decoupage table tucked away, holding old journals doodled on by visitors years ago, next to a box of plastic spoons you buy at the grocery store. Above are old Coleman gas lanterns strung from the ceiling next to glittered girls’ tennis shoes. In a corner are old bottles of

“Oh, I’ve been through some rough times, honey. But the Lord helped me through. Without him, I can do nothing and am nothing. This is not really for me, but for Him.”

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Above: Paulsen has recycled thousands of pounds of trash and used it to create art, including paintings on old windows and houses made of glass bottles.

body lotion, abandoned EXIT signs from office buildings and old telescopes. The girls’ clubhouse is what I had always wanted as a child: lace-ruffled curtains, pink-flowered wallpaper and an Easy Bake Oven. Even though items and debris are scattered all over and I dare not enter, nostalgia overwhelms me. In another area of the property, an entire shed is crammed with pieces of dishes and décor for sale. Paulsen doesn’t dumpster dive anymore, of course, although even at the age 67 she certainly has the energy to. But she laughs and tells me that they won’t allow it. Paulsen does have a big heart, though, and will buy, trade or barter with nearly every soul who comes in. “Oh, honey, I’ve heard all the stories,” she says. “Need this for medicine, that for my bills … I just can’t say no.” Those who love the thrill of a good hunt will be in heaven in Paulsen’s antiques room. You’ll need to allow hours to go

through the racks and shelves of stuff, but antiquities are there, waiting to be unearthed. It is hard to describe Paulsen’s world in words, but it drives visitors to come back again and again. It is a place that begs to be seen repeatedly, taking in a new corner or trying to trace down something from memories. And Paulsen isn’t done creating yet. Now that her chapel is complete, she has her sights set on a way to display her collection of 8,000 baby dolls. Walking the property, I speak to a family visiting while on vacation in Holden Beach. I ask them if they had been here before. “Oh, we come here every year,” the teenage daughter says. “My grandma is an artist, too, so we just love everything about this place.” Paulsen doesn’t have a computer or email (“If I did, I know I would spend all day on that thing on eBay, hunting for antiques,” she admits) so you can’t make an appointment to Summer 2016

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see her, but she stays on the property most days, greeting guests. She has no set schedule for her studio time; she creates when the Lord tells her, but there is always a new addition to see. When my time is over, I go to say good-bye. A visitor from Wrightsville Beach who owns a house in Holden Beach is excitedly introducing her out-of-town brother to Paulsen. While two hours ago I might have thought this odd, it now makes sense. Because the thing that matters most about Mary’s Gone Wild is Paulsen herself. This strange hamlet that many visitors unknowingly drive by isn’t just about art or hoarding or collections, it is about Mary Paulsen’s life. It is about her amazing story, her uniqueness, her creativity and her love for people. Paulsen asks me to come back and see her again, and I am already looking forward to it. Mary’s Gone Wild is a place for everyone to come step out of the bustle of life and back to childhood. There is no place on Earth quite like it. n

Want to go? Mary’s Gone Wild Where: 2431 Holden Beach Rd SW, Supply When: 9 am to 9 pm, 365 days a year Price: Free (donations accepted and given to Paulsen’s charity of choice) Info: marysgonewild.com

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Oh Pear! Greenlands Farm’s pear orchard creates an abundance of fruit that’s perfect for Heather Burkert’s kitchen magic.

P STO RY BY

Jane H i ll

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY

Purchasing a soggy parcel of land with

the intention of creating a sustainable farm is a scary prospect, but the Burkerts did it anyway. First they got grading equipment and contoured the land for optimum drainage, retention and water use. Then they planted a pear orchard. Over time, by adding various crops and farm animals that nourish each other, they achieved Greenlands Farm in Bolivia, which produces, among other things, a mighty harvest of pears. Nutritious and delicious, pears are better suited to this part of the state than their cousins the apples, explains Heather Burkert. Pears don’t get nearly the attention and marketing dollars that apples do, but, in fact, anything you can do with an apple, you can with a pear. If necessity is the mother of invention, a ton of ripe pears is the test. Burkert pairs cut pears with fresh figs in salad (both fruits ripen about the same time) and adds grated pears to just about anything. As the resident baker at Greenlands Farm, she is known for her talent using only fresh ingredients. She takes advantage of ripe pears’ natural sweetness to make pies and tarts. She also preserves them, dries them in a commercial

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L i n ds e y A . M i l l e r

dryer, or used them to make jam, pear butter or mincemeat. A contemporary twist on classic spiced pears is Burkert’s Pear Chai Jam, a golden concoction with flecks of cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, nutmeg and black pepper. “You can always find a use for something in season,” she says. “That’s how traditional recipes were born, creating with whatever was coming out of the field at the time.” On baking days, Burkert is elbow deep in organic flour, sometimes gluten-free flour, assembling crusts and fillings made from ingredients direct from the farm. Her pear pie with accents of port wine has a devoted following, as does her French tart, a puddle of rich pastry cream topped with a fan of sliced ripe pears. “Not many people know how to make pastry cream,” she says. “It’s not sweet at all. We don’t over-sugar things. If you use good ingredients and you choose varieties for their flavor, you just need to let the flavor come out.” America embraces pie on special occasions, especially holidays, but not so long ago pies were practically a staple in farm life. Even urban dwellers had pie safes before refrigeration and the pie filling reflected whatever was regionally available or abundant.


Heather Burkert’s Pear Chai Jam is made from pears grown in Greenlands Farm’s orchard.

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This spread: Greenlands Farm Store offers a bakery, cafe and food store offering items grown or made on site.

“My ancestors were farmers and they ate pie for breakfast, sort of the early version of a Pop-Tart, except better because they used what they had,” Burkert says. Kellogg marketed Pop-Tarts as a “toaster pastry” in 1964, decades after most Americans had forgotten about pie as a breakfast food, and sales have increased in each of the past 32 years, the company reports. Surely, a seasonal pear tart made with fresh ingredients and only a pinch of sugar in a cream and egg custard deserves a place at the breakfast table, too. The American Pie Council, which wants to see a pie slice on every plate, surveys consumers annually and finds a consistent preference for apple. Even at Thanksgiving, apple pie wins the day. Chocolate pie comes in second, and pear, well, it doesn’t even make the list. Pears, it seems, are misunderstood. Historically they had issues to overcome, too. In 18th-century Europe, where today’s apples and pear stocks originated, only nobility could afford the delicate-skinned, buttery-flavored pears. Picking season was short, supply was limited and

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transportation was impossible. Scarcity breeds status, which explains why Renaissance still-life paintings — funded by noblemen — featured shapely pears amid clusters of grapes. It probably also explains why your true love during that same era might consider a partridge in a pear tree a valuable gift on par with, say, ten lords a leaping. Pears were precious. In the 1800s, when Britain had more than 700 varieties of pears, American Colonists were still struggling to get a strong crop, though they may have been more interested in fruit for hard cider than pie. Settlers eventually


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took tree stock to the Pacific Northwest, where the climate was perfect for pears nearly year-round. Today, Washington and Oregon produce 80 percent of grocery store pears, according to USA Pears, a growers group. Like Burkert, chefs in that part of the country have learned to incorporate pears into every course. In eastern North Carolina, it’s not unusual to see pear trees in older neighborhoods and in the countryside where farms once stood, but there’s more to pear production than owning a pear tree, Burkert explains. Like apples, pears require two varieties in order to cross pollinate, a task usually tackled by bees. Pollination happens on the blossoms of fruiting buds in springtime, earlier for pears than apples, so a late spring frost can damage the crop. This is the gamble the Burkerts accepted 15 years ago when they started the orchard. They chose Kieffer, and old variety that’s good for jams and preserves, less popular for munching raw, and Moonglow, a softer, juicier, flavorful pear. Like

Pears don’t get nearly the attention and marketing dollars that apples do, but, in fact, anything you can do with an apple, you can with a pear.

everything else that grows at Greenlands, their pear trees are pesticide free, thanks to roaming chickens that peck at insects and then naturally fertilize the area in which they feed. Yield increases with proper pruning, a task for Henry Burkert, a certified arborist. In a good season, when nature cooperates, the orchard will produce about 16 bushels of pears — that’s just shy of 1,000 pounds. The Burkerts have to get creative in a hurry when they’re ready to pick, just before they ripen. Unlike apples that stop ripening when picked, pears should be picked when mature but not fully ripe. If you wait till one falls from the tree, you’ve waited too long.

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Above: Heather Burkert uses what’s fresh on the farm to create a variety of seasonal treats.

“There are only ten minutes in the life of a pear when it is perfect to eat,” a quote attributed to Ralph Waldo Emerson, is close to the truth. Fortunately, Burkert knows when it’s time to pick. She leaves them to ripen for a few days, and then she puts on her apron and gets to work. n

Want to go? Greenlands Farm Store 668 Midway Road SE, Bolivia 910-253-7934 greenlandsfarmstore.info

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DIVERSIONS

The Thrill of the Find Those glimmers of sea glass on the beach have stories to tell.

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Story by Sandi Grigg

Sea glass, also called a mermaid’s tear, is a shard of glass that has been tumbled by the ocean’s waves and sand over years until it is smooth and frosted. It is commonly found washed up on beaches in shades of brown, green and white, but the rare colors of blue, purple, red and orange also can be found. Humans have been making and using glass since around since 3500 B.C. As people settled along shorelines discard glass, much of their trash eventually makes its way into the ocean. Therefore, beaches and waterways that have been settled by people typically offer a better chance for finding these tide-worn gems. Sea glass hunting has gotten so popular that there are now numerous books available on the subject. Much of the research for this article came from the book “The Ultimate Guide to Sea Glass: Finding, Collecting, Identifying and Using the Ocean’s Most Beautiful Stones” by Mary Beth Beuke (Skyhorse Publishing). Read on for a guide on where to look for sea glass, the best techniques for finding it and how to know whether or not your finds are unique.

Where to Look Wherever people and water meet, you can expect to find sea glass. Certain areas within the United States are known for their sea glass– covered beaches. Fort Bragg, Calif., is one of the most famous. This area was once a dump and therefore the glass is in abundance. Time and 68

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Above: Tumbled and polished by the ocean, sea glass, sometimes called beach glass, is a treasured find for many beachcombers.

nature have combined to convert trash into treasure, but you must not remove any glass form the northern section of the beach, as it is part of a state park. Kauai Island in Hawaii is also home to a famous Glass Beach, where millions of small, smooth glass pebbles in blue, aqua, brown, green and occasionally red can be found. The glittering beach is the result of

the neighboring Swiss Cheese Shoreline of lava rock with a network of holes. The glass gets trapped and battered and then eventually makes its way up to the beach. Though the Brunswick beaches are not as favorable to catching glass in lava rocks, we do have an abundance of coral that can act in the same way. The Brunswick Islands and the coastal


areas of southeastern North Carolina offer tremendous potential for finding sea glass, and all colors of glass wash up on our shores. Piers, boat ramps and launches, industrial seaside areas and shipping channels are very good places to start. The Brunswick Islands fit just about all of the criteria to find sea glass, and the Cape Fear River is another source that is promising. Think of where the most populated beaches are and, conversely, where the beaches are a bit secluded. The more isolated the beaches, the better because more debris means more places for the sea glass to get trapped and carried ashore with no one to discover it. Digging into a shell hash is a great way to find sea glass. Shell hashes are large groups of broken shells, driftwood, seaweed, etc. that have washed up on the beach naturally. Sea glass is becoming harder to find because beaches are becoming cleaner, and people are recycling their glass now and using more plastic bottles. Many beaches don’t even allow glass on them anymore and there are hefty fines issued for having glass on the beach. Beach re-nourishment projects, which tend to bury existing glass, also contribute to the rarity of sea glass. Wrightsville Beach and Carolina Beach have undergone re-nourishment projects, making it difficult to find glass there. Additionally, those beaches are also heavily populated and the competition is stiff for any sea glass that does wash up. With so many obstacles, actually finding a mermaid’s tear is all the more rewarding.

When to Hunt Technically, you can walk on the shores at anytime of the day with as many people around you on a freshly pristine clean beach and still find a piece of sea glass. There are, however, a few tips to help make the search easier. It’s a myth that you will always find the most sea glass after a storm. While finding an abundance of sea glass after

a storm can occasionally happen, post-storm beaches can sometimes pull everything out to sea, having the opposite of the anticipated effect. In addition, many have noticed that after a heavy storm or hurricane no glass is found for a while. It is believed that it’s best to start your hunt about an hour before the tide is going out. Near the wet sand is the best area to look for sea glass because it is easier to be seen, but be aware that certain colors of glass (like white) turn almost invisible when wet. The wet sand is a good place to find the blue and green glass. Dry sand close to the wet sand is great to find white and brown colors or the elusive red. Sunny days are better than overcast days, and remember that glass glistens a little more than wet shells. Walk slowly and scan the beach with your eyes. It’s not a race to see who can find something the fastest, and you don’t want to miss something along the way.

Color Rarity Before the 1960s plastic was not widely commercially used, and glass was the main way to preserve and transport goods. Just about every household product was sold in glass packaging, and home cooks preserved

food in glass jars. Tin was also used, but in coastal communities tin would rust so glass was preferred. Most sea glass that is found in our area is in shades of green or brown. Green sea glass can be a wide range of shades and hues, and can be common (think beer, wine and soda bottles) or rare, if it’s bubbled, patterned, embossed or textured. Brown glass is also an old and new color. Common products like modern beer bottles are brown, yet very old Clorox and Lysol bottles were brown, and some of these still bear the imprinting. There is also a good amount of clear or white glass off our shores. From a new soda bottle to an old pane of glass, you can usually establish how old your white glass is by the thickness and any markings or bubbles. Clear glass from early in the last century contained manganese and has turned light purple form exposure to the sun. A lot of older white glass, however, had a greenish tint, and depending on thickness and whether bubbles are present, it could be an old piece of rarer glass. New glass of this shade is still used for wine bottles. Sea glass can also be aqua, blue, purple, red, yellow or orange. Collectors say some of the most rare sea glass is the color of blue, orange Summer 2016

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and red. They are among the rarest because they have not been commercially reproduced in abundance for many years and there is no new source for them. While the most common source of sea glass in the shade of aqua was most likely an old Coca-Cola bottle made in various parts of the country, the shades vary depending on the silica that was used. Cobalt blue glass is fun to find and stems from countless old products packaged in blue glass, such as medicines and even poisons. Purple sea glass can be found in abundance in certain parts of the world, but the United States is not one of them. Glass in its raw state usually has a greenish tint to it; to make glass white or clear, a bleaching chemical agent was added. When World War I broke out, because of new regulations, the chemical could no longer be used and the replacement chemical that was used turned glass lavender over a period of time. It’s quite thrilling to think that when you find a piece of sea glass in this color, you can date it! True purple glass is much rarer. Most pieces of true lavender sea glass found in European countries dates back to the Monarchy or Royalty and was reserved for the Bishops in the church. Red is the Holy Grail of sea glass and will make any sea glass collector’s week or year. One of the most common sources for red glass was made by Anchor

Hocking Glass Company for decorative household items, from vases, kitchen wares and railroad lanterns to Avon products and many more. In the 1950s the Schlitz beer bottle was also a ruby color and there was brewery on Long Island that made a beer called Red Bottle Beer. True red sea glass contains gold, which turned the molten glass its vivid red hue. This is why even today red glass is very expensive. Orange glass was most likely from an old decorative household item or from warning lights on boats. The odds of finding a piece of orange sea glass are very slim, for this color is the rarest and was seldom produced.

What to Do with Sea Glass When you get your piece of

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sea glass home, be sure to inspect it thoroughly. Wash it and hold it up to the sun like a jewel to see its true color. Closely look at some of the markings on the pieces and see if you can find raised letters, as those pieces have more value. Look for curves or indentions to see if you can distinguish what the item may have been. Identify numbers because they may hold the key to distinguishing the origins. The fun in sea glass hunting is that every piece is a treasure with a story. You can make things with your glass — jewelry, wind chimes, intricate mosaic sea glass tiles — or just store it in a jar. If you don’t find your own, you can buy sea glass products in local shops. Although the art created from sea glass is remarkable, there is something therapeutic about just holding a piece of sea glass and running your fingers over it. Next time you take a stroll on Holden Beach or Oak Island be sure to scan the soft wet sand for glimmers that could be a piece of history. A clean beach is a happy beach, but for a true sea glass hunter, someone’s trash can be the next person’s treasure. It’s all about the thrill of the find. n


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Around town

Worms and Coffee

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Saying goodbye to a local icon

Story and PHOTOGRAPHY by Barbara Sammons

What makes you smile? A funny joke,

an old-time movie, a good story with a happy ending? I never know what I will find to make me smile, but one thing that once brought a smile to my face was a sign at the Midway Trading Post in Bolivia: “Worms and Coffee.” The first time I saw it I stopped my car and grabbed my camera. “There must be a story behind this sign,” I said to myself, and with a smile on my face I clicked the shutter on my camera. The store was closed that day, so I headed home. Months later I learned that this local icon was closing on July 30, 2016, as widening of Highway 211 was in the future and the state had made an offer to buy the property. On a hot summer’s day, I decided to go over and take in what was left. With my camera and note pad in hand, I drove off to see if I could learn about the sign that had once made me smile. My afternoon was filled with listening to stories about customers, employees and the owners, Carole and Mike 72

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Richards. In 1993 Carole and Mike, high-school sweethearts originally from Nebraska, decided to make a major change. They had both worked in Chapel Hill, N.C., but during a time of layoffs they decided they wanted to write their own chapter for the life they wanted to live. And living at the coast was their choice. After meeting with a Realtor, they decided to purchase the Midway Trading Post, even though neither of them had any former retail experience. “What is the story behind the funny sign?” I asked Carole. She told me they had many signs for the store known as Midway Trading Post, but one day Mike said, “We need something catchy, something fun. Why not Worms and Coffee?” It stuck. An artist, Carole got to work designing a logo of a worm with a ball cap and a big grin on the side of a steaming cup of coffee. Loyal customers stopped by the store each morning, noon and night for their daily dose of beverages, snacks, and yes,


coffee and worms. Jars of jams and jellies lined the shelves, pickled eggs were packed in Mason jars, and packages of boar and venison jerky took center stage at the cash register. Carole and Mike were fixtures at the store. Mike, known as “Midway Mike,� was an avid golfer and enjoyed outdoor sports until one day in June of 2015 when he was suddenly taken ill. A short time after being diagnosed with leukemia, he passed away.

Above: The popular Midway Trading Post closed in July due to the upcoming widening of Highway 211.

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Above: Right, Carole Richards and her late husband, Mike, both originally from Nebraska, moved to Brunswick County and bought Midway Trading Post in 1993. Left, the benches out front, originally in a Southport theater, will soon be on the auction block.

How do you survive when life throws you a curve ball? Do you give in or do you find strength to move on? “The store was my saving grace after Mike’s passing,” Carole said. I see the love in her eyes when she speaks of her high-school sweetheart of nearly 50 years. “And my art gives me strength to move on.” Her abstract acrylic paintings are exhibited at the Franklin Square Gallery in Southport, where she is a member. Art feeds the soul and soothes the heart, the perfect medicine as Carole heals from the loss of her husband and now the closing of the store. Mike once told Carole he would know he had made it when the Brunswick Beacon published his story on the front page of the paper above the fold for all to read. “Mike, you have made it,” Carole said, showing me the article in the July 28 Brunswick Beacon with the article Mike had been wishing to see. Too bad it was about the store closing. On August 20, 2016, the auctioneer will pound his gavel to sell “anything that can be moved,” as Carole said. It will be a bittersweet ending to a life shared. 74

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Before I left, I asked Carole if I could photograph what is left of this local icon to preserve the sights that were so much a part of Carole and Mike’s life. She allowed me to work my way through the store capturing small bits and pieces of their treasures. We ended up outside where Carole sat on blue wooden seats originally from a theater in Southport and I took my place on a blue garden bench. We chatted some more, I grabbed a few more candid shots and then I remembered that I had brought something for Carole. “Be right back,” I said. I returned with a small bag of homemade Orange-Fig Shortbread. “It’s just something I do when I meet someone new, I bake cookies,” I said. “Then you must take home some of our own homemade jams, while we still have some,” said Carole. I followed her into the store and picked out a jar of fig preserves. I will bake something special with this jar of preserves from Worms and Coffee and remember this day and how I learned all about that sign that brought a smile to my face. “Hope to see you again,” called out Carole, as I turned to leave. “Me, too,” I said back to her. n


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InstaLove! 5 Minutes with the Creator of #100daysofNCBrunswick STO RY BY

A l l i so n B arr e tt C art e r

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY

J a m i e W or l e y

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Jamie Worley is a mother, fitness enthusiast, blogger and Brunswick County resident. She has spent the past few months sharing her love of the area through a self-created Instagram challenge called #100daysofNCBrunswick. She set out on a mission to take 100 photos of Brunswick County. The pictures under Jamie’s hashtag include historic homes, beaches, Fort Caswell, horseshoe crabs, farmers markets, 5K races and parades. It is a true celebration of life lived on the coast. Below are a few of Jamie’s photos from the #100daysofNCBrunswick challenge. Top: Day 36/100 #100daysofncbrunswick. Oak Island lighthouse, right next to the Coast Guard station. Ken & the big kids climbed to the top today; meanwhile the little kids and I watched dolphins and boats in the ocean behind us. Bottom: Day 90/100 #100daysofNCbrunswick. Evening by the sea.

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Now get to know the woman behind the camera. How long have you lived in Brunswick County and where are you located now? We moved to Brunswick County last fall from the Atlanta area to pursue our dream of a simpler life in a small coastal town. What was the inspiration for your new Instagram project and hashtag? Seeing several other Instagrammers participate in #the100dayproject made me want to do so, but it took me a week or so to come up with specifically what I wanted to do. I decided to celebrate our new hometown as I continue to explore it for myself. What is your favorite thing to do in Brunswick County? There’s so much to do! If I have to pick a favorite, which is really difficult, I’d say exploring the historic town of Southport or enjoying relaxed time at the beach or kayaking in the area. Pick another local Instagram account you love. For wonderful photos and places all over North Carolina, I enjoy following @ncoutdoor_inc and @tnc_nc. What’s the first thing you tell visitors to the area that they must do? Explore! There are so many great things in the area so my recommendations would depend on what your individual interests are. High on my list would be to take a kayak tour because it’s a wonderful way to see places you won’t see any other way. Visit Jamie online at See Jamie Blog (seejamieblog.com) and follow her on Instagram @jamieworley. Better yet, get out your phone and join Jamie’s hashtag challenge! Think you can take 100 photos of NC Brunswick? n

Top: Day 21: #100daysofncbrunswick. We haven’t had many date night opportunities lately but we’re exploring new spots when we get a chance. Tonight was Frying Pan restaurant in Southport, overlooking the Cape Fear River. Wasn’t crowded in this Wednesday night and food & service were good. (And we had actual grownup conversation!)

Bottom: Day 83/100 #100daysofNCbrunswick. The problem when I walk through historic Southport is suppressing the urge to squeal delightedly and declare EVERY house The Cutest Ever. Built in 1895 (if I remember correctly), this one overlooks the intracoastal waterway so you could sit on either of those adorable porches and watch boats go by while enjoying an almost constant gentle breeze.

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Above: Day 37/100 #100daysofncbrunswick. 14th Street Pier on a perfectly gorgeous day. Also: If you want to see major cuteness, google “wallaby on Oak Island.” We had a visitor named Boomer here on vacation; just wish we could’ve seen him in person!

Above: Day 77/100. #100daysofNCbrunswick. Bullfrog Corner in Southport is a fun little gift shop. Kathryn and I went hunting for kid birthday gifts and couldn’t resist a selfie with Mr. Bullfrog himself. Above: Day 79/100 #100daysofNCbrunswick. I’m crazy about this glass art made by one of the artisans at the local market. It’s like stained glass, but with buttons and shells and such added in. 78

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Above: Day 7: #100daysofNCbrunswick. Now that I’ve found three different marsh walkovers on the island, I incorporate them in my runs whenever possible. I mean, how much better could it get than running with scenes like this?!? Happy this morning’s rain cleared to let me get in a few miles today.

Above: Day 64/100 #100daysofNCbrunswick. Waterfront on the Cape Fear River. A lovely place to walk, eat dinner, sit on a park bench, & watch birds and people and boats. Above: Day 16: #100daysofncbrunswick. The 1st loggerhead nest of the season on OKI was laid last night, and neighboring island Bald Head kicked off the season just a couple of days ago. Yay! I don’t know where the nest is yet so we’ll celebrate with a photo of this awesome copper sculpture installed at our local rec center last year. I’m hoping for a record sea turtle season this year and eagerly anticipating volunteering as an apprenticing nest parent!! 80

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Above: Day 29/100: #100daysofncbrunswick. Indian blanket flowers (a.k.a. firewheels) grow wild all over the place here. They pop up by the road, in fields & empty lots, and always make me smile.

Top: Day 31/100 #100daysofncbrunswick. I’m in love with the historic homes and huge trees in Southport. One of many good reasons it was voted America’s Happiest Seaside town by @Coastal_ Living magazine last year. Middle: Day 53/100 #100daysofNCbrunswick: Canal at sunset. (See the kayaker?) My long run wasn’t as long as I’d planned but the tide was too high to run on the beach and I’m just feeling a bit low-energy. Still, six miles is six miles. Bottom: Day 62/100 #100daysofNCbrunswick. Part of historic Fort Caswell, originally built in 1838 to protect the Cape Fear River from foreign attack and later used as a Confederate fort during the Civil War.

Above: Day 46/100 #100daysofNCbrunswick: Island sunset. Summer 2016

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Nature

The Function of Feathers

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You see them nearly every day, but how much do you know about these delicate works of nature? Story by Joe Zentner

What comes to mind first when you think about birds? Very often it’s color — the brilliant red of a cardinal, the bright hue of a bluebird, the mottled brown of a female mallard. You might think about birds in one way or another every day, but how often do you contemplate a bird’s feathers? Plumage (all of a bird’s feathers combined) is perhaps the most prominent feature of a bird’s anatomy. Every bird has feathers, and everything that has feathers is a bird. Feathers are truly amazing creations that are designed to carry out many functions. Light but very strong, f lexible

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but tough, they cover most but not all of a bird. Beaks and eyes have no feathers, and most birds have featherless legs and feet. If clothes make the person, then feathers make the bird. Feathers come in an amazing array of colors — just about every hue imaginable. Birds, unlike most mammals, can see color. Birds have between 1,000 and 25,000 feathers, depending on the species. Larger birds have more feathers; the swan, with its long neck, has perhaps the most.


Feathers fall into five categories: Contour feathers are those that cover the body of a bird and provide the basic coloration. These overlap like roof shingles to give a bird an aerodynamic shape. Flight feathers on the wings are specialized contour feathers. These provide a lightweight, broad surface that pushes against air to make flight possible. Down feathers are the fluffy feathers that form the downy plumage of chicks, which creatures are born with and can move about soon after hatching. Down helps birds keep warm. Tail feathers provide lift, balance, steering and braking. Powder-down feathers

are found in only a few birds. They grow continually. The tips break off, forming a water-resistant powder. The metallic sheen of a heron is caused in part by powder down. Every feather consists of a tapering shaft bearing a flexible vane on either side. The exposed base of the shaft is called the calamus. An opening at the bottom of the calamus allows blood to enter the young feather during its short growing period. When growth is completed, the feather seals itself off. Feathers play many roles in the lives of birds: Mating In some species, the colors of the male have a direct impact on how attractive he appears to a female and, therefore, to his mating success. In some instances, the roles are reversed, with the male seeking clues to a female’s value as a mate by carefully examining the coloration of her feathers. Territorial dominance Biological research suggests that birds in excellent health produce feathers with super-bright colors. In establishing nesting territory, birds that are brightly

colored may be sending a signal that they are especially fit and that it would therefore be wise for others to keep out of “their” territory. Regulation of body temperature Feathers also help keep birds warm and dry. Penguin feathers, being small and densely packed, are particularly well suited for this purpose. The downy base of each feather traps an insulating layer of air against a penguin’s skin. The feather tips overlap to form a waterproof outer shield. Camouflage Feathers help provide camouflage from predators. For example, the winter plumage of a ptarmigan is pure white, which color matches the snowcovered grounds of the bird’s winter home. The spring molt produces mottledbrown feathers, making the female virtually invisible as she sits on a nest. Flight Feathers obviously play a crucial role in flight, lending an airfoil shape to wings that provides lift. Hummingbirds are particularly adept at controlling their feathers and thus the shape of the wing, as they hover while feeding. Protection Water birds have special oil glands that make their feathers waterresistant. Exceptions are birds that dive for food; they have no oil glands because they cannot be buoyant. Such birds, including anhingas, must dry their feathers in the sun, a spectacle you have perhaps witnessed if you have ever visited the Everglades. Some species, including killdeer, mockingbirds, many shorebirds and most gull species, exhibit a color pattern known as countershading, which features a dark back over light underparts. When viewed from above by a predator, the Summer 2016

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Brunswick’s Birds If you are a birder who has come for the first time to Brunswick County, you may be in for some surprises. A remarkable number of species find the area a desirable place to live. You may also be surprised by birds’ resourcefulness in coping with a sometimes unforgiving environment. Among the birds that make their home here are herons, piping plovers, American oystercatchers, raptors, red-cockaded woodpeckers, warblers, indigo buntings and summer tanagers. Also occasionally seen here are ibises, wood storks, bald eagles and terns.

dark back appears lighter in the sunlight, while the lighter lower half of the bird appears darker as a result of being in its own shadow. The effect is one of a single color, making the bird difficult to spot from a distance. Because feathers are critical to a bird’s survival, much time is spent keeping them well maintained. In fact, a good portion of a bird’s day is spent cleaning and grooming feathers by applying oil, bathing and preening. Feathers do eventually wear out. Molting, the process of losing old feathers and growing new ones, occurs in most birds once or twice a year. The feathers of predatory birds molt slowly because they need most of their feathers to fly with and hunt. The flight feathers of some predatory birds

last two to three years. Other birds, including penguins, lose all of their feathers over a two-week period of time, after new ones have begun to grow in. Feathers, regardless of where a bird lives —in the mountains, by the seashore, or in the desert — have an exquisite beauty, tenderness and functionality that has captured the imagination of people for untold centuries. These delicate works of nature have been utilized as personal adornments, ritual objects, decorative artifacts and tools by virtually every society since the dawn of time. While feathers have been used for a variety of human purposes, feathers look best on, and are most useful to birds. Let’s keep it that way. n Summer 2016

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FACES & PLACES

Brunswick Sheriff ’s Foundation Diamonds and Denim Charity Ball

Dana Fisher & Mike Allen

Marty & Catherine Cooke

Judge Ola Lewis with Brunswick County Sheriff’s Deputies

Shirley Babson & Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram

Wendy Hunt & Frank Williams

Mike Forte, Dana Fisher & John Ingram

Pauline Hankins & Felicia Woodard

Josie & Mose Highsmith

Sheila & Jon Evans

Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram & Michelle Ingram

Photography: Wendy Hunt

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FACES & PLACES

Future Generations Golf Tournament

Landon Patterson, Joe Faircloth, Dennis Miller & Spencer Faircloth

Walt Stachura, Gloria Wimmer, Ashley Sloup & Christian Sease

Larry Hammerbacher, Don Neilson, Floyd Foley & Jim Steed

Chris Schmitt, Linda Dybiec, Suzanne Frakes & Mary Barclay

Alan Inions, Chandler Taylor, Scott Taylor & Al Arrigoni

Tim Bringard, Jackson Pickard, Rick Wallauer & Jordan Saunders

Mike Clawson, Betsy Braddock Palmer, Powell Palmer & Jimmy Durham

Linda Lynes, Jayla Rogers & Dan Lynes

Photography: John Muus, Frank Herzog, & Ed Kay

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What’s happened

American Legion Post 543 Holds Memorial Day Ceremony

a Health Rocks! Stress Buster box with tools to help youth to continue managing stress. Twenty-six youth from Cedar Grove and 45 youth from Shallotte Middle took part in this 10-week program. Forty youth were presented with a certificate for completing 10 hours and a journal to help them remember that writing is one way to help reduce stress. North Carolina’s 4-H Health Rocks! Program aligns with national and state educational standards and is flexible enough to be used in school, after-school programs, clubs, and other settings. Brunswick County 4-H Teens in Leadership Training (TiLT) youth volunteers come together throughout the year and are trained in carrying out the program. Currently, there are seven youth volunteers trained in this program. If you would like more information on how to use this program in your school, home-school, after-school or special program, go to brunswick.ces.ncsu.edu. Photography: Contributed

On May 30 the Richard H. Stewart, Jr. American Legion Post 543 held its annual Memorial Day Ceremony at the Veterans Memorial in front of St. James Town Hall. The guest speaker was Randy Cash, national chaplain of the American Legion. More than 300 people were in attendance, and refreshments were offered after the ceremony.

CIS Shallotte Middle School Students Create a Farm to Table Experience

Photography: Contributed

4-H Health Rocks! Program Presented in Local Schools

Brunswick County 4-H congratulates Cedar Grove and Shallotte Middle Schools’ Communities in Schools After-School students in completing 10 hours of training in making healthy lifestyle choices. Coached by Angie Lawrence, 4-H program associate, and taught by Trisha Apple, 4-H/CIS program facilitator, and 4-H youth volunteers Alexis, Amelia and Autumn Apple, the program was called “4-H Health Rocks! Less Stress on the Test!” It’s a healthy lifestyle choices program, sponsored by National 4-H Council. Youth were taught hands-on lessons in decision-making, selfefficacy, critical thinking and stress management to aid them in avoiding unhealthy choices such as using drugs, alcohol or tobacco. In addition, Jillian Bowling and Katlyn Toney, also 4-H youth volunteers, joined Cedar Grove to help the Apple girls on occasion. Some of the activities included games learning the parts of the brain and how stress, tobacco, drugs and alcohol affect the messages sent in your brain. Using balloons, bubbles, yoga, bingo and many other active learning experiences, youth experienced stress, learned stress indicators and then how to manage stress with healthy stress-management tools. Each school was left with

In January 2016 Jane Linell, CIS 21st Century Community Learning Center after school STEM teacher, facilitated a conversation among the students about what they perceive the challenges to be in Brunswick County. As a result of this conversation, students came to the consensus that homelessness in their county is very real. They then began brainstorming ideas on how they could help solve the problem. As the conversation developed, students decided they wanted to create a farm to table restaurant. They wanted to also have a community garden that would grow produce to support the restaurant. The conversation then went much deeper. Students identified homeless issues in Brunswick County and felt homeless people deserve a second chance in life. The students’ focus was to give homeless people an opportunity for some job training and have them work in the restaurant or the garden. The students knew that this experience could give the homeless hope, boost their self-esteem and give them a marketable skill in order to transition out of the program and move toward independence. This conversation blossomed into a semester-long project that included a student-driven business Summer 2016

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and marketing plan for their conceptual restaurant named “Moonlight Sonata.” The student farm-to-table restaurant was a conceptual solution to the homelessness and hunger they identified as an issue in Brunswick County. Under the supervision of two community volunteers, Shallotte Middle School CIS 21st CCLC STEM students learned to use a variety of tools in order to create what they needed to make their own paper and materials. The students in the program hand crafted their own paper and paint to create menus. The students presented their final project at the end of this semester. The event began with a student-created presentation highlighting the key points of interest from the semester. Students then cooked and served a meal to invited guests from the community, who provided on-going support to help the program be successful. SMS Hand Bell Choir provided guests with a beautiful selection of music during the meal. This project was the solution to utilizing the various learning styles of each student. They learned how to use a variety of carpentry tools, technology, nutrition, serving skills, customer service and how to greet guests, public speaking and much more. The students enjoyed the project so much, many asked for it to be continued into the summer camp and the new school year. Photography: Contributed

Spelling Bee Tests Word Mastery and Supports Literacy Council Brunswick County Literacy Council (BCLC) demonstrated how much fun literacy can be at its annual Adult Spelling Bee and Silent Auction on May 16 at Brunswick Community College’s Virginia Williamson Auditorium. This year’s competition featured 13 teams of two spellers vying for the coveted first-place Spelling Bee title while also helping BCLC raise awareness of the critical need for adult literacy programs in Brunswick County. Team sponsorship fees and silent auction proceeds help support the Literacy Council’s outreach to county residents who need assistance with literacy and related life skills available through council programs. The silent auction offered a wide variety of goods and services from more than 100 donors. Items winning bidders took home included jewelry, clothing, art, home and garden accessories, gift certificates to more than 40 local restaurants and admission to area attractions and activities such as Alabama Theater and Battleship NORTH CAROLINA. South Brunswick Islands Rotary’s team of Susan Eggert and Dwight Willis spelled its way to victory in a spirited battle, correctly spelling both chimera and suffrutescent (meaning partially or slightly woody) for the win. Sharon United Methodist Church’s team of Vern Stephens and Susan Knight came in second, lasting until the final round when they misspelled chimera. Other words that tripped up spelling teams in earlier rounds were ingenious, 94

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adolescent, miscellaneous, xeriscaping, Quaalude, asphyxiation, dreidel, detritus, androgynous, tintinnabulatio, and ichthyophagist. Participating teams were sponsored by Brunswick Community College, Friends of the Library, Ocean Isle Beach Family Medicine, Saint Brendan the Navigator Catholic Church, Saint Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, Seaside United Methodist Church, Sharon United Methodist Church, South Brunswick Islands Rotary, Southport Rotary, State Port Pilot and Women’s Club of Lockwood Folly. Word sponsors were Berry, Padgett & Chandler PLLC, Sunset Slush and Jennifer S. Williams DDS, PA. In addition to the Gladys dePersia Wagenseil traveling trophy going to the champion spellers, two new awards were presented this year. Teams representing any category of organization that had three or more teams registered were eligible for special recognition, and this year two groups qualified—churches and Rotaries. David Baggett, Rotary District 7730 governor, presented the South Brunswick Islands Rotary team a plaque in recognition of its top ranking among the participating Rotary teams. The Sharon UMC team received awards from BCLC for being the last church team eliminated. Spelling Bee judges were Rachele Hobbs of Hobbs Realty Vacations, Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram and Sunset Beach Mayor Ron Watts. Gene Steadman was timekeeper, and pronouncers were Phil Parker and Teddy Altreuter. The Wagenseil trophy was provided by Joe & Moe’s Auto Service of Shallotte, and the winners’ plaques by Judy and Gene Vasile. Audience members were treated to refreshments courtesy of Dr. Daniel Spagnoli DDS of Brunswick Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery. Photography: Contributed

Brunswick County Youth Experience Life Science with Brunswick County 4-H Embryology School Enrichment Program

This summer Brunswick County youth explored life science, math and language arts through Brunswick County 4-H Embryology’s Hatching School Enrichment Classroom Project. Youth discovered the life cycle from egg to bird. More than


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600 youth from Belville, Bolivia, Jessie Mae, Southport, Town Creek, Supply, Union, Virginia Williamson and Waccamaw Elementary Schools, as well as L and L Montessori School and Mrs. Jones’ Early College High School Biology classes, hatched baby chicks and learned math by calculating correct temperature and humidity for the incubator. One way they learn life science is by learning the parts of the egg, what each stage of the 21-day process looks like. This year several of the classrooms were joined by Angie Lawrence from Brunswick County 4-H to participate in candling. Youth were mesmerized by participating in the process of candling to identify fertilized eggs, by learning to identify the air sac, spider veins and occasionally the eye and movement so they could keep a better eye on their hatchlings. Youth also learn life skills with this project, like Learning to Learn, by developing intellectual curiosity; Teamwork by working together to care for their project; and Planning and Organizing by learning to set shortterm goals. High school youth studied genetics and a more in-depth discovery of the life cycle. Photography: Contributed

Colonel Crowden graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in 1969. In April 2010 he was inducted into the Purdue University ROTC Hall of Fame. He obtained a Master of Science degree from the University of Southern California in 1985 and is also a graduate of the United States Army Command and General Staff College. After his service he was employed as the manager of plans, policies and procedures by the Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC), which is a billion dollar start-up environmental company designed to clean up oil spills throughout the United States and its territories. His career than took him to Northrop Grumman, where he worked as a senior engineer/manager until he retired supporting the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in development of software as well as plans and procedures to assist air traffic controllers direct aircraft around storms in order to arrive at their destination on time. Colonel Crowden resides in St. James with his wife, Maggi. Together they have five children and three grandchildren. Photography: Contributed

Richard H. Stewart Jr. American Legion Post 543 Elects Gary Crowden New Commander On May 25 the Richard H. Stewart, Jr American Legion Post 543 elected LTC (Retired) Gary G. Crowden as its 3rdPost Commander. The post currently has more than 170 members who dedicate themselves to assisting veterans and citizens of Brunswick County through various programs. Colonel Crowden has served as the Post Adjutant for the past two years and has been a member of the American Legion for 13 consecutive years. Colonel Crowden comes from a military family. His father was a World War II and Korean War veteran and Colonel Crowden served as an Army officer for over two decades including a tour with the famous 101st Airborne Division in the Republic of Vietnam. As a member of this unit he was an infantry platoon leader, ground cavalry troop executive officer and an air cavalry squadron adjutant. As a young lieutenant he participated as a member of the United States Central Treaty Organization (CENTO) marksmanship team in England. He has served in multiple positions of command and staff and retired from the military serving as an Emergency Planner for the Secretary of Defense where he was responsible for review of State Department embassy plans for evacuation as well as plans for the evacuation of the president and members of Congress should the need arise from the National Capital Region. The highlight of his military career was his assignment to the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO) in Jerusalem. In December 1988 he, along with 297 officers from 17 nations, were recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize for their collective work in the Middle East during Israel’s invasion into Lebanon in 1978 and the withdrawal of Israel from the Sinai, which resulted in the subsequent occupation of the Sinai by Egyptian forces.

Brunswick County 4-H Youth Succeed in District Project Record Book Event Project Record Books allow 4-H members to reflect on their experiences and what they learned from them throughout the 4-H year. Youth complete a 4-H plan, set goals, provide evidence of activities and learning, tell their 4-H story and elaborate on leadership, citizenship and community service activities each year. They submit Project Record Books representing the previous year’s work to the county event in January and two from each age division and content category are selected to compete in the Southeast District Project Record Book event. This year, 12 youth submitted 13 books in Brunswick County and nine moved on to the district event. Volunteers and staff judge project records in April. Each book receives a score on the 4-H scale of excellent, very good, good, fair or poor, and each age division and content category names gold, silver, and bronze medal winners. Brunswick County 4-H is proud to announce that Alexis Apple was named District Gold Medal winner in Personal Development, ages 16-18, with an excellent in Leadership. First-time competitor Ella Kirby was a District Bronze winner in Consumer and Family Science, ages 9-10, receiving Excellent at the county level. Other youth receiving Excellent at the county level and moving on to the district level included: Amelia Apple, age 13-15, category Personal Development and Leadership, and Science and Technology; Lena Devlin, age 13-15, category Animal Science; Jillian Bowling, age 13-15, category Citizenship & Civic Education; Kaitlin Jones, age 13-15, category Animal Science; Ella Kirby, age 9-10, category Animal Science; and Katlyn Toney, age 13-15, category Personal Development and Leadership. Summer 2016

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What’s happened

New Shipwrecks Exhibit Opens at the Museum of Coastal Carolina A grand-opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony was held on May 27 for the new Shipwrecks exhibit at the Museum of Coastal Carolina. The ceremony was co-sponsored by the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce. The new exhibit consists of a slide show featuring information about coastal shipwrecks, some shipwreck artifacts and a new 700-gallon aquarium that exhibits a portion of a ship’s paddlewheel. The Shipwrecks exhibit is sponsored by The GPS Store, owned by Drew and Gina Reger. “Museum visitors will learn about various shipwrecks right off our coastal region and see indigenous fish and North Atlantic spiny lobsters,” said Terry Bryant, executive director of the Ocean Isle Museum Foundation, Inc. “Our seashore is considered the Graveyard of the Atlantic and it holds a vast array of aquatic and historical treasures. Museum visitors will discover fascinating stories about shipwrecks and details about how their journeys began and ended.” Bryant added, “We deeply appreciate the Reger family for their continued support of our new exhibits. Sponsors such as the Regers care about our continued growth and see the significance of providing new educational exhibits that encourage tourists to return year after year to our area.” The museum foundation thanks sponsors Jessie Myers Construction, Bo Tate, Scott Walters with Coastal Pools, Butch Truelove with Truelove Fabrications, Sealake Nautical Charts, Pat O’Neil, Ray and Lou Bell, and Ron Binetti. The foundation also thanks Neal Parmley and Pete Gruodis, the museum’s aquarist, as the installers/builders.

Calabash Elks Lodge Treats Residents of Boys & Girls Home for National Youth Week

In honor of National Youth Week, nine young men from the Waccamaw Boys & Girls Home of North Carolina were treated to a day of fun courtesy of the Calabash Elks Lodge. Arriving in Calabash they were taken to Tropical Adventure Miniature Golf, where they had fun playing 18 challenging holes. Following an hour at Tropical Adventure they took a short trip down the road to the Back Porch Ice Cream Shoppe, where they got to choose the ice cream treat of their choice. Boys and Girls Homes of North Carolina, Inc. is dedicated to providing a comprehensive array of

residential and community-based services to meet the needs of vulnerable children by addressing their physical, emotional, social, educational and spiritual development. Photography: Contributed

Lecture Series Launched at the Museum of Coastal Carolina On May 31 Howard “Rusty” Petrea launched the Museum of Coastal Carolina’s 2016 Sand Bar Lecture Series with a program titled U.S. Navy: Carrier Aviation, Seal Team 6. The Sand Bar Lecture Series is sponsored by OIB Surf & Java. Rusty Petrea (CAPT USN Retired) spent 27 years in the U.S. Navy. He commanded an F/A-18 Squadron and a Carrier Air Wing. He was honored and fortunate to be operationally involved with members of Seal Team 6. Rusty and his wife, Carol, are residents of Ocean Isle Beach and founded The First Tee of Brunswick County as well as the Carolinas Leadership Academy. They are also owners of Petrea Imports, Inc., an importer of fine Italian wines. Petrea Imports supplied the wine that was served at the April 30 Wine Fest fundraiser that was held at the museum. Photography: Contributed

Shallotte Middle School Students Honored at Good Neighbor Breakfast Shallotte Middle School students were recognized during the Good Neighbor Breakfast hosted by Communities In Schools of Brunswick County in partnership with Brunswick County Schools and Shallotte Middle School. Students were selected by their teachers for representing good citizenship and being model students. Brunswick County Schools Superintendent Les Tubb and Jessica B. Swencki, director of quality assurance & community engagement for Brunswick County Schools, spoke to the students and their families about the importance of good citizenship and acknowledged the students’ accomplishments. Each student was then presented with an award from teachers. The event was sponsored by Walmart, Hardees and BoJangles. Students receiving the Good Neighbor Award were Ashley Esquivel, Hope Bass, Ryan Wagner, Ryan Connick, Marcus Richmond, Montana Murray, Jose Cabrerra, Vanessa Garcia, AJ Babson, Kyleigh Abernathy, Nick Barber, Lauren Grooms and John Holman. Photography: Contributed

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South Brunswick Islands Rotary Club Wins District Lighthouse Award South Brunswick Islands Rotary Club received the coveted District 7730 Lighthouse Award for 2015-16. District Governor Dave Baggett presented the award to club president Tom Adams at the annual district conference in Wilmington. Lighthouse Awards are intended to highlight clubs that have become beacons to other clubs because of their organization and involvement in all aspects of Rotary club life. Like the Presidential Citation, it is based on a point valuation process. However, unlike the Presidential Citation, the District Light House Award recognizes three clubs based on the number of club members: one for club membership up to 35; one for membership between 36 and 79; and one for membership more than 79. The membership level is based on the official club roster as of July 1, 2015. The SBI club has 74 members. To be considered, clubs need to accumulate 1,000 or more points, with a minimum of 100 points in each of the following five categories: Club Service, Vocational Service, Community Service, International Service and New Generations Service. Both the Rotary International Presidential Citation and the District 7730 Light House Award are club recognitions oriented to activities that occur throughout the Rotary year. These are highlighted in District Newsletters early in the year so that members are aware of what is expected and so that club leadership can track progress as it occurs rather than trying to recall at the end of the year what the club did.

State University, and Kyle Wagner attended the Roy Williams Carolina Basketball Camp at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Imani is the daughter of Shannon Smith. Kyle is the son of Fritz and Cheryl Wagner. Both students are rising 7th graders at Shallotte Middle School. “Brunswick Electric is pleased to give these outstanding students the opportunity to experience life on a college campus and learn from college coaches and student-athletes,” said Don Hughes, CEO/Manager at Brunswick Electric. “These camps teach valuable lessons that students can apply in their lives both on and off the court.” Imani and Kyle were selected by a panel of judges based on an application that included academic achievements, extracurricular activities an essay and a short-answer question. North Carolina’s 26 Touchstone Energy cooperatives provide funding for more than 50 middle-school students from across North Carolina to attend basketball camp. This is the 13th year the cooperatives have awarded young women scholarships to attend an N.C. State women’s basketball camp and the 11th year the co-ops have sent young men to the Roy Williams camp. Photography: Contributed

Academy of Costal Carolina Names Athletic Director, Begins Archery Program for Students

Photography: Contributed

BEMC Awards Sports Camp Scholarships to Local Students Academy of Coastal Carolina recently named Caroline McWhite as athletic director. McWhite is a graduate of West Brunswick High School and Wake Forest University and also teaches middle and high school science and math at the academy. The academy has recently added a number of athletic programs to its offerings, including men’s and women’s basketball, golf, archery and cross country.

Two local students earned Touchstone Energy Sports Camp Scholarships from Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation (BEMC) to attend summer basketball camps at two of the state’s largest college campuses. On full scholarships from BEMC, Imani Vaught attended the Wolfpack Women’s Basketball Camp at N.C. 100

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The newest athletic offering, led by Jan Tonkin and Ginger Clayton Taylor, is a club archery program for students in second grade through high school. The private school received sponsorships from community members who formed a booster club to support the program, which began in March 2016. Sponsors include Coastal Integrative Health, Atlantic Coast Electrical Service, ProFinder Charts, Jack’s Farm & Garden Center, Ocean Aire Travel Park, Carland & Hilda Allen, Atlantic Internal Medicine, Bill’s Seafood of Sunset Beach, John & Betty Ward, J. Huffman, Shallotte Insurance, and Lori & Ed Fargo. Archers from the Academy of Coastal Carolina will compete next year against NCCSA conference schools. Photography: Contributed


What’s happened

Caroline O’Brien Brings Canine for Service Abigail to American Legion Post 543 On April 27 at the regularly scheduled meeting of the Richard H. Stewart Jr. American Legion Post 543, Caroline O’Brien was the guest speaker, accompanied by her service dog-in-training Abigail. O’Brien spoke about the various services Canines for Service provides and, more to the Legion’s interest, Canines for Veterans. Quality-trained service dogs are provided for veterans with disabilities from all branches of the military. This training program is approved by the U.S. Dept. of Labor as an apprenticeship program in service-dog training. Commander Rick Sessa presented O’Brien with a contribution to continue Canines for Service’s fine and important work. Photography: Contributed

Isle Chapter of the American Wine Society (AWS) and Silver Coast Winery held its third annual wine competition for amateur winemakers. Sixty-eight wines from 13 different states were submitted to this year’s competition. Many winemakers submitted more than one type of wine. “The quality of the wine was extremely high,” said competition organizer and regional AWS Vice President Stanley Barwikowski. “We had some very unique wines. We had an olive wine and a wine made from golden cherry tomatoes. Of the sixty-eight wines that were submitted, 59 received either a Gold, Silver or Bronze medal.” The wines were judged on April 11 at Silver Coast Winery in Ocean Isle Beach. The four judges – all AWS Certified – were Jane Duralia, past president of AWS; Rege Duralia; Dana Keeler, winemaker at Silver Coast Winery; and Dave Caruso, chair of the Southport chapter of AWS. Gold, silver, and bronze medals were awarded to winning wines. In addition, each person who submitted wine received a certificate of participation and written feedback from the judging panel.

Shallotte Rotary Club Presents Check to Brunswick County Literacy Council

American Legion, Post 543 Attends JROTC, South Brunswick High School Award Ceremony

American Legion Department of North Carolina Post 543 fosters a relationship with South Brunswick Middle and High Schools to assist in promoting good citizenship. Legionnaires of the post have been active in presenting classes in history, the Constitution, leadership and other character-building topics. Throughout the year, post legionnaires have also assisted in teaching marksmanship to the cadets of the South Brunswick High School Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC),”Cougar” battalion. Rick Sessa, the commander of Post 543, and his adjutant, Gary Crowden, presented awards to recognize the efforts of these young cadets in various areas. There were also a number of additional awards presented to the cadets by other veteran and civic organizations. These awards were presented on April 14 at the JROTC Annual Awards Ceremony at South Brunswick High School. Photography: Contributed

Amateur Wine Contest Winners Announced As part of its annual Wine Fest fundraiser on April 30, the Ocean Isle Museum Foundation in conjunction with the Ocean

At a recent meeting Shallotte Rotary presented a $1,000 check to Dot Hoer, executive director of Brunswick County Literacy Council. Hoer elated that some of the programs that the Literacy Council runs include a basic skills program, GED preparation and an ESL class that is held at St. Brendan’s Catholic Church. Hoer also acknowledged the volunteers as all programs are staffed by volunteers from the community. Photography: Contributed

BCC Foundation Board of Directors Votes in New Executive Officers On June 14 the Brunswick Community College Foundation (BCCF) held its annual board retreat to reviews its progress toward annual goals and elect new executive officers. New officers are Mike Forte, president; Teresa McLamb, vice president; Libby Featherston, Summer 2016

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secretary; and Marc Kaplan, treasurer, all of whom will hold office until 2018. Outgoing president Carolyn Felton was honored for her service with a donation in her name to the BCC Board of Directors Endowment. New president Mike Forte has been a member of the board of directors since 2011 and is currently running for Brunswick County Commissioner. He has served as vice president to Carolyn Felton and chair of the events committee, coordinating events like the recent Community Luncheon with Southport local Howie Franklin. A seventh-generation Brunswick County native, Teresa A. McLamb has been an award-winning journalist and PR consultant for more than four decades. She is an owner-developer of Meadowlands Golf Club and Farmstead Golf Links at Hickman Crossroads and a licensed N.C. real estate broker. She served on the board of Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce for eight years including its presidency, the board of the Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce and several committees for the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce. Additionally, she is a founding member of the Brunswick County Tourism Authority. She holds a BA from UNC Charlotte and an MA from UNC Wilmington. As vice president, she plans to concentrate on longterm growth of the foundation’s resources and assets, as well as broadening its exposure to the citizens in the region. In addition to the meeting, the board had the opportunity to watch a live simulation in the Nursing Simulation Lab that was recently remodeled with the help of Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center Foundation and Brunswick County in 2015. The newly renovated labs consist of two separate areas used for training; the first lab is a five-bed hospital unit, and the second lab is a threebed simulation lab. All of the beds are actual hospital beds and are occupied with state-of-the-art training mannequins.

Ellen Good with the Seaside Teaching and Reaching Students (STARs) program. STARs is a summer reading enrichment program that accepts around 24 at-risk students going into 2nd or 3rd grade at Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary school. Good shared stories of the progress that some of the students from last year had made. She also explained the structure of the six-week program. In the morning the students receive literacy instruction and in the afternoon they participate in an enrichment program. On Monday afternoons the students swim at the Dinah Gore fitness center, and STARs hosts dinner for the students and their families Monday evening. Wednesday afternoon enrichment is a field trip, and Friday afternoons the students travel to Hickmans Crossroads Library. The afternoon programs are staffed by community volunteers. Photography: Contributed

Knights Scholarships Presented to High School Seniors

During lunch, the board enjoyed a speech from BCC graduate Krista Humphreys, who told her story of returning to college and how BCC helped her after struggling to find a job with her bachelor’s degree. Krista spoke to them about her gratitude toward the foundation for providing her with the funds to complete her associate’s degree in nursing without struggling financially.

Knights of Columbus, Sacred Heart Council #12537 of Southport, awarded $8,000 in academic scholarships to graduating seniors during the South Brunswick High School Senior Awards Night. The recipients were honored for their total academic achievement, community involvement and participation in school activities at South Brunswick High School. This is the Knight’s eighth year in awarding scholarships at South Brunswick totaling $85,000. Knights of Columbus Youth Director Rob Kirwan presented the scholarships at the ceremony.

Photography: Contributed

Photography: Contributed

Shallotte Rotary Club Presents Check to STARS Program

At a recent meeting Nancy Boston and Jimmy Green of the Shallotte Rotary Club presented a $5,000 check to Mary 102

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Cannon Foundation Awards Grant to Ocean Isle Museum Foundation, Inc. The Cannon Foundation has awarded a $25,000 grant to the Ocean Isle Museum Foundation, Inc. (OIMF), operators of the Museum of Coastal Carolina in Ocean Isle Beach and Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach. Terry Bryant, executive director of the OIMF, says that the grant will be used to replace failing HVAC units at Ingram Planetarium and is of tremendous need. “We can’t thank the Cannon Foundation enough for their generous donation.” Photography: Contributed


What’s happened

American Legion Post #543 Holds Military Appreciation Day Golf Tournament

On July 9 the Richard H. Stewart Jr. American Legion Post #543 held its annual Military Appreciation Day Golf Tournament. Almost 200 golfers participated in the event. Post #543 Commander Gary Crowden introduced a special guest, the North Carolina Department (State) Commander David Shore, and the two spent most of the day greeting and thanking the golfers. The tournament is the major fundraiser for Post #543. All proceeds will go to helping veterans and other worthy legion projects for the 2016/2017 fiscal year. In the words of Commander Crowden, “Today, six months of preparation came to an end. At the helm of the Military Appreciation Day was legionnaire Mike Fegan and right beside him was his wife, Sue. Legionnaires and their wives rallied together to make this the most successful event we have ever had. Words cannot express the pride I have in the members of the post and their wives who supported our efforts to make this a memorable and profitable venture. Special thanks go out to our wives for their support.”

Outreach Committee. Juneteenth commemorates the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, which abolished slavery in the United States. The Emancipation Proclamation was signed into law by the first Republican President Abraham Lincoln to be become effective January 1, 1863. Many remained in slavery until the final reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, which took place on June 19, 1865. On June 19, Union soldiers landed in Galveston, Texas, with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were indeed free. To commemorate that great day, many African Americans throughout the United States observe “Juneteenth” as a de facto national black holiday. The keynote speaker was Valerie White Johnson, administrator for Board and Commission of the office of Governor Pat McCrory. The GOP awarded a $1,000 scholarship to Samantha Tanck. The scholarship process required an essay on “Free enterprise versus socialism.” Jonaysha Douglas was recognized for the best essay. The 2015 scholarship winners attended and informed the crowd of their success after completing their first year in college. “Republicans, democrats, blacks and whites shared a meal, sang songs of praise and together celebrated one of the most historical events to ever take place in the lives of African Americans,” said Judge Hankins. Photography: Contributed

4-H Youth Volunteers Teach Enviro-Tour at the NC Cooperative Extension

Photography: Contributed

Brunswick County Republicans Host Juneteenth Scholarship Banquet

The Brunswick County Republican Party hosted a Juneteenth Scholarship Banquet on June 16. The event was organized by District Court Judge Pauline Hankins, chair of the Diversity

Wearing bright green shirts, 19 Communities in Schools summer day campers from Southport and Belville arrived with their instructors and Parks and Recreation Field Trip Coordinator Shannon Bates at the beautiful Brunswick County Cooperative Extension Botanical Garden’s in Bolivia. Youth were greeted and welcomed by 4-H Teens in Leadership Training (TiLT) youth volunteers and Angie Lawrence, 4-H TiLT coordinator. Campers brought their lunch and ate in the colorful Botanical Gardens, which is maintained by the Brunswick County Extension Master Gardeners and staff as a study garden for native plants and edible landscaping. After lunch, youth were ready for the Enviro-Tour field trip. Youth visited various stations to learn how each of us impacts our coastal environment and how we can help Summer 2016

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protect our coast, estuaries and watersheds. Stations were taught by TiLT youth volunteers, who studied and prepared hands-on lessons that were fun yet educational. The first hour, half of the youth were taught by Lena Devlin and Mackenzie Snyder, who read an interactive book about wetlands. Then Lena and Mackenzie taught the hands-on Enviro-scape model, which helps youth, through the use of all of their senses, to visualize non-point and point source pollution and learn how they can help protect wetlands and estuaries. After learning about wetlands, pollution and estuaries, youth were treated to a LIVE! Blue Crab presentation by Jillian Bowling, an award winning 4-H presenter who is very passionate about teaching youth to protect the environment they live in. Youth were able to make the connections between what they learned with the Enviroscape, to a native species to Eastern N.C. estuaries. Youth also learned that there are several native grasses and plants that help prevent erosion and learned about soils and participated in a hands-on science experiment on beach erosion, taught by TiLT youth volunteer Zoe Rowland. Once the group learned about native plants and soils, they were led through the Botanical Gardens by TiLT youth volunteers Amelia Apple and Bobbi Jane Lawrence, while they enjoyed a scavenger hunt. All lessons were interconnected and the campers had smiles on their faces as they enjoyed all of the activities. Photography: Contributed

South Brunswick Island’s Rotary Club Present Scholarships

President Tom Adams of the South Brunswick Island’s Rotary Club presented seven $1,000 scholarships to West Brunswick High School seniors during the West Brunswick High School Senior Awards program on May 26. David Venegas won the David Lancaster Band scholarship, and David Kamar won the West’s Interact Club scholarship. The other scholarship winners were Randaisa Daniels, Hayden Huffman, John McNeil, Divina Mercado and Savannah Midgley. Photography: Contributed

4-H Teens in Leadership Training Prepare for Teaching

South Brunswick Island’s Rotary Club Learns about Fraud

Edward Carter, Jr., deputy sheriff and detective in charge of fraud and fire investigations with the Brunswick County Sheriff ’s Office, spoke to the South Brunswick Island’s Rotary Club on June 3. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Mount Olive and is a certified Fire Arson Investigator, an EMT-Paramedic and completed the Advanced Professional Law Enforcement Certification. He has more than 18 years of experience with the Sheriff ’s Office. Specializing in fraud, Carter investigates consumer scams and identity theft. He gave the Rotarian’s ideas on how to protect themselves and their families from these types of crimes. Photography: Contributed

Brunswick County 4-H Teens in Leadership Training (TiLT) youth volunteers have been working hours during their free time to plan, prepare and execute learning experiences for Brunswick County youth for six years. This year youth volunteers focused on preparing educational programs for Communities in Schools/Parks and Recreation field trips to the Cooperative Extension for youth ages 5 to 12; in addition they will use the lessons planned to teach during the school year at after-school, weekend or library programs. This year at the annual TiLT planning and training retreat in May at Fort Caswell, Craven County Extension Agent Wendy Paschal and two of her 4-H youth Sarah Willis and Katherine Paul joined in. While most of the Brunswick County TiLT youth volunteers were broken into small groups to plan for Health ROCKS!, Enviro-Tour and Vermicomposting with Junior Master Gardeners, the Craven County youth worked with TiLT youth volunteer veteran Alexis Apple to learn the TiLT created NC 4-H curriculum, Be A Bone Builder. At the end of the retreat there was a contest for best overall presentation of workshop plan. 4-H Adult Volunteers Gus Grosch and Jane Kulesza joined the youth Summer 2016

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on Sunday to judge the Workshop Planning Contest. The Health ROCKS! team of Amelia Apple, Reilly Dumproff and Sadie Huntly took home the prize with their planning of games to help youth recognize stress and their planning of a yoga lesson to help youth to destress. Brunswick County 4-H’s 2016 TiLT youth volunteers range in age from 13 to 18, attend different schools in Brunswick County and have one thing in common – they love to learn and teach! The 2016 class of 4-H TiLT youth volunteers includes Alexis, Autumn, and Amelia Apple, Jillian Bowling, Lena Devlin, Reagan and Reilly Dumproff, Sadie Huntley, Bobbi Jane Lawrence, Zoe Rowland, Mackenzie Snyder, and Emily and Katlyn Toney. January through June, youth meet one Tuesday a month to learn how to teach youth and to learn and develop the material they will be teaching for summer, in-school, and after-school. Youth teams were coached and mentored by volunteers and N.C. Cooperative Extension staff, including new 4-H Agent Micah Gore; Mark Blevins, County Extension director; Michelle Cousineau, horticulture assistant; Chasady Quinn, UNCW intern; and Craven County 4-H Agent Wendy Paschal. Photography: Contributed

ELKS Flip Burgers for Vets Volunteer members of the Veterans Affairs Committee (VAC) executed their traditional Memorial Day Cook-Out and Picnic for the residents and staff of the North Carolina State Veterans’ Retirement Home in Fayetteville on Friday, May 13. The annual event is designed to recognize and honor senior veterans, many disabled or confined to nursing homes such as the one in Fayetteville, and thank them for their military service by providing them with a respite from their daily routine, a little attention, and just some plain old camaraderie. The VAC crew purchased, transported and cooked burgers, hot dogs, salads, sodas for the picnic lunch and served it to more than 120 residents and staff.

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Oak Island Light House Run a Great Success More than 1,100 registered runners gathered at the Middleton Park Extension for the 18th annual Oak Island Lighthouse Run. The run featured a half-marathon, a 10K and a 5K, along with an untimed 1-mile fun run. Each race featured brand-new courses starting from the Middleton Park Extension on Oak Island. With a certified half-marathon course along the North Carolina coast, it is no surprise that this is the largest attended of the four events, with 442 runners tracking along the 13.1 miles. Top Male Overall was Steven Anderson from Jamestown, who impressively completed the course in just over one hour and twelve minutes (1:12:25.7). It was not too far behind that the Top Female Overall, Meaghan Walsh of Wilmington, crossed the finish line in one hour and thirty-three minutes (1:33:39.3). While the halfmarathon boasted the highest number of registrants, both the 5K and 10K had equally impressive numbers with 361 and 255 registrants respectively. Other top male/female overall finishers included Jack Palagrutto & Karen Killeen (5K) and Brett Thomas & Kimberly Mueller (10K). The Oak Island Lighthouse Run is an event of the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce with timing provided by Go-Time of Wilmington, NC.

Old Bridge Preservation Society Organizes Project PBJ The Old Bridge Preservation Society sponsored a peanut butter and jelly drive to Spread the Love! Recognizing that there are children right here in Brunswick County who need help with getting regular meals, the club organized the community in making donations of peanut butter and jelly. This yummy and nutritious food went to qualified families through food pantries at Brunswick Family Assistance and Seaside United Methodist Church.


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Deadline for nominations is September 9, 2016.

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www.BrunswickCountyChamber.org A partnership between the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce and South Brunswick Magazine.

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*Bring in this ad to receive one waived Application & Administrative Fee & $300.00 off first full month’s rent (or current move-in special –whichever is greater). Only applies to a 12 month lease.

Schedule a tour! 866-393-8171 HPITidesAtCalabash.com. 108

South Brunswick Magazine


What’s happened

Future Generations Golf Tournament

On June 4 The First Tee of Brunswick County (TFTBC) held its sixth annual Future Generations Golf Tournament at Sea Trail Golf Resort. Nearly 300 golfers participated and after the round everyone gathered in the convention center for a barbecue dinner, live and silent auctions, and a 50/50 drawing. Be sure to save the date for next year’s Future Generations Golf Tournament, which will be held on Saturday, June 3, 2017, at Sea Trail Golf Resort. The First Tee supports young golfers like Jayla Rogers and Spencer Faircloth. Rogers recently spent a week at the International Junior Golf Academy in Hilton Head, S.C., where she received intense golf training for six days, and the Par 3 Championship in Richmond, Va. Faircloth just had the opportunity of a lifetime being one of 16 participants selected for the Digital Sense Pro Am at Congressional Country Club. He was paired with PGA Pro Joey McLister for an exciting 18 holes at the prestigious Congressional Country Club. He also got to spend time sightseeing around Washington D.C. and closed out his week with some golf practice at Top Golf. He will also attend The First Tee Life Skills & Leadership Academy for six days in Blaine, Minn. The alumni of TFTBC have also been busy. Ashley Sloup, who is a rising junior at Winthrop University, recently won the N.C. Women’s Amateur. Cameryn Smith, who is a rising sophomore at Queens University of Charlotte, had quite the freshman year. She and her team took home the South Atlantic Conference Title. Cameryn was once a participant at The First Tee Life Skills & Leadership Academy as well and will now be a chaperone. She has come back to the TFTBC and is the leading female intern at the Carolinas Leadership Academy, which is a unique opportunity for youth ages 14 to 18 to spend three nights getting golf and leadership training. The kids play Par 3 Scrambles, go to the beach, play games and much more, and the cost is only $100. On June 11 the TFTBC held its first ever Birdie Challenge at the Oak Island Par 3 at South Harbour. This was a 9-hole

competition between the Spring Birdie classes. The fourperson teams competed over 9 hole stroke play. The winning team was the Thursday Birdie class of lead coach Ed Gurski. To learn more about The First Tee of Brunswick County, see thefirstteebrunswickcounty.org. Photography: Contributed

Summer 2016

109


What’s happened

OrthoWilmington Breaks Ground in Shallotte A crowd gathered to celebrate the groundbreaking of the new OrthoWilmington medical facility in Shallotte on May 20. Everyone enjoyed sharing the news with the Brunswick area leadership and businesses, and the physicians had fun modeling their hard hats and wielding their new shovels. Town of Shallotte Mayor Walter Eccard and Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce President Shannon Viera were 110

South Brunswick Magazine

in attendance, along with representatives from ADAMS Southeastern Construction, the company responsible for creating the new facility. Purple Onion Catering Co., The Filling Station and OIB Surf and Java provided the refreshments. For information see orthowilmington.com. Photography: Contributed


Restoration & Remediation Relocation Services Insurance Companies Commercial Storage Real Estate

1-800-722-5728 | www.1800packrat.com

Last Chance for

WHITE PANTS GALA

Tickets $100 for each trip. **Prizes include required federal income tax withholdings!

ITALY OR PORTUGAL RAFFLE www.HospiceWhitePants.org

SAVE THE DATE! 8.27.2016

Audi Cape Fear’s Showroom

For more information on tickets to the event, raffle tickets, or sponsorships, please call 910.796.8099 ext. 6.

9 Day Italy Trip for Two • Round-trip airfare from • Half-day guided tour Wilmington to Rome/ of Rome Florence Entrance fees included: Vatican museums, Sistine • 7 nights at a 4-star hotel Chapel & St. Peter’s Basilica - 4 nights in Rome • One-way train tickets - 3 nights in Florence - Residency taxes included from Rome to Florence • Half-day guided tour of • Breakfast daily Florence • Round-trip transfer from Entrance fees included: airport to hotel in Italy Duomo, Baptistery & • 1 gourmet cooking class Giotto’s Bell Tower Only 500 tickets will be sold!

9 Day Portugal Trip for Two • Round-trip airfare from Wilmington to Lisbon/Faro • 7 nights at a 4-star hotel - 3 nights in Lisbon - 4 nights in Faro - Residency taxes included • Breakfast daily • Round-trip transfer from airport to hotel in Portugal • 1 wine-tasting at a local vineyard

• Half-day guided tour of Lisbon Entrance fee included: - Old Lisbon Castle of St. Jorge - Jerónimos Monastery • Half-day guided excursion to Evora - Bone Chapel entrance fee included • One-way train tickets from Lisbon to Faro

Only 500 tickets will be sold! Summer 2016

111


Shallotte inlet tide chart

D a t e

August September October High Tide

AM

Low Tide

PM

Time Height Time (EST) (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

D a t e

High Tide

AM

Low Tide

PM

Time Height Time (EST) (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

D a t e

High Tide

AM

Low Tide

PM

Time Height Time (EST) (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

1

7:33 am

4.8

7:56 pm

5.7

1:56 am

-0.1 1:50 pm -0.5

1

8:53 am

5.2

9:05 pm

5.5

3:05 am

0.2

3:10 pm

0.1

1

9:07 am

5.4

9:14 pm

5.2

3:10 am

0.4

3:28 pm

0.4

2

8:25 am

4.9

8:44 pm

5.7

2:45 am

-0.2 2:41 pm

2

9:35 am

5.2

9:43 pm

5.3

3:44 am

0.2

3:52 pm

0.2

2

9:44 am

5.3

9:50 pm

5

3:45 am

0.5

4:07 pm

0.5

3

9:14 am

4.9

9:29 pm

5.6

3:31 am

-0.2 3:30 pm -0.3

3

10:15 am

5.1

10:21 pm

5.1

4:20 am

0.3

4:33 pm

0.4

3

10:20 am

5.2

10:26 pm

4.8

4:20 am

0.6

4:45 pm

0.7

4

10:01 am

4.9

10:12 pm

5.4

4:14 am

-0.1

4:16 pm

4

10:56 am

5

11:00 pm

4.8

4:56 am

0.4

5:13 pm

0.6

4

10:58 am

5.1

11:04 pm

4.5

4:55 am

0.7

5:25 pm

0.8

5

10:47 am

4.8

10:55 pm

5.1

4:55 am

0

5:00 pm

0.1

5

11:38 am

4.8

11:41 pm

4.6

5:32 am

0.6

5:54 pm

0.8

5

11:39 am

5

11:45 pm

4.3

5:31 am

0.9

6:05 pm

1

6

11:34 am

4.7

11:38 pm

4.8

5:33 am

0.1

5:43 pm

0.4

6

12:26 am

4.3

12:23 pm

4.7

6:08 am

0.8

6:36 pm

1

6

12:32 am

4.2

12:25 pm

4.8

6:09 am

1

6:48 pm

1.2

-0.4

-0.2

7

12:23 am

4.5

12:21 pm

4.6

6:11 am

0.3

6:27 pm

0.6

7

---

---

1:10 pm

4.6

6:47 am

0.9

7:21 pm

1.2

7

---

---

1:15 pm

4.7

6:51 am

1.2

7:34 pm

1.4

8

---

---

1:10 pm

4.5

6:50 am

0.5

7:11 pm

0.9

8

1:14 am

4.1

1:59 pm

4.6

7:29 am

1.1

8:11 pm

1.4

8

1:24 am

4.1

2:07 pm

4.7

7:38 am

1.3

8:27 pm

1.4

9

1:10 am

4.3

1:58 pm

4.4

7:30 am

0.7

7:59 pm

1.1

9

2:03 am

4

2:49 pm

4.6

8:17 am

1.2

9:07 pm

1.5

9

2:18 am

4.1

2:59 pm

4.8

8:33 am

1.3

9:25 pm

1.4

10

1:57 am

4.1

2:45 pm

4.4

8:14 am

0.8

8:53 pm

1.2

10

2:54 am

4

3:39 pm

4.7

9:14 am

1.2 10:07 pm 1.4

10

3:13 am

4.2

3:52 pm

5

9:37 am

1.3 10:25 pm 1.1

9:52 pm

11

2:45 am

4

3:32 pm

4.5

9:04 am

0.9

1.3

11

3:46 am

4.1

4:30 pm

4.9

10:15 am

1.1 11:06 pm 1.2

11

4:08 am

4.5

4:45 pm

5.2

10:42 am

1

12

3:33 am

3.9

4:20 pm

4.6

9:59 am

0.9 10:51 pm 1.2

12

4:39 am

4.3

5:21 pm

5.1

11:15 am

0.9 11:58 pm 0.9

12

5:03 am

4.8

5:38 pm

5.4

11:43 am

0.7

13

4:23 am

3.9

5:09 pm

4.8

10:55 am

0.8 11:46 pm

1

13

5:34 am

4.5

6:12 pm

5.4

12:47 am

0.5 12:10 pm 0.6

13

5:59 am

5.2

6:31 pm

5.6

---

---

12:38 pm 0.3

0

1:31 pm

---

---

14

5:15 am

4

5:58 pm

5

11:49 am

0.6

---

14

6:27 am

4.9

7:01 pm

5.7

---

---

1:02 pm

0.3

14

6:52 am

5.7

7:22 pm

5.9

1:02 am

15

6:07 am

4.2

6:47 pm

5.2

---

---

12:40 pm 0.4

15

7:18 am

5.3

7:49 pm

5.9

1:34 am

0.1

1:52 pm

0

15

7:43 am

6.1

8:12 pm

6

1:50 am

16

6:57 am

4.4

7:33 pm

5.5

1:22 am

0.5

1:28 pm

0.2

16

8:06 am

5.6

8:36 pm

6

2:20 am

-0.2 2:42 pm

-0.2

16

8:33 am

6.4

9:02 pm

6

2:38 am

-0.6

17

7:45 am

4.7

8:17 pm

5.7

2:07 am

0.2

2:16 pm

0

17

8:54 am

5.9

9:23 pm

6

3:06 am

-0.4 3:33 pm -0.3

17

9:23 am

6.5

9:53 pm

5.8

3:27 am

-0.8 4:08 pm -0.4

18

8:31 am

5

9:01 pm

5.8

2:51 am

-0.1

3:03 pm

-0.2

18

9:43 am

6.1

10:12 pm

5.9

3:53 am

-0.6 4:24 pm -0.3

18 10:15 am

6.5

10:47 pm

5.6

4:17 am

-0.7 5:02 pm -0.3

19

9:17 am

5.2

9:46 pm

5.8

3:36 am

-0.3

3:52 pm

-0.2

19 10:35 am

6.1

11:05 pm

5.6

4:41 am

-0.6

5:17 pm

-0.2

19 11:11 am

6.3

11:46 pm

5.3

5:09 am

-0.5 5:56 pm

20 10:04 am

5.4

10:33 pm

5.7

4:21 am

-0.5

4:41 pm

-0.2

20 11:30 am

6

---

---

5:30 am

-0.5 6:11 pm

0.1

20 12:49 am

5

12:11 pm

6

6:02 am

-0.3 6:54 pm

0.2

21 10:55 am

5.4

11:25 pm

5.5

5:06 am

-0.5 5:32 pm

-0.1

21

---

---

12:31 pm

5.9

6:22 am

-0.2 7:09 pm

0.4

21

---

1:15 pm

5.7

6:59 am

0.1

7:56 pm

0.5

22 11:51 am

5.5

---

---

5:53 am

-0.5 6:25 pm

0.1

22

1:06 am

5.1

1:34 pm

5.7

7:17 am

0

8:13 pm

0.6

22

1:54 am

4.8

2:19 pm

5.5

8:00 am

0.4

9:04 pm

0.8

23

---

12:50 pm

5.5

6:43 am

-0.3 7:23 pm

0.3

23

2:10 am

4.9

2:38 pm

5.6

8:18 am

0.3

9:24 pm

0.8

23

2:58 am

4.8

3:20 pm

5.3

9:08 am

0.7 10:13 pm 0.8

-0.2 8:27 pm

0.5

24

3:13 am

4.8

3:39 pm

5.5

9:26 am

0.5 10:36 pm 0.8

24

3:58 am

4.8

4:17 pm

5.1

10:17 am

0.8 11:13 pm 0.8

0.7

25

4:14 am

4.8

4:39 pm

5.4

10:35 am

0.6 11:38 pm 0.8

25

4:56 am

4.8

5:12 pm

5

11:21 am

0.8

26

5:14 am

4.8

5:37 pm

5.3

11:38 am

0.5

26

5:50 am

5

6:03 pm

5

12:47 am

0.6 12:15 pm 0.7

---

---

11:21 pm 0.8

24

1:21 am

5

1:52 pm

5.5

7:36 am

25

2:22 am

4.8

2:53 pm

5.5

8:35 am

26

3:23 am

4.7

3:54 pm

5.5

9:40 am

0.2 10:50 pm 0.7

0

9:38 pm

---

---

---

0

-0.4 2:23 pm -0.3 3:15 pm

---

-0.4

-0.1

---

27

4:25 am

4.7

4:55 pm

5.5

10:47 am

0.2 11:54 pm 0.6

27

6:10 am

5

6:30 pm

5.3

---

---

12:33 pm 0.5

27

6:39 am

5.1

6:49 pm

4.9

---

---

1:02 pm

0.6

28

5:26 am

4.7

5:54 pm

5.5

11:49 am

0.1

---

---

28

7:02 am

5.1

7:17 pm

5.3

1:16 am

0.5

1:22 pm

28

7:23 am

5.2

7:31 pm

4.9

1:26 am

0.5

1:44 pm

0.5

0.4

29

6:25 am

4.8

6:49 pm

5.5

---

---

12:46 pm

0

29

7:48 am

5.3

7:59 pm

5.3

1:57 am

0.4

2:06 pm

0.4

29

8:03 am

5.3

8:09 pm

4.9

2:02 am

0.4

2:24 pm

0.5

30

7:19 am

4.9

7:39 pm

5.6

1:39 am

0.3

1:37 pm

0

30

8:29 am

5.4

8:38 pm

5.3

2:35 am

0.4

2:48 pm

0.4

30

8:39 am

5.4

8:46 pm

4.8

2:37 am

0.4

3:03 pm

0.5

31

8:08 am

5.1

8:24 pm

5.5

2:24 am

0.2

2:25 pm

0

31

9:14 am

5.4

9:21 pm

4.7

3:12 am

0.4

3:41 pm

0.5

*Tide charts are accurate to the best of our knowledge. If you are checking tides for navigational purposes, please verify these times with another source.

112

South Brunswick Magazine


Advertisers Index

Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Advertiser

Phone# Page#

1 800-Pack-Rat............................................................... 800-722-5728 111

In Touch CranioSacral................................................. 910-278-5877 90

Allstate – R&R Insurance Services, Inc............910-754-6596 59

Island Breeze................................................................... 910-579-4125 71

Angelo’s Pizzeria and Bistro...................................910-754-2334 111

Island Classic Interiors............................................... 910-579-8477 75

Arbor Landing at Ocean Isle..................................910-754-8080 15

Islands Art and Books................................................ 910-579-7757 79

Art Catering & Events................................................ 910-755-6642 14

J&K Home Furnishings............................................. 843-249-1882

Assurance Financial.................................................... 910-509-7231 91

Josh London, State Farm Agent..........................910-383-1303 23

Austin Oral Surgery.................................................... 910-769-1605 50

Kimberly Jo’s Boutique............................................. 910-579-7670 34

Bill Clark Homes............................................................. 910-575-2933

31

Kristin Dowdy, State Farm Agent........................910-754-9923 23

Blue Heron Gallery....................................................... 910-575-5088 108

Leland Tourism Development Authority.......866-529-0967 92

BlueWave Dentistry.................................................... 910-383-2615 67

Logan Homes.................................................................. 800-761-4707 88

Body Edge Fitness Solutions.................................910-575-0975 95

Lower Cape Fear Hospice.......................................910-796-8099 111

Boundary House........................................................... 910-579-8888 9

Luxe Home Interiors................................................... 910-371-0464 37

Boutique Around the Corner.................................910-575-7605 92

Martha Lee Realty........................................................ 910-579-2402 104

Braddock Built Renovations...................................910-754-9635 50

McLeod Seacoast......................................................... 843-390-8320 21

Brick Landing Plantation...........................................910-754-2745 64

New Hanover Regional Medical Center..........910-667-8110 BC

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce.....910-754-6644

NHRMC Physicians Group New Hanover Medical Group................................910-332-0241 12

56, 107

Brunswick County Dept. of Social Services....910-253-2112 59 Brunswick County Habitat for Humanity.......910-454-0002 89 19

Brunswick Forest.......................................................... 866-765-9326

Brunswick Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.....910-269-2420 92 Callahan’s of Calabash................................................800-344-3816 28 5

Cambridge Crossings................................................ 910-446-1170

Campaign to Re-Elect Pauline Hankins for District Court Judge............................................................................................ 91

24, 25

Novant Health................................................................. 910-721-2273 IFC, 43 Ocean Isle Creamery.................................................. 910-579-5300 34 Ocean Isle Family Dentistry....................................910-579-6999 75 Ocean Isle Helicopter Tours...................................910-575-7575 88 OrthoWilmington......................................................... 910-332-3800 13 Permanent Makeup by Theresa..........................910-232-1001 50 Pope Real Estate............................................................ 910-619-7673 79

Carolinas Oral and Facial Surgery......................910-762-2618 98

Purple Onion Café........................................................ 910-755-6071 14

Clark’s Seafood and Chop House........................843-399-8888 25

RJB Tax Associates...................................................... 910-338-3001 49

Coastal Insurance......................................................... 910-754-4326

Sea Island Trading Co................................................. 843-273-0248 11

45

Coastal Integrative Health.......................................910-755-5400 3 8, 82, 83

Seaside United Methodist Church......................910-579-5753 49

Coastal Carolina Pediatric Dentistry.................910-794-2266 95

Shallotte Insurance Services, Inc........................910-754-8161

98

Columbus Regional Healthcare System.........910-640-4070 106

Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Bar-B-Q..........................910-604-2038

4, IBC

CommWell Health......................................................... 1-877-935-5255 95

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber...............800-457-6964 108

Crow Creek....................................................................... 910-409-8590 98

Studios at the Livery.................................................................................................104

Deeb & Fanning, DDS, P.A.......................................910-579-5260 79

Team Highland............................................................... 910-485-6738 91

Deep Point Marina........................................................ 910-269-2380 14

Tides at Calabash.......................................................... 866-393-8171 108

Douglas Diamond Jewelers...................................910-755-5546 3

Time 2 Remember Photography........................910-253-7428 86

EmergeOrtho.................................................................. 910-332-3800 13

Trusst Builder Group.................................................. 910-371-0304

48

27, 86

Twin Lakes Seafood.................................................... 910-579-6373 71

6&7

U.S. Cellular – EZ Wireless......................................910-383-0021 17

Foster Insurance........................................................... 910-755-5100 88

Winds Resort Beach Club........................................ 800-334-3581 86

Farm Bureau Insurance.............................................910-754-8175 Floor Coverings International................................910-755-5999

Genie Leigh Photography........................................910-470-0456 75

Summer 2016

113


Capture the moment

Photo Captured By Joseph Lenz

Have you captured the moment? If so, email your photos to capture@southbrunswickmagazine.com. If we choose your photo to be published on this page, you will win $25.

114

South Brunswick Magazine


Summer 2016

115


T O TA L K N E E R E P L AC E M E N T

Intense pain limited Sally’s ability to enjoy life to the fullest. She had both knees replaced, and got her spunk back in the bargain.

Five-Star Recipient 2004-2015

An avid shopper, traveler and gardener who loves to entertain, Sally could no longer do the activities that brought her joy. After two surgeries at NHRMC Orthopedic Hospital and follow-up physical therapy, Sally reports that she is “good to go.� And she has several trips planned to prove it.

Interested in learning more about joint replacement surgery? Visit nhrmc.org/orthopedics, or call 910.667.8110.

Orthopedic Hospital