South Brunswick Magazine - Spring 2018 Edition

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Spring 2018 | SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

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THE CHEF AND THE FROG

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A TOAST TO THE COAST

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THE BUTCHER OF BRUNSWICK




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TABLE OF CONTENTS

D FEATURES

FEATURES

SPRING 2018 D VOLUME 9, ISSUE 3

56 THE CHEF & THE FROG

A multicultural restaurant puts downtown Whiteville on the map as a dining destination. By Melissa Slaven Warren

63 THE BUTCHER OF BRUNSWICK

All-natural meats, fresh-baked bread and many other delicacies await customers in the bright yellow building in Ocean Isle Beach. By Barbara Sammons

68 THE JOY OF A FAMILY FARM

Holden Brothers Produce is a celebration of family and the good fortune of fertile soil. By Teresa McLamb

75 A TOAST TO THE COAST

Wendy Li and Frank West share their love of fine wine at Ocean Isle Beach’s first wine bar. By Ashley Daniels

90 LUCK OF THE IRISH

Fibber McGees brings the taste and atmosphere of a traditional Irish put to Sunset Beach. By Sheree K. Nielsen

94 THE ART OF THE SWING

Golf Club Maestro in Ocean Isle Beach as the game of golf down to a science. By Melissa Slaven Warren

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PHOTO BY MARK HEAD

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99 WHAT LIES BENEATH

Southport residents uncover the town’s rich historic African-American history as they restore the John N. Smith Cemetery. By Terry Reilly


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

D IN EVERY ISSUE D DEPARTMENTS

DEPARTMENTS 30 ONLINE EXCLUSIVES

What’s online at SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

104

CONTRIBUTED RENDERING

43 IN EVERY ISSUE 16 PUBLISHER’S NOTE by Justin Williams

18 CONTRIBUTORS

Meet the contributors to South Brunswick Magazine.

21 WHAT’S HAPPENING

Upcoming events you won’t want to miss.

36 BUSINESS BUZZ

Keeping up with the local business scene.

110 BUSINESS PROFILE

Fosters Insurance by Melissa Slaven Warren

43 SPIRITS

Whipped Limoncello by Sandi Grigg

44 WHAT’S COOKIN’ Vidalia Onion Pie by Sandi Grigg

47 UP NORTH

What you’ll find in the Spring 2018 edition of North Brunswick Magazine.

111 FACES & PLACES

Brunswick County Association of Realtors Annual Banquet & The Little Princess Ball

49 RESTAURANT GUIDE

All the best places to eat local in South Brunswick County.

116 WHAT’S HAPPENED

What’s been going on around town.

80 BUSINESS

120 SHALLOTTE INLET TIDE CHART

Pure Markets, managers of the Sunset Beach Summer Market and Ocean Isle Summer Market, focus on locally made goods by Jo Ann Mathews

Tracking the highs and the lows at Shallotte Inlet from March to May

121 ADVERTISERS INDEX

Our directory of advertisers

86 NONPROFIT

Angelo’s owner James Lane is known for his food and contributions to the Brunswick community. By Ashley Daniels

122 CAPTURE THE MOMENT

A contest for SBM readers

104 AROUND TOWN

Two of Brunswick County’s newest communities: Pine Forest Plantation and Mirasol by Denice Patterson

114 SNIPPETS

Happenings on the local scene.

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PHOTO BY LAURA GLANTZ

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Explore the possibilities With more than 100 majors and minors to choose from, you’re sure to find one that’s right for you.

uncw.edu/applynow UNCW is an EEO/AA institution. Questions regarding UNCW’s Title IX compliance should be directed to TitleIX@uncw.edu.

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South Brunswick Magazine – Spring 2018 Volume 9, Issue 3 OWNER/PUBLISHER: Justin Williams DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Sandi Grigg MANAGING EDITOR: Allison Barrett Carter COPY EDITOR: Molly Harrison CONTRIBUTING GRAPHICS: Andy Garno Paula Knorr Teresa Kramer

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES: Lee Ann Bolton George Jacob

BLUE HERON HERON BLUE

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Carolyn Bowers Mike Cline Amy Conry Laura Glantz Ken Haubrich Mark Head Wendy Hunt Sheree K. Nielsen Terry Reilly Barbara Sammons Maurice Spagatner James Stefiuk Time 2 Remember Christian Viera

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Allison Barrett Carter Carolyn Bowers Ashley Daniels Sandi Grigg Jo Ann Mathews Teresa McLamb Laura Moore Sheree K. Nielsen Denice Patterson Terry Reilly Barbara Sammons Melissa Slaven Warren PUBLISHED BY: CAROLINA MARKETING COMPANY, INC.

GALLERY GALLERY

PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 (910) 207-0156 info@southbrunswickmagazine.com Reproduction or use of the contents in this magazine is prohibited.

© 2018 Carolina Marketing Company, Inc.

Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. strives to bring correct, accurate information that is published in the magazine. However, Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. cannot be held responsible for any consequences resulting from errors or absences. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. also cannot be held responsible for the services provided by any and all advertisers in our publications. All material in this magazine is property of Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. and may not be reproduced without authorization from the publisher. South Brunswick Magazine – A Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. publication is published four times per year and is distributed to residents and businesses in South Brunswick County, NC, to subscribers and to select areas of New Hanover County, NC and Horry County, SC.

About the cover:

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Spring 2018 | SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

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THE CHEF AND THE FROG

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A TOAST TO THE COAST

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THE BUTCHER OF BRUNSWICK

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Reader/Advertising Services Subscriptions Want to subscribe to SBM? Subscriptions are $15.99 per year and include 4 issues of SBM. Subscribe safely online using PayPal, credit or debit card at www. SouthBrunswickMagazine.com/subscribe. Call our office at (910) 207-0156 or email us at subscribe@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com to request a subscription.

Back Issues When available, back issues of SBM can be purchased for $5. Call or email us for information.

Letters We welcome your letters and comments about SBM. Send your letters to PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 or email them to info@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com. When sending your letters, keep in mind they may or may not be published in a future issue of SBM. The publisher reserves the right to make the final decision.

Writing Opportunities We are always willing to consider freelance writers and article ideas. Please send suggestions or inquiries to South Brunswick Magazine, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451. Or email us at edit@ SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

It’s A Food Evolution SBM Publisher Justin Williams and his daughter, Ava.

PHOTOS BY MATT MCGRAW

S

ometimes on lazy Saturdays or if we get up super early on a school day, my daughter, Ava, and I go out for breakfast. She orders a warm chocolate chip muffin and I get bacon, egg and cheese on an English muffin. She then proceeds to steal the bacon directly from my sandwich — every time! The proof is in the photo above. Of course I wouldn’t have it any other way because I love our hometown breakfast tradition. Yes, in this issue we’re focused on food, from players on Brunswick County’s evolving restaurant scene to people who make their living growing food. You’ll meet the two longtime local

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brothers who own Holden Brothers Produce and learn about the legacy farm that they’ve given a new life. You’ll also meet people who moved to the area from other places and are contributing to the local food scene in tasty ways: the owners of Coastal Wine Room in Ocean Beach, Brunswick County Butcher and Deli in Ocean Isle Beach, Fibber McGee’s in Sunset Beach, Angelo’s Pizzeria in Shallotte and The Chef & the Frog in Whiteville. If those stories make you hungry, be sure to consult our South Brunswick Restaurant Guide. But it’s not all food in this issue. We’ve got a fascinating tale about what’s going on under ground at the historic John N. Smith Cemetery in Southport, a piece about two new developments underway in the county and a story about a man who understands the physics of a golf swing – and, better yet, can help anyone become a better golfer. Yes, in this issue we’re focused on food, from players on Brunswick County’s evolving restaurant scene to people who make their living growing food. I hope you work up a healthy appetite reading this issue of South Brunswick Magazine and are inspired to get out this spring and visit some of our local restaurants. Happy spring to you all!

Justin Williams Owner/Publisher Publisher@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com


It’sinyournature tochoosethebest. Come home to award-winning, amenity-rich living.

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CONTRIBUTORS

Laura Glantz

Contributing Photographer

My background includes time spent in the U.S. Air Force working on B-1 Bombers, followed with 10 years in the design and sign industries. I have won multiple American Advertising Federation Addy Awards in design, and my design experience includes logos, brochures, business cards, T-shirts, wedding invitations, event collateral, magazine layouts, posters, vehicle wraps and signage. Custom illustration is a favorite of mine in creating a unique client brand. As an avid photographer, I feel I can capture so many defining moments that get lost in our everyday hustle. Photography is definitely one of my most favorite aspects of art. Stopping time for a moment with a “click” is truly exciting and it allows for the magic of our world to be captured forever.

Sheree K. Nielsen

Contributing Writer

Sheree K. Nielsen is Author/Photographer of 2015 Da Vinci Eye Award Winner, and Eric Hoffer Book Finalist (Art), Folly Beach Dances — a ‘healing’ coffee table book of lyrical poetry and photography inspired by the sea and her lymphoma journey. Her stories, poetry, and photography can be found in Southern Writers Magazine, Carolina Go!, AAA Southern Traveler, AAA Midwest Traveler, Missouri Life, South and North Brunswick Magazines, anthologies, newspapers, and websites across the nation. A picture book about overcoming handicaps and building confidence, Midnight – The One-eyed Cat, is due fall 2018 (Amphorae Publishing). When not writing, she can be found discovering new beaches and coffeehouses, with her husband and two goofy canine kids. Visit Sheree’s inspirational blog at www.shereenielsen.wordpress.com, @ShereeKNielsen, @follybeachdance, and www.beachdances.com

Ashley Daniels Contributing Writer Based in Myrtle Beach, I am a full-time freelance writer, wife and mother of three sons. My folio boasts nearly 20 years of regionally and nationally published work, including profiles on such South Carolina celebs as Darius Rucker, Dustin Johnson, Vanna White, Nancy O’Dell, the late author Mickey Spillane and more. I’ve also taken home two Best of Show ADDY awards and numerous silver ADDYs for my copywriting work that ranges from travel/tourism and hospitality campaigns to food and apparel retail, telecommunications and more. I received my BA in English writing from the University of Pittsburgh and my MA in writing from Coastal Carolina University. When I’m not in front of my laptop, I’m by the water on the beach or on the water on the boat with my family.

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James W. McCriskin, DO, cardiologist, is welcoming new patients at NHRMC Physician Group – Cape Fear Heart Associates’ Southport location.

Call for an appointment 910.662.9500 3009 Medical Plaza Lane, Southport, NC 28461 nhrmcphysiciangroup.org 20

South Brunswick Magazine

McCriskin-Unified-ad-3.562x9.875-REV.indd 1

10/12/17 11:00 AM


WHAT’S HAPPENING

Cape Fear Beer & Wine Festival

March 10 Cape Fear Beer & Wine Festival will feature more than 50 American breweries and wineries with more than 125 beers and wines plus live music and a silent auction. It will take place from 12 to 5 pm at the Convention Center in downtown Wilmington. Tickets are $15 to $50. Information: beerarmy.org/capefear

Women in Business Workshop: Put Yourself First

March 13 Put Yourself First will be an informative workshop and roundtable discussion facilitated by Linda Stinson of RLS Focused Solutions and several members of the Women in Business committee. The workshop is designed to provide insight into six different areas in which women struggle to maintain a balance within their personal and professional lives. The evening will kick off with mingling and refreshments and move into the discussion and roundtable. This event is free to attend, but registration is required and the first 25 registrants will receive a gift. Information: brunswickcountychamber.org/ women-in-business-committee

Dynamic Earth

March 16 & 17 This show at Ingram Planetarium explores the inner workings of Earth’s climate system. With visualizations based on satellite monitoring data and advanced supercomputer simulations, this cutting-edge production follows a trail of energy that flows from the sun into the interlocking systems that shape our climate: the atmosphere, oceans and the biosphere. Audiences will ride along on swirling ocean and wind currents, dive into the heart of a monster hurricane, come face-to-face with sharks and gigantic whales, and fly into roiling volcanoes. Admission is free for members; non-member is $9.50 for adults, $8.50 for seniors (62+), $7.50 children (3-12), and free for age 2 and younger. Information: museumplantetarium.org

Badwater Cape Fear — Ultra Marathon Race

March 16 to 18 It’s been called “the world’s toughest footrace.” It is a 50 km or 51 mile ultra-running race featuring a 12-mile warm-up on the car-free, one-lane-wide roads of Bald Head Island, followed by 19 or 39 miles of running on the east beach of the island and the wild, secluded sandy beach between Cape Fear and Fort Fisher. Runners will come from all over North

America, South America, the Philippines and the United Kingdom for this experience. The race is held along the Atlantic Seaboard with spectacular views of the Frying Pan Shoals to the east and wild and undeveloped marshlands to the west. Information: badwater.com/event/badwater-cape-fear/

Oyster Roast & Shrimp Boil Jamboree

March 18 At the Yacht Basin Eatery’s fourth annual event, you can indulge in all-you-can-eat oysters, shrimp, french fries, hush puppies and cole slaw and receive one beer ticket with a $35 admission ticket. The live music lineup is Trifecta from 1:30 to 3 pm, Hot Flash from 3 to 4:30 pm, Southport Johnnie & the Bizness from 4:30 to 6 pm, The Blues Kings from 6 to 7:30 pm and The Groove Pirates from 7:30 to 9 pm. Information: (910) 368-4108

Beer, Bourbon, BBQ Festival

March 24 The festival is a great day of beer sippin’, bourbon tastin’, music listenin’ and barbecue eatin’. Admission is $39 to $69 and covers a sampling glass for tasting beers and bourbons. Barbecue vendors will be on site, and there will be seminars in the tasting theaters and live music all day. This event will take place downtown Wilmington at The Shell from 2 to 6 pm. VIP tickets are available. Information: beerandbourbon.com/wilmington/show-info

Easter Egg Hunt

March 24 Beginning at 10 am, children ages 6 to 12 are welcome to search the grounds of Franklin Square Park for more than a thousand plastic eggs filled with goodies. Immediately after this free event, an Easter egg hunt for children ages 5 and younger will be held at the Fort Johnston Garrison lawn. Information: (910) 457-7945

Cape Fear Craft & Cuisine

March 31 Cape Fear Craft Beer Alliance presents the second annual Cape Fear Craft & Cuisine in beautiful Airlie Gardens in Wilmington. The event features 25 local chefs pairing a meal with 25 breweries. Tickets are $75, and the event will begin at 6 pm. Information: capefearcraftandcuisine.com

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Brunswick’s best kept

Secret

Classic cottage-style homes nestled beneath a canopy of oaks, just minutes away from the area’s best beaches. Nature trails and micro-parks abound, sunset walks are a way of life, and the pool and clubhouse complex beckons on sultry days. Discover the area’s finest in award-winning, sustainable front porch living. Discover Woodsong.

Custom Homes from the Mid 200’s Off HWY 179 in Shallotte • www.woodsongnc.com • (910) 617-5543


WHAT’S HAPPENING

Brunswick Civil War Round Table Events April 3, May 1, May 29

On April 3, the Round Table welcomes Dr. Richard J. Sommers, an award-winning author who has served 43+ years as instructor at the U.S. Army Military History Institute/U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. On May 1, the guest speaker will be Steve Davis, a popular speaker at Civil War Round Tables and historical societies, a prolific author of more than 100 books and articles on the Civil War and Book Review Editor for Blue & Gray Magazine for more than 20 years. On May 29, the guest will be Susannah Ural, Ph.D., a popular returning guest speaker and co-director of the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society in the history department at the University of Southern Mississippi. For specific topics, see the website. The Round Table meets on the first Tuesday of each month except during June, July and August. Meetings are held at Hatch Auditorium on Caswell Beach. Everyone is welcome. Registration and refreshments begin at 6:15 pm. The visitor fee is $10 and can be applied toward the $25 annual membership dues. This nonprofit organization is the largest Civil War Round Table in the country, boasting more than 1,250 members. Information: (910) 278-3545; brunswickcivilwarroundtable.com

Sunset Beach Spring Market

April 5 More than 70 of the area’s finest artisans will offer items such as pottery, local honey, fine jewelry, natural soaps and organic essential oils, baked goods, original photography, original art, candles and more. All items are handmade, homemade or homegrown. The market will be held from 10 am to 3 pm at Sunset Beach Town Park at 206 Sunset Boulevard. Information: thepuremarkets.com

Herb & Garden Fair

April 7 & 8 The 26th annual Herb and Garden Fair at Poplar Grove Plantation in Wilmington will feature some of North Carolina’s best herb and plant vendors, local artisans and crafters, food, concessions and activities for kids. Entry fee of $5 includes a raff le ticket, and

kids younger than 13 get in free. Proceeds benefit the conservation and preservation of Poplar Grove Plantation. Hours are Saturday 9 am to 5 pm and Sunday 10 am to 4 pm. Information: (910) 686-9518; poplargrove.org/ festivals/herb-garden-fair/

NC Azalea Festival

April 11 to 15 NC Azalea Festival in downtown Wilmington is an annual community celebration and includes big-name entertainment, festive galas, road races and dozens of fun family events. Founded in 1948, the Azalea Festival has emerged as the Port City’s premier event. Don’t miss the NC Azalea Festival Historic Home Tour presented by the Historic Wilmington Foundation. Also part of Azalea Festival is the Cape Fear Garden Club Azalea Garden Tour, which has been featured in Southern Living Magazine. Musical headliners this year include Billy Currington with Drake White and Kenton Bryant on April 12, Ludacris with Childish Major on April 14 and Dark Star Orchestra on April 15. The popular Street Fair will be held on April 14 and 15. See the website for a full listing of events and all the details. Information: ncazaleafestival.org

BBQ Cook-off on BBQ Road

April 13 & 14 The BBQ Cook-off on BBQ Road will feature music, a friendly wing competition, BBQ tastings, wine, tours and more. Come by on Friday night for the friendly wing competition, with free admission and wings for purchase, along with a cash bar for wine, beer, water and soda. Judging will begin at 6 pm, and an awards ceremony will be held at 7 pm. On Saturday a $5 admission fee includes three tickets for the BBQ tasting, with additional tickets available for purchase. Enjoy the tastings from 11 am to 2 pm, along with craft vendors and music by DJ Butch Barnes. Pork BBQ and chicken plates or BBQ sandwiches with sides will also be available for sale. Vote for your favorite BBQ and view the awards ceremony at 2:30 pm. Information: (910) 287-2800

Wine, Women & Chocolate

April 16 Wine, Women & Chocolate is an annual event held at Brunswick Senior Resources in Shallotte. It’s an exclusive shopping experience with amazing raff les, delicious wine and food as well as decadent chocolate. Spring 2018

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

This event will take place from 5:30 to 8 pm, and the $25 ticket includes one glass of wine, food, chocolate and a raff le ticket. Tickets will not be sold at the door so advance purchase is necessary. Information: brunswickcountychamber.org/women-in-businesscommittee

Woodsong Porch and Art Stroll

April 21 Woodsong, a walkable neighborhood located off Village Road in Shallotte, will hold its third annual Woodsong Porch and Art Stroll, an art and music festival, on Saturday, April 21 from 10 am to 2 pm. More than 20 local artists, live music, wine tastings, beer tastings and more will be featured. Fat Jack Duo will provide musical entertainment for the event, and concessions will be available from Jumpin’ Java Espresso Co, 2 Bros Coastal Cuisine and Sunset Slush. In addition to free wine tastings from Petrea Imports, this year’s event will feature free beer tastings provided by Makai Brewing Company of Ocean Isle Beach. Admission to the event is $5 and can be purchased at the entrance or in advance by visiting the website. Proceeds will benefit the Woodsong Scholarship for Construction Industry Careers at Brunswick Community College. Information: woodsongporchandartstroll.com

Oak Island Lighthouse 5K, 10K & Half Marathon

April 21 Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce will host the 20th annual Oak Island Lighthouse 5K, 10K & Half Marathon on April 21. Register early as this is a popular event. Start time is 7:30 a.m., and the event takes place at Middleton Park Extension Soccer Field in Oak Island. Information: (910) 457-6964; oakislandlighthouserun.com

Wilmington Jewish Film Festival

April 22 to 24, April 29 to May 1, May 5 & 6 Wilmington Jewish Film Festival, in association with United Jewish Appeal of Wilmington, presents the fifth annual Wilmington Jewish Film Festival: A World of Jewish Film. It will offer nine award-winning feature films and selected shorts over nine days. All showings will be in historic Thalian Hall Main Stage. Prices range from $7 to $17. The 7 pm evening films will be followed by a dessert reception, and the three early evening films will be followed by a light supper reception. Information: wilmingtonjff.org

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Waterway Art Association Spring Show and Sale

April 23 to 27 Waterway Art Association will present its 27th annual Spring Show and Sale from April 23 to 27 at Hickmans Crossroads Library, 1040 Calabash Road in NW in Calabash. The show is open to the public with free admission from 10 am to 5:30 pm during the week. A raff le of original artworks donated by the artists will again be held this year. The show is juried, and each year a prominent regional artist is asked the serve as judge for the show. A reception and awards presentation will be held on Thursday, April 26 from 3:30 to 5:30 pm at the library. The public is invited to attend the show anytime during the week and to attend the reception on Thursday. Further information about exhibiting in the show is available on the website. Information: (910) 754-7004; waterwayart.org

Wine Fest 2018

April 28 Ocean Isle Museum Foundation is hosting its annual Wine Fest fundraiser on April 28 from 6:30 to 9:30 pm at the Museum of Coastal Carolina. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Museum of Coastal Carolina in Ocean Isle Beach and Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach. Participants can sample a variety of wines from around the world, enjoy tasty treats provided by local restaurants, bid on live and silent auction items, socialize with friends and neighbors, and support two of the area’s best attractions. Tickets are $50 per person. The museum is at 21 E. Second Street in Ocean Isle Beach. Information: (910) 579-1016; museumplantetarium.org

NatureFest Southport

April 28 NatureFest Southport is a day of nature, education and fun held in several locations throughout town, including Franklin Square Park, Southport Riverwalk, the Southport downtown area and an excursion to the Green Swamp Preserve. Pre-registration is required for some events, but all are welcome to spend the day in Southport and enjoy nature’s best. Information: (910) 632-3268; facebook.com/ southportnaturefest

Southport Waterfront Market

May 2 to August 29 The market is held every Wednesday morning (weather permitting) from May through August. The location — under ancient live oaks on Fort Johnston Garrison lawn overlooking the Cape Fear River — is a treat in



WHAT’S HAPPENING

itself. Browse the beautiful produce, baked goods and handcrafted items while enjoying a breeze off the river and live music in the air. Information: (910) 279-4616 ; downtownsouthport.org

Sunset Beach Summer Market

May 3 to October 11 Every Thursday from May 3 through October 11 more than 60 of the area’s finest makers and growers will sell items such as farm produce, organic eggs, pottery, fine jewelry, local honey, jams and jellies, hand-crafted baskets, plants, natural soaps, organic essential oil products, original photography, baked goods, candles, kettle corn, fabric art, hand-squeezed lemonade and much more. All items are handmade, homemade or homegrown. Times are 9 am to 1 pm, and it’s held at Sunset Beach Town Park, 206 Sunset Boulevard. Information: thepuremarkets.com

Run Sunset Beach

May 19 Run Sunset Beach includes a Half Marathon, 5K and 1 Mile fun run/walk. More than 600 runners will race the second race of the islands’ four-race series, with the world’s largest series race medals. Six free shuttles will take participants and spectators to the start/finish line area. The Half Marathon starts at 7 am, and the 5K starts at 7:15 a.m. Be sure to bring your pre-race hydration of choice and show up a little early. Information: coastalraceproductions.com/race/ run-sunset-beach

Rims on the River Car Show

May 19 & 20 Rims on the River is a car show and awards ceremony held at N. Front and Chestnut in downtown Wilmington. Public hours for the car show are Saturday from 11 am to 5 pm. On Sunday at noon the vintage car cruise begins at the Schwartz Center on N. Front Street. This is a free event so come enjoy. Information: rimsontheriver.com

Oak Island Farmers Market

May 22 to September 4 Every Monday from May 22 to September 4, Oak Island Farmers Market is held from 8 am to 1 pm. Come out and get fresh fruits and vegetables, local honey, handmade or homegrown products and arts and crafts. It’s a great place to meet the locals and experience the culture of Oak Island. The market is held at Middleton 26

South Brunswick Magazine

Park Extension - Oak Island Soccer Field on 49th Street in Oak Island. Information: (910) 278-5518

SilverArts Exhibition & Sale

May 25 to 27 The SilverArts Exhibition & Sale at The ArtWorks in Wilmington features winning works in a statewide arts competition for ages 50 and older. Information: (910) 251-9622

Orange Street ArtsFest

May 26 & 27 The 23rd annual Orange Street ArtsFest convenes adjacent to the Hannah Block Historic USO/Community Arts Center in historic downtown Wilmington. The event is the largest arts festival in the Port City and features more than 80 artists and $550 in prize money. The event also includes live entertainment and a variety of food, plus hourly music, dance and theater performances. This free event will take place on Saturday from 10 am to 6 pm and on Sunday from 10 am to 5 pm. Information: (910) 251-1788

Tri-Beach Cruisers Car Club Cruise-in

May 28 The seventh annual Tri-Beach Cruisers Car Club Cruise-In will feature free hot dogs and hamburgers to all participants, raff les, door prizes, music and much more. Come out and see more than 90 beautiful automobiles at Ocean City Chevrolet on U.S. 17 North in Shallotte. This event is free to attend and will take place from 10 am to 3 pm. Information: (910) 713-9514; tribeachcruisers.org

Ocean Isle Beach Summer Market

May 29 to September 11 Every Tuesday from May 29 through September 11, more than 60 of the area’s finest makers and growers will sell items such as local honey, pottery, fine jewelry, original art, farm-fresh produce, organic eggs, wooden children’s toys, plants, original photography, natural soaps, organic essential oils, baked goods, pallet art, hand-sewn children’s clothing, kettle corn, hand-squeezed lemonade and much more. All items are handmade, homemade or homegrown. Hours are 9 am to 2 pm, and the location is 11 E. Second Street in Ocean Isle Beach. Information: thepuremarkets.com


NHRMC Physician Group connects you with hundreds of providers and NHRMC, your top-ranked hospital, for a single purpose: your health. Choose NHRMC Physician Group. FAMILY & INTERNAL MEDICINE

URGENT CARE

New Hanover Medical Group Central Office 1960 S. 16th Street, Wilmington 910.662.6000

NHRMC Urgent Care 1135 Military Cutoff Road, Wilmington 910.256.6222

Myrtle Grove Office 5145 S. College Road, Wilmington 910.662.6000 Ogden Office 7420 Market Street, Wilmington 910.662.6000 Brunswick Forest Office 1333 S. Dickinson Drive, Leland 910.662.6000 Autumn Hall 510 Carolina Bay Drive, Wilmington 910.662.6000 NHRMC Physician Group 2000 Brabham Avenue, Jacksonville 910.376.3030 Pender Primary Care 7910 US Hwy. 117 S, Rocky Point 910.300.4500 Wrightsville Beach Family Medicine 1721 Allens Lane, Wilmington 910.344.8900 Coastal Family Medicine 2523 Delaney Avenue, Wilmington 910.763.5522

NHRMC Urgent Care 112 Medical Village Drive, Ste. G, Wallace 910.285.0333

CARDIOLOGY Cape Fear Heart Associates NHRMC Heart Center Outpatient Services 1415 Physicians Drive, Wilmington 800 Jefferson Street, Whiteville 584 Hospital Drive, Bolivia 3009 Medical Plaza Lane, Southport 2000 Brabham Avenue, Jacksonville 910.662.9500

GASTROENTEROLOGY Hanover Gastroenterology 1509 Doctors Circle, Bldg. C, Wilmington 7420 Market Street, Wilmington 1333 S. Dickinson Drive, Leland 910.763.1219

NEUROLOGY NHRMC Physician Group Neurology 2131 S. 17th Street, Wilmington 1509 Doctors Circle, Bldg. C, Wilmington 910.662.7500

NHRMC Physician Specialists— Internal Medicine Specialists 1725 New Hanover Medical Park Drive, Wilmington 910.662.9300

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

The HIV Care Team 1725 New Hanover Medical Park Drive, Wilmington 910.662.9300

Coastal OB/GYN Specialists & Midwifery 2221 S. 17th Street, Wilmington 910.815.5190

Atlantic Fetal Medicine 2150 Shipyard Blvd., Wilmington 910.662.9480

Coastal Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility 2221 S. 17th Street, Wilmington 910.815.5090 Glen Meade Center for Women’s Health 1809 Glen Meade Road, Wilmington 1333 S. Dickinson Drive, Leland 510 Carolina Bay Drive, Wilmington 910.763.9833

NHRMC Physician Specialists— OB/GYN Specialists 2150 Shipyard Boulevard, Wilmington 910.662.9300

ONCOLOGY Cape Fear Cancer Specialists 509 Olde Waterford Way, Leland 910.343.0447 NHRMC Zimmer Cancer Center 2131 S. 17th Street, Wilmington 910.667.3000 New Hanover Gynecologic Oncology NHRMC Zimmer Cancer Center 2131 S. 17th Street, Wilmington 910.667.3000 Onslow Oncology 221 Memorial Drive, Jacksonville 910.455.5511

PSYCHIATRY New Hanover Psychiatry NHRMC Behavioral Health Hospital 2131 S. 17th Street, Wilmington 910.815.5625

PULMONARY MEDICINE Coastal Pulmonary Medicine 1090 Medical Center Drive, Wilmington 330 Military Cutoff Road, Unit B1, Wilmington 910.343.3345

RHEUMATOLOGY NHRMC Physician Group Rheumatology 1509 Doctors Circle, Bldg. C, Wilmington 1814 New Hanover Medical Park Drive, Wilmington 1333 S. Dickinson Drive, Leland 910.662.7550

SURGERY NHRMC Physician Specialists— General Surgery Specialists 1725 New Hanover Medical Park Drive, Wilmington 910.662.9300

NHRMC Physician Specialists— Maxillofacial Surgery

1725 New Hanover Medical Park Drive, Wilmington 2000 Brabham Avenue, Jacksonville 910.662.9331 Pediatric Surgery 2131 S. 17th Street, Wilmington 910.667.6819

UROLOGY Atlantic Urology 1333 S. Dickinson Drive, Leland 910.254.1033 1814 New Hanover Medical Park Drive, Wilmington 910.662.8765 3009 Medical Plaza Lane, Southport 910.662.8765 2000 Brabham Avenue, Jacksonville 910.376.3025

HOSPITALISTS New Hanover Regional Hospitalists 2131 S. 17th Street, Wilmington

Welcoming new patients Leading Our Community to Outstanding Health

nhrmcphysiciangroup.org Spring 2018

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WHAT’S ONLINE AT SOUTHBRUNSWICKMAGAZINE.COM D SPRING 2018

A CAROLINA GIRL’S LOCAL AND COASTAL HOLIDAY MENU By Sandi Grigg

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About twice a day a carriage or golf cart full of tourists rides by the pink late-Victorian house that was the setting for Crimes of the Heart, filmed in 1986 in Southport. The tour guide makes no mention of the man living therein, and that’s fine with Tom Sedivy, the house’s owner. He prefers to lay low. Sedivy bought the home because he liked the way it looked, and it suited his needs for a home base while he traveled. It’s close to the marina where he keeps his cabin cruiser, and it’s only a couple of hours away from the garage where he keeps his collection of street cars and racers.

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By Teresa McLamb

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TOM SEDIVY ENJOYS BEING A RACER AND ISN’T SLOWING DOWN

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I have always enjoyed cooking and I am not afraid to try new things. It seems that every Christmas party, work holiday social or family tradition involves food preparation. Predominantly I make Southern dishes because that is what I am most accustomed to cooking, but now that I live in an area that provides so much good quality seafood, my repertoire has evolved. I have put together my Favorite Coastal Carolina Holiday Menu. This menu uses the most prevalent and available seafood in our area during these cooler months yet is sure to impress guests at the Christmas table. While being a tribute to our North Carolina coastal bounty, it is still comfort food that will fulfill everyone at the table.


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BRAD CARTER IN SHALLOTTE AND HIS CRUD CRUSHER By Jo Ann Mathews

The common cold has plagued the human race for centuries, but Brad Carter, a pharmacist at Thomas Drugs in Shallotte, has a solution: Carolina Crud Crusher. Carter developed this cough syrup and over the years, especially during a rough 2018 cold and flu season, the pharmacy has increased its sales of the 8-ounce bottle of cough syrup to about 5,000 bottles each month through the tough months. “We never advertise,” Carter says. “It’s all word of mouth.” Three years ago this miracle liquid became available over-the-counter at the four Thomas-owned pharmacies: Thomas Drugs in Shallotte and Oak Island and Seashore Drugs in Calabash and in Little River. It is also available online and is shipped to all 50 states and the U.S. territories. About 200 North Carolina and South Carolina physicians write prescriptions for it. Carter is working on having it qualify for international sales. “We have a product unique to this area,” he says. PHOTO BY JO ANN MATHEWS

ARTIFICIAL REEF ASSOCIATION SUPPORTS THE BRUNSWICK COUNTY ENVIRONMENT By Jo Ann Mathews

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Sinking a ship in peacetime appears to be counterproductive unless you understand artificial reefs. And in Brunswick County, a group is working hard to sink ships and maintain a healthy environment under our seas. According to the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality, an artificial reef can be comprised of items such as decommissioned vessels, railroad cars, concrete reef balls and pipe materials. The benefits to these reefs include attracting a variety of marine life by providing food and refuge for them. North Carolina has 42 ocean reefs and 20 estuarine reefs with 14 oyster sanctuaries. Its artificial reef programs have developed into some of the most active state enhancement programs in the United States. “Artificial reefs are good for the environment,” says Andy Fisher of Oak Island, president of Long Bay Artificial Reef Association (LBARA). “They build and expand habitat and don’t produce pollution.” Spring 2018

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WATERFRONT SEAFOOD SHACK IN CALABASH DELIVERS DREAMS

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By Sheree K. Nielsen

Tucked away on a quaint harbor promenade in Calabash lies a hidden gem. Surrounded by picnic tables with grass-thatched umbrellas, a weathered dock flanked by swaying grasses, a shrimp trawler, magnificent marsh views and the aroma of fresh fried fish, you just might miss it. But signs that say “Fresh. Local. Wild.” point you to a tiny walk-up restaurant and adjoining building called Waterfront Seafood Shack Market and Eatery. Owned by Bob and Serina Taylor, this seafood sweet spot is the real deal.

CAPE FEAR FITNESS BRINGS COMMUNITY TO SOUTHPORT

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BETSY BRADDOCK BREAKS THE MOLD WITH HER HOME RENOVATIONS By Laura Moore

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It is hard to believe that the small town of Southport, a place people flock to because of its quiet vibe, could offer such a dynamic and successful fitness program and facility. But it does. Cape Fear Fitness was a vision ten years ago, has been adopted wholeheartedly by residents, and is expanding. Carysa Overcash remembers coming to work at Cape Fear Fitness around 6 am a few years ago and finding the exercise machines moved to different areas in the gym. She contacted her co-owner, boardcertified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Eric Lescault, but he said he hadn’t moved anything. Once they reviewed the camera footage they discovered a long-time member had done the rearranging. The man explained he found better spots for the equipment because it made optimum use of the space. “He thought he was helping us,” Overcash says and smiles as if picturing the incident. “That’s how [comfortable] our members feel. We pride ourselves on being a family. It’s your home away from home.”

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

By Jo Ann Mathews

When people look at the Braddock Built Renovations print advertisement that shows owner Betsy Braddock in a red dress and high heels, they often ask, “How can she build in that outfit?” Braddock’s response: “I can do anything!” And she can. From million dollar renovations to low budget remodels, Braddock is capable and willing to do it all. As the only female builder in Brunswick County, she has proven herself up to the task, no matter what that task may be. Founded in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1994 by her father as a second career, Braddock Built Renovations intrigued a young Braddock who was studying at Georgia Tech at the time.


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PHOTO BY CAROLYN BOWERS

PROVIDENCE HOME CELEBRATES 20 YEARS AND A LEGACY OF HELPING TEENAGERS By Carolyn Bowers

When the Providence Home Board of Trustees threw a huge party on November 18 to celebrate their 20th anniversary, they had no idea it would mean so much more. It wasn’t just a thank you to the community for all the support they have given, but it was also a special reunion.

More than 20 years ago, concerned and caring folks saw a community need for an emergency shelter for teenagers and determined to do something about it. This small group of dedicated people developed the plans, purchased the house, secured the funding, got all the approvals

and worked tirelessly to turn their dream into a reality. The result was the founding of Providence Home, the only residence in Brunswick County where teenagers who, for whatever reason, need a short-term cooling off period away from their families.

HEALTHY GREEN SOLUTIONS IS AN OCEAN ISLE BEACH MAN’S WAY OF HELPING By Melissa Slaven Warren

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When it comes to our health and well-being, one message is certain: “Our health is our responsibility, not our doctor’s,” says Dave Berkheimer, owner of Healthy Green Solutions in Ocean Isle Beach. One of the best ways to take charge of our own health is by educating ourselves. The start of a new year often means a renewed interest in our diet, exercise or overall health regimens. Maybe this is the year to think outside of conventional medicine? Berkheimer appreciates the role of traditional physicians but suggests individuals also consider working with “a doctor who is trained in functional medicine–including Naturopathy or Chiropractic. Functional practitioners work to locate the source of an illness or health concern and address the root cause.”

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McLeod Health

Excellent Care. Outstanding Physicians. Primary Care McLeod Family Medicine Seacoast Raymond Holt, MD Jennifer Locklear, MD Darron Molter, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 100 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 390-8320 McLeod Family Medicine Carolina Forest Ashley Locklear-Batton, DO Sara Camarata, DO Jason Harrah, MD Christopher Stanley, MD 101 McLeod Health Boulevard, Suite 201 Myrtle Beach, SC 29579 • (843) 646-8001 McLeod Internal Medicine Seacoast Jonessa Atienza, MD David Johnson, MD Marie LiVigni, DO 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 100 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 390-5217 McLeod Loris Primary Care Gary Barrett, MD José Hernandez, MD Wanda Grainger, FNP 3109 Casey Street Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 756-9292 Southern Medical Associates Keith Harkins, MD Chuck Mills, MD Mark Pelstring, MD Andrew SeJan, MD Sarah Norris, FNP Karen Staples, FNP 3418 Casey Street Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 756-7885 McLeod Primary Care Sunset Beach Lindsey Jernigan, FNP 690 Sunset Boulevard N., Suite 109 Sunset Beach, NC 28468 • (910) 575-8488

McLeod Primary Care Tabor City Kimberley Drayton, MD 706 East Fifth Street, Unit B Tabor City, NC 28463 • (910) 377-3293

Cardiology McLeod Cardiology Associates Nathan Almeida, MD Gavin Leask, MD Rajesh Malik, MD *Electrophysiology Amit Pande, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 220 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 390-0877 3485 Mitchell Street Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 756-7029

Ear, Nose and Throat McLeod ENT Seacoast Sarah Novis, MD Salvatore A. Zieno, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 340 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 366-3040 107 McLeod Health Boulevard Building 2, Suite 201 Myrtle Beach, SC 29579 • (843) 366-3040

Gastroenterology McLeod Digestive Health Center Seacoast Khaled Elraie, MD William Connors, PA-C 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 320 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 366-3715 3617 Casey Street, Suite C Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 366-3715

Nephrology McLeod Nephrology Loris Christopher Po, MD 3617 Casey Street, Suite C Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 716-7163


Obstetrics and Gynecology

Pulmonology and Critical Care

McLeod OB/GYN Seacoast Merritt King, MD Chris McCauley, MD Joycelyn Schindler, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 110 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 399-3100 3617 Casey Street, Suite A Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 756-7090 107 McLeod Health Boulevard Building 2, Suite 201 Myrtle Beach, SC 29579 • (843) ???-????

McLeod Pulmonary and Critical Care Seacoast Kevin Dineen, MD Dorothy Fullex, FNP 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 340 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 390-8302 Doli Biondillo, MD 3617 Casey Street, Suite C Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 716-7911

Oncology McLeod Oncology and Hematology Associates at Seacoast A Department of McLeod Regional Medical Center Donny Huynh, MD Stewart Sharp, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 300 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 366-3891

Orthopedics McLeod Orthopaedics Seacoast Eric Heimberger, MD David Lukowski, MD Peter Lukowski, MD Christopher Walsh, MD J. Christopher Lewis, PA-C 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 200 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 390-0100

Rheumatology McLeod Rheumatology Seacoast Pinky Vaidya, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 120 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 366-3060

Surgery McLeod Loris Seacoast Surgery Lewis Dickinson, MD Kenneth Mincey, MD Amanda Turbeville, MD Eric Young, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 310 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 399-9774 3617 Casey Street, Suite D Loris, SC 29569 • (843) 756-3150 107 McLeod Health Boulevard Building 2, Suite 201 Myrtle Beach, SC 29579 • (843) 366-3040 McLeod Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Dominic F. Heffel, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 310 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 777-7255

Vascular Care McLeod Vascular Associates David Bjerken, MD Christopher Cunningham, MD Joshua Sibille, MD 3980 Highway 9 East, Suite 240 Little River, SC 29566 • (843) 366-3755 1 (888) 812-5143

McLeod Health www.mcleodhealth.org

Carolina Forest | Little River | Loris | Myrtle Beach | Sunset Beach | Tabor City

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BUSINESS BUZZ

New Structure to Be Named Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage Pavilion

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage South Brunswick Office Receives Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce Excellence in Business Award

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ATMC and its employees recently contributed more than $10,000 to help local residents in need by supporting the cooperative’s annual United Way campaign. “ATMC is proud to support the United Way each year,” says O’Neal Miller, ATMC CEO. “Our employees are passionate about supporting this community, and the United Way of the Cape Fear Area has impacted thousands of lives right here in Brunswick County.” Money raised during the 2017–18 campaign will be dispersed in 2018 for a wide range of community, health, human services and educational needs in the region. Over the past decade, ATMC and its employees have contributed more than $260,000 to United Way.

Fulford Heating & Cooling Opens Showroom and Training Facility

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The South Brunswick Office of Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage was awarded the Excellence in Business Award at the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce 2018 Annual Chairman’s Awards Banquet on January 11. The Excellence in Business Award recognizes a business with 10 or more employees that has attained significant growth and is able to demonstrate the specific strategies and processes implemented to achieve sustainable growth. Consideration for this award includes business growth and improvement, good financial health, quality customer service, staying power and overall excellence in the marketplace and community contributions. Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage is the largest and bestselling real estate company in New Hanover, Brunswick, Pender and Onslow counties, with $1.628 billion in closed sales volume and 7,023 closed sales transactions in 2017. Sea Coast Advantage was founded in Wilmington in 1988 and joined Coldwell Banker in 1993. Sea Coast Advantage is staffed by more than 475 real estate agents in 13 offices in Wilmington (Autumn Hall and Midtown), Leland, Jacksonville, Carolina Beach, Topsail Island,

ATMC Employees Support Local United Way

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Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage, the largest real estate brokerage firm in New Hanover, Brunswick, Pender and Onslow counties, has donated $17,500 to the Town of Belville for the construction of a new Cultural Arts Pavilion at Brunswick Riverwalk Park at 508 River Road in Belville. In exchange, the pavilion will be named Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage Pavilion. Chris Royal, managing broker of the Leland office of Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage, presented a check for $17,500 to town leaders on January 22 during the Belville Board of Commissioners meeting. The Riverwalk is located opposite the western banks of Eagles Island on the Brunswick River. When complete the park will be one of the largest environmentally friendly, recreational and teaching facilities in the region. The park currently features a 125-foot fishing pier and observation deck, nature and walking trails, restroom facilities, a boat ramp, three picnic shelters and two playgrounds. The Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage Pavilion will be available for musical performances, exhibitions of children’s school projects, art exhibitions, summer movie nights and other special events. The construction of the pavilion is being done at no expense to taxpayers due to the generosity of Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage and additional private sponsors.

Hampstead, Southport, Sneads Ferry, South Brunswick, Oak Island, Holden Beach and Calabash.

Fulford Heating & Cooling recently opened the Fulford Heating & Cooling Showroom and Training Facility at 172 Ocean


BUSINESS BUZZ

Highway East in Supply. Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce and Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The purpose of the Fulford Heating & Cooling Showroom and Training Facility is to serve the community by educating it on the advancements in technology and energy savings. The Fulford Heating & Air professional staff exceeds expectations with premium installation, repair and service. Their technicians are highly skilled and trained to install, diagnose or repair any model of residential and commercial HVAC equipment. They also stay up-to-date in the industry by attending training classes regularly. Many members of Fulford staff have CFC certifications, Journeyman’s Cards and NATE certifications.

in new sales. Business Connections are structured networking meetings with the sole purpose of referring business and increasing sales between the businesses attending. It is open to any member of Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce. The types of businesses attending include finance, restaurants, construction, real estate, insurance, retailers, homebased businesses, healthcare and other services. In the Business Connections setting, members are unabashed about asking for referrals. The Business Connections meetings are held weekly on Tuesdays from 11:45 am to 1 pm. Business Connections is a sub-committee of the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce Business Development Committee and is chaired by Lucinda Arnold, Coastal Painting & Improvements. Business Connections is a benefit of being a member of the SouthportOak Island Area Chamber. There are no additional fees added to attend Business Connections meetings. Any non-member businesses may attend two meetings before they are required to join the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce. The base membership investment for joining the chamber is $275 per year.

Scott Montgomery Named Administrator of McLeod Health Loris

In 2017 members of Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce participating in the weekly meetings of Business Connections referred and transacted more than $1.2 million

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Chamber Networking Group Nets Members $1.2 Million in New Business

CFF² Kids Gymnastics & Youth Fitness Academy Celebrates New Location CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Scott Montgomery has been named the new Administrator of McLeod Health Loris. Montgomery will implement management action plans and be responsible for the establishment, maintenance and enhancement of quality health services in accordance with the philosophy and mission of McLeod Health. A member of the McLeod team since 2008, he has served the organization in McLeod Health Loris and McLeod Health Seacoast as Director of Rehabilitation, Associate Vice President and Rehabilitation Services/Orthopedic Services (Therapy, Fitness, Diabetes Management, Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation). He received his bachelor’s degree at Western Kentucky University in Communication Disorders and his master’s degree at Western Kentucky University in SpeechLanguage Pathology. Previous work assignments include serving at Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) as administrator from 2002 to 2008 and director in various settings including acute care, outpatient, skilled nursing facility and home health from 1996 to 2016. He also has previous teaching experience related to his clinical disciplines.

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony in December for CFF² Kids Gymnastics & Youth Fitness Academy as they celebrated the opening of their new 5,000-square-foot facility at 4633 Long Beach Road in Southport. CFF² Kids Gymnastics & Youth Fitness Academy is a USA Gymnastics Member Club serving children ages 18 months to 18 years old. Owners Carysa Overcash and Eric Lescault opened CFF² Kids in May 2016 as an extension of Cape Fear Fitness after recognizing there was a need to accommodate the sport of gymnastics and youth fitness of the area. The new facility more than triples their previous location and is the next step in their continued commitment to the youth fitness of the area. CFF² Kids Gymnastics & Youth Fitness Academy facility offers recreational gymnastics, youth

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BUSINESS BUZZ

fitness, pre-team and team gymnastics, camps, birthday parties, clinics, parents’ night out, private lessons and much more. Their equipment is the most up-to-date on the market, ensuring the safety of the students. Gymnastics increases coordination, flexibility and strength while creating better problem-solving skills, longer attention spans and the ability to work well with others. CFF² is dedicated to helping students achieve their goals at a safe and proper learning pace based on individual’s ability level. Their instructors are USA Gymnastics Instructor Certified.

Brunswick County Association of REALTORS® Releases 2017 Statistics According to the most recent statistics from the Brunswick County Association of REALTORS®, Brunswick County’s residential real estate sales totaled $1.2 billion in 2017, crossing the billion-dollar threshold for the first time since 2005. This is an increase of 32 percent over 2016. The number of units sold in 2017 jumped 23 percent over the previous year, increasing from 3,746 to 4,613. The average sales price increased 8.5 percent, from $243,610 to $261,925. With more than 1,000 properties sold, the Leland area remained the county’s biggest selling market in 2017, with sales volume totaling $266 million. Southport followed with slightly more than 500 properties sold and a total sales volume of $154 million. Residential sales in December increased 3.8 percent compared to the December 2016, from 344 to 357. The average sales price went from $248,000 this December compared to $264,923 last year, and total sales increased from $85.16 to $94.58 million, an 11 percent jump. Brunswick County Units Sold • December 2017: 357 • December 2016: 344 • Increase/decrease: +3.8% Average Sale Price • December 2017: $264,923 • December 2016: $248,000 • Increase/decrease: +6.8% Total Sales Volume • December 2017: $94,580,000 • December 2016: $85,160,000 • Increase/decrease: +11.1% Brunswick County Association of REALTORS® (BCAR) is the local association level of the largest trade association in the nation, presently serving its members, which are comprised of REALTORS®, Appraisers and Affiliate 38

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BUSINESS BUZZ

Members. Chartered in 1959 by the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR), BCAR represents the interests of its members in southeastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina.

New Provider Joins Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine & Convenient Care Novant Health is pleased to welcome Dr. Daniel Hall to Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine & Convenient Care in Shallotte. Hall joined the clinic in January and is accepting new patients. He is board-certified in family medicine and completed medical school at Wake Forest School of Medicine and his residency in family medicine at North Carolina Baptist Hospital, both in WinstonSalem, North Carolina. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Family Medicine and has special interests in occupational health, diabetes management and cardiology with an emphasis on preventive medicine.

Ribbon Cutting for Ford’s Fuel Southport Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony at Ford’s Fuel and Propane’s new office and showroom on November 30. Ford’s Fuel and Propane invites the public to stop by and meet their team and take a look at their new showroom at 3465 SouthportSupply Road in Bolivia. Ford’s Fuel Service offers gasoline and diesel fuel at both of their locations. Bulk deliveries of any quantity can be arranged with their small delivery truck or tanker quantities up to 9,000 gallons. They offer long-term contracts for large users and a variety of hedging tools. Ford’s offers sales, service and installation of all types of gas appliances, including indoor and outdoor appliances like fireplaces, gas logs, outdoor kitchens, tankless water heaters, shop heaters, commercial cooking equipment, pool heaters, gas lights, generators, grills and space heaters.

Ribbon Cutting for State Employees Credit Union On December 6 Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for new member State Employees Credit Union, which was celebrating their new location in Ocean Isle Beach. Their new location is at 923 Seaside Road SW in Ocean Isle Beach.

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BUSINESS BUZZ

Ribbon Cutting for Victoria Rose Boutique

their strengths. Their classes encourage confidence building, teamwork and personal growth. Small class sizes, professional staff and a compassionate environment make them more than just a dance studio; they are the Inspirations Dance Center family. Their students learn the value of hard work and take tremendous pride in what they accomplish.

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Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce recently held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the grand opening of Victoria Rose Boutique - Where Comfort Meets Style, located at 5001 O’Quinn Boulevard, Unit E in the South Harbor Marina Village. The owner’s twins, Sarah Victoria and Sadie Rose, are the namesakes of the boutique. Victoria Rose Boutique carries women’s sizes small to 3XL in the most comfortable stylish clothing of the season along with jewelry from their exclusive I’m Charmed collection. Let one of Victoria Rose Boutique’s professional stylists help you find your perfect outfit. Nationwide shipping is available for all in store and online purchases.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

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South Brunswick Magazine

Brunswick County Association of REALTORS® announced its 2017 annual award winners at a recent banquet in Ocean Isle Beach. Bruce Williams of Exp Realty was named REALTOR® of the Year, Wally Simpson of Movement Mortgage was named Affiliate of the Year, and A.J. Hipp of Resort Brokerage was recognized as an NC REALTORS® Rising Star. Additionally, J. Alan Holden of Re/Max at the Beach and Emily Willetts of Coldwell Banker Seacoast Advantage were granted REALTOR® Emeritus Status by the National Association of REALTORS®. REALTOR® Emeritus is granted to members who have held membership in the national association for a cumulative period of 40 years and have served at the national, state or local level.

Ocean Isle Beach Residents and Businesses to Benefit from ATMC FOCUS Fiber Optics

Grand Re-Opening for Inspirations Dance Center

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce recently held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the grand re-opening of Inspirations Dance Centre at their new location at 91 West Boiling Spring Road in Boiling Springs Lakes. The new building doubled the dance center’s square footage and allows them to have several different studios available for simultaneous classes in dance, martial arts, tumbling and adult fitness. Inspirations Dance Centre provides students with a solid foundation for dance and encourages every student to discover

Brunswick County Association of REALTORS® Announces 2017 Award Winners

As part of its five-year network enhancement and expansion project, ATMC will soon begin the construction of a fiber optic network that will span Ocean Isle Beach and enable it to deliver the company’s FOCUS fiber optic communications services to residents and businesses.The $5.5 million investment is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2018 and will provide more than 6,000 residents and businesses on the island with access to one Gigabit broadband speeds. “We are excited to bring FOCUS fiber optic services to Ocean Isle Beach,” said O’Neal Miller, ATMC CEO. “The time has come to upgrade the copper facilities we have used for decades to serve Ocean Isle Beach. Over the years, exposure to the harsh elements on the island have made these facilities susceptible to corrosion which requires more upkeep. By deploying fiber optic technology, we will be able to serve the island with communications services that provide not only greater Internet speeds, but also increased reliability.” Fiber optic technology is extremely reliable and capable of delivering voice, video and unshared bandwidth all through one connection. According to research conducted by the national Fiber to the Home Council, access to fiber optics


BUSINESS BUZZ

increases a home’s value by 3.1%, that’s an additional $5,000 for the median priced home. Businesses who take advantage of FOCUS fiber optics will have greater opportunities for cloudbased applications and will benefit from symmetrical upload and download speeds. ATMC plans to begin construction in February and is working closely with the Town of Ocean Isle Beach throughout the project to be mindful of construction in the busy summer months. In 2016 ATMC’s Board of Directors approved an aggressive five-year network and expansion plan designed to improve services for current members and strengthen the cooperative by expanding into some of Brunswick County’s fastest growing communities. As part of the plan, ATMC is expanding the coverage of its fiber optic network to include business districts and residential areas throughout Brunswick County. ATMC has also begun upgrading Internet services in rural service areas throughout the county. To find out more about ATMC’s products and services or to find out when fiber optic service will be available, visit iwantATMC.com.

estate brokerage owners to prepare the next generation of leadership to guide their businesses and to provide a foundation for the continued success of their agents. This year’s Ascend graduates comprise the third graduating class and join the first two classes in the Ascend Alumni Network, which offers structured events and continued opportunities to network. Ascend prepares participants to become successful brokerage leaders by challenging them to significant growth in three core areas: Leading Self. Leading Others. Leading Organizations. The program is taught by Realogy senior leadership, real estate industry experts and current successful franchisees from all Realogy brands. The curriculum combines onsite classroom sessions at Realogy’s headquarters in Madison, New Jersey, with online learning modules and culminates with individual case study presentations. Kinney’s case study presentation was selected as one of the Best of the Best of the 39 participants.

Business Networking After Hours Held at Check Six Brewing Company

Ribbon Cutting for Brunswick Health & Rehab Saber Healthcare Group

Check Six Brewing Company hosted Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce’s January Business Networking After Hours event. Chamber members enjoyed pairing beer and food from Hangar 17 Cuisine, the onsite mobile kitchen at Check Six Brewery. Hangar 17 Cuisine is at Check Six Brewing Company, 5130 Southport-Supply Road, and is open for lunch and dinner.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

On December 21 Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to welcome Brunswick Health & Rehab Saber Healthcare Group to the chamber. They are located at 9600 #5 School Road in Calabash.

Kinney’s Case Study Presentation Honored as a Best of the Best Winner Denise Kinney, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage, was among 39 real estate brokerage leaders from across the United States and Canada who recently graduated from Ascend: The Executive Leadership Experience. Ascend is an intensive 46-week program offered exclusively to Realogy brand-affiliated real

St. James Plantation Wins Awards for Marketing Materials Janette Fernandes, marketing coordinator for St. James Plantation (SJP) in Southport, won two national awards for marketing materials that she and her team created for the residential community home to more than 4,500 property owners on 6,000 acres in coastal North Carolina. The winning publications were printed by Brenda Klee, with whom Janette has worked in the past and who is currently account manager of The Printing Port in Myrtle Beach. The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) announced the awards in a number of housing-related categories. SJP’s Coasting Magazine won silver in the NAHB’s 55+ Marketing Campaign Awards, Direct Mail Piece or Campaign category while SJP’s Lifestyle brochure scored a gold for the Best 55+ Brochure. According to Ann Marie Moriarty, communications manager for Multifamily & 55+ Housing, NAHB, judges in the competition noted that Coasting Magazine provided a comprehensive presentation of the community and delivered all the information a prospective resident could want. The Lifestyles brochure was similarly deemed to be engaging and informative.

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SPIRITS

Springy Rewards Whip up this creamy, lemony concoction for the perfect postyardwork refresher.

S BY SANDI GRIGG

Spring is the time of year when we dust off our lawn mowers and prepare for the season of yard work. For me, the smell of fresh-cut grass and dirt goes with lemons. This is because of a memory from my childhood — working in the big family garden and sipping lemonade after all of our hard work. We would sit at our wooden picnic table that sat in the grass beside the garden with a feeling of accomplishment and anticipation of summer’s bountiful offerings. This particular cocktail I created about 10 years ago while tending my own garden before I moved to the coast. I pulled all the weeds from the garden and mowed the lawn and it took me back to those days with my family. I went into the house to create a lemon drink similar to my childhood lemonade but with a big-girl kick. With the few items I had I created what I call a Whipped Limoncello. I had already done quite a bit of work so I wanted to make something super easy. This very simple recipe consists of items that I typically keep in my house. Whipped vodka is so versatile, and limoncello is one of my favorites, and who doesn’t have ice cream? With my dirty hands and filthy clothes I poured it into a glass then sat on my deck overlooking my yard and garden. I plucked some fresh mint for garnish and sipped this delicious concoction that took me back to simpler days. Cheers!

Whipped Limoncello Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

2 cups of vanilla ice cream

Pour all of the ingredients into a blender and pulse until smooth. Divide between two glasses and garnish with lemon wedges and mint leaves.

2 ounces whipped vodka (Pinnacle or Smirnoff) 1 ounce limoncello Lemon wedges and mint leaves for garnish

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WHAT’S COOKIN’

I

A Southern Staple

More like a quiche, the sweet and savory Vidalia Onion Pie is a regional favorite. BY SANDI GRIGG | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES STEFIUK

If you have never had a Vidalia onion then you are missing out on a Southern favorite. Unlike most onions, which are astringent and spicy in flavor, Vidalia onions are sweet and cook up to taste like fruit. No joke, I can eat a Vidalia onion like an apple. One of my favorite ways to enjoy Vidalia onions is in a pie. This pie provides a sweet and savory accompaniment to any meat for a hearty meal or is excellent paired with a salad for a lighter meal. Southerners claim onion pie as their own, but this is not just a Southern dish as the French and British have their own versions. Vidalia onions are what make it Southern. Known as the “Southern truffle,” the Vidalia onion is only available during the spring and summer months. Though shipped throughout the United States, they are only grown in and around the town of Vidalia, Georgia (hence the name). These onions are so sweet because that region of Georgia has the perfect combination of weather, water and soil to produce some of the world’s sweetest onions. They have mild winters and steady rains, and the soil is very low in sulfur, creating a much sweeter onion. The Vidalia is also easily recognizable by the trademark sticker on each onion. Onions are part of the allium family of vegetables and herbs, which also includes chives, garlic, scallions and leeks. Onions have many possible health benefits including reducing the risk of obesity, heart disease and cancer. They are high in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

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South Brunswick Magazine

Even if you don’t like onions, I urge you to give this recipe a try. The Vidalia onion provides a whole new flavor, and this pie cooks up similar to a quiche. Feel free to make it your own and add bacon or use cheddar cheese instead of parmesan. Let the onion be the star of the dish but don’t be afraid to add your favorite ingredients if you wish. Enjoy!


WHAT’S COOKIN’

Vidalia Onion Pie INGREDIENTS 1 9-inch pie crust ½ cup butter 2 pounds sliced Vidalia onions 3 eggs 1 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon of parsley 3 tablespoons flour 8 ounces shredded parmesan cheese Salt and pepper

METHOD Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Saute the sliced onions over medium heat in the butter until clear. Mix the eggs, sour cream, parsley, 4 ounces of parmesan and flour in a large bowl. Add the cooked onions and salt and pepper. Pour the mixture into the pie crust and bake for 20 minutes. Top with the remaining parmesan and bake for an additional 20 minutes. Let cool slightly before slicing and serving.

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South Brunswick Magazine

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UP NORTH

NORTH BRUNSWICK MAGAZINE WHAT’S GOING ON IN OUR SISTER PUBLICATION

Spring 2018

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REVVING UP THE KITCHEN Mike Bowers of 2 Bros Coastal Cuisine shares what it takes to keep truckin’ on the food scene. There are likely few people happier to see the arrival of spring than Mike Bowers, co-owner of 2 Bros Coastal Cuisine food truck. Warm weather boosts business for this Leland resident and all the other players on Wilmington’s booming food-truck scene. By SHANNON RAE GENTRY

FOOD SECTION Explore the guide to restaurants in North Brunswick County and read about a few ways to eat local.

A HUB OF HEALTHY LIVING Seaview Crab Company’s seafood stand at Brunswick Riverwalk Park is part of a town initiative toward healthy living. It doesn’t seem possible to be a visionary while engaging in time-honored behavior, but Mark Anderson has found a way. Anderson is the manager of Seaview Crab Company’s Brunswick Riverwalk Market. Seaview Crab Company has been selling locally caught, fresh seafood in the Cape Fear Region for more than 10 years, with five open air markets. Yet Anderson made the first Brunswick County location happen, playing a pivotal role in the emerging future of the Brunswick Riverwalk Park in Belville. By ALLISON BARRETT CARTER

DIGGING IN TO DELISH After retiring from a busy restaurant kitchen after the birth of her son, Courtney Matheson found a new career in personal chef services, cooking classes and food tours. At an age when most kids are forbidden from standing too close to the oven, Courtney Matheson was cooking inventive dinners for herself on a regular basis, experimenting with whatever food was in the house. By EMILY PAGE HATCH

HEROES FOR HUNGER First Baptist Church of Leland’s Food Bank provides nourishment for the body and soul. Eighty-three-year-old Leland resident Bill Carne leads the FBC Food Bank as only a seasoned, retired pastor can do — with precision and love. He is there to lend his knowledge, care for the volunteers and feed more than 150 families per week. By ALLISON PARKER Spring 2018

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Now Making House Calls Now building in Brunswick Forest, Compass Pointe, The Forks at Barclay, Hearthstone, Magnolia Greens, Palmetto Creek, St. James Plantation, Waterford, Winding River and your neighborhood.

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South Brunswick Magazine

TrusstBuilderGroup.com 910.371.0304


THE BOUNDARY HOUSE

0

t e n d i a r u u G a t Res Brunswick County Dining | Spring 2018

SOUTHPORT All American Grill 505 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 477-6677 Asian Taste 1671 N. Howe St., Ste. 3, Southport (910) 457-0988 Bella Cucina 5177 Southport-Supply Rd. SE, Southport (910) 454-4540 Burney’s Bakery 808 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 454-4222 Café Koa & Market 302 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 363-4206 Castucci’s: An Italian Joint 4332 Long Beach Rd. SE, Southport (910) 477-6755 Clem’s Seafood 4351 Long Beach Rd. SE, Southport (910) 457-6958?? Dead End Saloon 4907 Fish Factory Rd. SE, Southport (910) 454-4002 Dry Street Pub & Pizza 101 E. Brown St., Southport (910) 457-5994

Eric’s Grille 1671 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 457-9024 Famous Subs & Pizza 1541 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 457-5143 Fat Andy’s Burgers 4655 Long Beach Rd. SE, Southport (910) 269-7008 Fishy Fishy Cafe 106 Yacht Basin Dr., Southport (910) 457-1881 Flava’s Ice Cream Shop 318 W. Bay St., Southport (910) 457-5150 Forget Me Not Thai Hibachi 1131 N. Atlantic Ave., Southport (910) 363-5063 Frying Pan Restaurant 319 W. Bay St., Southport (910) 363-4382 Joseph’s Italian Bistro & Chophouse 5003 O’Quinn Blvd. SE, Ste. C, Southport (910) 454-4440 Jumpin’ Java 4022 Old Bridge Rd. SW, Southport (910) 363-4841

ANGELO’S Angelo’s Pizzeria and Enoteca is an Italian fine dining establishment located in the heart of Shallotte. They offer a wide variety of pizzas, pastas and gourmet Italian dishes that give the authentic Italian feel, especially when paired with one of the selections from their famous wine list. —————

110 Shallotte Crossing Pkwy., Ste. D-3, Shallotte (910) 754-2334

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t e Restauran Guid Local’s Family Diner 832 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 457-0444

Ports of Call 116 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 457-4544

Southport Smoke House 1102 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 363-5035

Loco Jo’s Grill 602 N. Howe St., Ste. E, Southport (910) 457-9009

Potter’s Seafood 94 Yacht Basin Dr., Southport (910) 457-0101??

Spike’s Dairy Bar 201 N. Howe St., Southport

Moore Street Market 130 E. Moore St., Southport (910) 363-4203

Provision Company 130 Yacht Basin Dr., Southport (910) 457-0654

Mr P’s Bistro 309 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 457-0801

Side Street Bakery 417 N. Howe St., Ste. A, Southport (910) 363-4629

Old America Fish Co 150 Yacht Basin Dr., Southport (910) 457-9870

Slainte Irish Pub 1513 N. Howe St., Ste. 10, Southport (910) 457-6554

Oliver’s on the Cape Fear 101 W. Bay St., Southport (910) 477-9299

Southport Cheese Shoppe 417 N. Howe St., Ste. B, Southport (910) 477-6387

Port City Java 113 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 454-0321

Southport Gourmet & Sushi Bar 1643 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 477-9045

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Taylor Cuisine & Catering 731 N. Howe St., Southport (910) 454-0088 Terry’s North Carolina Barbecue and Ribs 4688 Long Beach Rd. SE, Southport (910) 477-9187 Thai Peppers Restaurant & Sushi Bar 115 E. Moore St., Southport (910) 457-0095 Tiki Tavern 730 E. 8th St., Southport, (910) 363-4453 Trolly Stop 111 S. Howe St., Southport (910) 457-7017

FIBBER MCGEES

JOEY O’S PIZZERIA

PORT CITY JAVA

Fibber’s offers high-quality food with a full menu, a wonderful atmosphere and a great location. It has live music on the weekends but is a place where you can meet for a drink, watch sports and feel comfortable anytime. At Fibber’s, it feels like home. —————

Joey O’s offers Italian food that is finger-licking good. Visit Joey O’s Pizzeria to try a variety of delicious Italian options including pizzas, calzones and more. Joey O’s serves the largest pizzas (18”) in the Ocean Isle Beach area. —————

1780 Queen Anne St., Ste. 1, Sunset Beach (910) 575-2271

From unique single origins to signature fair trade and organic blends, Port City Java’s handpicked coffee beans are the perfect gift for any occasion whether it’s a one-of-a kind gift for yourself, friend or family member. Visit any of their cafés to indulge in some truly delicious coffee or order your favorite beans online. PCJ always has you covered.

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South Brunswick Magazine

120-7 Causeway Dr., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-3233 6931 Beach Dr., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 575-3233

————— 511 Olde Waterford Way, Leland (910) 383-2429 ————— 1112 E. Cutlar Crossing, Leland (910) 383-1238


Brunswick County Dining | Spring 2018

Yacht Basin Eatery 122 Yacht Basin Dr., Southport (910) 363-4108

SUNSET BEACH Backstreet Café 1780 Chandlers Ln., Sunset Beach (910) 575-6759 Crabby Oddwaters 310 Sunset Blvd. N., Sunset Beach, (910) 579-6372 Fibber McGees See listing on page 50 Golden City Asian Cuisine 1021 Beach Dr. SW, Sunset Beach (910) 575-7637 La Cucina Italian Grill 1870 Chandlers Ln., Ste. 11, Sunset Beach (910) 579-9777

Magnolia’s Fine Food & Spirits 211 Clubhouse Rd., Sunset Beach (910) 287-1119 Maverick’s Java 303 Sunset Blvd. N., Sunset Beach, (910) 575-5282 Maverick’s Pointe 307 Sunset Blvd. N., Sunset Beach (910) 579-4444 Piper’s Bar and Grill 800 Sandpiper Bay Dr. SW, Sunset Beach (910) 579-9120 ext. 2 Sunset Beach Pier 101 W. Main St., Sunset Beach (910) 579-6630 Twin Lakes by the Sea 102 Sunset Blvd. N., Sunset Beach (910) 579-6373

HOLDEN BEACH Archibald’s Deli 2991 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Holden Beach (910) 842-6888 Beaches n Cream 3316 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-7326 Café Ahora 3369 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Ste. 4, Holden Beach (910) 842-1616 Cappuccino by the Sea 3331 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Holden Beach (910) 842-3661 Castaways Raw Bar & Grill 112 Ocean Blvd. W., Holden Beach (910) 842-5743

Las Palmeras 1720 Chandlers Ln., Sunset Beach (910) 575-2882

PURPLE ONION CAFE

SMITHFIELDS CHICKEN ‘N BAR-B-Q

THE BOUNDARY HOUSE

The Purple Onion Café opened on Main Street in Shallotte in 2004. Since then it has become a community favorite serving locals and visitors breakfast and lunch with a delicious menu of pastries, traditional breakfast items, burgers, sandwiches, soups, salads and desserts. —————

For over 30 years, Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Bar-B-Q, has focused on creating an enjoyable dining experience for our customers. At Smithfield’s we strive to be the best host. From the moment you walk through the door, you are our guest. Our staff personally delivers hot and fresh food right to your table, refills your drink and even takes care of discarding your trash. Our goal is for you to relax and enjoy the nostalgic decor and music.

The Boundary House is a place that consistently provides both community members and visitors with an elite dining experience. They passionately prepare and present quality cuisine with the highest level of service and value. —————

4647 Main St., Ste. 1, Shallotte (910) 755-6071

1045 River Rd., Calabash (910) 579-8888

————— 4670 East Coast Ln., Shallotte (910) 754-5522

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t e Restauran Guid Fantasy Isle Ice Cream 3354 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Holden Beach (910) 842-4008

Pelicans Perch 8 E. 2nd St., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-0102

The Lazy Turtle Oceanfront Grille 601 Ocean Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-7725

Mermaids Island Grill 102 Jordan Blvd., Holden Beach (910) 842-4999

Sarah’s Kitchen 1649 Seaside Rd. SW, Ste. 7, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 575-3777

Little Bit’s Grill 5902 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-6430

Ocean Boulevard Coffee 132 Ocean Blvd. W., Holden Beach (910) 842-9600 Seafood Barn Restaurant 3219 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Holden Beach (910) 842-2177 Sunset Slush 111 Jordan Blvd., Holden Beach (910) 619-7724

OCEAN ISLE Antonio’s Deli, Pizza and Grill” 5990 Beach Dr. SW, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-0001 Beaches Burgers 6551 Beach Dr. SW, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 575-7777 Big Nell’s Pit Stop 6828 Beach Dr. SW, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-6461 Brick Landing Plantation See listing on page 50 Castaway Grill 112 Causeway Dr., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-7788 Causeway Gourmet 100 Causeway Dr., Ste. 7, Ocean Isle Beach, (910) 575-1084 China King 925 Seaside Rd. SW, Ste. 12, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-8338 Dawg House Grill Too 6415 Beach Dr. SW, Ocean Isle Beach. (910) 579-8834 Jinks Creek Waterfront Grille 14 Causeway Dr., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-9997 Joey O’s Pizzeria See listing on page 50 Ocean Isle Fish Company Restaurant 65 Causeway Dr., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 575-5855

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Sharky’s Restaurant 61 Causeway Dr., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-9177 Sugar Shack 1609 Hale Beach Rd. SW, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 579-3844 The Isles Restaurant 417 W. 2nd St., Ocean Isle Beach (910) 575-5988

OAK ISLAND 55th Street Seafood House 5515 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 250-1873 Ahoy Doughnuts 5821 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-6929 Bar-B-Que House 5002 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 201-1001 Beana’s Kitchen 106 SE 58th St., Oak Island (910) 278-7209 Bob’s Dogs 8903 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-3456 Chaser’s Sports bar & Grill 8520 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-1500 Fish House 57th Pl. W, Oak Island (910) 278-6012 Island Way 1407 E. Beach Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-7770 Jones’ Seafood House 6404 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-5231 Kai-Joe’s 4722 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 622-1509

Oak Island Restaurant 6302 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 201-9925 Oak Island Sub Shop 5705 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-9040 OKI Scoop Shop and Burger Bus 4922 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island Old Bridge Diner 132 Country Club Dr., Oak Island, (910) 250-1184 Pepperoni Grill at the Beach 4320 E. Beach Dr., Oak Island (910) 250-1190 Pirates Deck 5827 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 933-4615 Pizza Shack 6212 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-6781 Russell’s Place Restaurant 5700 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-3070 Shagger Jacks 8004 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 933-4103 Swain Seafood Shack 5119 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 448-5056 Thai by the Sea 8300 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island, (910) 278-6420 The Confectionary 4345 Long Beach Rd. SE, Oak Island (910) 457-9310 The Flying Fish Café 705 Ocean Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-5504 Tranquil Harbour Restaurant & Bar 5908 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 250-1294 Turtle Island 6220 E. Oak Island Dr., Oak Island (910) 278-4944


Brunswick County Dining | Spring 2018 Wildfire Restaurant & Grill 4381 Fish Factory Rd., Oak Island (910) 457-9953

San Jose Mexican 5051 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-9181

SHALLOTTE

Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Bar-B-Q See listing on page 50

Angelo’s Pizzeria & Bistro See listing on page 50 Burg-Dog Grill 150 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Ste. 1, Shallotte (910) 754-4333 China Buffet II 110 Shallotte Crossing Pkwy., Shallotte (910) 755-5838 Duffer’s Bar & Grill 4924 Main St., Ste. 1, Shallotte (910) 754-7229 Hwy 55 Burgers Shakes & Fries 4501 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-7571 Inlet View Bar & Grill 1800 Village Point Rd. SW, Shallotte (910) 754-8439 Jerome’s Steak & Seafood 4909 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-8680 Jersey Girls Deli 5285 Main St., Ste. 6, Shallotte (910) 754-4455 Jumpin’ Java 4635 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-5282 Mama Brava’s Pizza and Subs 119 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Shallotte (910) 754-5151

Speedy Weenie 4624 Main St., Shallotte (910) 880-0178 Starz Grille (inside Planet Fun) 349 Whiteville Rd. NW, Shallotte (910) 755-2386 Sugar Confections Bakery 4830 Main St. #3, Shallotte (910) 754-3838 Tee Time Café 126 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Shallotte (910) 754-7008 The Daily Scoop on Main 4924 Main St., Ste. 5, Shallotte (910) 755-3899 The Filling Station 209 Village Rd., Shallotte (910) 754-7474 The Grillin’ Crab 4812 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-8700 Wing & Fish Company 4764 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-9858 Zeng’s Garden Chinese Restaurant 4734 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-5280

CALABASH

Old Shally’s Diner 5300 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-5599

Bagel Dock Café 1162 River Rd., Calabash, (910) 575-1200

Osaka Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar 110 Shallotte Crossing Pkwy., Shallotte (910) 755-6188

Bella’s Pizza and Deli 10136 Beach Dr. SW, Carolina Shores (910) 579-0000

Pelicans Snoballs 5460 Main St., Shallotte (910) 754-3767

Bennetts Grill & Café 10009 Beach Dr. SW, Calabash (910) 575-2494

Purple Onion Café See listing on page 50

Boundary House Restaurant See listing on page 50

Rivers Edge Golf Club Grill 2000 Arnold Palmer Dr., Shallotte (800) 789-0535

Calabash Seafood Hut 1125 River Rd., Calabash (910) 579-6723

BRICK LANDING The View at Brick Landing Plantation is the only restaurant in Ocean Isle Beach situated on a premier golf course overlooking the Intracoastal Waterway. It’s unique not only for its spectacular location and breathtaking views, but also for its outstanding cuisine. Coastal residents and visitors routinely visit The View at Brick Landing to enjoy fresh seafood and exciting American traditional dishes. With a focus on fresh and local, this restaurant brings a new and exciting take on dining out to the Ocean Isle Beach area. —————

1882 Goose Creek Rd. SW, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 754-2745

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t e Restauran Guid

Brunswick County Dining | Spring 2018

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HWY 55 BURGERS SHAKES & FRIES Hwy 55 brings a fresh, all-American diner experience with never-frozen burgers, sliced cheesesteaks piled high on steamed hoagies and frozen custard made in-house every day. Founded in eastern North Carolina in 1991, Hwy 55 reflects founder Kenney Moore’s commitment to authentic hospitality and fresh food. Lunch and dinner are grilled in an open-air kitchen, and they serve you at your table — with a smile.

————— Hwy 55 - Walmart Shopping Center 1114 New Pointe Blvd., Leland (910) 371-2707 ————— Hwy 55 – Mt. Misery Road 1725 Reed Rd., Leland (910) 371-6700

Captain John’s Seafood House 9887 Oak St., Calabash (910) 579-6011

Sandpiper Coffee and Ice Cream 6 Marina Wynd, Bald Head Island (910) 457-1222

Captain Nance’s Seafood 9939 Nance St., Calabash (910) 579-2574

Shoals Club 100 Station House Way, Bald Head Island (910) 454-4888

The Dockside Seafood House 9955 Nance St., Calabash (910) 579-6775

Will ‘o the Wisp 98 Keelson Row, Bald Head Island (910) 363-1887

Ella’s of Calabash 1148 River Rd., Calabash (910) 579-6728

SUPPLY

Grapevine Mediterranean Restaurant & Lounge 9991 Beach Dr. SW, Calabash (910) 575-6565 Gravy Southern Eatery 1165 Carlyle Pl., Calabash (910) 579-4733 Mmm Que Rico 1533 Thomasboro Rd. SW, Calabash (910) 579-5900 Sunny Side Up Diner 10068 Beach Dr. SW, Calabash (910) 579-5101 Sunrise Pancake House 10008 Beach Dr. SW, Calabash (910) 575-1001 Tony’s Pizza 1150 River Rd., Calabash (910) 579-3531 Waterfront Seafood Shack 9945 Nance St., Calabash (910) 575-0017

BALD HEAD ISLAND Bald Head Island Club 1 Salt Meadow Tr., Bald Head Island (910) 457-7300 Delphina Cantina 8 Marina Wynd, Bald Head Island (910) 457-1222 Honey’s BBQ 10 Marina Wynd, Bald Head Island (910) 457-5959 Maritime Market 8 Maritime Way, Bald Head Island (910) 457-7450 Mojo’s on the Harbor 10 Marina Wynd, Bald Head Island (910) 457-7217

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Betty’s Waterfront Restaurant 1045 B-Var Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-3381 Ginny’s Chicken House 3262 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-3230 Great Wall 1096 Sabbath Home Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-4733 Main Street Grill 3408 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-1862 Mankins Causeway Café 3397 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply, (910) 846-3430 Old Ferry Seafood 1069 Songbird Ln. SW, Supply (910) 842-6278 Patriones Pizza 2625 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-7900 Provision Company 1343 Cedar Landing Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-7205 Simply Barbecue 3240 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply (910) 712-4441 Silver Hill Grill 2049 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-6420 Sonja’s Grill 15 Coastal Dr. SW, Supply (910) 754-5115 Surfers Café Inc 1096 Sabbath Home Rd. SW, Supply (910) 842-2582 The Cove Restaurant 2633 Holden Beach Rd. SW, Supply (910) 846-2633


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The Chef & The Frog An multicultural restaurant puts downtown Whiteville on the map as a dining destination.

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BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL CLINE

Among the Southern kitchens and barbecue joints in Whiteville, you might be surprised to find The Chef & The Frog, a multicultural, Asian and Europeaninfluenced restaurant. “Dinner at The Chef & The Frog is an adventure,” says Guillaume Slama, co-founder, owner and husband to national award-winning Chef Sokun Nuon-Slama. “It’s not just about the food; it’s an invitation to learn about other cultures.” The walls of the eatery are sprinkled with photos of the restaurateurs captured among exotic sights around the world, including their homelands of Cambodia and France. Their hope is that their customers, when dining here, figuratively cross borders and open themselves to learning about different people, traditions and, of course, food. Generally, restaurants of this quality might develop a reputation as a special occasion destination. But Slama, who says the restaurant has

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Husband and wife team, Guillaume Slama and Sokun Nuon-Slama, cofounders of The Chef & The Frog.

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a loyal following of regulars, describes their casual fine dining experience as “unpretentious, affordable and authentic.” They even have an extensive wine list with selections from Oregon, California, Italy, Argentina and beyond that offers something for every budget. The Chef & The Frog is part of the vibrant downtown scene inside Vineland Village in Whiteville, which is 45 minutes from both Wilmington and Myrtle Beach. Nuon-Slama reimagines modern American and European dishes with

an ever-changing menu. Her creative chef specials and her skill of blending common dishes with exotic fare have landed her numerous accolades and awards, including membership to the prestigious Chaîne des Rôtisseurs, the oldest international gastronomic society honoring masters of the culinary arts. Nuon-Slama is a self-taught chef who learned from talented culinary experts in Italy, France and Spain, among other countries, and is inspired in part by her father’s cooking ability, which actually saved her family members’ lives. In the mid-1970s she and some members of her family were captured during the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia. “My family was spared due to my father’s ability to pose as a cook,” she says. “He offered his skills in return for our safety.” She and her family eventually escaped and moved to France, where she grew up — and where she would meet her prince charming, Guillaume. 58

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“Her creative chef specials and her skill of blending common dishes with exotic fare have landed her numerous accolades and awards, including membership to the prestigious Chaîne des Rôtisseurs...” “It was a hot day in June of 1994,” Slama recalls. “We were both visiting the Champs-Elysees in Paris.” They were each with their significant others but met in line at a cafe while ordering lunch. And that is where the fairytale began. They were kindred spirits, sharing family histories of plight and persecution. Slama’s own family fled to France after enduring violence and

aggression during the German occupation of the Netherlands. They eventually fell in love, married and moved to America in 1997. In 2009, after having run a successful restaurant outside of Athens, Georgia, that fell victim to the recession, the pair relocated to Whiteville when an opportunity presented itself to begin a new restaurant.

The building that the Slamas moved into was that of a previous restaurant called The Southern Kitchen, a long-standing traditional cooking establishment in the heart of Whiteville. Though Nuon-Slama would be cooking and serving Asian-fusion cuisine, the landlord refused to let them change the name on the side of the building. The restaurant had a soft opening in September of 2009, with 30 people lined up at the door. While most were instant fans, there were those who were taken by surprise. “People came in expecting a Southern kitchen,” Slama says. “You won’t make it if you don’t serve Southern food, people told us.” Wisely, they ignored the advice and continued to do things their way. Eventually the Slamas bought the building across the street and rebranded the outside of the restaurant: The Chef & The Frog. Even the menus read like a fairytale, beginning with the words “Once Upon a Time” and “In the Beginning” for the appetizers. There’s even an “Evil Witch Advisory” reminding diners of the dangers of consuming undercooked and raw foods. The offerings are eclectic, with items most diners wouldn’t expect to find together on a menu, including common Southern bites like fried green tomatoes and exotic tastes like escargots. Very few items repeat across the brunch, lunch and dinner menus, with the exception of a few staples like soups and salads. One dish diners will find on both the lunch and dinner menus is NuonSlama’s signature entree — Cambodian Beef. The tender sliced beef, along with her rib eyes and filets, are sourced directly from an Angus farm. Made with herbs and hot peppers from her own garden and served with warm, soft jasmine rice, there is no questioning why her Spring 2018

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Cambodian Beef has taken national honors in culinary competitions across the country. Another customer favorite is the Chef ’s Breast, a plump double chicken breast glazed with honey and spices, served with grilled pineapple and creamy grits. Not to worry for the non-meat lovers. The Chef & The Frog serves a variety of other dishes including salmon, tuna, shrimp and grits, and pastas. Nuon-Slama makes everything from scratch: breads, dressings, croutons, sauces, pickles, pastries and ice cream, and she even grows the lettuce, vegetables and herbs. Perhaps one of her defining ingredients is her homemade curry that she uses in her Cambodian dishes. “My curry is my mother’s recipe, and it was her mothers’ before that, and her mother’s mother, etc.,” explains Nuon-Slama. Ordering pre-made or premanufactured ingredients never occurred to her when she started cooking. “I started the hard way, and once I got started, I realized I wouldn’t have it any other way.” Fresh, quality, healthy and local are at the essence of their establishment. The Slamas travel hundreds of miles during their days off, driving to Asian grocery stores in two different states to get the freshest ingredients and hard-to-find items like baby bok-choy, yu-choy and soy beans. They support local agricultural businesses buying local cheese and honey from area farmers. At The Chef & The Frog, customers don’t have to worry about whether or not the Roasted Pork Belly has the same amount of chimichurri sauce this time as it did the last time they ordered it, or if the Chef ’s Breast will be overcooked or undercooked instead of just right. That’s because Nuon-Slama

cooks every single dish and oversees every aspect of its preparation. Consistency and quality are key to the restaurant’s success. She once hired a sous-chef to help her out so she could have a night or two off, but her customers weren’t fooled. “They were asking before making a reservation if I was cooking or not,” she says. For Nuon-Slama, it’s not just cooking. It’s art, and it’s a medium she’s passionate about. She blends Asian spices, French culinary techniques and Southern ingredients to “come up with a unique pallet of tastes and flavors” that complement each other, not compete with each other. The Slamas

have one wish for those who visit The Chef & The Frog — “get out of your comfort zone and try something new.” “I would like nothing more but for you to trust me and try what I have concocted for you,” Nuon-Slama says. Thanks to an active downtown development committee, of which Slama is a member, the revitalization efforts of Whiteville have made it possible for unique shops and restaurants like The Chef & The Frog to thrive, providing an intercultural dining experience to residents and visitors without ever having to leave their hometown. 

Want to go? The Chef & The Frog 605 S Madison Street, Whiteville (910) 640-5550 chefnc.com The restaurant is open for dinner Thursday through Saturday, for lunch Tuesday through Friday and for brunch on Sunday.

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The Butcher of Brunswick All-natural meats, fresh-baked bread and many other delicacies await customers in the bright yellow building in Ocean Isle Beach. STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARBARA SAMMONS

Above: A refrigerator case of fresh chickens, beef, pork and homemade lasagna and meatballs at The Butcher of Brunswick.

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The closest I’ve come to a butcher was my grandmother, who raised hogs and chickens on her farm in rural Ohio. We would walk by the well-used tree stump with a few feathery remnants and shudder slightly just thinking of the actions that had taken place. The idea of Grandma with a cleaver never deterred us from eating her chicken goulash or pork roast, however; it was just part of what comes with farming. We were eating all natural before it became popular. Lucky for me and the residents of southern Brunswick County, there is a butcher in town who does all the work, just like Grandma. One day as I was traveling U.S. Highway 17 to South Carolina, I noticed a very bright yellow building in Ocean Isle Beach with a sign that read The Butcher of Brunswick. Being new to the area, I always like to check out local stores that carry specialty items not found in big-box stores. I wasn’t prepared for the quality and selection found within the walls of that bright yellow building.

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Kevin Fahy (left), The Butcher of Brunswick owner, stocks an array of gluten-free products as well as an assortment of fresh baked Italian bread, hot Italian sausage, homemade pasta sauce, homemade mozzarella, shrimp ravioli and rice balls. A case stocked with items from Pastosa (right), a company out of Brooklyn, New York, offers unique Italian food finds.

Meats, Chickens and Hogs “Grab a loaf of bread and hold onto it,” are words you will hear as you enter the door. Why? Because the bread is that good and it goes fast as customers shop for meats, cheeses and sauces. “The breads come from New Jersey and New York and are baked fresh on the premises,” says Kevin Fahy, owner of The Butcher of Brunswick. Originally from Brooklyn, New York, Fahy is a retired police detective from New York City. He and his wife, Dawn, and daughter, Annie, moved to Ocean Isle Beach in October of 2002, just after the 9/11 terrorist attack on New York City 64

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and the death of his son in a car accident. “It was time for a change and new scenery,” he says. “I was looking for a place where I could find food products like I was used to back in New York. After a couple of years, I worked with Randy’s Meats and established a delicatessen within his store.” In 2008 Fahy and his wife purchased Randy’s Meats and rebranded the business as The Butcher of Brunswick. It was their dream to bring farm-raised meats and poultry to this new business and educate the public about the benefits of all-natural products. It has taken a few years, but Fahy is on the right track as he works with local farmers from the mountains of Georgia to family farms in North Carolina. “We source our beef from Harris-Robinette Beef out of


Pinetops, North Carolina,” he says. “It is 100 percent grassfed, free of pesticides and hormones. The beef comes in under ice and is butchered on-site. If you want a 2-pound chuck, we cut it for you. If you want ground chuck, we grind it for you. Whatever the customer wants, we are here to serve them.” Springer Mountain Farms, a family-owned business for more than 40 years in the hills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Mount Airy, Georgia, is Fahy’s source for the finest chickens on the market today. They are 100 percent allnatural with no antibiotics, steroids, growth stimulants or hormones and they are never fed animal by-products. Fahy sources whole hogs from Cheshire Pork and butchers them onsite. Cheshire Pork hogs are also all-natural with no flavoring solutions, preservatives, added hormones or fillers. Fahy and his team grind preservative-free, salt-free sausage every day and will grind it to your specifications. They also trim and tie tenderloins that are then oven-ready. All meats and poultry are wrapped in 30-day freezer wrap paper. Fahy suggests freezing these items if they are not cooked within 24 hours. Most of the products Fahy gets in are fresh and right from the farm, but there are other items he stocks that come in frozen and stay frozen. He does not re-package any items; he just keeps them the way supplier sends them. Some of these items include shrimp, clams,

mussels, lobster and seafood gumbo. He also stocks venison, wild boar, bison, alligator and Naked Beef and Naked Chicken from Joyce Farms out of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. At Thanksgiving he stocks locally sourced turkeys that were flash frozen and stay frozen at 32 degrees while traveling to his location.

A Little Bit of Italy and More Elsewhere in the store are large glass cases filled with homemade lasagna, eggplant Parmigiana, chicken cutlets, quiches, rice balls, meatballs, stuffed peppers, crab cakes, original Brooklyn knishes and crumb cakes shipped from New York. A freezer case is stocked with ravioli, gnocchi and fresh pasta from Pastosa, a third-generation, family-owned and -operated Italian specialty food company out of Brooklyn, New York. It general takes two weeks for Pastosa to make the

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products that Fahy orders, and they are shipped frozen. Mozzarella and Burrata (made from mozzarella and cream) and pasta sauces are handmade on-site every week. Delicately seasoned pastrami is flown in from New York, as are hot dogs and the wide selection of breads. Olive oil, sauces and pasta dot the shelves of the store, along with other home-baked treats. New and much welcomed items are the many glutenfree products, including gluten-free bread crumbs. The Fahys also offer catering. “Whatever the customer wants, that’s what we’ll prepare,” Fahy says. “We can prepare a pig roast or something as simple as hot dogs and hamburgers or as elegant as filet mignon or chateaubriand, just whatever the customer wants.” They cater events for between 50 and 800 people, with 50 guests being the minimum for on-site events. For events of less than 50 guests, they will prepare all the food but it needs to be picked up at the store. Dawn and Annie help in the store alongside Melissa Matthews, a seven-

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year employee, and Dave, a three-year employee, plus several part-time employees. “The food industry is a tough industry,” Fahy says. “We pride ourselves on offering fresh products at a fair price and being loyal to our customers. If a customer is not happy with a product they purchased, we encourage them to let us know and we’ll make things right. We want our customers to have the best experience when they walk into The Butcher of Brunswick.”

was overflowing with sausage, fresh mozzarella, pasta sauce, shrimp ravioli, pastrami, Swiss cheese and, of course, their famous bread. I still have visions of my Grandma and her cleaver, but it’s not so unsettling anymore since I found The Butcher of Brunswick. I’ll let him do the work and I’ll reap the benefits. 

On the Horizon “I have no plans for expansion; one store is enough for me,” Fahy says. Last fall he did lease some space in his building to Makai Brewing Company. Fahy caters their parties as well as provides food such as sandwiches, salads and hot specialties during their open hours. This is a new venture for both Fahy and Makai Brewing Company and undoubtedly will change over the next few months as they both settle in. As I walked around the store gazing at all the delicacies, I noticed my basket

Want to know more? The Butcher of Brunswick 5850 Ocean Highway W. Ocean Isle Beach (910) 287-6999 Facebook: The Butcher of Brunswick


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The Joy of a Family Farm Holden Brothers Produce is a celebration of family and the good fortune of fertile soil. BY TERESA MCLAMB PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA GLANTZ

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The front gate was locked when I met with Kelly and David Holden of Holden Brothers Farm Market this winter, but behind the scenes there was a flurry of activity readying the business for the spring season. The market was getting a fresh coat of paint, and the fields were being prepped for the juicy strawberries that will be harvested in April and May. Even in the winter, this produce farm and market is a 24 hour a day operation. Holden Brothers Farm Market grew out of the family farm that is more than 200 years old. “Historically our farm operation, the farm itself, came through my grandmother and has been in the family since probably 1756,� Kelly explains.

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The bicentennial farm was part of land grants to the Brooks family, the same family and grants that included what is now Sunset Beach. The Holden brothers’ great grandmother, Mary Anna Brooks, inherited the property from her father. Through the last 200-plus years, parcels have been sold off, placed in trust and deeded to other relatives. The 250-acre farm tended by the brothers may be the largest intact parcel. The brothers grew up working on the farm with their father, Paul Holden, who mostly grew tobacco, soybeans and corn. “My father taught me this,” Kelly says. “He was a hard worker; I got my work ethic from him.” Kelly, the youngest, went to Western Carolina University after graduating from Shallotte High School. It was the Vietnam War era, and he left school to join the Navy, where he was an electronics technician. David studied math and science at Campbell College before landing a job with American Standard in Wilmington. Over the next two decades he served in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve, became an accomplished commercial millwright and landed a job with Riegel Paper, where he stayed for 21 years. Neither brother ever intended to return to farming. But then their father had a heart attack. Responding to their father’s request, Kelly returned to the farm. He took night-time agriculture courses under the GI Bill. A few years later, he asked David to

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join him. David says leaving Riegel was a big decision. “I was making $13.45 an hour plus benefits; that was big money in 1985.” But he took a leap of faith and joined Kelly. They changed the operation from tobacco farming to vegetables and fruit, opening a small sales shack where the northbound lane of Highway 17 is now. “The early years were a struggle until we finally got on our feet,” Kelly says. “Business didn’t start to boom until after Highway 17 was four lanes, and all the new subdivisions started popping up and people moving in. Then we didn’t have to depend completely on tourists.” Their business today is nothing like in the early years. “The whole industry has changed; farming is an industry now,” David says. Kelly recalls the early days when he started experimenting with vegetable crops. “I think I was one of the first in the county to use plasti-culture,” he says. That’s the technique of applying a layer of plastic over the prepared soil and planting the crop through it.

Top left, Kelly, on left, and David Holden grow fruits and vegetables on a legacy farm that’s more than 200 years old. Below left, their farm and farm market in Shallotte employ numerous people. Holden Brothers Farm Market in Shallotte sells produce grown on the farm as well as items grown or made in North Carolina.

He began growing tomatoes for the wholesale market in 1982, but that didn’t pan out. “In the process, I started putting vegetables in the back of a trailer out beside the highway and people started stopping. I couldn’t believe how hungry people were for cantaloupes.” By 1984 he had opened the small stand on Highway 17. “I saw I couldn’t do it all and asked my brother to take care of the market, and I’d do the field work,” he says. That’s how it’s been ever since. Kelly is responsible for the farming and manpower, and David handles the business side. Kelly’s wife, Barbara, helps with the books, and David’s wife, Ouida, works in the market. Their aunt, Mae Watts, worked in the market until a few years ago. Her sister, 90-year-old Beulah McCoy, still helps out. “We grow all varieties of vegetables,” Kelly says, adding that more than 70 percent of what they sell is grown in their fields. They grow whatever works in the local climate and bring in others such as peaches, blueberries and apples. Just before closing for the winter, they were still picking collards,

mustard, turnips and lettuce. The last of the bell pepper crop was picked mid-December. “We’ve had a good business,” Kelly says, “but the challenge is keeping it going.” It is, as David says, a year-round operation that ignores birthdays and anniversaries. Late this winter they picked up tiny strawberry plants nurtured on Prince Edward Island, Canada, and distributed through Cottle Nursery in Faison. The next plantings will be squash and cucumbers, then cantaloupes, tomatoes, watermelons and sweet corn, and the process continues with planting and harvesting being constant. The fields will open for U-Pick strawberries in spring and tomatoes in summer. They grow five varieties of tomatoes, including one called Phoenix, which matures well in warm weather such as we have in autumn. Spring 2018

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Fall crops will include pumpkins. “I took me years to learn how to grow them,” Kelly says. With luck, the tropical storms will be few and far between. “What gets you are tropical systems that bring in bacteria and fungi. It’s difficult to combat that.” Likewise, if the crops are affected by storms, then the other growers to the south have the same problem and supply becomes scarce. David says the tomato harvest was so scarce this year that boxes normally costing $15 were up to $50. Labor is the brothers’ biggest challenge. “I’m fortunate I have one family that has worked with me for 20 plus years,” Kelly says. From St. Luis Potisi, Mexico, they travel home after the last tomato harvest and return in March, often bringing cousins and relatives with them. The majority of field hands are migrant workers. Yet there are still periods in the summer when he can’t get enough labor. The key to their success, David believes, is stocking what

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customers want. That’s led to increasingly diverse offerings of honey, jellies, handmade items and more. “One hot item now is John Brown Pimento Cheese,” he says. They’ve installed a new cooler that will offer meats and cheeses in 2018. They try to offer products from North Carolina or nearby: Ashe County cheeses, corn meal from Evergreen, jellies from Hendersonville. As spring rolls in, be sure to stop in and meet the Holden brothers and sample some of the produce they sell on one of the oldest farms in Brunswick County. 

Want to go? Holden Brothers Farm Market 5600 Ocean Highway West, Shallotte (910) 579-4500, holdenbrothersfarmmarket.com


910-754-8175 www.ncfbins.com

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Frank West and Wendy Li opened the doors to the Coastal Wine Room in May 2017.

A Toast to the Coast

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Wendy Li and Frank West share their love of fine wine at Ocean Isle Beach’s first wine bar. BY ASHLEY DANIELS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HEAD

Most of the retirees who move to Brunswick County retire not only from their snow shovels and wool socks, but also from their jobs. Brunswick County’s warm climate and beautiful beaches are the escape they’ve worked toward all of their lives and they can’t wait to relax, slow down and let go of the daily grind. For Wendy Li and Frank West, however, their retirement plan wasn’t quite that simple. Former residents of the suburbs of Cleveland, Ohio, the couple fell in love with the island of Ocean Isle Beach after years of vacations that began in 2005. In 2009 they purchased a home on the island, and in May

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2017 they opened the doors to the Coastal Wine Room, the first wine room on the island. “Our retirement plans needed to include a way to meet new friends and activities that would be a service to the residents and guests who visit the island,” they share on the wine room’s website. Li, who has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Stanford University and UCLA, hails from California, where she worked at Energizer Battery before moving to Ohio. West retired as an x-ray technician from University Hospitals St. John Medical Center. One commonality for the co-owners is a passion for wine. Amidst the impressive 300 labels Coastal Wine Room has in stock, you’ll find hints of Li’s California roots alongside wines from around the world. Everything is painstakingly selected from large and small vineyards, and most are not offered by other local retailers. “Our inventory features something you won’t find anywhere else,” West says. “We really try not to overlap from what’s offered in grocery stores, with a wider price range.” Coastal Wine Room offers wine flights (four sampling glasses each), ranging from rieslings and sparkling wines to a pinot noir, malbec and cabernet spanning the globe from California to Spain, Germany, South Africa, France and Argentina. Two of the owners’ favorites on their shelves right now are from Rombauer Vineyards: the chardonnay and California cabernet. If you’d like some food to go along with the grapes, Coastal Wine Room also offers a menu of small plates.

“Our inventory features something you won’t find anywhere else. We really try not to overlap from what’s offered in grocery stores, with a wider price range.”

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Want to go? Here are a few things to keep in mind before you make your trip to Coastal Wine Room:

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They host a special wine event/tasting each month in the off-season; during the summer, Coastal Wine room holds weekly wine tastings, wine pairings and more activities. If you join Coastal Wine Room’s Wine Club, you will receive two wines selected by Li each month; it’s a great way for members to broaden their palates. Off-season hours are Wednesday to Saturday 2 to 8 p.m., but hours will expand this summer. They can special order most wines by the bottle or case and usually have it within 24 hours. 12-bottle cases receive a 10% discount.

Coastal Wine Room 20B E. Second Street, Ocean Isle Beach (910) 393-2125, coastalwineroom.com

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Choose from a tasty spinach and artichoke dip served with tortilla chips, chips and salsa, pot stickers, a cheese board (with nuts, fruit and chocolate) and pretzels and hummus. Weekly tastings of featured wines give customers an added insight into what’s in their glass, from the actual wine-making process to the complexity and personality of each wine. “We always hear that this is something the island sorely needed,” West says. “It’s new, unique and creative. And it’s not a sports bar – we won’t have the football game on here! Husbands actually need to pay attention to their wives now.” If wine isn’t your preference, six taps rotate local craft brews that can be poured by the pint, half pint or growler. The beer menu taps into the local breweries (and some that are Ohio-based). Locals love to gather at the second-floor bar perched on the corner of East Second and Halifax streets for special events. During regular hours, Li says, many visitors to the island make this their first stop after check-in. “It’s nice because we’ve always had a social life centered around wine tastings and wine socials,” Li says, “but now we’re focused on the business side of wine. We quickly integrated into the local community and we’re able to meet new people this way, rather than just being retired.” Cheers to that! Here’s to mingling and meeting new friends through an appreciation for the creative art and science of fine wines. It’s an ancient practice that never grows old. And it’s a heck of a way to retire. 


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Handmade & Homegrown Pure Markets, managers of the Sunset Beach Summer Market and Ocean Isle Summer Market, ensure a focus on locally made goods. BY JO ANN MATHEWS

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One of the things to look forward to as the weather warms is the return of open-air markets. The offerings in the local markets can vary widely, creating unique outdoor shopping experiences all across the region. As managers of Sunset Beach Summer Market and Ocean Isle Beach Summer Market, Pure Markets wants to feature only “pure” products. That means they don’t allow vendors to bring resales, or merchandise bought from another source and sold at the market. Chris Wilson, manager of Pure Markets, which she and her husband, Jim, formed, explains that this means they allow vendors to sell only homemade, handmade and homegrown goods. Wilson says they listened to vendors to learn what makes a market successful. Those conversations reinforced their idea that a strict no resale policy is the key. “We talk to all vendors and ask how they make their products,” she says. “We allow a unique skill because it adds a form of art to our markets.” Some examples of the products featured at Pure Markets include Kevin Scott’s woodworking pieces, Leslie Angier’s shell art, Jody Belo’s painted switch covers and Richard Jones’ Venus flytrap plants, which, by the way, he is certified to sell.

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“We are always looking for something new and different,” Wilson says. “Every vendor is either personally invited to our markets or is chosen after submitting an application and a number of photos.” To ensure as much as possible that products are original, the team looks online at websites and Etsy accounts as well. “The skill level at our markets is such that you couldn’t recreate it,” Wilson says. Award-winning outdoor photographer Gary Baird joined the Sunset Beach vendors in 2017. He sells to tourists who want a memory of their trip, visitors who are impressed with his artwork and interior decorators who want to add to their projects. “It’s a wonderful place,” he says. “People from all over the area look forward to it. It’s kind of a destination.” Barbara Sfraga sells her pen and ink and pencil drawings as well as jewelry she makes from tree roots. “I never take from a live tree,” she says. Instead she picks up branches, limbs and other tree components that can be part of a piece of jewelry. She takes off the bark and debris, polishes what she wants to use and “sets the root system on a new journey. “I’m conscious of ecology,” she says. “Everything I use is nontoxic and supportive of the Earth.” The Sunset Beach market includes about 60 vendors, who sell in categories such as jewelry, skin-care items and foods. Farm-grown products without use of pesticides, travel snacks, pretzels, bakery items, Ocean Isle Beach’s Dixieland Kettle Corn Company and food trucks are accepted. YehMon51 travels with his food truck from Wilmington and offers his Jamaican menu, which is popular with the Sunset Beach market crowd. Pure Markets pays the Town of Sunset Beach a fee for the use of Sunset Beach Town Park and charges a nominal fee to vendors. Nonprofit organizations, such as Paws-Ability and Sunset Beach Turtle Program, are not charged. “[Summer Market] is an event that is an asset to the community,” Wilson says. “It enables nonprofits to get exposure, and the fee the town charges maintains the park. It’s a community gathering place, too, a social event. Everybody helps each other. We have a cooperative attitude rather than a competitive attitude.” Sfraga says the market has been wonderful for her.

Locals and visitors look forward to weekly market days in Ocean Isle Beach and Sunset Beach.

“Everybody helps each other. We have a cooperative attitude rather than a competitive attitude.”

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“I found my clientele there,” she says. “It’s a beautiful market in so many ways. We engage the community. It’s wonderful meeting with the artists there. We’re a family.” Wilson says they want market day to be a day that everyone in the community looks forward to. “We’ve created something we felt was good for the community,” she says. “We want to pay our share, be good stewards and continue to provide a good venue so our vendors can make a good living. Our goal is to make the market different every week and to have a positive experience for vendors, visitors and management.” Pure Markets is committed to the continuation of the Ocean Isle Beach and Sunset Beach markets for the benefit of the vendors as well as the community. “We have close ties and a deep respect for our vendors, for how hard they work and the talent that they have,” she says, nodding and smiling with satisfaction. 

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Want to go? Sunset Beach Summer Market kicks off on May 3 and continues each Thursday until October 11. Hours are 9 am to 1 pm. A preview Spring Market is coming up on April 5 from 9 am to 1 pm. It’s held at Sunset Beach Town Park, 206 Sunset Boulevard. The Ocean Isle Beach Summer Market is open Tuesdays from May 29 to September 4. Hours are 9 am to 2 pm. It’s held on the island at 8 E. 2nd Street. The markets run rain or shine. Bringing entertainment to the Sunset Beach Summer Market is in the works. For information call (910) 370-1373 or visit thepuremarkets.com.


BUILDING DREAM HOMES IN THE COASTAL CAROLINAS SINCE 1986

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60 Gregory Rd, Ste 1 Belville, NC 28451

Void where prohibited. Home features described and depicted herein are subject to change without notice. Illustrations are artists renderings. Some items illustrated or pictured are optional and are at an additional cost. Dimensions are approximate. Home and customer-speciic, detailed drawings and speciications will be furnished to each customer as part of their builder contract. Floor plans/elevations are subject to change without notice. Š Logan Homes 2018

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Food and Philanthropy

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Angelo’s owner James Lane is known for his unbeatable food and contributions to the Brunswick community. BY ASHLEY DANIELS |

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA GLANTZ

A forkful of fettucine and a helping of warm smiles from the staff and you’ll know why hundreds of locals can’t wait to return to their favorite booth or table for two at Angelo’s Pizzeria & Bistro. The food here —handmade pastas, pizza, gnocchi, stuffed banana peppers and more — is phenomenal, but there’s more to Angelo’s than just tasty eats. It’s also known for its philanthropic spirit in the Brunswick County community. Angelo Bertolozzi, a Tuscany native, served his first pie in his cozy restaurant in the Shallotte Crossing Shopping Center in the fall of 2003. That same year James Lane, who had moved to the coast from his hometown of Lexington,

N.C., came on board as a small partner with the restaurant. A restauranteur and former golf pro, Lane had originally relocated simply to be closer to the ocean. But he says he got way more than that at Angelo’s and in Brunswick County — he found a second family and a new community. “I feel so lucky to be living in a county where so many people are concerned about giving back to the community,” he says. Lane understands that giving back is essentially the definition of hospitality and that Angelo’s strives be leaders in that regard. “We offer genuine hospitality and genuinely good, quality food that keeps customers keeping back,” Lane says. “We Spring 2018

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want them to know we’re one of them, living and working here — we’re on their side.” After years of training by Bertolozzi on the business side, as well as in the kitchen, Lane took over the ownership reins when Bertolozzi retired in 2010. “But Angelo is still very much a part of the business,” Lane says. “I mean, his name is on the sign for a reason.” To show that he means business in his stance on community, Lane began hosting benefit wine dinners for local charities in 2013. Funds raised from those dinners have supported nonprofits such as Brunswick Family Assistance, First Tee of Brunswick County, Museum of Coastal Carolina in Ocean Isle Beach, Brunswick County Community College Foundation, on which he serves as a board member, Brunswick Literacy Council and Novant Health Foundation. Lane is also known to give out Angelo’s gift cards to local schools, churches and hospitals, plus he initiated his own in-house charity, Raising Dough, that’s an ongoing collection at the restaurant. “When the staff sees the restaurant giving back, it just helps the culture of this business,” he says. “I try to also hear what’s on the staff ’s heart with certain charities, to give back to those, too, because I want them to know that hospitality is doing those things and that community is important.”

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It’s no question that Lane has a passion for people and helping others. For that reason he was named one of the 2016 Future 10 Leaders by the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce. These young professionals are the poster children for the chamber’s mantra of Building Community and Supporting Business. The community, in turn, has embraced the restaurant, awarding Angelo’s the Best Italian Restaurant of Brunswick County in the Best of Brunswick contest. The restaurant also earned the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence in 2014, 2015 and 2016. The future is so bright, Lane has plans to build a bigger, better free-standing restaurant on Highway 17 in Shallotte, complete with alfresco dining options and private rooms for large groups. When he’s not planning ahead or giving back, he relishes time with his family — his wife, Ashley, and daughters Kennedy, age 6, and Claire, age 4. 

Want to go? Angelo’s Pizzeria & Bistro 110 Shallotte Crossing Pkwy, Suite D-3,Shallotte (910) 754-2334; angelosbistro.net


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Luck of the

Irish

Fibber McGees brings the taste and atmosphere of a traditional Irish pub to Sunset Beach.

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BY SHEREE K. NIELSEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTIAN VIERA PHOTOGRAPHY

A patio with cornflower-hued market umbrellas, string lights, hot pink mandevilla trellises and the aroma of fresh seafood in the air might not bring to mind a traditional Irish pub. But that’s what you’ll find at Fibber McGees in Sunset Beach, an Irish pub with coastal flair. Owner Rich Dobkin originally became familiar with Sunset Beach as a golf destination. After repeated visits to the area, he contacted a real estate agent and in November 2007 invested in two condo units. The thought of permanently settling in Sunset Beach became a reality when he conceptualized opening Brunswick County’s first Irish pub.

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The restaurant idea stemmed from a nostalgic comedy radio show called Fibber McGee and Molly and an Arizona restaurant bearing the name of Fibber McGees, in which Dobkin had investment dealings. Dobkin had two main requirements: that the restaurant be nonsmoking (smoking in restaurants was still legal in North Carolina at that time) and to have a dog-friendly patio. Fibber McGees opened in Sunset Beach in 2008 with 12 employees. Stepping inside the restaurant, you’ll quickly notice the rich tones of the caramel-hued and red oak walls and woodwork, much like a cozy Irish pub. “The bar is special,” Dobkin says. “My carpenter,


Brian Rooney, designed and built the bar from reclaimed red oak transported from the demolished St. Augustus Church in New City York. Brian’s dad was a member of the church.” The menu includes a great range of comfort-food appetizers like fried green tomatoes, quesadillas, nachos, wings and Reuben spring rolls. Salads, sandwiches, wraps, soups and delicious sides (Guinness-battered onion rings, anyone?) fill the extensive menu, and there are some traditional Irish dishes like shepherd’s pie and fish and chips. Favorites, however, reflect the taste of coastal diners: seafood pie, the shrimp burgers and the fresh scallops, which arrive at the restaurant three times a week. The scallops are prepared on a seasoned griddle that adds a delicious flavor. Numerous selections of bottle and draft beers as well as wines and spirits are available. Fibber’s staff includes several longtime employees. Alicia Cardenas, daytime cook and prep cook, has worked there for nine years. General Manager and Chef Steve Nehez hailed previously from Fibber’s on the Water in South Carolina before moving to the North Carolina location five years ago. Daytime manager and bartender John Thomas, who’s been with Fibber’s for more than five years, is revered by customers for his positive and easygoing attitude. Dobkin’s 20-year-old stepson, Aaron, works at the restaurant as well. Dobkin says his customers like seeing the familiar faces, in addition to the consistency of the food and the cleanliness and comfort of his restaurant. “They find this a warm, inviting place to hang out,” he says. In turn, Dobkin and his staff enjoy seeing many of the same customer faces two to three times a week. Some have been dining here regularly since the grand opening. Many are locals, and others frequent Sunset Beach several times a year. For some returning vacationers, the pub is often their first stop. Fibber’s stays open later than most restaurants in the area, making it a good place to get a meal later in the evening on the way into town. The staff members know the regular patrons’ names, their preferred drinks down to the tiniest details and how they like their food prepared. With the dog-friendly patio, the regulars keep

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company with their canine kids while dining, and the staff is quick to fill the doggy fountain for their drinking pleasure. One particular customer who dines at lunchtime always places a takeout order of two pieces of salmon for her fur babies. Some evenings there have been as many as five dogs outside, all well-behaved and coexisting with the other canines. Dobkin reminisces about watching a frequent customer’s Great Dane puppies grow up to adult dogs. “I’ve seen it all,” he says, “everything from Tea Cup Chihuahuas to Bull Mastiffs!” With Dobkin’s soft spot for dogs, it’s not unusual that he’s involved with Paws-Ability, a nonprofit organization that raises funds to assist local rescue groups and advance programs that benefit animal welfare in Brunswick County. Last fall Dobkin donated all the barbecue for the organization’s annual Bicycle Poker Run in Ocean Isle Beach. He praises Paws-Ability President Janie Withers for her great work with the organization. Dobkin enjoys supporting veterans’ causes as well. He participated as a supporter at the Veterans Memorial Dedication Program last fall. The ceremony, held at Sunset Beach Town Park, honored men and women who’ve served our nation. In 2015 he was presented with a framed flag in recognition of his monetary donation and services provided to the Veterans Memorial Golf Tournament. He has been involved in several Brick Landing tournaments supporting veterans as well. These days Rich lives in Leland with his wife, Carol, and canine kid, Jewels, a 2½-year-old yellow Labrador Retriever. Their “all American pound puppy” Samantha, a beloved family member, just recently passed at 13 years old. Rich has taken on a modest presence at Fibber’s, serving in an administrative aspect on weekday mornings, and he’s a firm believer of reinvesting funds back into the restaurant. Real estate ventures and Top Shelf Sportfishing, (a charter fishing business) in Morehead City also keep him busy these days. If you get a chance, pay a visit to Fibber McGees, where the staff is always cheery and if you come back a few times they’ll know your name. Raise a frosty glass of ale or stout to friends and family and enjoy the atmosphere of a traditional Irish pub in the coastal South. 

Want to go? Fibber McGee’s, 1780-1 Queen Anne Street, Sunset Beach; (910) 575-2271; fibbermcgeesnc.com 92

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Void where prohibited. Home features described and depicted herein are subject to change without notice. Illustrations are artists renderings. Some items illustrated or pictured are optional and are at an additional cost. Dimensions are approximate. Home and customer-speciic, detailed drawings and speciications will be furnished to each customer as part of their builder contract. Floor plans/elevations are subject to change without notice. Š Logan Homes 2015

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The Art of the

Swing

Golf Club Maestro in Ocean Isle Beach has the game of golf down to a science. BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTIAN VIERA

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Aerodynamics, angular velocity, dynamic balance, isometrics, moment of inertia, static balance and torque force? Sounds like the glossary of a physics textbook, but actually these are the physics behind making the perfect golf shot. The physics of a golf swing is much more complicated than a single strike of a golf ball. There is the golfer’s technique, the aerodynamics of the ball in flight and the ball spin. Essentially it’s the transference of energy between player and club. Professional golf club fitter C.J. Ebel knows that physics is what drives the importance of being properly fitted for golf clubs. “Golf clubs are complicated. Golf is a simple sport, but it’s complicated,” explains Ebel, owner of Golf Club Maestro in Ocean Isle Beach. “I take care of the complication, the physics part, so golfers can see improvement, develop consistency and keep their passion for the game.” Maestro is the Spanish word for teacher, which encompasses Ebel’s passion for educating golfers about the benefit of custom fitting their clubs. Customized club fitting can make an impressive difference in any player’s game, especially for seniors and newcomers to the sport. For golfers older than the age of 50, their swing speed starts to slow and they lose strength and flexibility, making their existing club set an ill-fit.

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“As we age it becomes more difficult to overcome strength to go out and purchase a new set of clubs. He can take an issues,” Ebel says. “We outgrow the original fitting of the existing set and balance and weight it properly to give golfers equipment.” That, he explains, makes the set improperly an opportunity to make more consistent swings for better weighted, which affects repeatability and comfort. contact when striking the ball. Off-the-rack golf club retail “When you have to force the club to do what you want it to sets are made from high-quality materials, but the weighting do, then the game is no longer enjoyable,” he says. and balancing typically differ from club to club in the same Players new to the game set because of the archaic are exceptional candidates for standardized fitting custom-fitted clubs as well. technique that uses a swing “When I talk about customweight machine. This results “If an off-the-rack club’s length, weight, fitted clubs, I often hear in clubs that have different shaft or grip doesn’t properly fit the people say, ‘I’m not good Moment of Inertias (MOIs), enough yet to get customand therefore the golfer has golfer’s body, he or she will most likely fitted clubs.’ But that’s the to use a different amount of develop unnatural techniques.” irony.” effort to swing each club. If an off-the-rack club’s “For the most part, golfers length, weight, shaft or grip typically have suitable sets, doesn’t properly fit the golfer’s so we work with what they body, he or she will most likely develop unnatural techniques. have,” Ebel says. “Then as their game develops and they think In addition to helping players get the right fitting clubs, Ebel about new clubs, we know the basic specs we can work with relies on his own past teaching experience to help other golf and we have a better idea of what they need in a new club.” instructors outfit their sets for teaching students. Proper balancing requires much more precision and focus Ebel’s customized balance crafting doesn’t require golfers on how each component (the club head, shaft and grip) are

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weighed and measured through the entire club set. Ebel’s Golf Club Maestro method focuses on determining a golfer’s physical effort and then defining it through a fitting process so that all of the clubs in the set swing with the same effort and timing. Ebel’s advanced way of fitting golfers to clubs has grown from his life-long exposure to and experience with the game of golf. His family owns and operates the Haystack Mountain Golf course outside of Boulder, Colorado, which has been around for nearly a

half-century. Haystack has an esteemed reputation as a teaching course that caters to a broad range of golfers. “I played all the time, and I had access to all types of clubs,” Ebel says. He played golf on his high school team, ranking number one, and continued playing through college in Texas and at Pfeiffer College in Misenheimer, North Carolina. Though Ebel spent many years instructing golf professionally, it was the process of making clubs that most appealed to him. He knows the technology through and through. Golf Club Maestro Balance Crafted Clubs measures the Moment of Inertia

Previous page: C.J. Ebel, owner of Golf Club Maestro, uses technology and physics to perfectly match golf clubs to golfers. This page: Ebel’s shop is in Ocean Isle Beach.

(MOI) using a MOI period counter instead of the traditional swing weight scale to craft all clubs in a set that require the same amount of physical effort to swing. He uses components of Tom Wishon Golf Technology exclusively because in his opinion they are the highest quality in the industry,

meeting OEM standards or better. The Club Maestro club-fitting process begins with a consultation in which Ebel gathers information about the golfer’s current set. It progresses to a fitting session using a test set of irons in which the importance is on determining the amount of physical ability and effort that the golfer has available to make the most consistent contact and highest club head speed during the golf swing. If a golfer’s goal is to play better golf, the solution could be custom-fitted clubs. Though it sounds complex, the end result in custom-fitting clubs can inspire dramatic improvements on the course. “I’ve witnessed the success of some of my clients who have dropped 10 or 15 strokes off their game after a month or so,” Ebel says. “It’s especially exciting for me to see players over 50 develop a consistency that they haven’t had in years. They not only gain distance, but confidence. It’s almost as if they’ve recovered their youth again.” 

Want to go? Golf Club Maestro: 6810 Beach Drive SW, Ocean Isle Beach; (910) 269-9920; golfclubmaestro.com

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What Lies Beneath Southport residents uncover the town’s rich historic African-American history as they restore the John N. Smith Cemetery.

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STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY TERRY REILLY

Long ago in Southport a small band of volunteers traditionally gathered at the John N. Smith Cemetery every Memorial Day. At the 3-acre parcel, hidden from Southport’s main thoroughfares and shrouded by the canopies of ancient live oaks, they cleared four seasons’ worth of accumulated detritus from gravesites and straightened toppled gravestones. But by the dawn of the twenty-first century that yearly tradition had ceased, and Southport’s only black cemetery was more a tangled wedge of unmaintained land than a revered burial place. The cemetery was established in 1880 by Southport’s St. James A.M.E. Zion Church, and it was a member of that same church who came to the cemetery’s rescue in 2011. Judy Gordon recruited volunteers from Southport’s four other black churches with ties to the burial grounds, including her

next door neighbor Gordon Walker, to form a nonprofit to fund the restoration. Walker was motivated to help after listening to a story from a 93-year-old Southport woman. She told him about the quarantine huts on stilts at the mouth of the Cape Fear River where European immigrants died during a flu epidemic. “They would be buried in the old Smithtown cemetery,” Walker says. “White, non-Americans were buried in the town cemetery while blacks, who lived here for multiple generations, could not be buried there. That really got to me.” As volunteers began uncovering buried headstones and clearing debris, Gordon pursued detective work to identify all of those entombed. Local churches and community members shared obituaries. A Southport Historical Society document from the 1980s identified the headstones for all Southport cemeteries. Gordon scoured Ancestry.com for death Spring 2018

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certificates that provided leads to spouses and other names. But a personal connection proved to be her best source. “My great uncle Edward E. McCoy was an undertaker,” Gordon says. “He kept cemetery books through the early 1940s. We picked up a lot of names.” Her list of names swelled to more than 900. But half of those names could not be found on gravestones. Across the cemetery’s neatly mowed grass, large swaths of land were void of headstones, and Gordon was certain many unidentified souls rested there. Last year the group turned to an unorthodox tool for help — dowsing. Eddie Davis, the team’s chaplain, walked a section of the grounds with a

“We’ll have more unmarked graves than marked graves when we’re finished.” pair of bent metal coat hangers. When his dowsing rods crossed in his hands, supposedly moved by unseen forces from a body below, a small piece of PVC pipe was used to mark the location. Owen Gidlow, a surveyor from Oak Island, recorded the exact locations of visible gravesites and dowsing markers. Dowsing is a method used mostly for finding water, and Davis learned the technique from an expert dowser who had recently passed through the area. Researchers debate the effectiveness of dowsing. A few months later the group traded the dowsing rods for modern technology, bringing in New South Technologies to use Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) equipment to scan for unknown gravesites. The $30,000 GPR device sent electromagnetic pulses into the ground to detect reflected signals that indicated graves. Sarah Lowry, the firm’s trained archaeologist, rolled the machine along a carefully laid out grid using Gidlow’s survey. Few tombstones impeded her path. “What you see above the ground is not what you have below, especially in older, historic cemeteries,” she says. “There are always unmarked graves and people in the wrong place.” The device located 891 probable burials. Only 133 of those sites had associated grave markers. 100

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The results shocked Gordon. “I was expecting only a handful here and there, not over 750 new graves!” she says. “We’ll have more unmarked graves than marked graves when we’re finished.” Ellie DeYoung, a board member for the cemetery nonprofit, worries about the financial ramifications. “I am astounded by the number,” she says. “How do we raise the money to mark all of those graves. Granite grave markers cost $26 each.” Funding may get a little easier since DeYoung led a successful effort to designate the cemetery as one of the Lower Cape Fear’s Most Threatened Historic Places. Yet the number of unmarked graves will soon climb. Half of the cemetery has not been surveyed, including the part where dowsing was used. Gordon’s team hopes to raise the $6,000 needed to complete the GPR work this year to reclaim more


Previous page: A survey of the cemetery shows the vast number of unmarked graves. This page: clockwise from top left, Former cemetery undertaker Edward McCoy’s final resting place; Maeve Herrick and Sarah Lowry use Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR to scan for unknown gravesites; restoration team (left to right) Judy Gordon, James Frink and Ellie DeYoung; restoration team member Gordon Walker.

lost history. Although the identities of many of the interred are unknown, the cemetery does offer a portal to Southport’s AfricanAmerican past. “Anyone in a leadership position in Southport is buried there,” Gordon says. Those buried include Frank Gordon, Judy Gordon’s great-grandfather, the first black school teacher in Brunswick County. Abraham Galloway, a slave, Union spy, militant abolitionist and one of the first African-Americans elected to the N.C. state legislature, died in 1870 and was reburied in Southport. Abram Blount, who joined the 37th Regiment United States Colored Troops in 1863 to fight in the Civil War, is buried in the cemetery, along with Spanish American War veteran Julius Jackson. The name Elias Gore is highlighted on the cemetery’s sign. Known as Nehi the Gentle Giant, he reportedly stood an inch shy of 8 feet. Dropping out of school early, he plied the local waters for menhaden to allow his siblings to continue their education. As Gordon seeks the identities of the deceased, she is also

pursuing the living with links to Southport’s black history. Several oral histories have been recorded, including the recollections of 87-year-old James Frink. He described Southport as a rural town with a train running through an unused corner of the cemetery. “The train came straight through on Rhett Street, along the cemetery and down to the river. It brought coal to the pier for the freighters,” he says. Frink recalled a role the cemetery played each year. “When I was real young, I remember the Memorial Day celebrations at the cemetery. There were speakers talking in religious tones, picnics and ice cream. Most graves were freshly adorned with shells and well maintained.” Spring 2018

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Want to help? If you’re interested in contributing to the restoration project at John N. Smith Cemetery in Southport, go to the John N. Smith Cemetery Restoration and Preservation Inc. website at johnnsmithcemetery.org

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Although segregation ruled at Judy Gordon (top left) goes over a that time, Frink says it was drawing of the accepted. “The African American known graves community knew the white in the cemetery community and they knew us. (pictured below). People from the churches got The sign at the together and cooperated. They cemetery entrance were together on most things.” As in Southport. far as integrated cemeteries with whites and blacks, Frink says, “It was not an option. Separate cemeteries were a tradition and everyone respected it.” Frink, who has a family plot, plans to be buried in the cemetery. “I am thinking about cremation. I was thinking about space and I know there is room for my ashes,” he says with a laugh. Space is indeed at a premium. New plots are not available, and the remaining 50 families with plots worry about room for future generations. Gordon’s team may provide the definitive answer, but it’s complicated. “The depth that they buried people was moved from 6 feet to 4 feet,” Frink says. “And I believe it was very common to have a person buried on top of somebody else.” Gordon adds, “No one really controlled where people were buried in the twenty by twenty foot grave sites. It’s very probable that people were buried outside their site and encroached on others.” Even with all the team’s technology and research, some history will remain irretrievable for the John N. Smith Cemetery. “We want a map like Arlington Cemetery where you know the location of everyone, but for us, there won’t be names for everyone,” Walker says. 


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AROUND TOWN

Development Watch

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Two very diverse communities, Pine Forest Plantation and Mirasol, are being built in central Brunswick County. BY DENICE PATTERSON

The 25-mile expanse of N.C. Highway 211 from Supply to Southport is bustling with development. That’s not a surprise, considering Brunswick County real estate sales passed the billion-dollar mark in 2017. The year before that the U.S. Census Bureau declared Brunswick County the second fastest growing region in the country. With vast swaths of former agricultural and forested acreage, it is no wonder a stretch of land in the St. James and Oak Island area is the focus for two new very diverse communities — Pine Forest Plantation and Mirasol.

CONTRIBUTED RENDERING

Pine Forest Plantation The 2,000-acre Pine Forest Plantation is on the north side of Highway 211, less than a mile east of the Midway Road intersection. Construction is well underway in Phase I, which will include more than 560 acres of single-family and multifamily residences, a community center with a pool and fitness facilities, a town center and a medical campus that includes medical offices and an assisted living facility. There will also be a 25-acre community farm, 90 acres of green space and 130 acres of wetland habitat conservation. “The Farm at Pine Forest will begin with blueberry production in 2018,” says David Davis, director of marketing.

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“We are planning a fully operational community-supported agricultural farm.” “Residents will have access to fresh produce at the farmers market and will have the opportunity to plant as well as harvest,” Davis says. The farm will include professionally managed pick-your-own produce fields along with plots for personal gardens. Novant Health is the first completed project. It opened in October of 2017 and is home to Novant Family Medicine primary care physicians. The campus will also provide offices for specialists, including optometrists, rheumatologists,


AROUND TOWN

CONTRIBUTED RENDERING AND MAP

oncologists, radiologists, cardiologists, dentists, dermatologists and chiropractors. Infrastructure for the single-family residences and assisted living facility is being installed now. “Early reservations are welcome, and the finished model home construction is expected to be complete by the end of 2018,” Davis says. Initial home builders include Centerline Custom Homes, Crane Building LLC and Jack Satterwhite Builder Inc. The Pine Forest development team is led by Tommy Sofield, a 30-year veteran of real estate development and management. Infrastructure and construction is being managed by Mark Brambell, a local expert with more than 20 years of land development and engineering experience. “Sofield and his team are dedicated to building a sustainable development in a unique community designed for active adults and their aging parents,” Davis shares. The goal of the new development is to provide all the amenities a senior would ever need in one

community — including recreational, retail and medical offices as well as an integrated care and a life-long care facility — all within a short distance to the beach. It is a community in which even seasoned Spring 2018

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AROUND TOWN

adults can plan for the future. “Our mission is to provide Oak Island with comfortable and affordable living options for seniors, well-appointed homes designed specifically for active adults, rental opportunities for those who wish to down-size without property worries, and access to quality care providers such as the Novant Health Family Medicine Pine Forest clinic,” Davis says. “We are pleased to be partnering with Affinity Living Group to provide semi-assisted independent living for seniors and easy transitions to assisted living and memory care.’” Davis has been with Pine Forest Plantation from the inception. “I’m proud to be a part of this project and look forward to the continued growth and build-out of such a project for the residents of Oak Island,” he says. “I very much look forward to seeing the many benefits of local economic opportunity and new jobs Pine Forest will bring to Brunswick County through The Farm, the Town Center and the Medical Campus at Pine Forest.” For more information about Pine Forest Plantation, call (866) 667-9784 or visit pineforestplantation.com.

Mirasol A few miles away on Highway 211, the land is cleared, a master stormwater retention pond is in place and site work is underway at Mirasol, a mixed-use retail and residential development. The preliminary site plan includes a total of 135 acres with nearly 40 acres dedicated to retail and offices. Nicholas Silivanch, broker at Eastern Carolina Commercial Real Estate in Wilmington, is marketing the property to be developed in four phases. Mirasol West is now on the market and is part of Phase I. It includes a little more than 16 acres with 1,500 feet of road frontage for retail space that is ideal for a grocery store, movie theater and in-line shops. Mirasol East will follow with 14

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acres dedicated to retail shops. “Located near St. James Plantation, Mirasol is uniquely situated to fill a void in retail development for the swiftly expanding area,” Silivanch says, In total more than 250,000 square feet of retail anchorage and outbuildings are planned. The site has all utilities, including water from St. James. Residential plans include single- and multi-family homes, and the developers are in talks with several local builders.


CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS AND MAP

“The area has garnered interest,” Silivanch says. Enough interest that NCDOT has approved a right-of-way access and median, allowing for a new left turn lane to provide for easy access into the main entrance of the community. Silivanch is pleased with the approval. “The interest in Mirasol continues to grow,” he says. For more information, call Nick Silivanch at (910) 399-4602 or visit eccrenc.com. 

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Business Profile

Foster Insurance

CREATIVEBYSIGN MELISSA OFF SLAVEN WARREN

N

early every industry has submitted to a digital transformation of one form or another. Consumers are accustomed to quickly making purchases online for clothing, office supplies, groceries, home mortgages and even insurance products. You can buy almost anything you can think of in less than 15 minutes. Sure, the digital age has made it easier for businesses to deliver a good customer experience, but there are some things that just don’t translate as well online — like going the extra mile with personalized options. “What we do is competitively shop your risk across all markets,” explains Sarah Foster, owner of Foster Insurance. “If you have a house on the beach, we don’t have just one company for you to consider. We have multiple companies. We research and bring all of them to you.” As an independent insurance agency, Foster Insurance provides a variety of coverage options including auto, home, business, renters, boat and much more. Unlike most other online insurance companies, Foster doesn’t specialize in one specific product, like car insurance for example, and they don’t represent a single insurance provider. They can give you a variety of options at the best possible value. “We have more places to go, so we don’t stop at the first stop sign,” Foster says. According to Foster, there aren’t many family-owned brick and mortar entities left in communities. “Dry cleaners, pharmacies, insurance companies, they all used to be family owned,” she says. Foster has been able to stay competitive in the age of the internet by being an advocate for her customers; something she learned from her dad, Larry Foster, who founded Foster Insurance Agency in Florence, South Carolina, in 1979. The younger Foster, who graduated from the University of South Carolina with degrees in economics and marketing, had planned for a career in marketing for start-ups and small businesses, but promptly changed her mind after her dad, in need of a new insurance agent, promised her “more money and less hours,” an offer she couldn’t pass up. She got her insurance license in 1987, and when her dad retired in 2005, he turned the business over to her. In addition to the original office, Foster Insurance Agency has a second office in Shallotte. 2 AOA_172_13_Foster_insurance_ (from Client Supplied) Her dad’s business philosophy was to hold his customers’ hands. “Today, that’s still our philosophy,” Foster says. “We try harder. Not that others don’t ze: 10x30 digital try hard. My agents give an extra effort to stay competitive and to help ©2012 Adams Outd ok as is our customers save money, even though it doesn’t always come o ok with corrections o new proof needed It is down illegal totoreproduce this idea i Any approved reproduction of this idea s money.” Foster has three additional agents besides herself, with a combined ient signature: date: in personal and commercial insurance. 63 years of experience Competing with companies that have large corporations backing them with 24-hour service has been a challenge for Foster Insurance at times. “As a small business, we’re looking globally in the day of the internet. We realize that not everyone wants personalized service,” Foster says. But for those who still appreciate individualized attention and options, knowing that Foster Insurance is just around the corner is valuable.

Foster Insurance Agency

“If you have a house on the beach, we don’t have just one company for you to consider. We have multiple companies. We research and bring all of them to you.”

Foster Insurance Agency: 5300 Main Street, Shallotte; (910) 755-5969; fosterins@atmc.net; fosterinsagency.com

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FACES & PLACES

Brunswick County Association of Realtors Annual Banquet

Wilson Sherrill, Ben Styers, Tracy Swanson, Clif Cheek, Barbara Andrews, Lynn Gulledge, Crystal Babson, Brooke Rudd-Gaglie, Bruce Williams, Donna Atherton

Larry & Clif Cheek

Vince Bacchi, Susan & Jim Giuffre

Brooke Rudd-Gaglie, Bruce Williams & Treasure Faircloth

Garrett Hansen & Triston Alderton

Don Sowers & Martha Lee

Lee Gushman & Cherri Cheek

Clif & Samantha Cheek

Lynn Gulledge & Anne Adkins

Lindsey Cartee, Mike Boswell, Ashley Park & Debbie Fox

PHOTOGRAPHY: TIME 2 REMEMBER

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FACES & PLACES

2018 Little Princess Ball

Nate Lindsay, Emrie Lindsay

Demetrius Brice, De’Nyah Brice

Corinne Bailey, Al Bailey

Reese Garver, Chris Garver

Brendan Hayes, JJ Browning, Bella Lyons

Drew Dail, Tinley Dail

Robert Bowman, Allison Bowman

PHOTOGRAPHY: AMY CONRY DAVIS

112

Vivian Cruz, Drew Taylor

South Brunswick Magazine

Ivey Kinley, Michael Kinley

Ella Macklin, Justin Macklin, Briar Macklin

Angaella Watkins, Jim Harper, Marissa Mote

Bob Flippin, Bleu Mosley

Corey Yandle, Samantha Hurley


Picture Perfect

In Any Season

Oak Island Lighthouse Run Half Marathon * 10k * 5k* 1 Mile Saturday, April 21st Oak Island OakIslandLighthouseRun.com

Coastal Consumer Showcase Thursday, March 1st 4:00pm—7:00pm St. James Community Center

Southport-Oak Island Golf Classic Saturday, May 5th Oak Island Golf & Country Club Southport-OakIsland.com Events of the...

Southport-Oak Island Area

Chamber of Commerce southport-oakisland.com 910.457.6964

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SNIPPETS

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce Chairman’s Awards At its 2017 Chairman’s Awards Gala on January 8, Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce recognized chamber member businesses that have put forth outstanding efforts in their business and the community. This year’s awards theme was Action!, and the dress code was black and white. Participants enjoyed dinner at The Isles Restaurant in Ocean Isle Beach prior to the presentation of the awards. Sponsors for the annual event were ATMC, Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation, Bloomers Floral Designs, Towne Insurance Agency dba Southern Insurance Agency, Angelo’s Pizzeria & Bistro, McLeod, Hughes and Hughes Nursery, Cool Breeze Heating & Air and Arbor Landing at Ocean Isle.

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South Brunswick Magazine

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN VIERA

Award recipients were: Ambassador of the Year: George Jacob The Ozzy Volunteer of the Year: Bill Raphael Community Impact: Museum of Coastal Carolina Rising Star: Bloomers Floral Designs Excellence in Small Business: Island Classic Interiors Excellence in Business: Coldwell Banker Seacoast Advantage


SNIPPETS

BCCF Bella Italia

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

On February 2 Brunswick Community College Foundation (BCCF) held its second annual Bella Italia, an evening filled with perfectly paired Italian food and wine from Angelo’s Bistro in Shallotte. Bella Italia was generously presented by Platio Sponsors Carolyn and Clint Felton, Dinah Gore and Novant Health. The nearly 300 guests were greeted at the door with sparkling Italian wine and tastes of North Carolina cured meats and cheeses before being ushered into the main ballroom to enjoy a plated five-course meal. With the melodies of local accordionist Al DiMarco playing in the background, guests enjoyed charcuterie samples and ravioli demonstrations provided by Southern Foods and Angelo’s Bistro. BCCF Student Ambassadors served as hosts, directing guests to their seats and ensuring they didn’t miss out on the chance to purchase tickets for the three fabulous raffle prizes — a Wine & Beer Raffle featuring Rocca Winery and Check Six Brewing Company from Southport, a Liquor Raffle featuring 17 bottles of assorted liquors to stock the bar, and a Grand Prize Raffle featuring a five-course dinner for six with wine parings at Angelo’s Bistro. The liquor raffle included limoncello homemade by BCCF Board of Director and Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center President Shelbourn Stevens.

PHOTOS BY TIME 2 REMEMBER

Rotary Club of Shallotte’s Las Vegas Night More than 600 people attended Rotary Club of Shallotte’s 13th annual Las Vegas Night at Planet Fun in Shallotte on January 27. Participants enjoyed a sit-down dinner catered by Starz Grille in addition to games including blackjack, craps, roulette, Texas Hold ’Em, horse racing and Rotary Wheel of Fortune. All participants at Las Vegas Night win, and all proceeds benefit charities. Everyone got a door prize valued from $15 to $50. The silent auction featured items such as quilts, wine baskets, free services, jewelry and vacation packages worth $100 and up. The live auction consisted of high-end items including a grand prize diamond ring from Douglas Diamond Jewelers.

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

McLeod Seacoast Welcomes New Fellows Class

were offered for the community during free Go Red Heart Healthy events. McLeod Seacoast hosted breakfast in Little River featuring vascular surgeon Dr. Joshua Sibille. McLeod Loris hosted breakfast featuring vascular surgeon Dr. David Bjerken, and McLeod Health Carolina Forest hosted lunch featuring cardiologist Dr. Anne Everman as well as lunch for the McLeod Foundation Angels in Little River.

Rotary Clubs Support Water Safety Programs for Children

On February 7 community leaders assembled at McLeod Seacoast to participate in the McLeod Seacoast Fellows Program. Monica Vehige, Administrator and COO, welcomed the group and gave an overview presentation of McLeod Health and the vision for Horry County. The Fellows were then given a tour of the McLeod Seacoast Emergency Department, where they could see first-hand the state-of-theart facility and learn about how the structure was designed with best practices in emergency care in mind. The Fellows had the rare opportunity to get a behind-thescenes look at emergency medicine and learn about emergency equipment and technological advances. McLeod TeleHealth Coordinator Christine Moseley spoke about telemedicine technology and demonstrated how it supports staff and physicians by being able to communicate with specialists across all healthcare fields in real time and the positive impact it has on emergent patient care. The Fellows also took a tour of an EMS ambulance provided by Horry County Fire and Rescue. The Fellows had the opportunity to ask questions and see inside these mobile emergency care units that are used to transport critical patients quickly and safely when seconds count. The goal of the McLeod Seacoast Fellows Program is to make participants valued and well educated partners in seeking answers to the challenges and opportunities facing healthcare. The class also obtains a working knowledge of the healthcare needs of the community and how McLeod Health and the McLeod Foundation are meeting those needs.

McLeod Health Offers Go Red Events McLeod Heart and Vascular physicians around the region helped McLeod Health celebrate national Go Red for Women day on February 2, a day established by the American Heart Association to raise awareness of the number one killer of women. Educational presentations on heart disease and stroke

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South Brunswick Magazine

When Sheila Roberts, president of the Southport Rotary Club, and Jim Moore, president of the South Brunswick Islands Rotary Club, attended the Rotary International Show in Atlanta this past June, they were both looking for new projects for their clubs to support the youth of Brunswick County. With many vendors vying to get clubs to adopt their particular programs, Roberts and Moore both were intrigued by the Josh the Baby Otter booth that promoted water safety for children. As the Rotarians learned more and attended a very moving seminar about the need to teach water safety, both were hooked on something they wanted to start back in Brunswick County. Drowning is the number one cause of unintentional injury death for children 1 to 4 years of age. Roberts and Moore were very pleased to learn that the Jack Helbig Memorial Foundation was already established in Brunswick County and using Josh the Baby Otter materials to get the message out in the schools. Roberts and Moore agreed to sell their club members on why this would be an excellent program for each club to adopt. The Southport Rotary Club got started first and applied for a $2,100 district grant, which was awarded. The grant allowed Southport to purchase teaching materials and a Josh the Otter adult costume to help support the Memorial Foundation. The South Brunswick Islands Rotary Club approved to donate $900 to buy additional teaching materials for the schools the Friday before the 1st Jack Helbig Memorial Foundation Polar Splash event was to take place. (Roberts and Moore both participated in the Polar Splash event, the Spring Lake Shiver, at Spring Lake Park in Boiling Spring Lakes.) Both Rotary Clubs will supply volunteers to go into the


WHAT’S HAPPENED

schools and help teach the program with Kelly Helbig, president of the Jack Helbig Memorial Foundation. The foundation will try to reach as many kindergarten and preschool classes as it can. Both Rotary Clubs are interested in keeping this program ongoing year after year if they can find enough funding to reach every student in Brunswick County.

Brunswick Arts Council Awards Grassroots Grants Brunswick Arts Council, through the North Carolina Arts Council’s Grassroots Arts Program, has released the list of subgrantees that have been awarded Grassroots Grants during the 2017-18 year. The Grassroots Arts Program (GAP) provides per capitabased funding for arts programming to all 100 counties across North Carolina, ensuring opportunities for citizens to experience the arts in their own communities. Activities include festivals, concerts, dance and theater productions, artist-in-schools programs, galleries, Native American powwows, art classes and African drumming circles. The Grassroots Grants were awarded to: Brunswick County Parks and Recreation, Brunswick Concert Bands Inc., Leland Cultural Art Center, Rourk Library Friends of the Library, Oak Island Art Guild, Waterway Art Association, Associated Artists of Southport, Coastal Harmonizers, Listen Up Brunswick County and Brunswick Intercultural Festival.

Rep Iler Challenges Local Businesses to Join Him in Sponsoring Wine Fest Representative Frank Iler recently donated $500 to the 2018 Wine Fest hosted by the Ocean Isle Museum Foundation (OIMF) and challenges other businesses and individuals to do the same. He has been instrumental in providing state funding and necessary upgrades at the Ingram Planetarium this year, which has provided support towards their educational goals. He also encourages the community to come out for a night of food, music and wines from around the world The Wine Fest fundraiser will be held on April 28 from 6:30 to 9:30 pm at the Museum of Coastal Carolina. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Museum of Coastal Carolina in Ocean Isle Beach and Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach.

Gathering of Brunswick County Intercultural Festival Volunteers Volunteers of Brunswick County Intercultural Festival (BCIF) Bringing the World Together gathered at the assembly room of the Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation on January 27. The gathering was a wonderful way to bring together the most valuable resource: volunteers, the heart and soul of the festival. It was also a chance to get to know each other better, renew friendships and strengthen volunteers bonds with a common goal — the cultural education and artistic enhancement of the community. Sharing resident’s diverse culture, music, dance, history, food, in turn foster better understanding, promote awareness, acceptance, respect for our differences and respect for each other.

Tryggeseth Honored as Paul Harris Fellow Eric Tryggeseth, owner of Grand Strand Coffee Bar in the Food Lion center in Carolina Shores was recently recognized by the Rotary Club of South Brunswick Islands with a Paul Harris Fellow award. The Paul Harris Fellow pin and certificate were presented to Tryggeseth by James Moore, club president, and Gary Olin, club treasurer, in appreciation for Tryggeseth’s selfless contributions to the Brunswick County community and to the club’s international effort to eradicate polio. Just a few decades ago, the world was paralyzed by the fear of polio. More than 25 countries were polio endemic and thousands of families sadly watched as the disease crippled hundreds of people each day, most of them children. In 1985, in response to this suffering, Rotary launched PolioPlus. For more than 30 years, Rotary has led the private sector in this global effort to rid the world of this crippling disease. As a result of millions of dollars in monetary contributions and countless volunteer hours administering the polio vaccine, polio cases have been reduced 99 percent worldwide. Through Tryggeseth’s help, coffee bar customers can drop spare change into a Pennies for Polio container located prominently on the counter.

Ocean Isle Museum Foundation Hosts 2018 Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon Ocean Isle Museum Foundation, Inc. held an appreciation luncheon for its dedicated volunteers on January 16. The volunteers have given more than 8,000 hours to the Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium. Executive Director Terry Bryant spoke on behalf of the staff and board and thanked all the volunteers for giving their time and talents. The attendees were able to view the commercial Spring 2018

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

that won the Chairman’s Award for the Community Impact category. This award was presented by the Brunswick Chamber of Commerce at their 2018 Annual Gala. Terry Bryant, Joyce Houle and Lynn Moore of the Museum and Planetarium presented the following awards to volunteers: Planetarium Rookie of the Year: Diane Crisafulli Museum Rookie of the Year: Jean Barcus Museum Volunteer of the Year: Ginger Trapanotto Planetarium Volunteer of the Year: Knight Gaillard Lifetime Achievement Award: Jackie Pickup

McLeod Loris Emergency Team Recognized for Efforts in Saving Drowning Infant

McLeod Seacoast, which are a part of McLeod Children’s Hospital. These donations will help provide specialized programs and services needed in the treatment of children.

Samara’s Village Visits with the Knights Guests from Samara’s Village were the featured speakers at the Sacred Heart Knights of Columbus January 10 Business Meeting. Donna Robey-Sullivan, co-founder and treasurer, and Mary Anne Hersam, marketing and public relations talked about how Samara’s Village is the only organization serving Brunswick County youth and families by providing the much needed education and services for pregnant and parenting teens. Mentoring throughout pregnancy and parenting an infant to a toddler through a successful Home Visit Program is what the organization is all about.

Brunswick Early College High School Student Wins Oratorical Contest

Emergency teams responsible for saving 13-month-old Bentley Martin after he fell into a pool and drowned met at Horry County Fire and Rescue (HCFR) Station 15 in Aynor, South Carolina, on December 19. The McLeod Health Emergency Department Staff, McLeod Air Reach and the HCFR teams were recognized for their contributions in their life-saving services to young Bentley. McLeod Loris Emergency Department Physician Dr. Michael Morgan and Director Karen Corker were honored to be a part of the celebration for little Bentley Martin.

Rumble in the Jungle King Mackerel Tournament Benefits McLeod Loris Seacoast Pediatrics Little River Inlet Saltwater Fishing Club hosted its fifth annual Rumble in the Jungle King Mackerel Fishing Tournament sponsored by Sportsman’s Choice Marine from October 20 to 22. On December 15 the club and Sportsman’s Choice Marine presented a check to the McLeod Health Foundation for $2,601.50 to benefit the pediatric patients they serve. The funds were made possible from the proceeds of the sale of the fish that were caught during the tournament and sold through Seven Seas Seafood. The funds raised will directly benefit children treated at McLeod Loris and

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Nestor Rodriguez recently won the annual American Legion Post 543 Constitutional Speech Contest held at the St. James Community Center. Rodriguez, a junior at Brunswick County Early College High School, chose as his oration topic “The Dreamers; a Solution.” He earned the Gold Medal and a $1,000 college scholarship from Post 543. He will now compete at the District level against winners from other communities in southeast North Carolina. Cassi Bailey, a junior at South Brunswick High School, earned the Silver Medal and a $750 scholarship. Her topic traced the “Evolution of Voting” under the Constitution from its adoption to the present day. Each contestant gave a prepared oration and a presentation about a Constitutional topic randomly selected just before they spoke. The topic was the Second Amendment. Rodriguez competed in last year’s contest and won the Bronze Medal. This was Bailey’s first contest. Both will be eligible to compete again next year. Since 1938 the American Legion High School Oratorical Contest has encouraged the nation’s high school students to study the Constitution and hone their public speaking skills. This was Post 543’s fifth contest with Post Legionnaires mentoring the participants to help them prepare for the event.

CIS Receives Grant from Eshelman Foundation Communities In Schools of Brunswick County has been awarded a grant from The Eshelman Foundation to support the Action for Success Dropout Prevention Program. The CIS Action for Success Program follows best practices of


WHAT’S HAPPENED

the national CIS Model, providing students with a full time Success Coach at each school site, delivering evidencebased services to support academic skill building, regular school attendance, positive behavior and social-emotional learning needs. CIS evidence based support and one-onone relationships with caring adults is instrumental in helping remove barriers to learning. Meeting basic needs and providing support helps students concentrate on their academic, social and emotional growth, helping prepare them to enter college, the military or the workforce. Last year the program provided individualized targeted services to 334 at-risk students and 99% were promoted to the next grade at the end of the school year. CIS currently provides an Action for Success program in four middle schools and Waccamaw School (K-8) that incorporates Success Coaches, community volunteers and club and business partnerships to support student achievement. CIS assists Brunswick County students through tutors, mentors, 21st Century Community Learning Center After School programs, Teen and Peer Court programs and parenting education, with a major focus on dropout prevention services. The support of the Eshelman Foundation will help ensure at-risk students can continue receiving the extra support needed to be successful in school. CIS deeply appreciates the current and past support of the Eshelman Foundation in strengthening academic skills, positive social connections and the emotional well-being of students in Brunswick County. The Eshelman Foundation mission is to strengthen North Carolina by improving the quality of life for children living in local communities through support of solution-based programs that focus on pediatric health care and educational-related issues.

Museum of Coastal Carolina Holds Robotics Class At the Robotics Fun with Dot and Dash activity at the Museum of Coastal Carolina on January 27, attendees had the opportunity to learn more about programming and using robots for fun. All ages came to the lecture hall to learn about basic programming concepts and see demonstrations on using the equipment provided. Afterwards they were invited to practice their skills working directly with the robot sets.

Brunswick Arts Council Reaches Bronze GuideStar Nonprofit Profile Level Brunswick Arts Council (BAC) recently achieved the Bronze GuideStar Nonprofit Profile level. GuideStar is the world’s largest source of information about nonprofit organizations and a leader in advancing transparency in the nonprofit sector. This level demonstrates BAC’s deep commitment to nonprofit

transparency and accountability. In order to be awarded the GuideStar logo, BAC had to fill out every required field of the nonprofit profile page on guidestar.org. The GuideStar database contains a profile for every tax-exempt nonprofit registered with the IRS. GuideStar invites nonprofits to update their profiles at no cost to the organizations. Updating allows nonprofits to share a wealth of up-to-date information with the millions of people who visit GuideStar to learn more about nonprofit organizations and the more than 120 sites and applications that use GuideStar data.

Bringing Wreaths Across America Close to Home As part of Wreaths Across America veterans of American Legion Post 543 gathered at the Cape Fear Memorial Park on December 16 to lay wreaths to honor a veteran from each of the five services. A wreath was also placed on the marker of Richard H. Stewart, Jr., after whom the Post is officially named and who was killed in the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Wreaths Across America enters its 14th season by contributing 1.5 million wreaths to adorn and honor the graves of fallen veterans in 1,400 cemeteries nationwide. This is the first time Post 543 has held a formal event locally, said Kirk Davis, Honor Guard Commander of Troops for this event. Davis said that the Post Honor Guard participates in many events honoring veterans throughout the year, such as annual Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies, Southport’s Fourth of July parade, Oak Island’s Christmas Parade, St. James Military Appreciation Day events, as well as providing military funeral honors with flag-folding and the playing of Taps at local veteran funerals. Post 543 hopes to place a wreath on the graves of all fallen veterans in the area as an annual event.

Check Presented to Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary School Sons of the American Legion (SAL) Squadron #503 Calabash Commander John Manning recently presented Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary Principal Alicia Williams a check in the amount of $1,100. This donation was the result of a funfilled Bowling Tournament chaired by Past Commander Bob Molloy at the Brunswick County Bowling Center in Shallotte. These monies will go to the school’s Back Pack Program. The next bowling tournament will be held in March 2018.

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SHALLOTTE INLET TIDE CHART

D a t e

March High Tide

AM

Low Tide

PM

Time Height (EST) (ft)

Time (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

D a t e

April

High Tide AM Time (EST)

Low Tide

PM

Height Time (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

D a t e

May

High Tide AM Time (EST)

Low Tide

PM

Height Time (ft) (EST)

AM

Height (ft)

Time (EST)

PM

Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft)

1

7:23

5.6

7:51

5.2

1:23

-1.2

2:03

-0.9

1

9:36

5.1

10:03

5.5

3:47

-0.8

4:05

-0.5

1

9:52

4.5

10:18

5.3

4:10

-0.3

4:14

-0.0

2

8:12

5.6

8:40

5.3

2:15

-1.3

2:50

-0.9

2

10:19

4.8

10:47

5.3

4:32

-0.6

4:45

-0.3

2

10:33

4.3

10:59

5.1

4:51

-0.1

4:52

0.2

3

8:59

5.4

9:28

5.3

3:05

-1.2

3:34

-0.9

3

11:02

4.5

11:31

5.0

5:15

-0.3

5:24

-0.1

3

11:15

4.1

11:42

4.8

5:30

0.1

5:31

0.4

4

9:45

5.1

10:16

5.1

3:53

-1.0

4:17

-0.7

4

11:47

4.2

---

---

5:57

-0.0

6:04

0.3

4

---

---

12:01

3.9

6:11

0.4

6:12

0.7

5

10:32

4.7

11:06

4.9

4:39

-0.6

4:59

-0.4

5

12:18

4.8

12:35

4.0

6:40

0.3

6:45

0.6

5

12:28

4.6

12:50

3.7

6:53

0.6

6:55

0.9

6

11:21

4.3

11:57

4.6

5:25

-0.2

5:41

-0.0

6

1:07

4.5

1:27

3.8

7:24

0.6

7:31

0.8

6

1:18

4.4

1:42

3.7

7:38

0.7

7:43

1.1

7

---

---

12:12

4.0

6:12

0.2

6:25

0.3

7

1:59

4.3

2:19

3.6

8:14

0.8

8:23

1.0

7

2:09

4.3

2:33

3.7

8:27

0.9

8:40

1.2

8

12:50

4.4

1:04

3.7

7:02

0.5

7:14

0.6

8

2:51

4.2

3:11

3.6

9:10

1.0

9:26

1.1

8

2:59

4.2

3:23

3.8

9:21

0.9

9:43

1.2

9

1:42

4.2

1:57

3.6

7:58

0.8

8:11

0.8

9

3:43

4.2

4:03

3.7

10:10

1.0

10:31

1.1

9

3:49

4.2

4:12

4.0

10:16

0.8

10:46

1.0

10

2:35

4.1

2:49

3.5

8:59

0.9

9:16

0.9

10

4:35

4.2

4:55

3.8

11:07

0.9

11:31

0.9

10

4:39

4.3

5:02

4.3

11:08

0.6

11:43

0.8

11

4:28

4.1

4:43

3.5

11:01

0.9

11:17

0.8

11

5:26

4.3

5:45

4.1

11:57

0.7

---

---

11

5:29

4.4

5:51

4.6

11:56

0.3

---

---

12

5:21

4.2

5:36

3.7

11:54

0.8

---

---

12

6:15

4.5

6:32

4.4

12:23

0.6

12:42

0.4

12

6:18

4.5

6:39

5.0

12:35

0.5

12:42

-0.0

13

6:11

4.3

6:25

3.9

12:10

0.6

12:42

0.5

13

7:01

4.6

7:16

4.7

1:10

0.3

1:24

0.1

13

7:06

4.7

7:25

5.4

1:24

0.2

1:27

-0.3

14

6:58

4.5

7:10

4.1

12:58

0.3

1:24

0.3

14

7:44

4.8

7:57

5.1

1:55

0.1

2:06

-0.2

14

7:54

4.8

8:11

5.7

2:11

-0.1

2:13

-0.5

15

7:40

4.7

7:50

4.4

1:41

0.1

2:04

0.1

15

8:25

4.9

8:38

5.4

2:38

-0.2

2:47

-0.4

15

8:40

4.9

8:58

5.9

2:59

-0.4

3:00

-0.7

16

8:19

4.8

8:28

4.6

2:23

-0.1

2:43

-0.1

16

9:07

4.9

9:20

5.5

3:22

-0.3

3:28

-0.5

16

9:28

4.9

9:45

6.0

3:48

-0.5

3:48

-0.7

17

8:57

4.9

9:06

4.8

3:04

-0.3

3:21

-0.3

17

9:50

4.9

10:04

5.6

4:07

-0.4

4:12

-0.5

17

10:19

4.8

10:37

5.9

4:38

-0.5

4:38

-0.7

18

9:34

4.9

9:44

5.0

3:45

-0.3

3:59

-0.4

18

10:36

4.8

10:51

5.6

4:52

-0.4

4:57

-0.5

18

11:15

4.7

11:32

5.7

5:29

-0.5

5:31

-0.5

19

10:13

4.8

10:24

5.0

4:26

-0.3

4:39

-0.4

19

11:28

4.6

11:45

5.5

5:40

-0.3

5:45

-0.3

19

---

---

12:16

4.6

6:22

-0.4

6:26

-0.3

20

10:55

4.7

11:09

5.1

5:08

-0.3

5:19

-0.4

20

---

---

12:26

4.4

6:32

-0.1

6:37

-0.2

20

12:33

5.5

1:20

4.5

7:18

-0.2

7:25

-0.1

21

11:43

4.5

---

---

5:53

-0.2

6:03

-0.3

21

12:45

5.3

1:30

4.4

7:28

0.1

7:35

0.1

21

1:36

5.3

2:24

4.6

8:19

-0.0

8:31

0.2

22

12:00

5.0

12:38

4.3

6:41

0.0

6:52

-0.2

22

1:48

5.1

2:34

4.4

8:32

0.2

8:42

0.2

22

2:38

5.1

3:26

4.7

9:24

0.1

9:42

0.3

23

12:58

4.9

1:39

4.2

7:36

0.2

7:47

0.0

23

2:52

5.0

3:38

4.5

9:42

0.3

9:54

0.3

23

3:39

4.9

4:25

4.8

10:27

0.1

10:52

0.3

24

2:00

4.9

2:42

4.1

8:41

0.4

8:52

0.1

24

3:56

5.0

4:40

4.6

10:50

0.2

11:06

0.1

24

4:37

4.7

5:22

5.0

11:25

-0.0

11:54

0.2

25

3:05

4.9

3:46

4.2

9:55

0.4

10:04

0.1

25

4:58

4.9

5:40

4.9

11:50

0.0

25

5:34

4.6

6:16

5.2

---

---

12:16

-0.1

26

4:10

4.9

4:50

4.4

11:07

0.2

11:16

-0.1

26

5:57

4.9

6:36

5.2

12:09

-0.0

12:42

-0.1

26

6:28

4.5

7:06

5.3

12:49

0.1

1:02

-0.1

27

5:14

5.0

5:53

4.6

---

---

12:10

-0.0

27

6:53

4.9

7:27

5.4

1:05

-0.2

1:30

-0.3

27

7:18

4.4

7:52

5.4

1:39

0.0

1:45

-0.1

28

6:16

5.2

6:52

5.0

12:20

-0.4

1:04

-0.3

28

7:43

4.9

8:14

5.5

1:56

-0.4

2:13

-0.3

28

8:03

4.4

8:33

5.4

2:24

-0.0

2:26

-0.1

29

7:13

5.3

7:45

5.3

1:18

-0.6

1:54

-0.5

29

8:28

4.8

8:57

5.6

2:44

-0.4

2:55

-0.3

29

8:46

4.3

9:13

5.4

3:07

-0.0

3:06

0.0

30

8:05

5.3

8:34

5.5

2:11

-0.8

2:40

-0.6

30

9:11

4.7

9:38

5.5

3:28

-0.4

3:35

-0.2

30

9:26

4.2

9:51

5.2

3:47

-0.0

3:45

0.1

31

8:51

5.3

9:19

5.6

3:01

-0.9

3:23

-0.6

31

10:05

4.1

10:30

5.1

4:26

0.1

4:24

0.3

*TIDE CHARTS ARE ACCURATE TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE. IF YOU ARE CHECKING TIDES FOR NAVIGATIONAL PURPOSES, PLEASE VERIFY THESE TIMES WITH ANOTHER SOURCE.

120

South Brunswick Magazine


ADVERTISERS INDEX Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Allstate – R&R Insurance Services, Inc.................. 910-754-6596 60

Foster Insurance.............................................................. 910-755-5100

96, 110

Angelo’s Pizzeria and Bistro........................................910-754-2334 74

Genie Leigh Photography........................................... 910-470-0456 96

Arbor Landing at Ocean Isle...................................... 910-754-8080 46 Hughes & Hughes............................................................. 910-287-3810 107 Art Catering & Events................................................... 910-755-6642 14

Hwy 55 Burgers Shakes and Fries........................... 910-371-6700 82

Austin Oral Surgery........................................................910-769-1605 55

Intracoastal Realty Corporation................................910-258-4503 79

Azalea Festival Home Tour........................................... 910-762-2511 46

Island Classic Interiors...................................................910-579-8477 74

Bell & Bell Buick GMC.................................................... 843-399-8300 62

Islands Art and Books.....................................................910-579-7757 60

BenchMark Physical Therapy.....................................910-399-4039 20

J&K Home Furnishings.................................................. 843-249-1882

Bianchi Brickyard Supply............................................. 910-454-4445 98

Josh London, State Farm Agent................................ 910-383-1303 93

Bill Clark Homes................................................................910-575-2933 38

Kristin Dowdy, State Farm Agent............................ 910-754-9923 93

Bleu....................................................................................... 910-579-5628 98

Legacy Homes by Bill Clark.......................................... 910-363-1682 39

Blue Heron Gallery..........................................................910-575-5088 12

Logan Homes................................................................... 800-761-4707 85

BlueWave Dentistry........................................................ 910-383-2615 5

Luxe Home Interiors.......................................................910-371-0464 89

Body Edge Fitness Solutions......................................910-575-0975 113

McLeod Health.................................................................. 843-366-3891

Boundary House.............................................................. 910-579-8888 7

New Hanover Regional Medical Center..................910-667-7170 BC

Boys & Girls Home of NC............................................... 877-211-5322 98

NHRMC Physicians Group New Hanover Medical Group......................................910-254-1033

Braddock Built Renovations........................................ 910-754-9635 76 Brick Landing Plantation...............................................910-754-2745 14 Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce......... 910-754-6644 67 Brunswick County Dept. of Social Services........... 910-253-2112 46 Brunswick Forest............................................................. 888-371-2434 17 Brunswick Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery............910-269-2420 107 Callahan’s of Calabash...................................................800-344-3816 15 Carolinas Oral and Facial Surgery............................. 910-762-2618 74 Christian Viera Photogrphy....................................... 803-609-8190 113 Clark’s Seafood and Chop House.............................. 843-399-8888 42

28, 29

34, 35

20, 27

Novant Health....................................................................910-579-8363 6 Ocean Isle Family Dentistry........................................ 910-579-6999 82 Pope Real Estate............................................................... 910-619-7673 60 Purple Onion Café............................................................910-755-6071 14 Riptide Builders................................................................. 910-816-4167 3 RJB Tax Associates........................................................ 910-338-3001 72 Sea Island Trading Co....................................................843-273-0248 9 Seaside MedSpa.............................................................. 910-575-6999 12 Seaside United Methodist Church............................910-579-5753 76

Seaside Wellness..............................................................910-754-2273 55 Coastal Craft Beverage Company............................ 910-575-4458 96 Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Bar-B-Q............................... 910-754-5522 IFC Coastal Insurance............................................................ 910-754-4326 19 Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber....................800-457-6964 113 Coastal Wine Room..........................................................910-393-2125 82 Southport Candle Co. & Bathworks........................... 910-363-4211 20 Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage.......................910-371-1181 13 Sunset Dental................................................................... 910-575-6300 IBC CommWell Health........................................................... 877-935-5255 62 Time 2 Remember Photography...............................910-253-7428 89 Crow Creek.......................................................................910-409-8590 25 Trusst Builder Group..................................................... 910-371-0304 48 Delightful Dog Grooming........................................... 910-880-9300 93 University of NC at Wilmington.............................. 910-962-3000 11 EmergeOrtho................................................................... 910-332-3800 4 Winds Resort Beach Club............................................ 800-334-3581 89 Farm Bureau Insurance - Shallotte............................910-754-8175 73 Woodsong........................................................................... 910-617-5543 22 Fibber McGees...................................................................910-575-2271 55

Spring 2018

121


CAPTURE THE MOMENT

PHOTO CAPTURED BY FRANK ELLISON

Have you captured the moment? If so, email your photos to capture@southbrunswickmagazine.com. If we choose your photo to be published on this page, you will win $25.

122

South Brunswick Magazine


Spring 2018

123


Life resumed Intense pain limited Sally’s ability to enjoy life to the fullest. After a double knee replacement at NHRMC’s award-winning orthopedic hospital, she’s now twice as active, and infinitely grateful. Visit nhrmc.org/orthopedics or call 910.667.8110 to learn about joint replacement surgery options.