South Brunswick County - Spring 2017 Edition

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Spring 2017 | www.SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

Bald Head Island’s Full Moon Tradition

BCC’s Place for Creativity

Up and Running with Coastal Race Productions

A Coastal Road Trip






Care for your entire family at one office Whether you call the North Carolina coast home all of the time, some of the time or you’re just visiting our sunny shores, Novant Health Family & Internal Medicine South Brunswick is here to care for you year-round. Our team provides expert care for every member of your family, from infants and children to adults and seniors. We look forward to forming a relationship with you and working with your other physicians so you stay healthy and can enjoy all the coastal life has to offer. After all, our job is to make everyone feel right at home. Please also join us in welcoming three new team members to our growing family — George Bell, MD, Candice Sieben, MD, and Stefani Connel, MD.

We’re accepting new pediatric and adult patients. Call 910-579-8363 to schedule an appointment.

Novant Health Family & Internal Medicine South Brunswick 75 Emerson Bay Road SW, Suite 102 Carolina Shores, NC 910-579-8363

nhfamilyinternalmedsouthbrunswick.org © Novant Health, Inc. 2016 9/16 • NHMG-58363


B R U N S W I C K CO UNTY JUST KEEPS GETTING STR ON G E R.

NEW SHALLOTTE OFFICE NOW OPEN EmergeOrtho, formerly OrthoWilmington, is combining our Supply and Sunset Beach offices into a single, convenient location: 5160 Ocean Highway (Hwy 17) in Shallotte. Patients will have even greater access to comprehensive orthopaedic, spine and pain management care, including physical therapy, advanced imaging services, and AccessOrtho, a walk-in service providing immediate diagnosis and treatment for pressing orthopaedic conditions.

Emerge stronger. Emerge healthier. Emerge better. EmergeOrtho.com | 910.332.3800 | 800.800.3305 | Offices in New Hanover, Brunswick and Onslow Counties

Š 2017 EmergeOrtho

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Trusst Builder Group

Now Making House Calls Now building in Brunswick Forest, Compass Pointe, The Forks at Barclay, Hearthstone, Magnolia Greens, Palmetto Creek, St. James Plantation, Waterford, Winding River and your neighborhood.

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TrusstBuilderGroup.com 910.371.0304


Come enjoy the sweeter side of life at Arbor Landing. Senior Living for a New Generation 910.754.8080 www.RidgeCare.com

Discover the home, lifestyle, and security that you’ve been searching for. Designed with you in mind, our residents enjoy…

Call us today to schedule your personal tour or to learn more about Arbor Landing at Ocean Isle.

Spacious studio, one, and two bedroom apartments

Daily social activities

24 hour on-site staff

Three restaurant style meals served daily

Assisted services such as medication reminders and wellness checks offered

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Table of contents

Features

In Every Issue

45 Better Than Siri

16 Publisher’s note

Terri Durham celebrates 25 years at the Southeastern Welcome Center. By Denise Patterson

By Justin Williams

18 SBM contributors

Meet the contributors to South Brunswick Magazine

52 Up and Running

Coastal Race Productions keeps Brunswick County moving. By Melissa Slaven Warren

21 What’s happening

Upcoming events you won’t want to miss

62 Eyes on the Prize

Brunswick County Board of Education Chairman Ed Lemon wants all kids prepared for future success. By Allison Barrett Carter

29 Business buzz

Keeping up with the local business scene

86 Faces & places

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce Annual Chairman’s Gala

68 The Howl

Bald Head Island’s monthly full moon beach parties. By Allison Barrett Carter

89 Business profiles

Cape Fear National Stories by Teresa A. McLamb

77 Coastal Road Trip

106 Miles and Eight Towns By Barbara Sammons

90 What’s happened

What’s been going on around town

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PHOTO BY Genie Leigh Photography

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104 Tide charts

Tracking the highs and lows at Shallotte Inlet from May to July

105 Ad index

68 106 Capture the moment

A contest for SBM readers. Photo by Ken Guhse

Departments 27 Online Exclusives

What you will find online at www.SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

35 Spirits

Herbal Lemonade Cocktail By Sandi Grigg

36 What’s cookin’

Southern Banana Pudding By Sandi Grigg

39 Up North

What you’ll find in the Spring 2017 edition of our sister publication, North Brunswick Magazine.

41 Nonprofit

South Brunswick InterChurch Council provides relief and compassion for those in need. By Jo Ann Mathews

58 Around town

Brunswick Community College’s Southport Center is a place to tap into creativity. By Carolyn Bowers

Our directory of advertisers

101 Snippets

Happenings on the local scene

PHOTO BY Mark Steelman

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PHOTO BY Mark Steelman

PHOTO BY Christian Viera

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d Features d In every issue d Departments


Giving Flight to Imagination www.uncw.edu UNCW is an EEO/AA institution. Questions regarding UNCW’s Title IX compliance should be directed to TitleIXcoordinator@uncw.edu.

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South Brunswick Magazine – Spring 2017 Volume 8, Issue 3 CEO/Publisher: Justin Williams Chief Administrative Officer: Sandi Grigg Editor: Molly Harrison Art Director: Andy Garno WEB EDITOR: Allison Barrett Carter

Account Executives: Lee Ann Bolton George Jacob Contributing Photographers: Carolyn Bowers Mark Steelman James Stefiuk Genie Leigh Photography Jo Ann Mathews Time 2 Remember Barbara Sammons Christian Viera Contributing Writers: Carolyn Bowers Teresa A McLamb Allison Barrett Carter Denice Patterson Sandi Grigg Barbara Sammons Jo Ann Matthews Melissa Slaven Warren PUBLISHED BY: CAROLINA MARKETING COMPANY, INC.

Dr. Roc McCarthy is Welcoming New Patients at Atlantic Urology - NHRMC Physician Group

PO Box 1361 Leland, NC 28451 (910) 207-0156 info@southbrunswickmagazine.com Reproduction or use of the contents in this magazine is prohibited.

© 2017 Carolina Marketing Company, Inc.

Board certified in urology, Dr. McCarthy is welcoming new patients at the Brunswick Forest office. As a patient of NHRMC Physician Group, you will enjoy seamless connectivity to more than 200 specialists and NHRMC, the region’s top-ranked hospital, through one secure, shared electronic medical record. You can also use NHRMC MyChart to request appointments, email your doctor, view test results and more. Call for an appointment 910.254.1033 12

nhrmcphysiciangroup.org

South Brunswick Magazine

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Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. strives to bring correct, accurate information that is published in the magazine. However, Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. cannot be held responsible for any consequences resulting from errors or absences. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. also cannot be held responsible for the services provided by any and all advertisers in our publications. All material in this magazine is property of Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. and may not be reproduced without authorization from the publisher. South Brunswick Magazine – A Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. publication is published four times per year and is distributed to residents and businesses in South Brunswick County, NC, to subscribers and to select areas of New Hanover County, NC and Horry County, SC.

About the cover: When the full moon rises over the ocean each month, Bald Head Island residents and visitors head to the beach and howl. Writer Allison Barrett Carter and photographer Mark Steelman ferried over to the island to see what this lunar tradition is all about. See their story on page 68.


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Reader/Advertising Services Subscriptions Want to subscribe to SBM? Subscriptions are $15.99 per year and include 4 issues of SBM. Subscribe safely online using PayPal, credit or debit card at www.SouthBrunswickMagazine.com/subscribe. Call our office at (910) 207-0156 or email us at subscribe@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com to request a subscription.

Back Issues When available, back issues of SBM can be purchased for $5. Call or email us for information.

Letters We welcome your letters and comments about SBM. Send your letters to PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 or email them to info@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com. When sending your letters, keep in mind they may or may not be published in a future issue of SBM. The publisher reserves the right to make the final decision.

Writing Opportunities We are always willing to consider freelance writers and article ideas. Please send suggestions or inquiries to South Brunswick Magazine, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451. Or email us at edit@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Change of Address If you move, please submit your new and old address to South Brunswick Magazine at info@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Advertising Interested in advertising in SBM? Please contact us to set up a meeting with an Account Executive. Our main office number is (910) 207-0156, or you can email us at advertise@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Marketing Services Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. provides a wide range of marketing services. This includes advertising design services, custom publications, mailing services and more. Contact our office for additional information or to set up a meeting with a Marketing Consultant.

SouthBrunswickMagazine.com Visit us online at the above website. With any additional questions, call us at (910) 207-0156. 14

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Cambridge Crossings Sales Office Open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. CAMBRIDGE CROSSINGS

4197 Cambridge Cove Circle, Southport At Fish Factory Rd. just south of Long Beach Rd.

TEL.: (910) 446-1170

www.Cambridge-Crossings.com

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Publisher’s note

PHOTO BY Matt McGraw Photography

Above: Publisher Justin Williams and his daughter, Ava, love living in this ever-growing area.

Feeling the Brunswick Love I live in pretty much a constant state of appreciation for this place that I am so fortunate to call home. Every time we put together an issue of a magazine — which is practically all the time now with four issues of South Brunswick Magazine and four issues of North Brunswick Magazine — I am in awe of what we find right here in our own backyard. So many great things are happening in Brunswick County. Of course we have our beaches, islands, rivers, waterways and parks to explore, and 16

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we have events all of sorts that get people out of their homes and out celebrating in the community. We also have an abundance of down-toearth and genuinely interesting people, each one with a unique story to tell. With every edition of the magazine I get to meet more of them and introduce them to you. In this issue of South Brunswick Magazine you will meet Terri Durham, who is the director at Southeastern Welcome Center. She has been there for 25 years, introducing newcomers to all

the fun, cultural and educational things to do in Brunswick County. She has a ton of knowledge about the area, and if you haven’t stopped in to say hi to Terri then you should. I bet even you longtime residents will learn something new about this area from Terri. You’ll also meet Dave Hutnik and Johnna Terragna, owners of Coastal Race Productions, who have started a series of races in Brunswick County and are making an impact on the health of local residents as well as on the bottom line for nonprofit organizations. And since education is an important part of our lives in this growing community, we introduce you to Ed Lemon, the new chairman of the Brunswick County Board of Education. If you’re looking for one of Brunswick County’s most unusual events, you need to hop on a ferry to Bald Head Island on the night of the next full moon. Out on remote Bald Head, Charles and Melissa Pope of Maritime Market host a Howl at the Moon event every month. Everyone is welcome to join a potluck supper on the beach, followed by the channeling of inner wolves as the moon rises over the ocean. Finally, we ride along with writer and photographer Barbara Sammons on a daylong road trip from Southport to Calabash. See the unique beauty of our South Brunswick coastal towns through Barbara’s eyes and you too will be swept up in appreciation for this spectacular place. We hope you enjoy this issue of South Brunswick Magazine. As always, we appreciate your feedback. Happy spring!

Justin Williams CEO/Publisher Publisher@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com


It’sinyournature tochoosethebest. Come home to award-winning, amenity-rich living. Brunswick Forest offers a coastal by nature lifestyle surrounded by scenic marshes, winding creeks

and stunning ocean beaches. Residents enjoy all the region has to offer, as well as an outstanding selection of lovely homes and an abundance of truly exceptional amenities. Cape Fear National® Golf • Fitness Center • Walking & Biking Trails • Tennis & Pickleball Indoor & Outdoor Pools • Town Creek River Launch • The Villages Shopping Center

if it’s in your nature to seek excellence, we look forward to yourvisit. Must play course Pickleball Courts Model Homes Kayaking

888.371.2434

BrunswickForest.com

PREMIER HOME SITES FROM THE $70s ELEGANT HOMES FROM THE $200s

Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of these properties. The features and amenities described and depicted herein are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. This is not an offer to sell or solicitation of offers to buy real estate in any jurisdiction where registration or advance qualification is required but not completed. © Brunswick Forest Realty, LLC Licensed NC Real Estate Brokerage Firm

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Contributors

Molly Perkins Harrison

Editor

I’m a native North Carolinian who has been pulled toward the water ever since I left my hometown of Burlington at age 18. I graduated from East Carolina University, moved directly to Nags Head and have never considered leaving. I’ve been working as a writer and an editor for the last 25 years, and I’ve worked with North Brunswick Magazine and South Brunswick Magazine since their beginnings. Though I don’t live in Brunswick County, I feel like I really know it editing these publications for the last 10 years. When I’m not working, I am practicing or teaching yoga or doing something outside — running half-marathons, swimming in the ocean, paddleboarding on the sound, gardening with my husband or trying to keep up with my two kids.

Barbara Sammons

Contributing Writer and Photographer

I am an award-winning photographer and published writer with more than 45 years behind the camera. My favorite subjects to photograph are junkyard cars, trucks and tractors, and Mother Nature. I am the secretary and webmaster for the Friends of the Library of Southport and Oak Island and the vice president of the Carolina’s Nature Photographers Association. I am a former professional chef, graphic designer, marketing professional and master gardener. Originally from Los Angeles, Calif., I now reside in Southport.

Mark Steelman

Contributing Photographer

I am a full-time professional photographer and work hard to ensure that anyone or anything looks its best. A few weeks ago I was at the Convention Center and took a photo of a group of women. One woman was particularly stressed about having her photo made and pleaded, “You be sure to Photoshop me!” I replied, “Lady, I don’t mess with perfection!” Her face beamed and she gave me a kiss right there in the middle of the grand ballroom. I love my job! See for yourself at marksteelmanphoto.com or marksteelmanimages.com.

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2017 PALMETTO GOLD AWARD RECIPIENTS

MCLEOD HEALTH NURSES BRING HOME THE GOLD AGAIN. Nurses play a vital role in the overall hospital experience for patients and their families. And for exhibiting outstanding excellence in their profession, twelve McLeod Health nurses have received the prestigious Palmetto Gold Award. This level of recognition for our nurses is another reason why McLeod Health is the Choice for Medical Excellence. Congratulations to all of our 2017 Palmetto Gold Award Recipients FIRST ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Julie Lambrou, Michele Davies, Bridget Long, Hannah Herring, Sondra Moseley, Penny Pahis SECOND ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Elaine McElveen, Cheryl Dulac, Thomas Chappell, Cheryl Neuner, Abby Lambert, Chappel Timmons

www.jobs.mcleodhealth.org FLORENCE | CHERAW | CLARENDON | DARLINGTON | DILLON | LORIS | SEACOAST

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What’s happening

Brunswick Arts Council Accepting Grassroots Grant Applications Brunswick Arts Council is now accepting 2017–18 Grassroots Grant Applications. Additional information on the North Carolina Arts Council’s Grassroots program, as well as the application form, is available on Brunswick Arts Council’s website or you can find The Brunswick Arts Council on Facebook and Twitter. The North Carolina Arts Council’s Grassroots program, using a per capita based formula, provides funding for the arts in all 100 North Carolina counties through partnerships with local arts councils. Brunswick Arts Council serves as the North Carolina Arts Council’s partner in awarding subgrants to local arts-based organizations in Brunswick County. As an advocate for the arts, Brunswick Arts Council seeks to develop partnerships with county governments, schools and universities, city revitalization boards, economic development councils, chambers of commerce and tourism bureaus. These partnerships are often the catalyst for sustainable economic and community development utilizing the arts and can lead to programs that connect diverse parts of a county through shared arts experiences. Information: brunswickartscouncil.org

First Tee of Brunswick County’s Carolinas Leadership Academy

Various weeks available The First Tee of Brunswick County’s Carolinas Leadership Academy (CLA) is the perfect place for your teen to spend an unforgettable week at the beach. CLA is a weekly overnight camp for boys and girls between the ages of 14 and 17. The 10,000-square-foot facility houses 50 campers plus counselors and coaches. CLA sits on 28 secluded acres with a nine-hole par 3 course, a driving range, multiple putting and chipping areas and plenty of wide open space to engage in various other activities and sports. Your teen will make lifelong friends with other campers from all over the country while learning valuable leadership skills and techniques in a fun and interactive environment. The week is also filled with playing golf, visiting local attractions and spending time at the beach. Information: thefirstteebrunswickcounty.org

Southport Waterfront Farmers Market

Wednesdays through September 27 Come to the farmers’ and chefs’ local food celebration at the Southport Waterfront Farmer’s Market. You can browse the beautiful local produce, baked goods and handcrafted items spread under ancient live oak trees. There is usually a breeze off the river and there’s always live music in the air. The market is held on the Fort Johnston Garrison Lawn every Wednesday morning from 8 am to 1 pm. Information: (910) 279-4616

Sunset Beach Waterfront Market

Thursdays through October 12 Sunset Beach Waterfront Market will offer residents and visitors shopping each Thursday from 9 am to 2 pm. Shoppers will be able to purchase products direct from select homemade and homegrown artisans. Available products will include jewelry, original art, homemade spices, soaps, cutting boards, essential oils, homemade baked goods, jams and jellies, honey and much more. The market will be held weekly at the Sunset Beach Park, 206 Sunset Boulevard, Sunset Beach. Information: (888) 573-2235; sunsetbeachmarket.com

Ocean Isle Beach Artisan Market

Through September 25 A summer artisan market will be held in Ocean Isle Beach next to the Museum of Coastal Carolina. The market will take place from 9 am to 2 pm every Monday from May through September. The market will be held on a trial basis at first to see how it affects traffic, parking and local property owners. The market will be similar to the Sunset Beach Waterfront Market, which has been successfully going on for two seasons now. At the market shoppers will be able to purchase products direct from select artisans. Available products will include jewelry, original art, homemade spices, soaps, cutting boards, essential oils, homemade baked goods, jams and jellies, honey and much more. Information: oceanislebeach.com

Shallotte Summer Concert Series

Through August 10 Come to the Mulberry Park at 123 Mulberry Street in Shallotte from 7 to 9 pm every Thursday this summer for either a movie or live music. The events are free to attend. May 18: The Wilmington Big Band May 25: Gary Louder & Smokin’ Hot June 1: Disney’s The Little Mermaid June 8: Disney’s Zootopia June 15: Sing June 22: Disney’s The Jungle Book (2016) June 29: The Secret Life of Pets July 6 Darrell Harwood July 13 Southern Trouble July 20 Jim Quick & The Coastline Band July 27 Blackwater Rhythm and Blues August 3 The Catalinas Aug 10: Too Much Sylvia Information: townofshallotte.org

Sunset Beach Summer Concert Series

Through September 6 Sunset Beach Concerts Series is held between Memorial Day and Labor Day at the Village Park at Seaside Village. Look for the gazebo in the small park across from Fibber’s Restaurant on the mainland. The free concerts are held

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What’s happening

from 7 to 9 pm (weather permitting). Bring your beach chair and some cash for the numerous food vendors. Parking is available along Sunset Boulevard North and in the parking lots of closed area businesses. The concerts will be featuring Great Festival Food by Gary Coleman, Papa John’s, Dixieland Kettle Corn and Sunset Slush Classic Italian Ice. May 24: Tim Clark Band May 31: Carolina Soul June 7: Gary Lowder & Smokin’ Hot June 14: Trey Calloway August 23: Liquid Pleasure August 30: Jim Quick & Coastline September 6: The Embers featuring Craig Woolard Information: (910) 367-6396

Hatch Auditorium on Caswell Beach. Guest presenter Chris Mackowski, Ph.D., professor at St. Bonaventure College in Allegheny, NY, where he teaches journalism and mass communications. He has also worked as a historian for the National Park Service at Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park. His topic: “Spotsylvania’s Bloody Angle.” His storytelling presentation-style received a standing ovation at his last visit in February 2016. Registration and refreshments begin at 6:30 pm and the program begins at 7 pm. Guest admission fee is $10 and can be applied toward the $25 annual membership dues. This nonprofit organization now has more than 1,150 members, making it the largest Civil War Round Table in the country. Information: (910) 278-3545

Ocean Isle Beach Concert Series

Special Friends of Seaside (SFOS) United Methodist Church Event

Through September 8 Music lovers get ready to a great summer lineup at the Ocean Isle Beach Free Concerts Series. All concerts take place in the parking lot at the Museum of the Coastal Carolinas on Ocean Isle Beach. Concerts are held every Friday night from 6 to 8 pm May 26: Gary Lowder & Smokin’ Hot June 2: Bailout June 9: North Tower June 16: Carolina Breakers June 23: Blackwater Rhythm & Blues June 30: Band of Oz July 7: The Embers featuring Craig Woolard July 14: Continental Divide July 21: The Legacy Motown Revue July 28: Jim Quick & Coastline August 4: The Attractions August 11: Holiday Band August 18: Steve Owens & Summertime August 25: Too Much Sylvia September 1: The Entertainers September 8: Blackwater Rhythm & Blues Information: (910) 579-5163

Tri-Beach Cruisers Car Club Cruise-in

May 28 More than 90 beautiful automobiles will be on display for the seventh annual Tri-Beach Cruisers Car Club Cruise-In on May 28 from 10 am to 3 pm. Free hot dogs and hamburgers will be provided to all participants around 12:30 pm There will be raffles, door prizes, music and much more. Admission is free. This event will take place at Ocean City Chevrolet on U.S. Highway 17 N. in Shallotte. Information: (910) 713-9514

Brunswick Civil War Round Table

June 6 The Round Table will hold a June meeting and take a break for July and August. The meeting will be held at 22

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June 12 Special Friends of Seaside (SFOS) is a new outreach, support and activities ministry for young adults with physical challenges and their families. This new ministry has sprung from families who see the importance of ministering to all of God’s children, providing safe and welcoming space to gather as a community. SFOS meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 6 to 8 pm in the Fellowship Hall. There is no cost to attend. SFOS is open to all young adults in our community who are living with physical challenges, so please invite any friends or neighbors who might like to be a part of this group. Information: seasideumc.org

A ‘60’s/Oldies Dance Party with Mike’s Garage Band

June 24 Brunswick County Literacy Council Presents A ‘60’s Oldies Dance Party Featuring Mike’s Garage Band. The event will take place from 5 to 10 pm at the Brunswick Community College’s South Brunswick Island Center at 9400 Ocean Highway in Calabash. Bring your own snacks but please do not bring outside beverages. A cash bar will be onsite serving wine, beer, soft drinks, water and coffee. This event costs $10 per person. Tickets may be purchased at the Brunswick County Literacy Council, 282 Ocean Highway E., Supply. Information: (910) 754-7323; bcliteracy.org

Rock N’ Roll Sock-Hop with Mike’s Garage Band

July 15 Mike’s Garage Band joins Brunswick Senior Resources Inc. in bringing you a wonderful evening of great food, dancing to the oldies and lots of fun at BSRI’s second annual Sock Hop. This event will take place from 6 to 11 pm at the Brunswick Center at Shallotte, 3620 Express Drive in Shallotte. Tickets cost $25 each and include dinner, door prizes and music by Mike’s Garage Band. Information: bsrinc.org


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Online Exclusives

d Extras you will only find online

Online Exclusives

What’s online at Southbrunswickmagazine.com d Spring 2017

Boys to Men Mentoring Program What started as a divinely inspired vision is now a reality for Caryl Fullwood.

Brunswick County Association of REALTORS® Honors Clifton Cheek as 2016 Realtor of the Year

Go to: Southbrunswickmagazine.com/ boys-to-men-mentoring-program-usescommunity-strength/

Clifton Cheek’s commitment to the community helped lead to his participation on the Brunswick Vision Task Force. Go to: Southbrunswickmagazine.com/ the-brunswick-county-2016-realtor-ofthe-year-clifton-cheek/

Operation at Ease From March to October, the community of St. James hosts military families every other weekend, about 50 each season. Go to: Southbrunswickmagazine.com/ operation-at-ease/

Ingram Planetarium Offers Diverse Programs & a New Vision of the Skies

Sunset Beach Writer Jacqueline DeGroot Finds Her Audience Self-published author takes her book to Pelican Bookstore in Sunset Beach. Go to: Southbrunswickmagazine.com/ sunset-beach-writer-jacqueline-degrootfinds-her-audience/

Seaside United Methodist Church Starts a Special Friends Group

Manager Will Snyder revamped programs and updated equipment.

Mary Jordan of Supply helped fashioned a Special Friends of Seaside support group.

Go to: Southbrunswickmagazine.com/ ingram-planetarium-offers-diverseprograms-a-new-vision-of-the-skies/

Go to: Southbrunswickmagazine.com/ seaside-united-methodist-church-startsa-special-friends-group/

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Business buzz

Ultimate Burial & Vault Ribbon Cutting

designated facilities. The findings were part of HRC Foundation’s Healthcare Equality Index 2017, a unique annual survey that encourages equal care for LGBTQ patients by evaluating inclusive policies and practices related to LGBTQ patients, visitors and team members.

CresCom Bank Hosts Business After Hours and Ribbon Cutting

Ultimate Burial & Vault Company held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on April 6 with the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce. Ultimate Burial & Vault Company is at 1409 Ocean Highway West in Shallotte. Photography: Contributed

Companion Cremation Ribbon Cutting CresCom Bank hosted the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce Business Networking After Hours event in February. The Southport branch is at 4945 Southport-Supply Road in Southport. CresCom Bank also held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on April 5 with the help of the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce. This event also marked the celebration of CresCom’s new location at 840 Sunset Boulevard North in Sunset Beach. Photography: Contributed

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for new business Companion Cremation on Friday April 7. Companion Cremation is at 65 Sellers Road in Supply. Photography: Contributed

Novant Health Medical Centers Highlighted in 2017 Healthcare Equality Index Novant Health is proud to announce that 13 of its acute care facilities have been recognized as Leaders in LGBTQ Healthcare Equality by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, the educational arm of the country’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) civil rights organization. Novant Health is one of only nine healthcare systems nationwide that have 10 or more facilities that received the recognition. Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center was one of the 13

Novant Health Expands Physical Therapy Services to Calabash On April 26 Novant Health opened a new outpatient physical therapy location at 9970 Beach Drive SW, Suite 1 in Calabash. The Calabash office is Novant Health’s second outpatient physical therapy location. Novant Health held an open house and ribboncutting ceremony at the new location on Tuesday, May 2. The office is staffed by Dan Woeckel, physical therapist. He received his bachelor’s degree in physical education from Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, his bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from Chicago Medical School in North Chicago, Illinois, and his master’s degree in business administration with a focus on healthservices management from Keller Graduate School of Management in Oak Brook, Illinois. Novant Health offers physical therapy on an inpatient basis at Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center and offers outpatient services in Shallotte and now Calabash. Spring 2017

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Business buzz

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce Winter 2017 Golden Pineapple Awards

at Novant Health hospitals will be able to choose between kits containing items such as playing cards, puzzle books, an eye pillow and ear plugs or a blank journal/sketchpad. Novant Health is providing one kit a week to each patient free of charge.

Brunswick County Association of Realtors® Hosts Legislative Breakfast

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce awarded 10 local businesses a Golden Pineapple Award for the winter of 2017. The recipients were: Accommodations: The Robert Ruark Inn Service: Cooper Electric, J & J Boat Services, Southport Magazine, Southport Pilates

Congressman David Rouzer was the featured speaker at the Brunswick County Association of Realtors® (BCAR) annual Legislative Breakfast in Supply on February 24. State Representatives Frank Iler, a Republican, and Deb Butler, a Democrat, also addressed the bipartisan group of attendees, as did Brunswick County Board of Commissioners Chairman Frank Williams. County Commissioners Marty Cooke and Mike Forte, Board of Education member Charlie Miller, Holden Beach Mayor Alan Holden and Dosher Hospital Trustee Joe Agovino were also in attendance. BCAR is the local association level of the largest trade association in the nation and its members include Realtors®, appraisers and affiliate members. Chartered in 1959 by the National Association of Realtors® (NAR), BCAR represents the interests of its members in southeastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina.

Activities & Attractions: Yeah Right Charters Professional: Carolinas Connect Realty, Doyle Dennis Nationwide Insurance, Margaret Rudd & Associates, Inc., Realtors

ATMC Sponsors Trojan Hall of Fame at WBHS

Retail: Lantana’s Gallery & Fine Gifts. Golden Pineapple Awards are given quarterly to businesses nominated by their customers for providing consistent and exceptional customer service. If you would like to nominate a business that has provided you with exceptional customer service, visit the chamber’s website southport-oakisland.com and click the Nominate a Business for Golden Pineapple. Photography: Contributed

Little Caesars Grand Opening Little Caesars Pizza and the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce held a grand opening and ribbon-cutting on February 3. Little Caesars is on Main Street in Shallotte.

Novant Health Hospital Provides Activity Kits to Patients Novant Health is offering patients the option to choose a Meaningful Activity Kit as one way to help alleviate anxiety and reduce boredom during their hospital stay. Patients receiving care 30

South Brunswick Magazine

Next fall West Brunswick High School will have a new way to recognize and honor its student athletes who have helped build the athletic program into what it is today. The West Brunswick High School Athletic Booster Club will unveil the ATMC Trojan Hall of Fame, which will be located near the entrance of the school’s gymnasium. Photography: Contributed

Novant Health Offering Living Wage In addition to its dedication to providing compassionate care and service, Novant Health is committed to offering competitive


Business buzz

compensation and benefits packages. As part of this commitment, Novant Health is implementing a minimum wage based on local costs of living over and above the state-mandated minimum wage, commonly referred to as a living wage. Novant Health will have two living wages to compensate for local costs of living: one for North Carolina and one for Northern Virginia. The living wage for team members working in North Carolina will be $11 per hour, and the living wage for team members in Northern Virginia will be $14 per hour. This change benefits about 2,000 team members in North Carolina and 350 team members in Virginia.

Carolina Strong Physical Therapy Ribbon Cutting

closer to becoming a reality as representatives from Southport Christian School and Moffitt Builders of Oak Island broke ground on new classroom facilities to house Southport Christian High School (SCHS). SCHS, located at 4457-A Flagship Avenue in Southport, is currently enrolling 9th grade to open in the fall 2017 and has already reached 80% of its enrollment goal. SCHS will be a combination of online and seated instruction program, and the teacher facilitators have been certified. Students will be able to take honors classes as freshmen and AP classes beginning their junior year. Unlike students in the preschool to 8th grade programs, students of SCHS will not have to wear a uniform but will have a dress code. Photography: Contributed

New provider joins Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine & Convenient Care Novant Health is pleased to welcome Justin Lucas, FNP, to Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine & Convenient Care in Shallotte. Lucas joined the clinic in March and is accepting new patients. Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new location of Carolina Strong Physical Therapy at 4002 Executive Park Blvd, Suite 800 in Southport. Equipped to provide individualized quality treatment, Michael (Mike) Payne and wife, Kelly, are well educated, trained and experienced to assist patients by reducing pain, improving function and helping them return to their activities.

Lucas is a board-certified family nurse practitioner. He received his bachelor’s degree in nursing from Walden University and his Master of Science in Nursing from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington’s family nurse practitioner program. Most recently, Lucas worked for Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center as a nursing administrator and house supervisor. Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine & Convenient Care is at 5145 Sellers Road in Shallotte.

Photography: Contributed

ATMC Staff Supports United Way Ground Breaking for Southport Christian High School

In 1995 the vision of the original planning committee for Southport Christian School was to offer a preschool through high school curriculum. On March 20 that vision took one step

ATMC employees and directors have contributed more than $13,000 to help local residents in need by supporting the cooperative’s annual United Way campaign. Money raised during the 2016–17 campaign will be dispersed in 2017 for a wide scope of community, health, human services and educational needs in the region. ATMC and its employees have contributed approximately $250,000 to United Way in the last ten years. Photography: Contributed

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Business buzz

Dosher Wound Care Center Earns National Quality Award

After achieving an impressive 95 percent heal rate during its first year in operation, the wound-care team at Dosher Memorial Hospital improved performance to a 97 percent heal rate in year two. For this accomplishment, U.S. wound care authority Healogics has named Dosher a Robert A. Warriner, III, MD, Center of Excellence for wound healing. While improving health outcomes, Dosher’s Wound Care Center also treated 45 percent more patients in 2016 than the prior year. Most patients are referred to the center by their family doctor or other physicians, but people can obtain care at the Dosher Wound Care Center without a prescription. Dosher operates the only hospital-based wound care center in Pender, New Hanover or Brunswick counties.

Southport. Scheck joined the clinic in February, and Clagg joined the clinic in March. Both providers are accepting new patients. Before coming to Novant Health, Scheck worked at Onslow Primary Care in Jacksonville, N.C. He received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia, his bachelor’s and master’s degree in public health from the Atlantic Institute of Oriental Medicine in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and went on to complete medical school at the Ross University School of Medicine in North Brunswick, New Jersey. Scheck completed his residency in family medicine through the Alaska Family Medicine Residency Program at Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage, Alaska. Clagg is an advanced registered nurse practitioner. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing and completed the family nurse practitioner program at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. Before coming to Novant Health, Clagg worked at CVS Minute Clinic. Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine is at 1456 Howe Street, Suite 201 in Southport.

Healthy Green Solution Ribbon Cutting

Photography: Contributed

Family First Health Center Ribbon Cutting

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce held a ribboncutting ceremony for Healthy Green Solutions in March. Healthy Green Solutions specializes in Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy, promoting healthy plant-based nutrition with Juice Plus, and the Tower Garden — helping clients with breathing clean air anywhere indoors, drinking healthier water and doing laundry with no detergent. Healthy Green Solution is open by appointment at 6934 Beach Drive, Suite 2 in Ocean Isle Beach. Photography: Contributed

Family First Health Center held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on March 17. The Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce was on site to help celebrate the new ownership. Family First is at 4911 Bridger Road in Shallotte. Photography: Contributed

Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine Adds Two New Providers Novant Health is pleased to welcome Dr. John Scheck and Sara Clagg, NP, to Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine in 32

South Brunswick Magazine

Coastal Consumer Showcase The 2017 Coastal Consumer Showcase drew its largest crowd in seven years as an estimated 600 people attended the annual event held at the St. James Community Center. More than 60 businesses were available to answer questions about the products and services they provide to Southport-Oak Island area residents on a daily basis. Residents and visitors who attended the show were encouraged to register for a chance to win $100 and numerous prizes in the Pick-A-Prize Auction. Mary Johnson of Southport was the lucky winner of the $100 cash prize. The Coastal


Business buzz

Consumer Showcase is an event of the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce and sponsored by Dosher Memorial Hospital, The State Port Pilot, Al Fulford HVAC, Southport Magazine Custom Colors Paint & Flooring Center and South Brunswick Magazine.

Brunswick Senior Resources Ribbon Cutting

Lynn Lancaster, RN Earns Dosher Hospital Triple E honors Twenty-four-year Dosher Memorial Hospital registered nurse Lynn Lancaster is the Employees Exceeding Excellence award recipient at Dosher for the first quarter of 2017. Dosher colleagues say Lancaster is committed to providing consistent, high-quality care to hospital inpatients and assisting other staff members. Words of praise came from team members, physicians, administration and patients. For her achievement, Dosher presented Lancaster a check for $250, a letter of commendation from the hospital president and other perks. Photography: Contributed

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce recently held a ribboncutting ceremony for Brunswick Senior Resources, Inc. This event was held to celebrate the new location at 101 Stone Chimney Road in Supply. Photography: Contributed

Junebugs Bags & Boutique Ribbon Cutting

Coffee with Girls at Side Street Bakery The ladies of the Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce recently met at Side Street Bakery for networking. Christina Willetts, owner/operator of Side Street, provide wonderful treats for the ladies. The bakery is at 417-A N. Howe Street in Southport.

Coffee with Girls at Happiest Art Studio in the World Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce’s Coffee with the Girls event was held on March 21. Betsy Kimmel of Laugh & Breathe Yoga was the presenter, and while ladies were physically in the “Happiest Art Studio in the World,” Pescado Y Amor on Oak Island, Kimmel guided their minds on a relaxing trip to the beach through Mindful Meditation.

Tornado Clean Up at Cinghiale Creek

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Junebugs Bags & Boutique on March 27. This event was to celebrate their new location at 2869 Holden Beach Road in Supply. Photography: Contributed

On February 15 a strong storm that produced a tornado blew through Cinghiale Creek. It was a scary few minutes with the staff hunkered down in the bathroom while it blew through, and thankfully everyone came out safe. The facility, however, suffered a lot of damage. The golf course lost many of its nets that surround the driving range, many trees were toppled over and deck furniture was destroyed. The staff would like to thank the volunteers who helped with the clean up and thank everyone who donated funds to help them replace the nets and equipment. Spring 2017

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South Brunswick Magazine


Spirits

Herbal Lemonade Cocktail Serves 4

Ingredients 1 cup sugar 1 cup water 2 sprigs of basil 2 sprigs of mint 2 sprigs rosemary 2 sprigs of thyme 6 ounces vodka 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 8 lemons)

Springtime in a Glass

T

Club soda to taste

When life gives you lemons and herbs, make cocktails for your friends. Story by Sandi Grigg

The herbs of springtime are

delicate and light as a feather. Those first tender tendrils lend our cooking and cocktails the unmistakable flavor and fragrance of freshness and greenery. Marry those clean and crisp aromas with the tartness of lemonade and you have the perfect thirst-quenching cocktail for the spring season. Herbs are becoming more popular in cocktails not only for their beneficial oils, but also for their favorable appearance and taste. With the urge to DIY and the desire to consume organic food as much as possible, many of us are taking advantage of growing and utilizing our own herbs. I find lemonade to be the quintessential drink of springtime. With my herb garden just starting to look plush, I wanted to create a drink that not only held true to the familiar notes of spring, but also spiced it up a bit. In this case, I

herbed it up with the incorporation of thyme, basil, mint and rosemary. This is a drink you can feel good about. Thyme is known to help with cough, sore throat, arthritis, upset stomach and skin disorders. Basil helps reduce inflammation, can reverse the effects of aging and serves as an antibacterial. Mint can help with digestion and is cleansing to the palate. A relative of mint, rosemary can be used to stimulate the immune system, improve digestion, increase circulation, boost memory and act as an anti-inflammatory. At the end of the day, when your spring cleaning or gardening is complete and you feel satisfied with your accomplishments, sit outside, take in big breaths of fresh air and then sip on my crisp Herbal Lemonade Cocktail. It’s not too sweet and is infused with lots of herbal goodness. Cheers!

Method Combine sugar, water and herbs in a small saucepan and simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low and continue to simmer for about 10 minutes. Remove the syrup from the heat and let it sit for a while; the longer you let it sit, the more the flavor of the herbs will infuse into the syrup. Strain the syrup into a pitcher and add the lemon juice and vodka. Divide evenly into four highball glasses with ice. Top off each glass with club soda to taste and stir. Garnish with sprigs of herbs and lemon slices. n

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What’s COOKIN’

Go Bananas This Southern staple is the perfect dessert for a crowd. Story by Sandi Grigg

PHOTOGRAPHY BY James Stefiuk

I

In the South bananas are not

just a fruit you eat on the go or serve alongside pancakes. We prefer to slice them and sandwich them on bread with peanut butter or bake them with walnuts into savory bread or, best of all, layer them up with wafers and custard into the deliciousness that is banana pudding. Universally loved, this sweet dessert can be prepared a number of ways. The easiest way to make banana pudding is with a few sliced bananas, a box of vanilla pudding, wafers and a tub of whipped cream, but I prefer to make it 36

South Brunswick Magazine

from scratch. My homemade custard and browned meringue add extra love to the dish. Church picnics, funerals, family gatherings, tailgating — these key Southern social events tie people together and create strong food memories, and banana pudding is ideal for serving at them. It’s easy to make, and, particularly, to make in bulk. It is easy to serve as you can bring it in big pans or bowls, and you don’t have to keep it warm. My father-in-law, Calvin, loves banana pudding. This year for his birthday I made my banana pudding

recipe, assuming the family would all enjoy a helping. But he hid it away from the family in the downstairs refrigerator. The next morning I came into the kitchen and there he sat, finishing off the entire pan by himself. “This was for MY birthday right?” he said. Call it an early morning hankering or one fantastic recipe, either way, he has now requested my banana pudding every year for his birthday. This creamy banana pudding dessert is one of the more scrumptious ways to show ‘em some Southern hospitality — no matter where you’re from. Enjoy!


Southern Banana Pudding You will need a 9 x 13 dish and a hand mixer. Serves 8.

Ingredients 1 box vanilla wafers 8 bananas, sliced For the custard:

For the meringue:

5 egg yolks

5 egg whites

1 cup sugar

½ teaspoon salt

2 cups milk

12 tablespoons sugar

2 tablespoons flour

1 teaspoon vanilla

Pinch of salt 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Method Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. For the custard, add the egg yolks, 1 cup sugar, milk, flour, salt and vanilla in a pot over medium heat. Simmer until thick, like pudding. Remove from heat and let cool. It will thicken even more as it cools. For the meringue, beat egg whites and salt with a hand mixer until frothy. Add the sugar one tablespoon at a time, mixing between until all the sugar is added and the meringue has stiff peaks. Lastly, add the vanilla and gently fold in with a spatula. To assemble, layer the bottom of the dish with vanilla wafers. Layer half of the sliced bananas on top of the wafers. Spread half of the custard over the wafers and bananas. Repeat these three steps using the remainder of the wafers, bananas and custard. Top with the meringue by plopping dollops then gently spreading the dollops around. Bake for 15 minutes or until the meringue has browned peaks. Store in the refrigerator after it has cooled. n

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910-754-8175 www.ncfbins.com

Brunswick County 4560 White St. Shallotte, North Carolina 28459

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South Brunswick Magazine


Up North

North Brunswick Magazine What’s going on in our sister publication

The Value of a Teacher Brunswick County Board of Education Vice Chairman John Thompson believes that strengthening schools begins with more support for teachers. John Thompson is no stranger to educational problem solving. After a seven-year term on the Communities in

who were simply looking to express their artistic abilities under one roof. And now they are showing Wilmington how to slow down and savor the world. By Fanny Slater

Pickleball for One and All The paddle sport is a smash hit in Brunswick County. A cross between tennis, badminton and Ping Pong, pickleball is the fastest-growing sport in the nation, and it’s booming in retirement communities throughout Brunswick County. Communities like Brunswick Forest, Compass Pointe, Magnolia Greens and Waterford of the Carolinas offer community courts, and seniors are showing up in droves. In fact,

business of handcrafted goods and supplies in downtown Wilmington’s NOFO district. Their business, Brick + Mortar, is the story of longtime friends

Schools (CIS) of Brunswick County’s Board of Directors and eight years on the Brunswick County Board of Education, he was recently named vice-chairman of the Brunswick County Board of Education and hopes to channel his efforts into supporting teachers. By Allison Barrett Carter

Slow Down and Savor

Brunswick Forest’s Pickleball Club boasts nearly 500 members. By Dean Blaine

The founders of Brick + Mortar in Wilmington share their secrets to coffee, hand-crafted goods and appreciating the finer things in life. Jeff Bridgers and Logan Tudor have gone from being North Brunswick High School punk rock buddies to partners of a wildly successful, entirely self-invested

2017 Real Estate Guide Our annual guide for homebuyers and homeowners. Meet the movers and shakers in the local real estate and building industries, along with some of the people who are making Brunswick County home. Spring 2017

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BLUE HERON GALLERY

WWW.BLUEHERONGALLERY-NC.COM

Elegant yet Whimsical Jewelry, Pottery, Glass, Metal, Fine Handcrafts & Gifts Over 200 American Artists 1780-10A Chandlers Ln, Sunset Beach, NC 40

South Brunswick Magazine

|

910-575-5088


Nonprofit

Avery Jenkins (left) of Shallotte accepts groceries from Daniel Bernier, a volunteer at Shallotte Area Food Pantry.

A Helping Hand South Brunswick InterChurch Council provides relief and compassion for those in need. Story and PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jo Ann Mathews

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B

Betty Bair understands what

it’s like to be hungry without enough money to buy food. She is separated from her husband and can’t stretch her income to cover all monthly expenses. About seven years ago she heard through a minister friend that Shallotte Area Food Pantry at Camp United Methodist Church (CUMC) in Shallotte distributes groceries each Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon. She checked it out. “You sign your name and get your food,” Bair, 67, says. “It’s not embarrassing. It’s kind of private.” The pantry has been functioning at CUMC for 20 years and is the primary project of South Brunswick InterChurch Council (SBIC), which serves residents from N.C. 211 to the South Carolina border. This Christianbased nonprofit organization is not affiliated with Brunswick Family Assistance or any other nonprofit. SBIC was formed in 1981 through the efforts of the late Ouida Hewitt of Shallotte and others, who envisioned a ministry in Brunswick County that assists those in dire need. At that time, four churches —First Baptist, Calvary Baptist, Camp United Methodist and St. James Episcopal, all in Shallotte — came together with the aim of providing emergency services: food, clothing, shelter, medical support, education and spiritual encouragement with love and compassion. Today 17 churches comprise SBIC membership. Members pay dues, but the organization depends on fundraisers, donations and grants to meet its budget, which is $129,900 for 2017. All money goes for food, other assistance to the needy and operating expenses, which is a mere 4 percent, says Tom Horan, president of SBIC. Congregants of the churches volunteer their services. “Nobody gets paid,” Horan says. “We’re all volunteers.” 42

South Brunswick Magazine

Nonprofit

About 80 people, who must prove residency in Brunswick County, request food for themselves and their families at CUMC each week. Avery Jenkins, 76, makes his own chow chow from the tomatoes and peppers he grows in his garden, but the retired tool and die maker needs more food than what his garden provides and what he can afford to buy on his fixed income. He’s been coming to the pantry for about five years. “Groceries got expensive, so going to the pantry helps me out,” he says. “We get lots of canned food there, plenty of peanut butter, green beans and corn. Some meat, but not a lot.” Mary Pritchard, food pantry coordinator, says a two-to-three day supply of nutritious food for each family

Horan says 20 percent of county residents are at the poverty level. “The average per capita income has increased in recent years, but that doesn’t mean the poverty has gone away,” he says. Cynde Mitchell, 63, has been going to the food pantry for 13 years. “There were five of us then. We needed food,” she says. Her husband has since passed on, but two of her sons don’t have jobs and live at home, so the need for food persists. “The people are nice there,” she says. “You get enough food to feed your family for two or three days.” SBIC wants to broaden its services, which includes Thanksgiving dinner for Meals on Wheels participants, but they need more volunteers and more financial assistance. Priscilla Evans, SBIC public

SBIC was formed in 1981 through the efforts of the late Ouida Hewitt of Shallotte and others, who envisioned a ministry in Brunswick County that assists those in dire need. member is the goal at the pantry. “That to me is very important,” she says. “We supplement with meat.” About 40 percent of the registered people come every week. “We see the poorest of the poor,” Pritchard says. “I think it takes a lot of courage to ask for help. Some people are embarrassed, but your job is to feed your family. A downward turn can happen to anybody, and that’s why we’re here.” Pritchard has been associated with the pantry for more than a decade and explains that the organization served 5,000 people in the early years. That number gradually increased, so that 16,939 people were served in 2016. She’s noticed the changing demographics, and says now the pantry is serving fewer children and more seniors.

relations director, is looking to see what other fundraising activities the organization can hold, but a major concern is that much of the community doesn’t know SBIC exists or what its mission is. “We have to raise awareness,” she says and explains that the organization has introduced a monthly newsletter, marketing materials, a new logo and a revamped website. “It goes beyond just the food,” Pritchard says, and explains that volunteers listen to what people who come for assistance tell them about the challenges in their lives. Bair, who has volunteered at the pantry, explains that one time a young woman was standing to the side away from others. When Bair approached her, the woman said she needed prayers


Above: Gathered for a South Brunswick InterChurch Council executive board meeting are Tom Horan (left), president; Don Evans, fundraising coordinator; Priscilla Evans, public relations director; Paul Carman, treasurer; Jeanne Parietti, secretary; and Mary Pritchard, food pantry coordinator.

because of a domestic violence situation. Bair told her about Hope Harbor Home. Weeks passed before Bair got a call from the woman saying she couldn’t find Hope Harbor Home. Bair met the woman and led her to the facility. “You help others by talking to them,” Bair says. “Even if I didn’t get food for myself, I’d help others. I do what God

Although several generations may live together, sometimes they only have one vehicle and can’t get to the free job training Brunswick Community College offers or participate in other free programs. “My goal is to open my heart and try to help others,” she says. Because of monetary cuts, grants have diminished so that the agency’s

…a major concern is that much of the community doesn’t know SBIC exists or what its mission is. “We have to raise awareness.” wants me to do. I connect with people less fortunate. It’s what I do.” Linda Herrick has held nearly all leadership roles in SBIC since she became a volunteer for the organization 15 years ago. She says one problem has not been solved: transportation.

services are curtailed. It continues to participate in the Brunswick Electric Membership Cooperation’s PowerStat program, the pay-as-you-go metering method of payment, but its four primary fundraisers — Run for Food in January, Crop Walk in November and

two concerts at various times through the year — don’t provide enough capital to cover the needs of the poor beyond what the food pantry provides. “During the past decade SBIC has established a sound financial footing for our pantry operation,” Horan says. “We’re a group of Christians helping the poor.” At the same time, “We need to find additional funding before offering more assistance.” n

Can you help? To volunteer or make a donation to the South Brunswick InterChurch Council: sbicnc.org Facebook: South Brunswick InterChurch Council Tom Horan, president: tom.horan@atmc.net, (910) 579-5994

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South Brunswick Magazine


Better Than Siri Lifelong Shallotte resident Terri Durham celebrates 25 years in the perfect job at Southeastern Welcome Center. STO RY BY

D e n i s e Patt e r so n

7

P H O T O G RA P H Y B Y

C h r i st i a n V i e r a

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At

the front door of the

southeast entry to the state, Terri Durham and her staff are the friendly faces that greet travelers from around the world. They are the information staff of North Carolina’s Southeastern Welcome Center, a little post-and-beam treasure with 40-foot white pine ceilings along U.S. Highway 17 North in Shallotte, where Durham has been the director for 25 years. Armed with smiles, experience and vast amounts of local information, they greet more than 500,000 visitors a year. Opened in 1992, the $1.2 million dollar facility was built by the N.C. Department of Transportation. Durham’s employer, 46

South Brunswick Magazine

Southeastern Welcome Centers, Inc. has managed the welcome center’s information services ever since. Another contractor manages the restrooms, concessions area and landscape management. The 1,200-square-foot building is stocked with magazines and maps, brochures, guidebooks and coupons. If someone wants to know something about North Carolina tourist spots, this is the place to start. Durham celebrated her 25th anniversary at Southeastern Welcome Center this year. Born in Chapel Hill while her father was in dental school, Durham considers herself a native of Shallotte. “This is home,” she says. Her father, Dr. John Madison, moved his family to Shallotte in 1965; he is still in practice after 50-plus years. Durham’s


Above: Terri Durham and her staff at Southeastern Welcome Center in Shallotte are a wealth of information.

mother, Evelyn, is in real estate. Her younger brother, Tim Madison, owns Duffer’s Bar & Grill on Main Street in Shallotte, and her older brother, John “Tal” Madison, is a Methodist minister in Wilmington. “Shallotte is a great place to raise a family,” Durham says. “Our whole family has stayed nearby.” Married to Carson Durham IV, she is a mother of two and was thrilled to be able to raise her family here. “We even bought a house on the road where I grew up,” she says. “When the agent told us we’d have to change the locks because

everyone in the neighborhood had a key, we laughed. Why would we do that? These are folks I have known all my life.” Her daughter, Madison, and her husband, Jim Stewart, live in Shallotte and are expecting Durham’s first grandchild this year. Durham’s son, Carson Durham V, is a junior at West Brunswick High School. “We were lucky enough to raise our children near their grandparents. To see those relationships is amazing,” Durham says, adding that she hopes to enjoy the same experience with her own grandchildren.

“Working with the people was the real hook for me,” she says. “That’s when it really kicked in that this was the perfect job.”

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Durham attended Methodist College in Fayetteville then Durham Technical Institute for training as an optician, but opted for a career in real estate instead. “In the early 1990s rentals were doing well, but we were not selling much so I looked for a part-time job,” she says. Her family watched the new welcome center building being built and wondered what it was going to be. When they found out, she interviewed for a job there and was hired as a full-time information counselor. “Working with the people was the real hook for me,” she says. “That’s when it really kicked in that this was the perfect job.” Three years later she was promoted to director. Today the welcome center employs four women: Durham, Judy Peterson and two part-time employees – Marie King and Vanessa Hewett. Peterson has been with the center for more than 20 years. “Working with Terri is wonderful,” she shares. “We have so much fun!” “There is little that can prepare you for this job,” Durham says, adding that she and her staff are not only information counselors but also detectives, advisors, researchers and more. “There is no certificate program or degree that could have prepared us for what we do every day. It is all on-the job training.” They plan routes for drivers and make reservations for golf tee times, hotels and ferries. They recommend restaurants, hotels, bed and breakfasts and tourist attractions. They have traveled all over the area themselves, so they have seen and experienced most of what they recommend. Their most popular request is for reservations on the Cedar Island to Ocracoke Island ferry, which requires advanced reservations, especially in the summer. In fact, Southeastern Welcome Center makes more ferry reservations than any other center. Durham and her staff have called local hospitals to locate loved ones for travelers, found assistance for stranded drivers and even made a call to the sheriff when a visitor noticed goats loose along the highway. “Judy played matchmaker once, when she located a local woman for a traveler who had gone to school with her,” Durham says. “The couple is now married.” Then there was that time that an older couple who had been on the road camping for six months needed help because their dog had just died. The staff was able to get them in touch with a local vet right away.

“It is both a burden and an honor,” Durham admits. “You have to know how to respond to each person at the moment – we will do anything that is legal.” Because the windows of the welcome center are tinted, visitors cannot see people inside the building, but the women at the information desk can see them. This has led to some interesting sights. “We see human nature at its finest,” Durham says with a laugh. They have witnessed people changing clothes in the parking lot, watched grown adults “smooching like teenagers” in the front seat, and observed people walking cats — and one time even a rabbit — on leashes. One winter Durham arrived at work to find a man had pitched a tent against the back of the building. She strongly advises against that for safety reasons. “To me the most interesting ones are the people who are travelling to find themselves, whether they are biking or walking,” she says. “We could sit for hours and just listen to them.” The staff has a strong relationship with the staff at the South Carolina Welcome Center in Little River, calling each other often to ask for assistance for their visitors. In the blink of an eye and without the use of a computer, Durham and her staff can pull together a two- or three-day trip of coastal adventures for any type of visitor. They also welcome locals who have run out of ideas to entertain the grandchildren. “Stop in and let us share some ideas,” Durham says. In a time when nearly everyone has their eyes glued to a hand-held device, these women are a breath of fresh air. “We are people persons,” she says. “People serving people.” Reflecting on her quarter of a century at the information desk, Durham has no regrets: “If my career ends tomorrow, I am happy with what I achieved.” n

Their most popular request is for reservations on the Cedar Island to Ocracoke Island ferry, which requires advanced reservations, especially in the summer. In fact, Southeastern Welcome Center makes more ferry reservations than any other center.

Want to go? Southeastern Welcome Center is at 394 Whiteville Road/U.S. Highway 17 Bypass in Shallotte. It is open Monday through Saturday from 9 am to 5 pm. It’s closed on Sundays as well as Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Restrooms are open 24 hours. Concessions hours vary by season. You can reach them by phone at (910) 754-2505.

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South Brunswick Magazine


Who Will be next year’s

The choice is yours NOMINATE Nominate a young professional you know for this year’s Future 10!

DEADLINE

MORE INFO

Deadline for nominations is July 31, 2017.

Call 910.754.6644 or visit BrunswickCountyChamber.org and click on Future 10 banner.

www.BrunswickCountyChamber.org SouthBrunswickMagazine.com/future10

A partnership between the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce and South Brunswick Magazine.

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Up and Running With eight races and more than 6,000 runners a year, Coastal Race Productions keeps Brunswick County moving.

T STO RY BY

M e l i ss a S l av e n Wa r r e n

7

P H O T O G RA P H Y B Y

G e n i e L e i gh P hotog r a phy

Ten years ago Johnna Terragna ran her first marathon. Crossing that finish line meant way more to her than ticking an item off a to-do list. Running gave her a profoundly different roadmap for how to live.

Terragna’s passion for running began as a youngster during a trip to Chicago, where she watched in awe as the Chicago Marathon took place. But it was her personal battle in overcoming cancer that was the catalyst to start running herself. Reflecting on things she had always wanted to do but had never tried, she set a goal to run a marathon. The training for the race was just the thing she needed to heal her body and soul after her cancer treatments. “I led a pretty defeated life for a very long time,” Terragna says. “When I first started training, I didn’t realize if I was 52

South Brunswick Magazine

running away from things or running toward something.” Either way, it was running that helped pull her out of the dark times. Terragna began running with a group that helped keep her motivated and encouraged her to get in her run times. “I became smitten with the running community,” she says. “They were so supportive.” Through running clubs and races, she found teammates, partners, friends and a future opportunity. Her first race was out of town, and she noticed that it wasn’t put together very well: not enough hydration options, poor route markers, misplaced volunteers and logistical issues. But the lack of organization didn’t dissuade her from future runs. In fact, it prompted her to start her own race


This spread: David Hutnik and Johnna Terragna, co-directors of Coastal Race Productions

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Above: Coastal Race Productions holds BAM (Big Ass Medal) races in Sunset Beach, Holden Beach and Ocean Isle Beach.

series, Coastal Race Productions, along with her co-founder and son-in-law, David Hutnik. Four years ago Coastal Race Productions hosted its first race, Run Sunset Beach, with about 500 runners. Today they host eight races a year — four Big Ass Medal (BAM for short) races and four holiday-themed races with more than 6,000 runners. They expect 8,000 to 10,000 runners in their 2018 series. All of its BAM series, including the 5Ks, half marathons and full marathons, are USATF certified and sanctioned. “We have people from 40 different states participating in our races,” Hutnik says. “Also, we have people from other countries, including Canada, Mexico and Brazil, who have participated.” Runners come to the area to run the races, but they stay to enjoy the beaches and they eat and shop while they are here. Since all Coastal Race Production’s events are held during the shoulder season between Labor Day and Memorial Day when tourism and business is slow, this means increased financial opportunities for local merchants. “We’re currently doing an economic impact study with the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce to see the impact that our races have on our local community,” Hutnik says. 54

South Brunswick Magazine

“We also have a lot of marketing opportunities for merchants interested in getting their names out there.” Just what attracts people to the area for these races? Hutnik believes it’s a combination of the Big Ass Medals, the quality production of each and every event, and their familyfriendly philosophy. “We have the world’s largest race series medal,” he says. “Each medal is nearly seven inches, and every one of our racers gets one.” Producing well-organized events is paramount to Coastal Race Production’s business model. Terragna and Hutnik both devote more than full-time hours overseeing every detail. “On race day things just don’t happen to fall into place,” Terragna says. “It’s a big commitment, but it’s one we’re both passionate about.” Terragna and Hutnik take care of the day-to-day operations, but come race day, they wouldn’t be able to manage if it wasn’t for the help of their own run-loving family, including David’s wife, Jackie, their 10-year-old daughter, Addie, and Terragna’s husband, Terry. “It’s truly a family business,” Terragna says. “They pick up all the pieces that we need them to and more. But we’re also always welcoming volunteers from the community as well.”


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The close-knit, family-inspired feeling of inclusiveness is a thread that runs all the way through to the Coastal Race Production participants. In all of its BAM series races, all running paces are welcome. Each race is walker-friendly, stroller-friendly and very family-friendly. “Our holiday series is also pet-friendly,” Hutnik says. As if their schedules weren’t already packed, Terragna and Hutnik recently launched Run CRP, a weekly running club with four locations to make it easier for people to participate: Oak Island, Shallotte, Ocean Isle Beach and Sunset Beach. For those who’ve thought about running but are having difficulty finding the motivation, Run CRP welcomes every pace, whether you want to get out of the house and complete your first mile or you want to train for a whole marathon. Coastal Race Productions is more than just a race series and a running club. They work with the chambers of commerce as well as local nonprofits to raise money and awareness for a variety of causes and charities. “Every race in the BAM series supports one main nonprofit,” Hutnik says. “Plus we spread out smaller support to several other nonprofits. That’s 16 nonprofits all together.” Many who run races aren’t just running a distance, they’re running to accomplish things in their lives. They’re also running to memorialize someone else or they are running for

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someone else. Once fulfilling her own goal to overcome trauma and illness, Terragna now hopes to help others cross the finish line, physically and emotionally. “It’s a journey getting there and to be a part of that is truly inspiring,” she says. “I like to say that while cancer may have changed my life, running saved it.” n

Want to run? Coastal Race Productions has several more races coming up in 2017: BAM Series: Run Holden Beach on September 9 Run Ocean Isle Beach on October 7 Holiday Series – Dates TBA Shallotte Trick or Trot 5K on October 21 Calabash 5K Turkey Trot on November 23 Southport Ugly Sweater 5K on December 16 Sunset New Year’s Plunge 5K on January 1, 2018 For more information and race details, visit coastalraceproductsions.com or runcrp.com.


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Around town

On the Right Side of the Brain

A

Brunswick Community College’s Southport Center is a place to tap into creativity. Story and PHOTOGRAPHY BY Carolyn Bowers

Ask anyone why they moved to southern

Brunswick County and invariably they will say the ocean. A couple of years later ask them how they are enjoying the ocean, and they are very likely to say, “I love the ocean, but I don’t get there as much as I thought I would; I am so busy doing other things.” Those “other things” frequently involve doing something creative and new. After decades of using the left side of the brain at work, many people have an irrepressible desire to develop the creative side of their brains. And that is exactly what Brunswick Community College’s Southport Center provides. 58

South Brunswick Magazine

When Barbara McFall moved to Oak Island a few years ago, she immediately detected this trend and was delighted when she was offered the position of director of the Southport Center. Her vision was to make it a first-class learning center for artists, craftsmen and musicians. She wanted to hire experienced professionals to teach each class and buy stateof-the-art equipment for the students to use. That was in the fall of 2015. Less than a year and a half later, the school has classes in everything from beginning guitar and pop piano to every level of pottery, painting and silversmithing. Other offerings range from recording and production to beginning quilting to stained


glass. At this writing there were 18 classes with a total of Her student Sue Singerline said it is the best class she has 175 students. By the time you read this, there will be ever taken. “She shows us little tips to make things easier,” several new classes available for the fall semester. McFall she said. Singerline’s goal is to build up her inventory so she welcomes suggestions for new classes as well. can sell her work at a farmers market this summer. “The class McFall was the perfect choice for has become like a sisterhood,” she said. the director’s job. As a professor and “We have a lot of fun and always go out department head at West Virginia for lunch together.” University, she had the experience of Claudia Goss Dyar is a procurement transforming the home economics specialist at Duke Energy and she has unit into the College of Art and some flexibility in her schedule, so she Community Development. takes off every Tuesday from 1 to 3 pm to I recently visited the classrooms at teach a beginner’s class in stained glass. the Southport Center and had an The students learn both leading and unexpected experience. Each class was copper foiling. Student Cindy Schachte filled with an atmosphere of energy and said eventually she hopes to do a glass excitement. Students in every class were mosaic from a pattern that she designed. thrilled with their progress and had In describing her feelings about the class, Above: The Pottery Wheel class high praise for their instructor. I could another student, Debra Costello, said, “I is a hands-on experience. sense that unmistakable bond and am connecting with my inner child. It’s camaraderie that develops in a going to be my new meditation.” Opposite page: Instructor Rusty Professional recording artist Jamie classroom of people who are all Hughes works with student Sally Hoover has been producing, recording dedicated to improving their skill level Buchanan in a watercolor class. and teaching music since his high and helping others do the same. Here Below: Barbara McFall, director school days in Charlotte. He teaches a are a few of the people I met. of Brunswick Community Andrea Carroll comes up from Calabash class in recording and reproduction College’s Southport Center. to teach the Pottery Wheel class on and advises his students on what Tuesdays. She previously ran the pottery equipment to buy, how to set it up and program at Leland Cultural Arts Center and is now the how to use the software (Cubase) to get the best results. instructor at both BCC Southport and Sunset River Marketplace. When I asked one of his students if he felt that he was now Her student Judy Steffens said, “We like this class because ready to record on his own, he said, “I think so, but I’ll every time we come she teaches us something new, a new have Jamie’s phone number pasted on my wall.” technique.” Pointing to another student, Rosemary Weiss, Steffens said, “She’s a real professional. Her pottery is perfect.” But Weiss was quick to deny Steffens’ high compliment. “No, I don’t do perfect,” Weiss said. “You want perfect, go to Walmart.” But she did admit to selling her work at the Kd Morris Art Gallery and Wine Shop in Holden Beach. My next stop was Barbara Bennett’s Advanced Silversmithing class. Bennett is a well-known jewelry designer and silversmith. She has been teaching for several years and sells her work at Ricky Evans Art Gallery in Southport and Cameron Arts Museum and Eclipse Art Gallery in Wilmington.

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Around town

Watercolorist Rusty Hughes is a Southport legend in his own time. He has been teaching painting for 47 years and has had some students for as long as 18 to 20 years. One of his newer students was trying her hand at a still life of grapes, oranges and a green apple and was thrilled with her progress. “I was going to eat the apple,” she said, “but I decided I needed it in the picture, so I guess I’ll have an orange instead.” Kimberly Caroon is another well-known name in the Southport area. She has been a professional potter and teacher for 25 years and is delighted to have her nice big room at the Education Center with one entire wall of windows to give the class plenty of light. She teaches several classes from beginners to advanced. Sharon Vinciguerra has been a student of Caroon’s for 12 years and is arguably the potter with the most distinctive style in southeast North Carolina. Her work is whimsical and humorous and often packs a message. The day I visited Caroon’s class, a near mishap took place, but the story turned out to have a happy ending. Caroon’s students were crowded around the kiln while the newly fired pieces were taken out one by one. When Caroon came to Vinciguerra’s bee-themed piece, there is a universal groan in the room. The bee had been fused to a vase, which would seem to make them both headed for the discard pile. But their resourceful teacher had other plans. After considering a number of options, Caroon decided to pry the pieces apart using a screwdriver. She found exactly the right spot with the screwdriver and skillfully popped the two pieces apart, saving both of them. And that was a very good thing for Vinciguerra’s “Bartholomew the Bee” because unbeknownst to either of them at the time, that piece would soon be in very high demand. 60

South Brunswick Magazine

Later that day Gibby Wilson was at a party when someone told the story about the saving of “Bartholomew the Bee.” Bartholomew is about 1 foot in length and probably 18 inches high from his two feet to the top of his wings. In his belly there is a woman behind bars screaming to get out. The plaque on his stand reads, “Bartholomew took revenge on all humans and their insect-killing devices.” Wilson heard that and excitedly announced that she had to have that piece. “My son James is getting his Ph.D in bees next week and this will be the perfect gift,” she said. She was waiting at Franklin Square Gallery door in Southport when they opened the next day and ambushed Vinciguerra as soon as she walked in. After buying Bartholomew, Wilson asked Vinciguerra if she would happen to have a piece of pottery with bed bugs. Her daughter-in-law has a master’s degree in bed bugs, she said, and then her son and his wife could have matching sculptures to represent their respective specialties. Vinciguerra got to work creating a bed bug piece in her ever-so-imaginative head. Such is a life in the day of an artist, and it all started at the Southport Center. n

Want to take a class? Brunswick Community College Southport Center 704 N. Lord Street, Southport (910) 755-6500 email: mcfallb@brunswickcc.edu A class schedule is available in BCC’s Choices brochure, which is mailed to residents.


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1/25/17 10:47 AM


Eyes on the Prize As the new Chairman of the Brunswick County Board of Education, Ed Lemon’s goal is to get all kids prepared for future success.

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STO RY BY

A l l i so n B a r r e tt C a r t e r

7

E P H O T O G RA P H Y B Y

Mark Steelman

Ed Lemon is the son of a coal miner from West Virginia. He was the first in his family to graduate from college and was once a professional baseball player. He knows about commitment, hard work and the sacrifice required to build a better future. He believes that unless school prepares students for life beyond the classroom, it is somehow failing. His goals for Brunswick County Schools are to train students for real-life employment and at the same time to bring Brunswick County businesses the homegrown, hardworking employees they need. He wants to move education toward a concentration in career pathways and workforce preparation. When he took the Board of Education oath of office at the end of 2016, Lemon took on more than the average board member. He came on as chairman, a rarity for a newcomer. Being elected chairman by his fellow board members, he says, indicates a shift the board wanted. “I think the board was ready to slant toward instruction and curriculum versus building,” Lemon explains. “They are interested in defining and setting high academic success.” It’s been awhile since the Board of Education has had a professional educator in its ranks, let alone as its leader. Lemon is now retired but spent decades in education. His many positions included teacher, coach, guidance counselor, assistant principal, principal and superintendent. He is also a father. Through it all, he has seen public education at work from many different angles. Lemon worked at Hoggard High School and helped open Laney High School. In 1977 he was hired by Brunswick County Schools, and he is excited to bring his experience to the county once again and help implement the changes he senses the area wants.

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Above: Lemon walks the halls at Williamson Elementary with third-grade teachers Riley Vliet, Tricia Padgett and Tiffani Frink. Left: Lemon meets with thirdgrade teachers Kristen Hill and Tricia Padgett.

“We want to get a workforce for Brunswick County,” he says. “We want to have kids ready to go for area employment and we want the connection to be real. School systems are ultimately responsible for preparing kids for a career.” As part of his aim to make sure every student is employment ready, Lemon is pursuing some new ideas. He talks of turning one of the high schools into an academy and wants to offer technical training in fields like clean air and 64

South Brunswick Magazine

cyber security. He even speaks of training high school students to graduate with culinary degrees so they can fuel the businesses springing up on the back of tourism across Brunswick County. Lemon has spent significant time researching and observing pilot programs and creative school curriculums. While no concrete steps have been taken yet toward these changes, Lemon is aggregating information that he hopes can fuel a comprehensive vision. “We want to have a concept for careers and know exactly where we are heading even though we won’t be able to implement for a while,” he explains. The new chairman also knows that the board needs to focus on many immediate needs in the county schools. Now that the


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Right: Ed Lemon learns about Rachel’s Challenge with Principal Randy Horne at Virginia Williamson Elementary School in Bolivia.

school bond referendums have passed, construction will start as planned. Unfortunately, that doesn’t change what happens in the buildings. Many people want to see Brunswick County fix failing schools, and Lemon hears them. He wants some schools to apply for a Turnaround School Model with the federal government. This will allow them the flexibility to address their real needs while be exempt from some mandates. As a former administrator, Lemon understands that the people best equipped to tell a school what it needs are the trained professionals in that school every day. As part of the goal to turn some schools around, Lemon challenges his board to find ways to address problems with teacher longevity. “There is no exact formula for turning a school around,” he says. “We have to encourage homegrown teachers. We need to recruit and retain.” 66

South Brunswick Magazine

Much like Board of Education Vice Chairman John Thompson, Lemon wants to encourage more staff development, which he hopes will show teachers that their school is invested in them. Obviously, one single chairman cannot change the entire school system. Lemon says he works on a team and is surrounded by a lot of people who want to do the best they can for Brunswick County Schools, even if they don’t necessarily agree on how. But Lemon says he is prepared to work hard, putting in countless hours of hard work, travel, meetings, research and interviews to help the students around the county get where they need to go. n


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South Brunswick Magazine


sa elis M

n

Pope, Bald

come each s wel fu l ent l mo sid o re

T

Hea d I sla nd

lous beach p fabu art a yf th i or w

Thanks to Cl aud ea n d

. one y r e ev

The Howl

The sun sank in the west moments ago, but the crowd on the beach peers to the east, straining to be the first to set sight on the rising moon. The air carries a bagpiper’s soulful notes, while a crackling bonfire offers warmth and gentle light. People hold up their phones, checking to see what time the moon is supposed to rise. “It should be any moment,” they whisper. A faint glimmer of orange light appears on the horizon, so striking and strange that most believe it to be the sun reflecting off the shrimp boats. But, no, it is the moon. “The moon is rising!” someone yells. Everyone howls, without reservation or hesitation. It is primal and just plain fun. On Bald Head Island, the sun setting and the moon rising is cause for celebration. For the past

STO RY BY

A l l i so n B a r r e tt C a r t e r

six years Claude and Melissa Pope have hosted a monthly Howl at the Moon event, or, as the locals call it, the Howl party, at Access 39 of the East Beach of Bald Head Island. On this island a person can have the rare experience of standing in one spot and seeing the sun set and the moon rise. There is no doubt that this is magical, though magical events seem to be commonplace on Bald Head Island. In a place that doesn’t allow cars, where visitors are constantly tripping over nature, where access is by ferry and where the year-round population is less than 200, the remoteness of Bald Head Island can feel enchanted. But for those living on the island in a dark winter, it can also feel a little lonely, which is why everyone looks forward to the Howl.

7

P H O T O G RA P H Y B Y

Mark Steelman

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Above: Maritime Market provides soup and a beach fire for The Howl attendees. Opposite page: Peter McArthur plays bagpipes at all of The Howl events; residents gather on the beach for a potluck before the moon rise.

The event is a casual affair, and at its core it is the opportunity for residents and tourists to come together. As one Bald Head resident says, “It is the ultimate Cheers, where everyone really does know your name … and your kids … and your activities….” On Howl nights people march onto the beach bearing plates and hauling chairs. As they come closer, Claude or Melissa yell their name with delight, welcoming them. A large potluck, anchored by a warm soup from the Popes’ Maritime Market, always forms on tables propped on the beach. Folks gather around two bar tables, laughing and drinking wine and martinis from Thermoses. Each month’s Howl at the Moon is sponsored by a different business. Sometimes the sponsors attend, sometimes they don’t, but they contribute something to the event, like the Irish coffee offered by Always Ready Cart Care at the January event. As the sun sets, Peter McArthur begins playing bagpipes somewhere over the dunes and regally marches his way onto the beach, where he keeps his inspired performance going 70

South Brunswick Magazine

well into the dark. McArthur has been an integral part of every Howl at the Moon event for two years, coming all the way from his home in Fayetteville. The Popes had the idea for bagpipes after a vacation at the Inn at Spanish Bay Resort, where a bagpiper plays the sun down every night. “We thought, well, we gotta do that!” Claude says. That is pretty much the way the Popes live nowadays: We gotta do that! Joy for life and for the island emanates from these two. Former Raleigh residents, Claude and Melissa began vacationing on Bald Head Island in 1988, when their children were 5, 3 and 1. In 1990 they came with their extended family, and it was that trip that solidified their love for the place. Today, the kids are 33, 31 and 29. One runs the Island Retreat Spa, one runs the Bald Head Blues brand, and one is a JAG officer in the Coast Guard. The Pope family timed their beach visits when the sun was setting and the moon was rising, and they started their howling events as a family. “This was part of our experience, coming out here with our beach chairs, having a big fire and


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Releases with the SBM Summer 2017 Edition

Deadline: June 15, 2017

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South Brunswick Magazine


Left: Watching the moon rise and howling with friends on Bald Head Island’s East Beach.

waiting for the moon to rise,” Claude says. “Sometimes it wouldn’t rise until 10, 11 at night, but we were out here having a good time.” In 2001 the Popes sold their dream home in Raleigh to buy a place on Bald Head, and they began to summer on the island. Claude sold his business (GetItQuick.com) in 2007 and needed a new project. In 2010 he and Melissa began looking at businesses on Bald Head Island and bought Maritime Market in January 2011. As Claude jokes, he couldn’t find a job after selling his business, so he bought himself one.

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“The market is the essence of what this island is,” he says. “Everybody comes to the market. Every experience on the island comes back to the experience of food. The market is our opportunity to facilitate and build memories for everyone.” The first month they became year-round residents, and three weeks after they bought the market, the Popes decided to host a Howl. “I wrote people: I know this sounds crazy, but we’re going out to East Beach tonight. Our chef is bringing a big pot of chili, bring your beer or wine, and we’re going to go howl at the moon,” Claude says. “Forty-two people showed up. And that was in January!” When the population on Bald Head Island surges by the thousands in the summer months, Howl at the Moon is a fabulous party held on a wide-open, picturesque beach, and hundreds of people have been known to congregate. But it is the winter months when The Howl seems to be most significant. “This is the place to be,” one Bald Head Island resident says. “This is my chance to see my friends who live here on the island. This is where I know we will always be, it’s a guarantee.” Claude says this is important. “For us, it means being able to pull everybody together to enjoy an aspect of this island that everyone agrees on,” he says. “There’s enough differences of opinion on the direction of the island or the environment 74

South Brunswick Magazine

or the politics … but here’s an event that pulls everybody together that reminds us of why we love Bald Head. It’s about family, it’s about friends, it’s about quiet nights and sharing good cheer and being blessed and pinching ourselves that we actually get to live here.” Howl at the Moon is exceedingly successful because of Claude and Melissa and their welcoming, engaging personalities. And they intend to keep doing this for quite some time. Howl at the Moon is a place where everyone, young and old, tourist and resident, four-legged friend and human, can howl at the top of their lungs, shouting a Bald Head Island welcome to the large and beautiful moon. n

Want to go? Howl at the Moon Beach Parties Sponsored by Maritime Market, 8 Maritime Way, Bald Head Island (910) 457-7450 maritimemarketbhi.com Upcoming Howl at the Moon dates are June 9, July 9 and August 7; other dates are listed on the Maritime Market website. The events are free and all are welcome, though participants are asked to their own beverages and an appetizer to share.


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106 Miles 8 Towns 1 Saturday A road trip from Southport to Calabash and back

I

t’s only 8:30 a.m. and I feel like I

have accomplished all my chores for the day,” I say to my sister. It’s a beautiful, crisp Saturday in early March with bright, blue Carolina skies and too nice of a day to stay in the house. “Grab your camera and let’s go for a road trip,” she calls out. “Okay,” I say, “you don’t have to ask me twice.” With camera in hand we set off from Southport and head to Calabash. Growing up in Southern California, my family always made time for road trips and the proverbial Sunday Drive. “Take a look at what’s around you,” our dad would say. “There is always something to see.” Our parents are gone now but our road trips continue. By the end of this Saturday road trip, we had covered 106 miles, visited eight towns, enjoyed spicy tacos and ended our day with creamy, handmade ice cream. This road trip was a joy to the senses as we really did look at what is around us. When was the last time you took a road trip?

S T O R Y a n d P H O T O G RA P H Y B Y

B a r b a r a S a mmo n s

7

Supply

Shallotte Calabash

Our route was: Southport, Calabash, Sunset Beach, Ocean Isle Beach, Holden Beach, Supply, Shallotte, Oak Island and return to Southport

Holden Beach Ocean Isle Beach

Southport Oak Island

Sunset Beach

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1

2

4

3

5

Southport

1. East Coast Greenway sign, Corner of E. 8th and Lord streets. The East Coast Greenway is a developing trail system, linking many of the major cities of the Eastern Seaboard between Canada and Key West. greenway.org 2. A view from Marsh Walk

3. Kayaks at The Adventure Kayak Company, 807 N. Howe Street, theadventurecompany.net 4. Porch railings with decorative flamingos and palm trees; W. West Street 5. Adkins-Ruark House, Circa 1890, Bed and Breakfast, 119 N. Lord Street

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6

7

8

9

10

11

Calabash

6. Boats along Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway 7. Directional sign near Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway 8. Metal Shark Netting near Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway 9. Gravy Southern Eatery, 1165 Carlyle Place, known for many house specialties like meatloaf, peach cobbler, made-to-order hush puppies and Calabash-style seafood, only open Monday through Friday; gravysoutherneatery.com 10. Happy Face Chair, Sunrise Pancake House, 10008 Beach Road 11. Beck’s The Original Calabash Restaurant Started 1940, 1014 River Road

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12 13

15

14 16

Sunset B each

12. Do Not Feed Alligators at Carl Bazemore Bird Walk at Twin Lakes, Shoreline Drive. The lakes attract more than 150 different species of birds, from graceful wading birds to darting songbirds in the trees and shrubs nearby. The lakes are private property and it is illegal to feed the alligators. 13. Little Free Library and Old Bridge Store at Old Bridge Preservation Society-Museum and Interpretive Center, 109 Shoreline Drive West; oldbridgepreservationsociety.org 14. Swings at Sunset Beach Park facing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, sunsetbeachnc.gov 15. Old Bridge Store at the Old Bridge Preservation Society-Museum and Interpretive Center, 109 Shoreline Drive West; oldbridgepreservationsociety.org 16. Ingram Planetarium, 7625 High Market Street, museumplanetarium.org

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17

18 19

20

Ocean Isle B each 17. Museum of Coastal Carolina, 21 E. 2nd Street; museumplanetarium.org 18. River Country Mini Golf, 1 Causeway Drive

19. Water tower. The East End Water Tank has been completed and is now fully operational. The old tank has been removed and security fencing has been installed. The new spheroid-style tank has a 250,000-gallon capacity and stands approximately 125 feet tall. 20. “Lillah” in Commemoration of The Ocean Isle Property Owners Association’s 20th Anniversary in 2003. Thom Beaman, sculptor; Bottom of bridge that crosses over the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway

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22

21 23

24

H olden Beach & Supply 21. Old fishing boat listing in Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Holden Beach

22. Beaches-N-Cream, handmade ice cream made onsite from all original recipes, 3316 Holden Beach Road SW, Supply; hbbeachesncream.com 23. “Sale” sign on wooden bench at SugarBritches, 3252 Holden Beach Road SW, Supply 24. “Gifts” sign on metal chair at SugarBritches, 3252 Holden Beach Road SW, Supply

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25 26

28 29

27

30

25. Playground at Mulberry Street Park, 123 Mulberry Street 26. Garden Chair, Community Garden in Mulberry Street Park, 123 Mulberry Street. The park opened in spring 2016 and features an amphitheater, a pavilion, a playground, a community garden and walking trails; townofshallotte.org 27. Live oak, possibly more than 2,000 years old, 1616 Village Point Road (same as photo 30) 28. Braille signage at playground, Mulberry Street Park, 123 Mulberry Street 29. Town of Shallotte sign 30. Live oak tree (same as photo 27)

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32

31 33

Oak Island

31. Ocean Crest Pier at 1409 E. Beach Drive. The 893-foot pier near 14th Place East was voted most popular fishing pier in North Carolina by Fisherman’s Post. 32. Beach House with Flip Flop Shutters at E. Beach Drive near Ocean Crest Pier 33. New sea grass plants on sand dunes. Many sand dunes were destroyed by Hurricane Matthew in October 2016. n

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FACES & PLACES

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce Annual Chairman’s Gala

Cindy Leonard, Laurel Bellamy, Rodney Brown & Cindy Reed

April Owens, Nancy Smith & Paula Smith

Dr.’s Tori & Justin Asbury

Linda Williams & Melony Rice

Jacqueline Pappas & Alan Wikander

Tori & Clint Humphrey

Kelli Dillahay, Haylie Long & Kim Spivey

Janie & Glenn Withers

Ashley & James Lane

Lindsey Jernigan, Jenna Cox & Katie Inman

Sandra & Al Braden

Charlie Butcher & Nicole Paramore

Carolina & Matt Cowan and Jonathan & Beth Peele

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Heather & Mark Coley

Linda Stinson & Mason Anderson


FACES & PLACES

Jordan, Stacey & Callie McCumbee

Jackie & David Hutnik

Linda & Bob Stinson

Robyn Beliveau, Shannon Viera & Heather Buell

Regina & Heyward Lowry

Melissa Pauley & Sheliah Hooper

Mercy McCurdy & Dave Bryan

Derick & Taylor Thompson

Cynthia & Allan Cheatham

Melinda Johnson & Tori Humphrey

Lisa & Gordan Winfree

Lynn & Michael Wiggins

Rich & Melony Rice

Susan Bullin & Dale Hicks

Priscilla & Don Evans

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Southport-Oak Island Golf Classic Saturday, May 6th Oak Island Golf & Country Club Southport-OakIsland.com

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South Brunswick Magazine


Cape Fear National

Business Profile BY Teresa A. McLamb

W

hether you’re an avid or novice golfer, this summer might be the time to beef up your game. Cape Fear National (CFN) at

Brunswick Forest has embraced technology to bring a new level to your playing ability. CFN is offering lessons using FlightScope technology to help you see exactly how you’re playing. The teaching tool uses 3-D tracking to measure ball speed, club speed, carry, distance, club path and horizontal and vertical launch angles, according to Paul Hughes, the Contributed Photo

course’s head superintendent. Lessons are available from the head pro and the first assistant pro (see below). Hughes says there’s also a new addition this year that golfers will enjoy. “We have Club Car’s Precedent i3 golf carts for every golfer,” he says. “It’s the first golf cart in the world with built-in connectivity. It will give you yardages, aerial representations of each hole and electronic scorekeeping, and you can pre-order food and beverages

Cape Fear National has been rated by Golfweek as one of the Must Play courses in North Carolina.

from the cart.” Beyond technology, however, the test of the course is often in the

“I came here because of Brunswick Forest’s vision of a master

greens. Tim Cate designed the 18-hole course with bentgrass greens,

planned neighborhood that included everything from townhomes to

following the tradition of other local upscale courses such as Landfall,

estate lots on the golf course, and outstanding amenities,” he says. He

Eagle Point and Cape Fear Country Club. Bent greens are a challenge

adds that home sites are available now on several of the course’s

to maintain in the coastal North Carolina heat, but they provide an

signature holes.

excellent putting surface. A graduate of Clemson University’s turf grass school, Hughes came to Cape Fear National in 2008 to accomplish grow-in. “Cate was very

Brunswick Forest residents have the option of two types of golf memberships, and local nonresidents also enjoy a locals’ rate. Tee times can be made online.

hands-on during grow-in,” Hughes says. “Now I’ll see him once or twice a year. He’s really pleased with the condition of the course, and

Book a Lesson

how we’ve been able to keep it in good shape, to keep the integrity of

45 minutes with first assistant golf professional Blake Valand - $70

the design he had on paper.”

45 minutes with head professional Adam Clark - $80

While some of the other upscale courses have converted from bentgrass, Hughes is quite satisfied with the greens at Cape Fear National. Bentgrass, he says, is a show of commitment to offering the finest golf experience in the area.

Three hours with either - $200 Cape Fear National: (910) 383-3283; email: aclark@capefearnational.com or bvaland@capefearnational.com; website: brunswickforest.com/championship-golf

“Bermuda grasses are good putting surfaces,” he says, “but to some golfers, bent rolls better than Bermuda.” Hughes continues to be pleased with the golf experience at Cape Fear National as well as the growth of the Brunswick Forest community.

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What’s happened

Legionnaire Steve Muir Receives National Recognition

Seaside United Methodist Church Singers Invited to Perform at Lincoln Center

On behalf of the American Legion National Commander, Commander of the Department of North Carolina American Legion Post 543 Gary Crowden presented Steve Muir, a Legionnaire assigned to the Post, a Certificate of Meritorious Service given by the American Legion National Veterans and Rehabilitation Commission. Muir has had a long and distinguished career in service to the nation both as a United States Marine and a Veteran Service Officer with the Department of Veterans Affairs. Since his retirement, he moved to St. James and became a member of Post 543. For the past three years he has applied his knowledge acquired in the service to his country in assisting the veterans of North Carolina in a myriad of activities.

Kathryn Parker and the Seaside United Methodist Church Singers have been invited by the Distinguished Concerts International New York City (DCINY) to participate in a performance of a premiere work by Pepper Choplin on the DCINY Concert Series in New York City. This performance will be in David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center for Performing Arts on May 29, 2017. Seaside United Methodist Church was selected, according to Dr. Jonathan Griffith, artist director and principal conductor for DCINY, because of the quality and high level of musicianship demonstrated by the singers as well as the exceptional quality of their audition recording.

Photography: Contributed

Oak Island Elks Lodge 2769 Makes Donation To Paws4People On February 23, prior to its bimonthly meeting, Oak Island Elks Lodge 2769 presented a check for $1,000 to Cece McConnell, Deputy Executive Director Training Programs & Client Services at the Paws4People Organization in Wilmington. Also present was Wil Nobels, an Army veteran for whom the donation was designated for the training of his assistance dog. Making the presentation on behalf of the Lodge was the Lodge’s Veterans Committee Chair Joe Fitzpatrick. The Veterans Committee is charged with raising and distributing funds to U.S. Uniform Services Veterans, primarily in Brunswick County but also in North Carolina. Its primary fundraiser is a monthly breakfast held the third Saturday of the month from 8 to 11 am at the Elks Lodge, 106 East Dolphin Drive in Oak Island. Through its Paws4Vets Assistance Dog Placement Program, veterans, service members and dependents of either with physical, neurological, psychiatric or emotional disabilities can receive physical and/or neurological assistance dogs, medical alert assistance dogs or emotional support dogs. Paws Intervention Transfer Training for a veteran and assistance dog can take five to 12 months. As such, according to Paws4People, it takes $35,000 to place a customized assistance dog with veterans and military dependents living with various disabilities. For more information contact Paws4People.org. 90

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Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium Receive Grant Award from N.C. Science Museums Grant Program In January the Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium was one of 41 science centers across the state to receive a grant award as part of the $2.44 million North Carolina Science Museums Grant Program. The new program is one of the many ways that the State of North Carolina invests in sustaining and advancing one of the most diverse and widespread networks of science museums in the country. Grants were awarded based on criteria that promote the priorities of state government, with a primary goal of enhancing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education opportunities for the public, particularly in low-resource communities. The awards, which ranged from $51,912.92 to $76,912.92, will be applied to the 2016–17 fiscal year budgets of these science centers.

American Legion, Post 543 SBHS JROTC Awards On April 20 the JROTC award ceremony was held at the SBHS. 1st Vice Commander Dan Bennett presented the awards. The American Legion Scholastic is awarded to the cadet who ranks in the upper 10% of the JROTC Academic Class and who demonstrates outstanding qualities in military leadership and actively participates in student activities. The American Legion Excellence Award is awarded to the cadet with outstanding cadet performance, demonstrates qualities of dependability and good character, adherence to military discipline, leadership ability, as well as fundamental and patriotic understanding of the importance of JROTC. 1st Place Marksman - Cadet Christine Girard 2nd Place Marksman and American Legion Scholastic Award Cadet Tommy Nguygen


What’s happened

1st Vice Commander, Post 543 - Dan Bennett 3rd Place Marksman - Cadet Kourtney Burton American Legion Excellence Award - Brady Udlinek

Shallotte Rotary Donates to Samara’s Village Shallotte Rotary Club donated $500 to Samara’s Village, which is a nonprofit organization founded in 2015 to address the unique needs of pregnant and parenting teens. Their focus is not only on young mothers, but also on the fathers. The program facilitators, fatherhood advocates, therapists/counselors, and nurses provide education and support in a judgment-free, teen-specific environment designed to optimize healthy outcomes. Photography: Contributed

The Golf Ball The sixth annual Golf Ball took place on March 25 from 5 to 10 pm at the South Brunswick Islands Center in Carolina Shores. This year featured live music from Gary Lowder & Smokin’ Hot. A silent auction, basket items and a 50/50 raffle raised money for The First Tee of Brunswick County’s Taylor Scholarship Fund. Monies raised enable The First Tee to award college scholarships to its participants.

Relay for Life Charity Basketball Game Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office took on New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office in their annual charity basketball game to benefit Brunswick County Relay For Life. The event took place on March 10 at the South Brunswick High School gymnasium. Spectators enjoyed concessions and half-time games to win fun prizes from Jungle Rapids, Defy Gravity, Crossfire Paintball and more. Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Quartet sang the National Anthem, and the SBHS JROTC presented the colors. Admission was a $5 donation to the American Cancer Society at the door. All paid admissions were entered for a door prize drawing to win a cool prize from Relay For Life. Everyone was able to purchase a luminary to decorate in honor of someone they love. All luminaries were displayed at Brunswick County Relay for Life at West Brunswick High School on May 5.

Brunswick County 2017 Pet Education Week Paws-Ability has a goal to teach a six-week Pet Education Program to 4th grade students in Brunswick County on a yearly basis, integrating its lesson plans with the schools’ Character Development Program. The program focuses on good judgment, integrity, kindness, perseverance, respect and responsibility of animals. Paws-Ability volunteers, many of whom are retired teachers, teach the classes. With more education Paws-Ability hopes to directly impact the future of Brunswick County animals, lower euthanasia rates in the county, reduce animal cruelty, promote better care of owned pets, promote informed choices when selecting a pet and expose young minds to pet. The 4th graders of Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary School began participating on April 20 for a six-week Pet Education Program. Part of this year’s is to write an essay. Editors of the Brunswick Beacon will judge the essays. Each student participating in the program will also receive a T-shirt with the promise-pledge to properly care for the pets they will have in their lifetime. BEMC, First Bank, Shallotte Rotary and the Sea Trail Garden Club are providing the funding assistance for the 2017 program for Brunswick County.

Little Princess Ball

It was another memorable year for the annual Little Princess Ball sponsored by Communities In Schools (CIS) and Brunswick County Parks and Recreation in February. The Little Princess Ball is for girls in kindergarten through fifth grade accompanied by an adult male role model. Little princesses came dressed in their prettiest dresses, ball gowns and favorite princess costumes. Little girls in tiaras and bright smiling faces filled the Brunswick Center in Southport, South Brunswick Islands Center in Carolina Shores and Leland Cultural Arts Center in Leland. It was a special afternoon filled with dancing, face painting, games, food and fun. Even with the event expanding to a third location this year, the

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What’s happened

Southport and Carolina Shores locations sold out and Leland almost completely sold out as well. Hundreds of girls and their male role models danced, laughed and made memories. Refreshments were provided and every girl took home their very own tiara with streamers. The Little Princess Ball would not be possible without support from partners including Brunswick County Parks and Recreation, Brunswick Community College South Brunswick Islands Center, Brunswick Center at Southport and Leland Cultural Arts Center. Special thanks to Walgreens of Southport, Nancy Jo’s Homemade Bakery of Oak Island, Ahoy Donuts of Oak Island, Walmart of Southport, Walmart of Shallotte, Lady Sweet Cakes of Leland, Calabash Garden Tea Room, Harris Teeter of Leland, Food Lion of Leland, Lowes Foods of Ocean Isle Beach and Lowes Foods of Bolivia for making the 2017 princess ball a success by providing delicious treats for the event. More than 70 volunteers including Communities in Schools (CIS) and Brunswick County Parks and Recreation staff, families and friends worked hard to make sure the event was a success. The Little Princess Ball is sponsored by CIS and Brunswick County Parks and Recreation. Proceeds from the event support the programs and services of Brunswick County Parks and Recreation and Communities In Schools of Brunswick County. Photography: Contributed

4-H Participants Chosen as First NC Healthy Living Ambassadors

In October 2016 Jillian Bowling and Amelia Apple from Brunswick County 4-H were chosen as the first North Carolina Healthy Living Ambassadors. They learned about new curriculum, techniques and activities that can help N.C. residents achieve success and encourage underserved youth to live healthier, more active lifestyles. These two youths are part of the Brunswick County 4-H Teens in Leadership Training (TiLT) youth volunteer program. These young ladies have been teaching healthy living for the past three years. While they were in Chevy Chase, Maryland, with other youth and adults, they were invited to attend the National Healthy Living Summit 2017. Photography: Contributed

Woodsong Porch and Art Stroll Benefits Local Construction Scholarships Woodsong, a traditional walking neighborhood off Village Road in Shallotte, held its second annual Woodsong Porch and Art Stroll, an art and music festival, on April 22. The inaugural event in 2016 featured 16 artists represented by Sunset River Marketplace, live music and wine tastings. The 2017 event nearly doubled in size, with almost the entire neighborhood’s many front porches hosting local artists and artisans. The event also featured live music from Fun Fatale Trio and Highway 17 South Bluegrass Band. Concessions were available from Jumpin’ Java Espresso Co, 2 Bros Coastal Cuisine and Sunset Slush. In addition to wine tastings from Petrea Imports, this year’s event featured beer tastings provided by Check Six Brewing Company of Southport, as well as olive oil tastings by The Olive Press. Admission to the event was $5. Proceeds from the event benefit the Woodsong Scholarship for Construction Industry Careers at Brunswick Community College. The scholarship provides funding for local students seeking trades and certifications to enter the construction industry in Brunswick County. The neighborhood raised enough funding to establish an endowment to benefit Continuing Education programs at Brunswick Community College.

Charity Gala to Benefit Local Victims of Domestic Violence

GFWC of Holden Beach women’s club hosted its ninth annual Blooming for a Cause Charity Gala on April 8 at Sea Trail Convention Center in Sunset Beach. The silent auction, fashion show and luncheon benefited victims of domestic violence through donations to Hope Harbor Home, a local shelter for women and children fleeing domestic violence, and Providence Home, the only emergency youth shelter in Brunswick County. The gala’s silent auction was a success, and a highlight was Clarice Holden and her Island Breeze ladies’ clothing fashion show. Thanks to the generosity of hundreds of local businesses, associations, philanthropists and artists throughout Brunswick, New Hanover and Horry counties, this event has been a great success over the years. Since the gala’s inception, GFWC of Holden Beach has donated more than $125,000 to the named beneficiaries from its proceeds. Photography: Contributed

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What’s happened

Museum and Planetarium Seek Volunteers As the Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium prepare for a busy summer season, Volunteer Coordinator Joyce Houle is looking for additional volunteers. Both facilities need volunteers at the front desk to greet visitors and answer their questions. Both facilities also need volunteers to provide customer service in their gift shops. Additionally, the museum needs volunteers to work at the touch tank, where they will supervise visitors and answer questions about the marine animals in the tank. All volunteers receive training from staff members. There is always a staff member on duty to help volunteers if help is needed. Volunteers can sign up for as little or as many hours as they wish and for whatever days they wish. Flexible hours, interesting coworkers and interacting with the public make volunteering an appealing opportunity.

Shallotte Rotary’s Students of the Month December - Lea Dziorny, a student at Shallotte Middle School. Lea was accompanied at the meeting by her mother, Iwona Vyroubal.

January - Triston Leonard, a student and FCA leader at Shallotte Middle School. Sherry Wood, a teacher at Shallotte Middle School, nominated him for creating and leading devotions as well as for his help planning a recent breakfast honoring First Responders. February - Sayri Cuji, who hopes to one day become a wildlife biologist. Photography: Contributed

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What’s happened

Literacy Council Wine and Dine Event

Brunswick County Literacy Council held its second annual wine and dine evening at La Cucina Italian Grille in Sunset Beach on January 23, with proceeds going to support Literacy Council programs and students. The Literacy Council offers one-on-one instruction free of charge to help adults transform their lives, increase their job-readiness and contribute to a stronger community by improving their skills. Literacy Council volunteers provide personalized support in reading, writing, mathematics, GED preparation, financial and health literacy and technology competence. It is estimated that 43 percent of Brunswick County residents (approximately 44,000 people) ages 16 and older read at no higher than a fourth-grade level. Event fundraisers such as the wine dinner and the 28th annual BCLC Adult Spelling Bee and Silent Auction, which was held on May 23, produce needed revenues for the council’s work in the community. Photography: Contributed

Brunswick County Master Gardener Spring Plant Sale Brunswick County Master Gardeners Volunteer Association hosted its Spring Plant Sale on April 21 and 22. The sale offered an extensive collection of color in blooming perennials and flowering shrubs that flourish in the coastal Carolinas. The plant sale featured an expanded selection of salvias, daisies, lenten roses, bougainvillea, azalea and blooms galore. It was a popular sale, with customers waiting for the gates to open. This event was held at the Brunswick County Government Center, 25 Referendum Drive, Building N in Bolivia.

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South Brunswick Magazine


What’s happened

South Brunswick High School JROTC Marksmen Take First Place

Dosher Memorial Hospital and Hardees of Southport. Students recognized were: Hunter Adkins, Claire Berlacher, Jonathan Caison, Trinity Cobb, Trinity Cottle, Davina Daley, Ford Disbrow, Hailey Evans, Skii Gaines, Ryleigh Gleason, Khia Glover, Christian Haggblom, Logan Harrell, Bella Jennings, Samantha Jordan, Makayla Lapps, Vicente Martinez-Long, Audrey McLaughlin, Rylee Miller, Mary-Peyton Moffitt, Nathaniel Nye, Alexander Patterson, Rachel Pullin, Kayla Reedy, Bender Sanderson, Carson Satterwhite, Caleb Seawell, Mallory Sechler, Xander Spencer, Gracie Wainwright, Jeana Ward and Andrew Wilson. Photography: Contributed

Recently North Brunswick High School hosted an air rifle competition that consisted of 62 marksmen from 15 teams. South Brunswick High School JROTC Air Rifle Team finished an impressive first in the competition, with several of its shooters distinguishing themselves in individual competition. Kourtney Burton finished in second place overall, and her fellow teammates took honors in individual shooting categories. Ryanna Edge finished first in prone, Christina Girard took third place in standing, and Tommy Nguyen was first in the kneeling position. The American Legion Post 543 sponsors the JROTC, and Post 543 Commander Gary Crowden coaches the rifle team. Photography: Contributed

Good Neighbor Breakfast Honors 32 Local Students

Brunswick Family Assistance Appreciates American Legion, Post 543 American Legion Post 543 was given a Certificate of Appreciation from Brunswick Family Assistance (BFA) for its assistance in packaging and distribution of USDA commodities to needy Brunswick County citizens. Stephanie Bowden, executive director of BFA, spoke to the members of Post 543 and then presented Commander Gary G. Crowden with the certificate at the recent Post monthly meeting. Photography: Contributed

Funds Sought for Monument in Brunswick County Thirty two students at South Brunswick Middle School were honored on March 17 for being Good Neighbors in their school and in their communities. Honorees, along with their families, were invited to attend the award ceremony, which took place in the school’s media center. Breakfast was shared while guest speaker, the Honorable Pauline Hankins, N.C. Judicial District 13th Court Judge, shared what it means to be a good neighbor. Teachers of the students then presented the awards while sharing briefly why the student was chosen to be honored. Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with South Brunswick Middle School, holds the breakfast twice a school year. Organizers would like to thank the sponsors of the event: Blue Sky Promotions,

So many life lessons can be learned from studying the history of our great country and the important documents penned by America’s founders. The Charters of Freedom are the documents that secured the liberty and rights for all Americans: the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Foundation Forward, Inc. would like to memorialize these documents in a monument to be built in Brunswick County. Foundation Forward, Inc. is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit, educational project started in North Carolina to introduce all Americans to these founding documents and help preserve American history. Educational resources will also be available for use by area students to help ensure that they learn about and experience

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What’s happened

first-hand the value and importance of these documents. All community funding will be from private donors along with civic, historic and veteran’s organizations. No tax dollars will be used. The anticipated total cost of materials and labor is around $65,000. To raise the money the group will take donations or you can purchase brick(s), which will bear the name of the donor or they can be used for memorials. Each brick is $100. Visit the website at: brunswickchartersoffreedom.com/about-charters-of-freedom

Toastmasters Area 93 Speech and Table Topics Contest

professionals that are at the heart of afterschool programs during Afterschool Professionals Appreciation Week from April 24 to 28. CIS serves more than 500 students in afterschool programs, and an estimated 10.2 million children participate in afterschool programs nationwide each year. Afterschool programs are viewed as much more than just childcare. They are widely credited as the way to enhance education in STEM, literacy, the arts, social and emotional learning, health and wellness, and more. Afterschool Professionals Appreciation Week is a joint effort of community partners, afterschool programs, youth and child care workers and individuals who have committed to dedicating time to recognize and appreciate those who work with youth during out-of-school hours. CIS operates afterschool programs serving elementary and middle school students in Brunswick County. There are 316 elementary students and more than 200 middle school students who continue to learn after the final school bell rings each day. CIS staff and volunteers work to help students learn and grow their educational skills. Photography: Contributed

Strawberry and Wine Festival

Members of the Brunswick County Toastmasters Club (BCTM) participated at the Area 93 Speech and Table Topics (Impromptu Speaking) contest held on March 25 at the Wilmington Government complex. BCTM contestants were Pamela Brown and Marilyn Graham for Table Topics. Contestants for the International Speech Contest were Gracia Mejias and Marilyn Graham. Gracia Mejias took a third place win. Photography: Contributed

Communities In Schools of Brunswick County Celebrates Afterschool Professionals Appreciation Week

Old Bridge Preservation Society held its fifth annual Strawberry and Wine Festival on April 30 in Sunset Beach Town Park. Mike’s Garage Band provided the music, and guests enjoyed strawberry shortcake, barbecue, wines and craft beers.

Juleps and Jazz Novant Health sponsored a Kentucky Derby-style fundraiser was held on May 6 at 101 Stone Chimney Place in Supply. Live jazz featuring The Nick Michael’s Trio, heavy hor d’oeuvres, a cash bar, raffles, a silent auction, door prizes and the 136th Kentucky Derby were available for all to enjoy.

Museum Presents Carnivorous Plants in NC with Mark Todd The Museum of Coastal Carolina presented guest speaker Mark Todd on May 6. Todd’s topic was the Venus Flytrap Expedition: Myrtle Head Excursion. Attendees will met first at the Museum of Coastal Carolina for a brief presentation and then went to Myrtle Head Excursion for a guided expedition. Todd is the President of North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC), a national nonprofit organization that protects carnivorous plants and their habitat.

Communities In Schools of Brunswick County (CIS) joined with the National Afterschool Association (NAA) to celebrate the

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SNIPPETS

Wings & Wheels EAA Chapter 939 presented Wings & Wheels on Saturday, April 15 at Cape Fear Regional Jetport (KSUT). The day began with a delicious pancake breakfast. The Wings portion of the event featured aircraft static displays, classic and antique parking areas, aircraft judging and an awards presentation. The Wheels portion was open to all cars and trucks. Awards and trophies were given, and all profits went to help the chapter sponsor a young person to attend the EAA Air Academy Summer Camp. Photography: Barabara Sammons

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SNIPPETS

Las Vegas Night and Charity Auction Rotary Club of Shallotte hosted its 12th annual Las Vegas Night on Saturday, January 28 at Planet Fun in Shallotte. WECT-TV’s Jon Evans was host at this fun and entertaining event, which raised funds and awareness for local and international charities. Every guest got a door prize, and the grand prize was flat-screen smart TV. Thanks to the contributions of local businesses, the silent and live auctions were a great success. Hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, dinner, dessert and beverages kept everyone satisfied, while games such as blackjack, craps, roulette and Texas hold ‘em brought in the fun. Look for this fantastic event next year. For more information about the club, go to shallotterotaryclub.com. Photography: Christian Viera

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SNIPPETS

152nd Anniversary of the Fall of Fort Anderson The 152nd anniversary of the fall of Fort Anderson was held on February 18 and 19. Guided tours were offered for $10, with all proceeds from the tours going to the Gun Emplacement Fund, an effort by the Friends of Brunswick Town to install a working seacoast gun into the Southern Battery of Fort Anderson. Visitors experienced the sounds of artillery and felt the ground quake beneath their feet. A small tent village was set up where visitors could hear stories of malaria fever and its remedies. Guests could also purchase spices, teas, reading materials and clothes reminiscent of that era. Fort Anderson State Historic Site is at 884 St. Philips Road SE in Winnabow. It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9 am to 5 pm. Photography: Barbara Sammons

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Shallotte inlet tide chart

D a t e

June

High Tide AM

Low Tide

PM

Time Height Time (EST) (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft) 0.1

9:21 pm

D a t e

AM

PM

Time Height Time (EST) (ft) (EST)

1

2:22 am

4.9

3:09 pm

4.6

9:03 am

0.5

1

2:47 am

4.4

2

3:19 am

4.6

4:05 pm

4.7

10:03 am 0.2 10:27 pm 0.6

2

3:37 am

4.2

3

4:12 am

4.4

4:58 pm

4.7

10:59 am

0.3 11:28 pm 0.6

3

4:27 am

4

5:04 am

4.2

5:48 pm

4.8

11:47 am

0.3

---

4

5

5:54 am

4.1

6:35 pm

4.9

12:20 am 0.5 12:30 pm 0.2

5

6

6:42 am

4.1

7:19 pm

5

1:06 am

0.4

6

6:53 am

--1:10 pm

0.2

July

High Tide

Low Tide

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft) 9:52 pm

D a t e

August High Tide

AM

Low Tide

PM

Time Height Time (EST) (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

3:34 pm

4.7

9:21 am

0.3

0.8

1

3:49 am

3.9

4:35 pm

4.6

10:18 am

0.8 11:06 pm 1.1

4:24 pm

4.7

10:14 am

0.4 10:52 pm 0.8

2

4:38 am

3.9

5:23 pm

4.7

11:10 am

0.7 11:57 pm

1

4

5:13 pm

4.7

11:05 am

0.4 11:46 pm 0.8

3

5:29 am

3.9

6:10 pm

4.8

11:59 am

0.7

---

5:16 am

3.9

6:00 pm

4.8

11:51 am

0.4

---

4

6:18 am

3.9

6:56 pm

5

6:05 am

3.9

6:46 pm

4.9

12:34 am

0.7 12:35 pm 0.4

5

7:05 am

4.1

7:39 pm

5.1

1:29 am

0.7

1:30 pm

0.4

3.9

7:28 pm

5

1:18 am

0.6

7:48 am

4.2

8:19 pm

5.3

2:11 am

0.5

2:13 pm

0.3

--1:17 pm

0.3

6

---

12:44 am 0.8 12:46 pm 0.6

7

7:27 am

4.1

7:59 pm

5.1

1:49 am

0.3

1:49 pm

0.2

7

7:37 am

4

8:09 pm

5.1

2:00 am

0.4

1:58 pm

0.3

7

8:29 am

4.4

8:57 pm

5.3

2:51 am

0.3

2:55 pm

0.2

8

8:08 am

4.1

8:36 pm

5.1

2:29 am

0.2

2:28 pm

0.2

8

8:18 am

4

8:47 pm

5.1

2:41 am

0.3

2:39 pm

0.2

8

9:08 am

4.5

9:35 pm

5.3

3:31 am

0.2

3:37 pm

0.2

9

8:47 am

4.1

9:13 pm

5.1

3:09 am

0.2

3:06 pm

0.2

9

8:57 am

4.1

9:24 pm

5.1

3:22 am

0.2

3:20 pm

0.2

9

9:47 am

4.6

10:14 pm

5.3

4:10 am

0.1

4:19 pm

0.2

10

9:24 am

4.1

9:49 pm

5.1

3:48 am

0.1

3:45 pm

0.3

10

9:35 am

4.1

10:02 pm

5.1

4:01 am

0.2

4:01 pm

0.3

10 10:29 am

4.7

10:55 pm

5.1

4:49 am

0

5:02 pm

0.3

11 10:02 am

4

10:27 pm

5

4:27 am

0.2

4:24 pm

0.4

11 10:14 am

4.1

10:40 pm

5

4:40 am

0.1

4:41 pm

0.3

11 11:14 am

4.8

11:41 pm

5

5:29 am

0

5:47 pm

0.4

12 10:40 am

3.9

11:06 pm

4.8

5:06 am

0.2

5:03 pm

0.5

12 10:55 am

4.1

11:21 pm

4.9

5:19 am

0.1

5:22 pm

0.4

12

---

12:05 pm

4.9

6:11 am

0

6:34 pm

0.5

13 11:22 am

3.9

11:49 pm

4.7

5:45 am

0.3

5:44 pm

0.6

13 11:40 am

4.2

---

---

5:58 am

0.1

6:05 pm

0.5

13 12:32 am

4.8

1:00 pm

5

6:56 am

0

7:28 pm

0.6

14

---

12:08 pm

3.9

6:24 am

0.3

6:26 pm

0.7

14 12:07 am

4.8

12:31 pm

4.3

6:38 am

0.1

6:52 pm

0.6

14

1:28 am

4.7

1:58 pm

5.1

7:46 am

0

8:29 pm

0.7

15 12:35 am

4.6

12:59 pm

4

7:06 am

0.3

7:13 pm

0.8

15 12:56 am

4.7

1:25 pm

4.5

7:22 am

0

7:45 pm

0.7

15

2:27 am

4.6

2:58 pm

5.3

8:42 am

0.1

9:38 pm

0.7

16

1:25 am

4.5

1:52 pm

4.1

7:51 am

0.3

8:07 pm

0.8

16

1:49 am

4.6

2:20 pm

4.7

8:10 am

0

8:46 pm

0.7

16

3:27 am

4.6

3:58 pm

5.4

9:45 am

0.1 10:50 pm 0.6

9:09 pm

-0.1 9:54 pm

---

17

2:16 am

4.5

2:46 pm

4.4

8:40 am

0.2

0.8

17

2:45 am

4.5

3:17 pm

5

0.6

17

4:29 am

4.6

4:59 pm

5.6

10:51 am

18

3:10 am

4.5

3:41 pm

4.7

9:35 am

0

10:17 pm 0.6

18

3:42 am

4.5

4:15 pm

5.3

10:05 am -0.2 11:03 pm 0.4

18

5:31 am

4.7

6:00 pm

5.8

11:55 am -0.2

19

4:06 am

4.5

4:37 pm

5.1

10:33 am -0.2 11:23 pm 0.3

19

4:42 am

4.5

5:14 pm

5.5

11:07 am -0.4

---

19

6:33 am

4.9

6:59 pm

5.9

12:55 am

20

5:04 am

4.6

5:34 pm

5.5

11:30 am -0.5

---

20

5:44 am

4.6

6:14 pm

5.8

12:08 am 0.2 12:07 pm -0.6

20

7:31 am

5.1

7:54 pm

6

1:49 am

-0.1

21

6:03 am

4.7

6:32 pm

5.8

12:25 am

12:27 pm -0.7

21

6:45 am

4.8

7:13 pm

6

1:08 am

-0.1 1:06 pm -0.7

21

8:24 am

5.3

8:44 pm

6

2:40 am

-0.3 2:44 pm -0.6

22

7:02 am

4.8

7:28 pm

6.1

1:23 am

-0.3 1:22 pm -0.9

22

7:44 am

4.9

8:08 pm

6.2

2:04 am

-0.4 2:03 pm -0.9

22

9:15 am

5.4

9:32 pm

5.9

3:28 am

-0.3 3:35 pm -0.5

23

7:59 am

5

8:23 pm

6.3

2:19 am

-0.6 2:18 pm

-1

23

8:39 am

5.1

9:01 pm

6.1

2:58 am

-0.6 2:58 pm -0.9

23 10:04 am

5.4

10:18 pm

5.6

4:14 am

-0.3 4:24 pm -0.3

24

8:55 am

5

9:16 pm

6.3

3:14 am

-0.8 3:13 pm

-1.1

24

9:33 am

5.1

9:52 pm

6

3:50 am

-0.6 3:52 pm -0.8

24 10:53 am

5.3

11:04 pm

5.3

4:57 am

-0.2 5:12 pm

25

9:50 am

5

10:10 pm

6.1

4:08 am

-0.8 4:08 pm

-1

25 10:27 am

5.1

10:43 pm

5.7

4:39 am

-0.6 4:44 pm

25 11:43 am

5.1

11:52 pm

4.9

5:39 am

0

5:58 pm

0.3

26 10:46 am

4.9

11:04 pm

5.8

5:00 am

-0.8 5:02 pm -0.8

26 11:21 am

5

11:35 pm

5.4

5:27 am

-0.5 5:36 pm -0.3

26

---

12:34 pm

5

6:20 am

0.3

6:44 pm

0.7

27 11:45 am

4.8

---

---

5:52 am

-0.6

5:57 pm

-0.5

27

---

12:17 pm

4.9

6:13 am

-0.3 6:27 pm

0.1

27 12:41 am

4.6

1:25 pm

4.8

7:02 am

0.6

7:32 pm

1

28 12:01 am

5.5

12:46 pm

4.7

6:43 am

-0.4 6:52 pm

-0.1

28 12:27 am

5

1:13 pm

4.8

6:59 am

7:18 pm

0.4

28

1:31 am

4.3

2:16 pm

4.7

7:46 am

0.8

8:24 pm

1.2

29 12:58 am

5.1

1:45 pm

4.7

7:34 am

-0.2 7:49 pm

0.3

29

1:19 am

4.6

2:06 pm

4.7

7:45 am

0.3

8:12 pm

0.8

29

2:21 am

4.1

3:05 pm

4.7

8:35 am

1

9:21 pm

1.4

30

4.7

2:41 pm

4.7

8:27 am

0.1

0.6

30

2:10 am

4.3

2:57 pm

4.7

8:34 am

0.5

9:09 pm

1

30

3:11 am

4

3:54 pm

4.7

9:30 am

1.1 10:21 pm 1.4

31

3:00 am

4.1

3:46 pm

4.6

9:25 am

0.7 10:08 pm 1.1

31

4:01 am

4

4:44 pm

4.7

10:28 am

1.1

1:54 am

0

---

8:49 pm

---

9:05 am

---

0

---

-0.6

---

0

11:56 pm 0.4 --1:51 pm

11:17 pm

*Tide charts are accurate to the best of our knowledge. If you are checking tides for navigational purposes, please verify these times with another source.

104

South Brunswick Magazine

---

0.1 12:55 pm -0.4 -0.5

0

1.3


Advertisers Index Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Allstate – R&R Insurance Services, Inc..................................................910-754-6596 92

In Touch CranioSacral..........................................................................................910-612-6618 14

Angelo’s Pizzeria and Bistro...........................................................................910-754-2334 61

Island Classic Interiors.........................................................................................910-579-8477 67

Arbor Landing at Ocean Isle..........................................................................910-754-8080 9

Islands Art and Books..........................................................................................910-579-7757 57

Art Catering & Events.........................................................................................910-755-6642 75

J&K Home Furnishings......................................................................................843-249-1882

Austin Oral Surgery..............................................................................................910-769-1605 48

Josh London, State Farm Agent................................................................910-383-1303 14

Bill Clark Homes.......................................................................................................910-575-2933 95

Kimberly Jo’s Boutique......................................................................................910-579-7670 56

Blue Heron Gallery.................................................................................................910-575-5088 40

Kristin Dowdy, State Farm Agent..............................................................910-754-9923 14

BlueWave Dentistry..............................................................................................910-383-2615 50

Legacy Homes by Bill Clark............................................................................910-363-1682 94

Body Edge Fitness Solutions.........................................................................910-575-0975 98

Logan Homes.............................................................................................................800-761-4707 57

Boundary House......................................................................................................910-579-8888 13

Luxe Home Interiors.............................................................................................910-371-0464 61

Boutique Around the Corner........................................................................910-575-7605 67

McLeod Seacoast...................................................................................................843-366-3891 19

Braddock Built Renovations...........................................................................910-754-9635 75

Mulch & More.............................................................................................................910-253-7663 48

Brick Landing Plantation...................................................................................910-754-2745 72

New Hanover Regional Medical Center...............................................910-667-7773 BC

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce....................................910-754-6644 23

NHRMC Physicians Group New Hanover Medical Group.......................................................................910-254-1033 12

Brunswick County Dept. of Social Services......................................910-253-2112 92 Brunswick County Habitat for Humanity...........................................910-457-1772 76 Brunswick Forest....................................................................................................888-371-2434 17 Brunswick Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.........................................910-269-2420 98 Callahan’s of Calabash.........................................................................................800-344-3816 26 Cambridge Crossings.........................................................................................910-446-1170 15 Carolinas Oral and Facial Surgery.............................................................910-762-2618 61 Clark’s Seafood and Chop House..............................................................843-399-8888 28 Coastal Insurance....................................................................................................910-754-4326 34 Coastal Integrative Health...............................................................................910-755-5400 44 Coastal Carolina Pediatric Dentistry.......................................................910-794-2266 67 CommWell Health..................................................................................................877-935-5255 40 Dosher Memorial Hospital..............................................................................910-454-3944 IBC Douglas Diamond Jewelers..........................................................................910-755-5546 3 EmergeOrtho............................................................................................................910-332-3800 7 Farm Bureau Insurance - Shallotte...........................................................910-754-8175 38 Farm Bureau Insurance - Southport......................................................910-457-9559 85 Foster Insurance......................................................................................................910-755-5100 76 Genie Leigh Photography................................................................................910-470-0456 98 Hwy 55 Burgers Shakes and Fries............................................................910-371-6700 76

Novant Health............................................................................................................910-579-8363

24, 25

6, 96

Ocean Isle Creamery...........................................................................................910-579-5300 56 Ocean Isle Family Dentistry............................................................................910-579-6999 85 Permanent Makeup by Theresa.................................................................910-232-1001 92 Point Break Surf & Skate...................................................................................910-477-6203 40 Pope Real Estate......................................................................................................910-619-7673 57 Purple Onion Café..................................................................................................910-755-6071 75 RJB Tax Associates...............................................................................................910-338-3001 48 Sea Island Trading Co..........................................................................................843-273-0248 20 Seaside United Methodist Church...........................................................910-579-5753 72 Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Bar-B-Q.................................................................910-754-5522 IFC Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber...................................................800-457-6964 88 Studios at the Livery..............................................................................................................................................100 Sunset Dental.............................................................................................................910-575-6300

4, 5

Tides at Calabash....................................................................................................866-393-8171 88 Time 2 Remember Photography..............................................................910-253-7428 85 Trusst Builder Group............................................................................................910-371-0304 8 Ultimate Burial & Vault.......................................................................................877-828-5826 100 University of North Carolina at Wilmington....................................910-962-3000 11 Winds Resort Beach Club................................................................................800-334-3581 88

Spring 2017

105


Capture the moment

Photo Captured By Ken Guhse

Have you captured the moment? If so, email your photos to capture@southbrunswickmagazine.com. If we choose your photo to be published on this page, you will win $25.

106

South Brunswick Magazine


Spring 2017

107


Passion Renewed When avid surfer Barbara experienced a major heart attack, NHRMC cardiologists placed a stent to open a completely blocked artery. Now she’s back in the water doing what she loves. Visit nhrmc.org/heart, or call 910.667.7773 to learn more about NHRMC’s award-winning cardiac program.