SBM Winter 2019-20

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Winter 2019-20 Winter 2019-20 || SouthBrunswickMagazine.com SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

Seizing

e h t

Clay

Jeffcoat Pottery in Calabash transforms common elements into objects of beauty. C O M PL IM E N TA RY

BEHIND THE SCENES AT 3 BRUNSWICK RESTAURANTS |

MULLED CIDER |

MEET BCC'S NEW LEADER



S

ome guests rose on their first morning in Tuscany after their

transatlantic journey. Descending the hotel stairs, they admired “the most beautiful painting they had ever seen.� After a few moments gazing at the olive grove, vineyard, and the hills beyond, a bird flew by, revealing this painting as the simply stunning view through a window. Travelers find art around every corner in Bella Italia. For eighteen years, Private Italy Tours has given guests the gift of memories. Should your travel plans include Italy, Greece, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, or the Netherlands, we hope you will consider contacting us. From small group tours to custom itineraries, we commit to providing unforgettable experiences in remarkable locations.

Private Italy Tours Ltd come home again to Italy

Asheville, NC 28801

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In the award-winning, master-planned community of Brunswick Forest, Park West is a charming new neighborhood of beautiful homes with upscale features including granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, wood flooring, low-maintenance exteriors, and a variety of floor plans. All brought to you by our esteemed builder team. Visit AmenityRichLiving.com, call 866.765.9326 or stop by the Welcome Center today.

Cape Fear National® Golf • Fitness Center • Walking & Biking Trails The Villages Town Center • Town Creek River Launch • Tennis & Pickleball • Indoor & Outdoor Swimming PREMIER HOMESITES FROM THE $80s | ELEGANT HOMES FROM THE $300s - $800s Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of these properties. The features and amenities described and depicted herein are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. This is not an offer to sell or solicitation of offers to buy real estate in any jurisdiction where registration or advance qualification is required but not completed. © Brunswick Forest Realty, LLC Licensed NC Real Estate Brokerage Firm


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

D FEATURES

FEATURES

WINTER 2019-20 D VOLUME 11, ISSUE 2

50 82 PHOTO BY INDIGO SILVER

44 SEIZE THE CLAY

Jeffcoat Pottery in Calabash stands out for its exceptional glazes and the teamwork of its dynamic owners. By Joan Leotta

50 TALKING TRASH

Green for Life employees work hard and fast in the collection of garbage and recycling across Brunswick County. By Ed Beckley

66 LEADING BCC INTO THE FUTURE From farm life as a youth to a long career at Wayne Community College, Dr. Gene Smith brings a strong work ethic to his new post as president of Brunswick Community College. By Teresa A. McLamb

82 A CULINARY JOURNEY PHOTO BY ED BECKLEY

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Terry and Andrew Bland of ART Catering and Events and Purple Onion Cafe share their love of food with the people of Shallotte and Brunswick County. By Melissa Slaven Warren


Your Hometown Favorite for 43 Years Five stars is not enough! Our Intracoastal Realty agent is phenomenal at understanding what her buyers are looking for and helping them find just the right property. We moved to Wilmington from NY - she was a great help getting the list of properties to see to a manageable level, walking us through the differences in the process between NY and NC, and being our feet on the ground from offer to closing with everything that needed to be done at our new home. Even after closing, she’s been a great resource, helping us find all of those businesses that are part of daily life.� ~ S. Chernoff

www.IntracoastalRealty.com | 910.579.3050

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

77

IN EVERY ISSUE 16 PUBLISHER’S NOTE by Justin Williams

18 CONTRIBUTORS

Meet some of the contributors to South Brunswick Magazine.

20 WHAT’S HAPPENING

Upcoming events you won’t want to miss.

26 BUSINESS BUZZ

Keeping up with local businesses.

31 UP NORTH

What you’ll find in the Winter 2019-20 edition of North Brunswick Magazine.

33 ONLINE EXCLUSIVES

Extras you’ll only find online

95 BUSINESS PROFILES

Clark’s Seafood and Chop House, Sea Island Trading Co. By Melissa Slaven Warren

99 FACES AND PLACES

2019 Holiday Banquet & Charity Celebration for the Rose House

What’s been going on around town.

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71 PEOPLE

Tracking the highs and the lows at Shallotte Inlet.

From fleeing violence in Vietnam to living and working around the world, Holden Beach resident Uyen Nguyen has lived a life that few could imagine. By Jo Ann Matthews

105 ADVERTISERS INDEX 106 CAPTURE THE MOMENT

77 AROUND TOWN

A contest for SBM readers

Members of the Coastal Carolina Chapter of the American Harp Society cultivate appreciation of the harp through performances, instruction and guest artist recitals. By Beth Klahre

DEPARTMENTS 35 SPIRITS

Spiked Mulled Citrus Apple Cider By Sandi Grigg

87 SNIPPETS

Happenings on the local scene

36 WHAT’S COOKIN’

36

Brie, Bacon & Asparagus Quiche By Sandi Grigg

39 WHAT’S NEW

The Boat Landing Restaurant offers good food, drinks and views. By Kurt Epps, a.k.a. The PubScout

55 BEHIND THE BUSINESS

The new owners of Moore Street Market Café and Deli remake a Southport favorite. By Carolyn Bowers

61 NONPROFIT

At Brunswick Christian Recovery Center, men, and soon women, step through faith into recovery. By Denice Patterson

PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

100 WHAT’S HAPPENED

104 SHALLOTTE INLET TIDE CHART

PHOTO BY JOHN MUUSS

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PHOTO BY BRENT GALLANT

PHOTO BY CAROLYN BOWERS

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D IN EVERY ISSUE D DEPARTMENTS


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South Brunswick Magazine – Winter 2019-20 Volume 11, Issue 2 OWNER/PUBLISHER: Justin Williams DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Sandi Grigg COPY EDITOR: Molly Harrison CONTRIBUTING GRAPHICS: Paula Knorr Teresa Kramer Eliza Dale Niemann

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES: Brian Wilner George Jacob

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Carolyn Bowers Megan Deitz Brent Gallant Mark Head Laura Glantz John Muus Bill Ritenour Mike Spencer James Stefiuk

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Carolyn Bowers Ed Beckley Kurt Epps Sandi Grigg Beth Klahre Joan Leotta Sheree K. Nielsen Jo Ann Mathews Teresa A. McLamb Denice Patterson Melissa Slaven Warren PUBLISHED BY:

CAROLINA MARKETING COMPANY, INC. PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 (910) 207-0156 • info@northbrunswickmagazine.com Reproduction or use of the contents in this magazine is prohibited.

© 2019-20 Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. strives to bring correct, accurate information that is published in the magazine. However, Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. cannot be held responsible for any consequences resulting from errors or absences. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. also cannot be held responsible for the services provided by any and all advertisers in our publications. All material in this magazine is property of Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. and may not be reproduced without authorization from the publisher. South Brunswick Magazine – A Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. publication is published four times per year and is distributed to residents and businesses in South Brunswick County, NC, to subscribers and to select areas of New Hanover County, NC and Horry County, SC.

About the cover: Winter 2019-20 | SouthBrunswickMagazine.com

Seizing the Clay Jeffcoat Pottery in Calabash transforms common elements into objects of beauty. C O M PL IM E N TA RY

BEHIND THE SCENES AT 3 BRUNSWICK RESTAURANTS |

12

South Brunswick Magazine

MULLED CIDER |

MEET BCC'S NEW LEADER

Photographer Brent Gallant captured this image of Joe Jeffcoat in his pottery studio in Calabash. Joe and his wife, Tonda, have been making pottery together since the 1970s, and their award-winning work is known for its craftsmanship and fine glazes. Read about the Jeffcoats in Joan Leotta's story, which starts on page 44.


Healing Wounds is Our Specialty. Providing Hope is Our Purpose.

When you can reverse the need for an amputation, or help a patient with a chronic wound who has tried everything and has nowhere else to turn, you know you’ve made an impact on the lives of the people in your community. At the Dosher Memorial Hospital Wound Care Center, we get to do this every day. With the latest in technology, including hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and with one of the highest outcome and patient satisfaction rates in the country, Dosher has been recognized as a National Center of Excellence for wound treatment 3 years in a row. Ou expert care is covered by most insurance plans, and no physician referral is necessary. Our

Call 910-454-1192 or visit Dosher.org/Wound to ďŹ nd out more. 924 N. Howe St. Southport, NC 28461 Dosher is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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Transforming Your Home

is an Art. .

Reader/Advertising Services Subscriptions Want to subscribe to SBM? Subscriptions are $15.99 per year and include 4 issues of SBM. Subscribe safely online using PayPal, credit or debit card at www. SouthBrunswickMagazine.com/subscribe. Call our office at (910) 207-0156 or email us at subscribe@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com to request a subscription.

Back Issues When available, back issues of SBM can be purchased for $5. Call or email us for information.

Letters

Betsy Braddock | 910.754.9635

betsy@braddockbuilt.com | braddockbuilt.com

We welcome your letters and comments about SBM. Send your letters to PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 or email them to info@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com. When sending your letters, keep in mind they may or may not be published in a future issue of SBM. The publisher reserves the right to make the final decision.

Writing Opportunities

Ask about our Holiday Menus & Parties

We are always willing to consider freelance writers and article ideas. Please send suggestions or inquiries to South Brunswick Magazine, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451. Or email us at edit@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Change of Address If you move, please submit your new and old address to South Brunswick Magazine at info@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Advertising Interested in advertising in SBM? Please contact us to set up a meeting with an Account Executive. Our main office number is (910) 207-0156, or you can email us at advertise@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Marketing Services Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. provides a wide range of marketing services. This includes advertising design services, custom publications, mailing services and more. Contact our office for additional information or to set up a meeting with a Marketing Consultant.

SouthBrunswickMagazine.com Visit us online at the above website. With any additional questions, call us at (910) 207-0156. 14

South Brunswick Magazine


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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Publisher Justin Williams and his daughter, Ava.

So Much Gratitude Those who know me well, know this: I genuinely love southeastern North Carolina. Our publications and websites now cover nearly 100 miles from Topsail Island through Little River, South Carolina, and I truly care about all of the areas in between, from Pender and Onslow counties in the north to New Hanover County in the middle to Brunswick County and Horry County in the south. As I travel around getting these publications together, I’m always in awe of how each of these areas is unique. Each town along this stretch of coast has its own personality and idiosyncrasies, but you know what’s the same everywhere I go? The awesomeness of the people I meet along the way. Through my travels over the past 15 years I have met so many cool people and gathered so many stories to tell (and maybe a few I shouldn’t), and the people are the main reason this area means so much to me. Every day I hear people lament about the growth and development of southeastern North Carolina, and I understand where they’re coming from, but I want to say this: Can you blame people for wanting to be here, for loving this place as much as we do? I find that the newcomers are also really cool people with fascinating backgrounds and specialized talents that contribute to the overall good of the community. 16

South Brunswick Magazine

In this edition of South Brunswick Magazine, you’ll meet some of these people, newcomers and longtime locals alike. You’ll meet Dr. Gene Smith, the new president of Brunswick Community College, as well as Calabash potters Joe and Tonda Jeffcoat, Shallotte restaurateurs Terry and Andrew Bland and Holden Beach resident Uyen Nguyen, whose path to Brunswick County was both harrowing and fascinating. We take you to the Boat Landing Restaurant in Sunset Beach, to Brunswick Christian Recover Center, to Moore Street Market in Southport and even alongside the crew of Green for Life as they collect recycling. At the end of each year, I count my blessings, and one of the biggest blessings has been the community’s support of this magazine. I appreciate our advertisers. I appreciate our readers. I appreciate everyone who allows us to tell their stories. I appreciate all of you who provide us with vital feedback. We can’t do this without you! ! Justin Williams Owner/Publisher Publisher@SouthBrunswickMagazine.com


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CONTRIBUTORS

Kurt Epps, a.k.a. The PubScout CONTRIBUTING WRITER AND PHOTOGRAPHER

I am a retired English teacher, a veteran of 37 years in the high school classroom, and I have also served as an adjunct professor at the college level. I'm a multiple awardwinning writer and have won national recognition for my coverage of the craft beer industry, in which I've been immersed since 1996. An expert at beer and food pairing, I emcee dinners, host public and private tutored beer tastings and evaluate and review beer bars, breweries, brewpubs and pubs, as well as restaurants with good beer menus. I encourage the responsible enjoyment of beer, and my favorite quote comes from Jim Koch of the Boston Beer Co.: "All beer is good; some beer is better.” My mission as The PubScout’s is to locate and write about the "better.”

Teresa A. McLamb CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Since high school I have been a professional journalist. My love of storytelling and the written word led me to a BA in journalism from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an MA in English from University of North Carolina Wilmington. I feel very fortunate to be a native of coastal North Carolina. My love of art, animals and travel often lead to articles in magazines and on the web. I am also a real estate developer and licensed broker. I am the mother of two and live in Carolina Beach and Hickman Cross Roads with my cats.

Jo Ann Mathews CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I was a freelance writer and English teacher before my husband, Steve, and I moved from Flossmoor, Illinois, to Ocean Isle Beach in 2000. Both of us are Illinois natives, but I love to write and Steve loves to golf so Brunswick County offered the perfect venue. Our son Steven is a naval officer and lives in Virginia Beach with his wife, Meghan, and their three sons, Jackson, Jefferson and Harrison. Our son Jeffrey is an investment banker in San Francisco. I like swimming, jazz, needlepoint and my Kindle.

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South Brunswick Magazine


Introducing Dr. Alex K. Humbert, D.C. CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN Voted BEST OF BRUNSWICK #1 Chiropractor 2011 2012 2013 2015 2016 2017 2018

2019

“I am blessed to be able to serve the people of Brunswick County and to join the Coastal Integrative Health staff team. Being from Brunswick County makes it even more exciting to give back to the people who have been there for me and have helped me accomplish my goals of becoming a Doctor of Chiropractic. Along with my team we are here to provide the latest and most up-to-date evidence based care to our patients and to carve a path to a better, healthier pain free life. We will be there every step of the way along our patients’ journey.”

Request an appointment today! chiropractic

physical therapy

massage therapy

910.755.5400 | coastalhealthnc.com

728 Village Rd SW, Shallotte, NC 28470

2nd Location 1175 Turlington Avenue, Suite 103, Leland, NC 28541 Winter 2019-20

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

New Year’s Eve Party at Mavericks Pointe

December 31 Ring in 2020 with the New Year's Eve Party at Mavericks Point. Doors open at 5 pm. Please RSVP by purchasing your tickets ahead of time. Tickets are $18 per person and include party favors, heavy hors d’ oeuvres, live karaoke and a DJ. Information: (910) 579-4444

New Year’s Eve at Shallotte Moose Lodge

December 31 Trilogy will be playing on New Year’s Eve at the Shallotte Moose Lodge. The party starts at 8 pm and is open to members and guests. The lead singer of Trilogy is a member, so just say you are a friend of the band and you will get in. Admission is $20 single and $30 per couple; finger food is included, and beer and wine will be for sale at bar. Bring a brown bag with your favorite liquor and just pay for the setup. Stay and bring in the New Year until 1 am. Information: Facebook – New Years Eve Shallotte Moose Lodge

breast cancer, will take place at the House of Pickleball in Leland. Each participant will receive a performance athletic fit shirt, and those who register before the end of the year will receive a $5 discount. Each day will include rounds of each category until final elimination. Information: (910) 253-7780; houseofpickleball.com

North Carolina Jazz Festival

January 23 to 25 The 40th annual North Carolina Jazz Festival will take place at The Hotel Ballast on the banks of the Cape Fear River in downtown Wilmington. The 2020 event brings new jazz musicians to the stage along with some of the longtime favorites. Opening night will feature Veronica Swift with the Emmet Cohen Trio. Ben Polcier, Bruce Harris, Judy Kurtz, Chris Gelb, Adrian Cunningham, Rossano Sportiello and Nicki Parrott will all be performing. Information: ncjazzfestival.org

Mint Julep Jazz Band

January 11 A concert with Mint Julep Jazz Band will feature almost all of the musicians on their recent album, performing Keenan’s originals and some holiday classics in groupings ranging from traditional jazz combos to Big Band. The show will be held at Odell Williams Auditorium. Doors open at 7 pm, and the show starts at 8 pm. Advance tickets are available online for $12 (plus a parking option), or tickets will be available at the door for $15. Information: bccowa.com

Health Hacks Cooking Demo & Nutrition Education

Shallotte Rotary’s Las Vegas Night

January 13 & February 10 Free, 90-minute, healthy cooking demonstrations and nutrition programs will be offered at the WWAY Event Center on January 13 and February 10. The events will take place from 6 to 7 pm, and no preregistration is required. First timers get a free t-shirt. Information: wwaytv3.com/healthhacks/

Dink for Pink Pickleball Tournament

January 21 to 26 A pickleball tournament benefitting Lump to Laughter, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting those diagnosed with 20

South Brunswick Magazine

Shallotte Rotary’s Las Vegas Night

January 25 The 15th annual Shallotte Rotary’s Las Vegas Night is set to take place on Saturday, January 25 from 6 to 10:30 pm at Planet Fun in Shallotte. This is a fun, game-filled night you won’t want to miss. Tickets are $85 and include appetizers and dinner. A cash bar will be available to purchase wine and beer. Door prizes as well as a silent and live auction will be underway. All proceeds benefit those in need, and all prizes are made possible by local businesses. Information: shallotterotaryclub.com


WHAT’S HAPPENING

Cirque Zuma Zuma

February 7 Get ready for an exhilarating African Cirque Style show that’s packed with amazing themes to wow its audiences. The show is coming to Odell Williamson Auditorium on the campus of Brunswick Community College. Doors open at 6:30 pm, and tickets are $33. Information: bccowa.com

Cirque Zuma Zuma

Run Oak Island 2020

February 15 Run Oak Island includes a full marathon, half marathon (east and west courses), 5K and 1-mile event that showcase this beautiful island. The full marathon starts at 6:45am and weaves along the marsh, around a golf community and through the beautiful arboretum. This year there will be a two half marathon options for you to choose from. Half Marathon West will start at 8:30 am and run the second half of the full marathon course and includes lots of beachfront running and beautiful views from the ICW Bridge. If you choose Half Marathon West you will also have the ability to compete in the 5K, which starts at 7 am. Information: coastalraceproductions.com

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce Annual Chairman’s Awards Gala

February 20 The 2020 annual gala will be held on February 20 at the Isles Restaurant. The top three nominees in each category will be featured in a professional 30-second marketing video segment at the gala. The event will take place from 5:30 to 9 pm, and tickets are $50 each. Information: brunswickcountychamber.org/chairmansawards/

Historic Happy Hour

Historic Happy Hour on the Old Baldy grounds

February 26, March 25, April 22 Enjoy beer and wine on the Old Baldy grounds while having an intimate curator tour of The Smith Island Museum of History. History Happy Hour will take place on the fourth Wednesday of every month from 4:30 to 6 pm. Each month will explore a different topic of Bald Head Island history. Included in your reservation is admission into the museum along with beer and wine. Information: (910) 457-5003; oldbaldy.org

Special Olympics Polar Plunge

February 29 Join a day of fun, music, line dancing, games, food trucks and a Care Fair. At this fundraiser for the Brunswick County Special Olympics,

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

you can take a plunge that will help provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for differently abled children and adults. Participants are encouraged to wear their most creative costume for a chance to win prizes. This event will take place at the Oak Island Parks and Recreation center from 11 am to 12 pm. Information: sonc.net/local-programs/ brunswick-county/

N.C. Coast Dog Games

N.C. Coast Dog Games

March 21 This event is back and will be near the waterfront in the Old Yacht District in Southport on March 21 from 10 am to 3 pm. Events include (to participate in or just come to watch with your dog): Dock Jumping, UpDog Disc, agility, small dog races, vendors, food and other fun. This event has no ticket sales, but there is a minimum suggested $5 donation to The Sergei Foundation per person upon admission. Information: ncdoggames.com

Woodsong Porch and Art Stroll

April 25 Woodsong, located off Village Road in Shallotte, will hold its fifth annual Woodsong Porch and Art Stroll, an art and music festival, on Saturday, April 25 from 10 am to 3 pm. Proceeds from the event benefit the Woodsong Scholarship for Construction Industry Careers at Brunswick Community College. The 2020 event will

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feature more than 20 local artists represented by Sunset River Marketplace, live music, wine tastings, beer tastings and more. Local band Miles Atlas will provide musical entertainment for the event. Concessions will be available from the Butcher of Brunswick, Wicked Good Pretzel and Sunset Slush. This year’s event will feature free wine tastings from Petrea Imports, free beer tastings provided by Makai Brewing Company of Ocean Isle Beach and free chair massage from Synergy Wellness therapists. Admission to the event is $5, and tickets can be purchased at the entrance or online. Information: eventbrite.com/e/2020-woodsong-porch-and-artstroll-tickets-80507204215


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BUSINESS BUZZ

BEMC Rate Changes Take Effect April 1, 2020

Local Women Honored at 2019 Women of Impact Awards

On April 1, 2020, Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation (BEMC) will enact a necessary rate change to allow the fixed cost of the BEMC system to be more fairly allocated to all 78,000 members. This will include aligning rates between the base facility charge and the charge for energy. The impact on an individual member’s bill from the changes to the rate schedule will be determined by the amount of energy the member’s household uses each month. However, an average residential member who uses 1,000 kWh per month will see an increase of approximately $8.64 per month.

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce honored its Women of Impact Award recipients on November 4 at Brunswick Plantation Resort & Golf Course. The chamber’s Women in Business Committee developed the Women of Impact Awards in an effort to recognize people from diverse backgrounds and industries to ensure that their achievements become part of the fabric of the community. After lunch and an address by keynote speaker Fran Scarlett, awards were presented to: Woman of the Year: Regina Nichols, The Printing Shoppe

Dosher and BCC Foundation Leaders Earn Executive Certificates in Nonprofit Leadership

Established Business Owner Award: Sheila Smeltzer, A+ Pro Services Established Business Woman Award: Suzanne Lewis, First Citizens Bank

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Emerging Entrepreneur Award: Kerri Allen, The Flying Locksmiths - Coastal Carolina

Lynda Stanley, president of Dosher Memorial Hospital Foundation, and Elizabeth Wassum, executive director of Brunswick Community College Foundation, have received certificates in Executive Nonprofit Leadership from Duke University. The Executive Certificate in Nonprofit Leadership is a comprehensive program that offers experienced nonprofit professionals the opportunity to increase their capacity for effective leadership, enabling its graduates to gain awareness of emerging trends in the nonprofit sector, work effectively with other leaders across organizations and stakeholder groups to capitalize on opportunities for synergy in addressing critical social issues and lead strategic change within their organizations. The Tom and Susan Rabon Charitable Foundation sponsored the programs for both Stanley and Wassum.

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Volunteer of the Year Award: Mary Pritchard, South Brunswick Interchurch Council Hidden Gem Award: Regina Lowry, Autumn Care of Shallotte Nursing and Rehab Center Educator of the Year Award: Shelia Vaught, West Brunswick High School Dude Award: Timothy M. Randall, Brunswick Community College

Wilmington Health Adds New Department Wilmington Health has added a new department for Interventional Pain and Regenerative Medicine, and Christopher Hess, MD, has joined Wilmington Health to head it. Dr. Hess has expertise and a commitment to providing traditional and innovative solutions in the treatment of chronic pain, including interventional nerve blocks, injections, stem cell therapy and platelet-rich plasma. He received a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from Indiana University in


BUSINESS BUZZ

Bloomington, Indiana. He earned his medical degree from Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Hess completed an anesthesia residency and internship and pain medicine fellowship at Harvard, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, Massachusetts. He is board certified in both pain medicine and regenerative medicine.

real estate agents in Holden Beach. Many guests joined CENTURY 21 Sweyer & Associates for the grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new office on November 6. Greg Mayer, captain of the Fishin’ Frenzy, as seen on Wicked Tuna: Outer Banks, was present at the event.

Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center Now Offers Diagnostic Heart Catheterizations

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

South Shore Dance Academy Holds Ribbon Cutting

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce held a ribboncutting ceremony for South Shore Dance Academy on August 27. Located at 4672 Long Beach Road SE in Southport, South Shore Dance Academy began its inaugural dance season September 3. After completing renovation of the former On My Toes dance studio this summer, owners Marcia Kelly and Aubrey Sonnendecker are excited to open their doors to the community to share their passion for dance.

Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center is now providing muchneeded diagnostic cardiac catheterizations and vascular studies to the Brunswick County community. Novant Health has partnered with New Hanover Regional Medical Center’s Cape Fear Heart Associates to offer mobile diagnostic cardiac catheterizations performed by Cape Fear Heart Associates’ Dr. Joshua Winslow twice a month at Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center. In addition, Dr. J. Andrew Smith of Novant Health Surgical Associates is able to perform vascular studies on the mobile unit. Winslow is board-certified in nuclear cardiology, cardiovascular medicine and internal medicine. He earned his bachelor’s degree of science in biology from Hobart College in Geneva, New York. He received his doctor of medicine degree from Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He completed his internal medicine residency at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii, and a cardiovascular medicine fellowship at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. Smith earned his bachelor’s degree from the

Novant Health Pediatrics Ribbon Cutting & Open House Novant Health Pediatrics Brunswick held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house on November 10. Attendees were encouraged to bring their children and had the chance to meet and greet with a special princess and superhero guests. Guests enjoyed office tours and light refreshments. The office is at 20 Medical Campus Drive, Suite 20, in Supply.

J. Huffman's Holds Ribbon Cutting

THROUGH

9

On November 4 Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce and community members participated in a ribbon-cutting ceremony at J. Huffman's. Door prizes and gift certificates were part of the celebration. J. Huffman's is located at 1771 Clippers way in Sunset Beach.

CENTURY 21 Sweyer & Associates Office Relocates to Holden Beach Causeway CENTURY 21 Sweyer & Associates has relocated its office from the Lockwood Folly subdivision to a new office on the Holden Beach Causeway at 3446 Holden Beach Road, Suite 3. The new space accommodates the company’s growth and the varying needs of its

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BUSINESS BUZZ

University of Tennessee in Knoxville and completed medical school at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center in Memphis. He then went on to complete residency in general surgery at New Hanover Regional Medical Center in Wilmington, North Carolina. Before coming to Novant Health, Smith worked for Carolinas HealthCare System at Shelby Surgical Associates and was an attending surgeon at Carolinas HealthCare System – Cleveland.

agents to provide local real estate information and answer questions about the current market. This new location also provides unprecedented marketing exposure for local home sellers. With the new location in downtown Southport, Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage brings its total number of offices in southeastern North Carolina to 22, with locations from Calabash to Havelock.

Brunswick County’s Margaret Rudd Bishop Receives NC Realtors® Ben Ball Community Service Award

McLeod Health Carolina Forest Names Emergency Department Director McLeod Health Carolina Forest has recently named Mary Canady, RN, as the new emergency department director. The new freestanding McLeod Health Carolina Forest Emergency Department is the only Emergency Department in the Carolina Forest community. Canady comes to McLeod Health Carolina Forest from McLeod Health Dillon. She served in the Emergency Department for the last 12 years, with the last two years as emergency department director. She is a past recipient of the prestigious Palmetto Gold Award. She received her Associates’ Degree in Nursing from Southeastern Community College and continued her education at Coastal Carolina University, receiving her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Canady has been married to her husband, Daniel, for the last seven years, and they have a Great Dane named Harley.

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage Expands with Downtown Southport Office Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage celebrated the opening of its new office at 108 S. Davis Street in Southport with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house on September 10. At this new convenient downtown location, visitors have immediate access to experienced

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Brunswick County Realtor® Margaret Rudd Bishop received the N.C. Realtor® Ben Ball Community Service Award for 2019 at the state association’s recent conference in Pinehurst. According to the N.C. Realtor® website, the award honors a Realtor® who deserves recognition due to their continuous and extraordinary contributions to the betterment of their communities through outstanding public service. Bishop has been a leader in the community and the real estate profession throughout her 45-year career. She has served as president of the Brunswick County Association of Realtor® (BCAR) twice, first in 1982 and again in 2012. She also served as BCAR vice president and secretary and on the N.C. Association of Realtor® board of directors. She was inducted into the N.C. Realtor® Hall of Fame in 2010 and has received the BCAR Realtor® of the Year Award, Lifetime Service Award and Constant Flame Award. She served as president of the Southport Oak Island Chamber of Commerce and as a board member for N.C. Citizens for Business & Industry (NCCBI). She also served on the Brunswick County Schools Business Advisory Council, the Brunswick County Tourism Development Authority and the executive board of the Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America. Bishop earned the Life Member Award from the NC Realtor® Political Action Committee. She received both the Small Business Award and Small Business Person of the Year from the Brunswick Community College Small Business Center and the Brunswick County Distinguished Woman Award from Hope Harbor Home. An avid bicyclist, she recently completed a 34-day ride from Vancouver, British Columbia, to Tijuana, Mexico, down the Pacific Coast Highway.

Dosher Names New Operating Room Director Dosher Memorial Hospital welcomes Mark Wagaman, MSN, RN, CNOR, RNFA, to the staff as the surgical services clinical nurse manager. Wagaman brings 10 years of nursing leadership in the Operating Room to Dosher and maintains certifications as a Certified Nurse-Operating Room and as an RN First Assistant. Wagaman, who began his healthcare career as a respiratory therapist, graduated from York College in York, Pennsylvania, with a Bachelor’s degree in Respiratory Therapy and then continued his education at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, for his BSN in Nursing and Regis University in Denver, Colorado, for his MSN.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

McLeod Loris Seacoast Surgery welcomes Dr. Craig L. Selander, who joins Dr. Kenneth Mincey, Dr. Amanda Turbeville and Dr. Eric Young in practice. Board certified in General Surgery, Dr. Selander joins his partners in providing high-quality general surgery services using the latest surgical procedures and techniques including robotics. These experienced surgeons provide diagnosis and surgical treatment for a variety of diseases and conditions. Dr. Selander will be seeing patients at the Little River and Carolina Forest offices. Dr. Selander comes to McLeod Loris Seacoast Surgery from Pee Dee Surgical Group in Florence, South Carolina. He attended the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, South Carolina, where he also completed his Surgical Residency.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

McLeod Loris Seacoast Surgery Welcomes Dr. Craig Selander


BUSINESS BUZZ

Wagaman recently relocated from Coatesville, Pennsylvania, to Southport with his wife, 13-year-old daughter and two dogs. An enthusiast of the outdoors, he looks forward to living in a warmer climate and enjoying all the activities that coastal North Carolina has to offer.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

New Director Elected to ATMC Board Douglas H. Hawes, board president for ATMC, has announced that Julia Fort Tripp has been elected to serve on the ATMC Board of Directors. Tripp was elected to represent District 2 (Calabash, Longwood, Carolina Shores), replacing Randy Hardee, who served on the ATMC Board since 2013. A longtime resident of Brunswick County, Tripp completed her undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of North Carolina Wilmington with a Bachelor of Science in Business Management and a Master of Science in Accounting. Tripp owns and operates Tripp’s Trucking, LLC. She also has a background in telecommunications accounting and auditing, governmental auditing and human resources management. She commented that she looks forward to representing District 2 on ATMC’s Board of Directors. She and her husband, Dave, reside in Ash with their two sons, Eli and Ean. She serves as church clerk and assistant treasurer at Friendship Baptist Church in Ash.

Up Your Arts Holds Ribbon Cutting Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce recently held a ribbon-cutting ceremony at American Fish Company for Up Your Arts, a nonprofit organization founded in 2017 to support and enhance the creative and performing arts throughout the greater Southport area. Up Your Arts is currently holding Open Mic Night on Thursdays at 7 pm at American Fish Company. They are also planning May’s Plein Art event and major efforts to restore the former Southport City Hall in an effort known as Save the Hall.

Novant Health Is Recognized for Its Commitment to Safety and Quality On November 7 the Leapfrog Group, a national nonprofit that evaluates the safety, quality and patient experience provided by hospitals across the country, released its fall 2019 Hospital Safety Grades. The Leapfrog Group recognized Novant Health’s commitment to safety and quality by assigning its acute care facilities eight As and four Bs. Novant Health is proud to share this news that reflects its continued improvement in its safety and quality scores.

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UP NORTH

NORTH BRUNSWICK MAGAZINE WHAT’S GOING ON IN OUR SISTER PUBLICATION

Winter 2019-20

THE NEXT CHAPTER Leland locals were sad to see Lisa Milligan retire from her 35-year career at Leland Library, but she’s still going strong. By Jo Ann Mathews, Photos by Laura Glantz

d Monkeying Aroun IS AN CHIN MONKEY — G, SMART CAPU H FAMILY. BUSTER — A LOVIN BER OF THE SMIT IMPORTANT MEM

COMPLIMEN

TA RY

LELAND’S NEW BUSIN

ESSES

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DR. OATES, BCS

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Lisa Milligan laughs when asked to compare the two jobs she’s held this year. “From one end of the spectrum to the other,” she says. After 35 years as librarian at Leland Library, 25 of them as branch manager, Milligan retired July 1 and on August 5 became a part-time sales representative for Gaines Oil Company in Goldston, N.C.

SCORPIONS

OPEN FOR BUSINESS Check out five of the new businesses that have set up shop in Leland this year.

MONKEYING AROUND Buster — a loving, smart capuchin monkey — is an important member of the Smith family.

Photos by Laura Glantz

Recognizing the growth and prosperity of North Brunswick County, many entrepreneurs see Leland area as the perfect place to build a new business or expand an established one.

By Melissa Slaven Warren Photos by Megan Deitz

Seventeen-year-old Jonathan Smith admits that 7-year-old Buster can be a pain sometimes. “It’s like having any other sibling,” Smith says. “He can be annoying, but you love him anyway.” There is one difference in this rivalry among brothers: Buster is a blackcapped capuchin monkey. Capuchins are a New World primate from South America. They are social animals with the intellectual capabilities to use tools, process information, remember things and create value systems. They can also process emotion.

THE SAABMAN At his Winnabow warehouse, Medhat Bary keeps the dream alive for Saab owners. By Annesophia Richards Photos by Mike Spencer

As a child, Medhat Bary imagined that one day he would own a Saab 9000. The car of his dreams looked like an aircraft with its cockpit layout and front dash filled with switches and gauges. Even as a young boy, Bary knew he would somehow get the chance to sit behind the wheel of such a beautiful and powerful car. What he didn’t know, however, was that decades later, his childhood passion would lead him to become affectionately known as the Saabman around Brunswick County and beyond.

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ONLINE EXCLUSIVES

D EXTRAS YOU WILL ONLY FIND ONLINE D LIFEINBRUNSWICKCOUNTY.COM

SOMETHING’S NEW AT HWY 55 ON MAIN STREET IN SHALLOTTE by Joan Leotta

Driving down Main Street Shallotte, just before it intersects with Highway 17, your eye catches a glimpse of posters featuring cheeseburgers, shakes, fries and root beer floats. No, you have not crossed the time barrier. You’ve found Hwy 55 Burgers, Shakes & Fries, a retro diner.

| CONTINUE READING ONLINE

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PHOTO BY LAURA GLANTZ

One of the things that sets this diner apart from other burger places is its opento-the-customer grill and a menu that goes well beyond burgers to include seafood, chicken and more. There’s even a frozen custard bar.

THE JINKS JINX HAS ENDED

by Kurt Epps, a.k.a. The PubScout

PHOTO BY KURT EPPS

The first time, we arrived only to find that it was closed for renovations (more on that subject later). Another time, we had reservations with friends, but a looming, massive storm (not named Dorian) with possible tornadoes short-circuited that. And on four occasions, there wasn’t a parking space to be had in the restaurant lot.

So we were both surprised and elated to find a real-live spot at dinnertime after returning from a 100-mile motorcycle ride to support a local Humane Society cause. | CONTINUE READING ONLINE

|

PHOTO BY JO ANN MATHEWS

I suppose the seventh time’s the charm? On at least six occasions over the past six months, the missus and I tried to visit Jinks Creek Waterfront Grille in Ocean Isle Beach but were thwarted for one reason or another.

HELPING PEOPLE BREATHE EASIER by Jo Ann Mathews

Cindy Averitt abandoned her desire to be a teacher when she heard her twin sister marvel at the fascination of studying respiratory therapy. This specialty treats patients from newborns to seniors who have breathing difficulties and respiratory illnesses such as asthma, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Averitt switched careers at Fayetteville Technical College 30 years ago, and in September 2019 was named Practitioner of the Year by North Carolina Society for Respiratory Care. | CONTINUE READING ONLINE Winter 2019-20

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party packs $7.99 per person

20 GUESTS

$159.80 5 Pints of BBQ 30 Pieces of Chicken 5 Pints of Cole Slaw 5 Pints of Potato Salad 10 Dozen Hushpuppies 2 Gallons of Tea 20 Set-ups

(Plates, cups, forks, etc.)

30 GUESTS

$239.70 8 Pints of BBQ 45 Pieces of Chicken 8 Pints of Cole Slaw 8 Pints of Potato Salad 15 Dozen Hushpuppies 3 Gallons of Tea 30 Set-ups

(Plates, cups, forks, etc.)

50 GUESTS

$399.50 13 Pints of BBQ 75 Pieces of Chicken 13 Pints of Cole Slaw 13 Pints of Potato Salad 25 Dozen Hushpuppies 5 Gallons of Tea 50 Set-ups

(Plates, cups, forks, etc.)

Prices vary based on location.

Leland

910.371.6900

Shallotte 910.754.5522

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SPIRITS

Comforting Cocktail Enjoy this spiked hot apple cider by the fire with your honey or serve it to your holiday crowd. BY SANDI GRIGG

I

It’s that time of the year again — the time for soft blankets, roaring fires, good books and warm drinks. When I settle in for a bit of coziness by the fire, one of my personal favorite toddies is a mug of hot apple cider. It’s delicious as it is, of course, but when spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg and served warm, it transforms into something spectacular. The flavors are complex, and the aroma is reminiscent of the holidays. In fact, this recipe is as perfect for holiday celebrations as it is for days by the fire. You can create this recipe on the stovetop as suggested or you can prepare it in an Instant Pot, slow cooker or thermal carafe. You can use pre-mixed mulling spices, but taking the extra step to create your own spice sachet adds a personal touch and allows you to create a unique flavor profile. This version is spiked with Crown Royal Apple, creating a comforting cocktail that’s perfect whether you are enjoying it yourself on a cold winter’s night or sharing with others at a party. It is easy to serve this to a crowd as the recipe can be scaled up or down. The longer it simmers the better it tastes and the better the house smells. Feel free to use garnishes like star anise and fresh orange slices to make it more visually appealing.

Spiked Mulled Citrus Apple Cider Serves about 20

INGREDIENTS 1 gallon apple cider

2 cinnamon sticks

2 liter orange soda

3 star anise

10 ounces orange juice

1 orange

1 cheesecloth

2 sliced apples

1 teaspoon cloves

Crown Royal Apple

2 to 3 whole nutmegs

METHOD Pour the cider, soda and orange juice in a large saucepan. Tie the cinnamon sticks, star anise, cloves, nutmeg and peeling from the orange in the cheesecloth and drop in the pot. Slice the orange flesh and toss it and the sliced apples in the mixture. Bring to a simmer on the burner. Reduce heat to low, cover and let steep for 3 to 4 hours. Divide among individual mugs. Add about 1 ounce of Crown Royal Apple to each (use more or less if desired). Winter 2019-20

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WHAT’S COOKIN’

A New Level of Brunch For an easy and impressive mid-morning meal, whip up a fluffy quiche with Brie, bacon and asparagus. BY SANDI GRIGG

B

Brunch quiche, that perfect combination of breakfast and lunch, allows you to merge eggs with just about any meat, cheese and vegetable assortment. It is also perfect because it’s so easy to make — just mix it all together and let the oven do the work. This version takes the perfectly savory combination of bacon, Brie, shallot and asparagus to a whole new brunching level. The key to making sublimely f luffy quiche is to beat the eggs and milk almost to death. You want to get as much air whipped into the mixture as possible, which causes it to puff as it bakes. You also want to be sure that your contents don’t leak as they cook, so it is best to precook your components. Not too long ago we had friends over on a chilly weekend. They had recently gotten engaged, and I 36

South Brunswick Magazine

wanted to offer something both scrumptious and fancy to celebrate. They weren’t arriving until later that morning, so I created this recipe to feast and toast to their engagement. Side note: This recipe goes great with Champagne! My friends were very impressed with the meal, and it seemed like I had put more effort into the meal than I actually did. You can certainly make your own pie crust, but for the sake of keeping it simple, I purchased a prepared pie crust. I have tried many quiches in my time, and they usually have ham and cheese, sometimes spinach and mushroom, but I wanted to make this one feel more elegant and celebratory with fancier ingredients. The next time you want to serve something sophisticated but easy for brunch, try this quiche. Feel


WHAT’S COOKIN’

Brie, Bacon & Asparagus Quiche INGREDIENTS 1 pie crust 6 eggs ¾ cup milk 4 ounces Brie 1 shallot, chopped 6 stalks of asparagus, trimmed 8 ounces bacon, diced 1/8 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon parsley Salt and pepper

METHOD Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Crisp the bacon in a pan over medium-high heat. When the meat is about halfway done, add shallot to the pan and saute until the bacon is done. Set the pan aside to cool. Meanwhile, in a medium mixing bowl, vigorously beat the eggs, milk, garlic, parsley, salt and pepper. Add the bacon/shallot mixture from the pan into the egg mixture. free to change up the ingredients if you don’t like something or have dietary restrictions. Just about any creamy white cheese would complement the bacon and asparagus. You can certainly use turkey bacon instead of pork bacon, and if asparagus is not your preferred vegetable, then artichokes would be a great substitution. Just be sure to whip the egg mixture vigorously and precook the liquid out of your added ingredients for a f luffy and tasty quiche.

Break the Brie into small pieces and drop it into the mixture. Pour the mixture into a prepared pie crust. Top with the asparagus stalks in a circular pattern. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes. Serve warm. Winter 2019-20

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South Brunswick Magazine

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WHAT’S NEW

PUB SCOUT

A Bit of Bermuda in Sunset Beach

H

The Boat Landing Restaurant offers good food, drinks and views. BY KURT EPPS, A.K.A. THE PUBSCOUT

Having been to Bermuda at least 15 times, I suppose I qualify as a Bermuda-phile. And, I mean, who isn’t, if you’ve ever been there? Driving into the parking lot of the Boat Landing Restaurant in Sunset Beach, I had a distinct sense of deja vu. Though I had never been to the Boat Landing before, it had a palpable Bermudian aura, kind of like the famous Swizzle Inn (where they know me very well).

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WHAT’S NEW

While the Swizzle Inn serves great food and drinks, and hosts a helluva Oktoberfest party, it does not sit on the water as the Boat Landing does. And the Boat Landing also reminds me of one of my all-time favorite haunts in BDA — the now extinct (but never to be forgotten) Ye Olde Cock and Feather Inne, right on Hamilton’s famous Front Street, overlooking Hamilton Harbor. From its wonderful balcony, I’d watch the sunsets set aglow with a special magical light the boats bobbing in the harbor, and to take in that scene with a quality British ale or a Gosling’s Dark and Stormy was, for me, the stuff of legend. Not surprisingly, I could imagine that same magical light reflecting off boats passing by on the Intracoastal were I to sit on the Boat Landing’s Bermuda-like balcony. I mean, the place

is called Sunset Beach for a reason, folks, and though the beach is not visible from the BL, the Intracoastal is and the sunsets are. They’re real. And they are spectacular. With the CEO of the Northeast’s famous Organized Havens on one arm and my missus on the other, we strode in to see what was in store for us food, drink and view-wise. The layout of the place is rather labyrinthine, with little “snugs,” nooks and crannies for dining as publicly or as privately as you’d like, including the main dining room, which has a water view. Then there is a whole upstairs area, which includes a bar, more seating inside and available seating out on the balcony provided the time and the season agree. Because we had stood for too long, enrapt by a phenomenal sunset, we opted for the main dining room. 40

South Brunswick Magazine

Balcony seating, Intracoastal views, delicious food and wonderfully attentive service make The Boat Landing Restaurant in Sunset Beach a locals' favorite.


WHAT’S NEW

PUB SCOUT

‘‘

‘‘

‘Fantastic’ wouldn’t suffice for my shrimp & grits, which came out with an over-easy egg on top and chock full of Tasso ham, plump tender shrimp and incredible Gouda Pimento Grits permeated with a wine butter sauce.

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WHAT’S NEW

PUB SCOUT

Some very nice wine, prosecco and beer choices (Wicked Weed’s Pernicious always satisfies) were available, and our very friendly waitress brought ours out quickly. She thoroughly answered any questions we had about the menu — and if you have The PubScout’s favorite item, Shrimp and Grits, on the menu, I’m usually asking questions. Me: “I’m a Shrimp and Grits Maniac. How good are yours?” Server: “They are soooooo good! You’re going to love them! Me; “Sold. Bring ‘em on.” The ladies ordered Mahi-Mahi Tacos, and we also ordered some Dragon Shrimp Tempura with Sriracha as an appetizer, and it was fantastic. The ladies said the same for their tacos. But “fantastic” wouldn’t suffice for my S&G, which came out with an over-easy egg on top. Chock full of Tasso ham, plump tender shrimp and incredible Gouda Pimento Grits permeated with a wine butter sauce, I’d need at least four words to describe it: I’ll definitely be back.

Owner/chef Ryan Duffy, who, along with his wife, Camille, opened this place only last March, wasn’t done. The desserts all sounded spectacular, but with two Key Lime Pie experts at my table, we opted for Ryan’s House Made Key Lime Pie. It was beautifully presented, flavorful, tart/sweet and had a perfect, creamy consistency. Four words: They’ll definitely be back. If you like to go to restaurants for classy decor, understated or overstated dining room elegance with brilliant white tablecloths, scintillating silverware and maître d-type class, don’t come to the Boathouse Landing. But if you enjoy great food, a comfortable island ambience, great sunsets from the balcony and a homey feel with wonderfully attentive service, the Boathouse Landing could be for you. It could also be for you if you love Shrimp and Grits. Or Mahi Mahi Tacos. Or Dragon Shrimp Tempura. Or house-made Key Lime Pie. Or Bermuda. And if you ever go to the Swizzle Inn in Bermuda (where they know me VERY well), just mention my name. Then run like hell. Cheers! The PubScout

Want to go? The Boat Landing Restaurant 102 Sunset Boulevard North Sunset Beach (910) 575-2259 theboatlandingrestaurant.com 42

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CA NC E R S U RV I VO R

RUN NER

G RA NDM A

Care for every woman you are Novant Health offers unrivaled care for every woman you are – at every age, stage and walk of life. We know that the care you need today might not be the same care you need tomorrow, and we’re proud to offer expert care that’s as diverse and multifaceted as you are. So whether you’re scheduling your first gynecological exam or what seems like your millionth Pap smear, trying to have a baby or working through menopause, you can count on Novant Health to get you back to the things you love faster.

Discover care that always puts you first NovantHealth.org/everywoman

© Novant Health, Inc. 2019

Winter 2019-20

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Jeffcoat Pottery in Calabash stands out for its exceptional glazes and the teamwork of its dynamic owners. BY JOAN LEOTTA | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRENT GALLANT

rtists transform common elements into objects and moments of beauty, and this is especially true of Joe and Tonda Jeffcoat. Jeffcoat Pottery began in Wilson, North Carolina, in 1974, when both Joe and Tonda held full-time jobs — Joe worked in a bank and Tonda taught art. At that time, they were seeking a source for simple pots for their burgeoning hobby — the cactus business. Unable to find what they were looking for, they

learned about a pottery class at Wilson Technical Institute that seemed to offer a solution to their need for good-looking but inexpensive containers. Joe soon discovered that his math and physics background gave him an ability to quickly center clay on the wheel — a critical first step in the process of throwing a pot. Tonda’s art talent gave them design and color know-how. Soon their collaboration on the pots took over their interest in cacti. Joe applied his scientific knowledge to Tonda’s sense of color, and the quality of their glazes soared. Winter 2019-20

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Wine and craft beers by the flight, by the glass, bottles & fine cigars for sale in our retail shop and wine bar. Try our Tapas for superb small plate dining! Open year round, because it’s always wine season. Get the latest information on our tastings, pairings, specials & events at: CoastalWineRoom.com  @CoastalWineRoom 910.393.2125 20-B East 2nd Street | Ocean Isle Beach, NC

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South Brunswick Magazine


Their pottery collaborations became sought after in Wilson and at the festivals where they displayed and sold their work. Soon the artistic pottery world began to take notice of this dynamic duo. Awards began to pile up. “We began receiving awards in 1982,” Tonda says. “We always create pieces with a creative idea in mind, not for the sole purpose of competing for an award. The fact that we have entered many competitions and received awards is a bonus. We are proud of all the awards we have received over the years.” Two of the awards they’ve received are the 2003 Nancy Hendrix Memorial Award from the Neptune Festival in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and the 2010 First Place Professional 3D at the Waccamaw Artists and Crafts Guild in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. As an added accolade, Seagrove Pottery Group regularly invites Jeffcoat Pottery as one of the few out-of-town potters to their renowned annual Pottery Festival on the weekend Joe and Tonda Jeffcoat before Thanksgiving. not only create wellIn 2005 the Jeffcoats designed functional retired from their other jobs pieces for sale, but also and established a pottery generously share their talents and knowledge studio on Killebrew Road in with other local potters. Calabash, where they display a plethora of decorative and functional pottery objects. It’s also where they inspire dozens of other potters through classes, seminars and friendship. The Jeffcoats use wheel-thrown and hand-building techniques. “Each piece of clay that we throw on the wheel is weighed for consistency and made with an eye for functionality and design,” Joe says. Pieces are dried to leather hard and then trimmed to their final form. After completely drying, the work is loaded into electric kilns for the first firing or bisque firing. One thing that sets Jeffcoat Pottery apart from others is the glazes. These are applied after the bisque stage. Their ability to tease red from copper glazes and the soft “wash” effect they derive from wood ash (that they prepare themselves from raw material of recycled wooden pallets), make their pottery quite sought-after. The Jeffcoats make a wide range of objects, from mugs to specialty sinks, from vases and trays to chicken roasters and baking dishes, the latter of which come with recipes.

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Ginny Lassiter, owner of the Sunset River Art Gallery in Calabash, has carried Jeffcoat Pottery since the couple moved to town. “What attracted me to it is how beautifully and well made their pieces are — and the range of colors they offer,” Lassiter says. “Also, they do functional as well as art pieces and have so many different wares that many people regularly add to their collection. In fact, I have several people who vacation in the area and every year they stop into the gallery looking for

a new piece of Jeffcoat Pottery to add to their collection.” Joe explains the secret to the difference in their pottery. “The secret is our propane-fired kiln. It allows us to go to higher temps. We mix our own glazes from raw chemicals and glaze each piece by spraying. The glazed pieces are then loaded into our 78 cubic foot shuttle kiln and fired using propane gas to approximately 2,350 degrees for 13 hours. After allowing the kiln to cool for 24 hours, we unload the 350 to 400 pots per firing and get them ready for our customers.” The couple’s path to success is a study in succeeding through passion for one’s art. From the very beginning, the Jeffcoats have continually sought to improve themselves as artists and to share what they learn with others. Each uses his or her particular talents to create wonderful, useful and display objects. Joe throws the pots, Tonda sculpts, and they collaborate on deciding on color, design and glazes. 48

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Denise Bruckner, a Horry County potter who sells her work at Brookgreen Gardens and exhibits with the Carolina Clay Guild, is a student of the Jeffcoats. She notes that the couple’s tutelage has vastly improved her glazing ability. “The Jeffcoats are always willing to share, explain and give us space to find our own new ways of doing things,” she says. Former student Nancy Knapp of Winding River agrees that working with the Jeffcoats boosted her understanding of process and of glazes. “In addition, the couple gave me the encouragement to know that I should always keep trying,” she says, adding that the Jeffcoats lead by example in the artistic community, giving freely of themselves to others. “They help area potters find kilns and purchase clay on behalf of individual potters and for those who teach pottery in the area.” Because of the popularity of their work, the Jeffcoats have so many orders to fill that they no longer open the studio to sell retail or teach regular classes, nor can they fire work for other potters. Their gas and electric kilns are in full use to meet the demand of the orders, including, for example, one for several thousand pieces of pottery on a regular basis for the North Carolina Aquariums. The Jeffcoats do host one workshop each winter at their studio; it’s open to local artists and often features a teacher who has a long-term friendship with them. Some people believe that artists leave a piece of themselves in whatever they create. Touching the Jeffcoat pieces, this feels true — the objects themselves are lovely, peaceful in their design and glazes, and when you touch them, you feel the kindness of Joe and Tonda Jeffcoat shining through. 

Want to see it for yourself? JEFFCOAT POTTERY is available at Sunset River Art Gallery, Brookgreen Gardens and at several festivals in the area, including the annual Oyster Festival at Ocean Isle and others. A full list of festivals is on their website. jeffcoatpottery.com


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TALKING TRASH Green for Life employees are hungry, healthy and strong as horses. STORY AND PHOTOS BY ED BECKLEY

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I told my neighbor one night recently that if she saw me outside with my camera at the crack of dawn the next day, it's because I'm doing a feature story on the great folks who collect our garbage and recycling every week. “Oh, so I shouldn't worry some crackpot photographer is on the loose?” she asked. (You gotta love a wisenheimer!) “They really work hard,” she said. “I can't imagine how many miles they walk, and calories they burn every day.” “I'll find out tomorrow and let you know,” I promised. Having arranged this moving interview and photo-shoot ahead of time, Green For Life driver Kenneth Lawson gives me a heads-up that he’ll be in my Ocean Isle Beach neighborhood around 10 am. Green for Life Environmental (GFL) is the new name for Waste Industries. When Lawson and teammate Eugene Gaskin of Ashe are on their way, detained by a few dozen unsavory pick-ups before stopping for my mean green cart in Ocean Isle, I am as excited as if I am waiting for a parade. And since parades are pretty much always on the move, I'm also getting anxious. As I’m planning to run alongside the truck, how in the world am I going to interview, photograph and keep up with these guys without coronary arrest? I soon discover that when trash carts are far apart, the truck will always get to them faster than I can catch up by running. My fear is the guys will get so far ahead, the interview will be over before it begins. The men had already been up and on the job for hours. Gaskin, with a

Green for Life employees Kenneth Lawson (opposite page) and Eugene Gaskin (above). Winter 2019-20

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CONSIDER THIS When asked if there is anything customers can do to make their jobs easier Lawson and Eugene offer a wish-list:

longer commute than his partner, rises at 3:45 am. Lawson kicks off the blankets at the much cozier hour of 4:10 am, and arrives at work just after 5. When they get to me, the sky is light enough that I don't need to use a flash on my camera. With a stop-action setting and burst mode, my camera gets going capturing these athletes in motion. Gaskin hops aboard a traveler's ledge at the back of the vehicle and grabs the safety handle. Lawson surges the behemoth truck forward. Garbage carts ahead! Lawson quick-stops and brakes, then jumps out toward a cart. Gaksin follows suit from the rear. Both wheel their prey to the jaws of the beast and angle the cans forward. For safety, all trucks have “tippers,” so employees don't have to lift the carts. The mechanical “teeth” clamp onto the carts and flip them topsy-turvy. Out comes the junk. The giant mouth swallows the rubbish and spits out the cans. Delicious. The guys grab and run the cans back to the curb, resume their trucking positions and head down the road. I am running as fast as I can to their next stop. They do this again and again and again — on average 10.5 hours and 85 miles a day and up to six days a week at the beaches during max tourist season. Green for Life Operations Manager Joe McCarthy says each of his one-and two-person crews in Brunswick County hauls on average as many as 1,000 trash carts every day. Each one weighs about 75 pounds. McCarthy says there are also one-person crews in which the driver operates an automatic truck. They roll it to the curb, and robotic arms grab the cart and hoist it into the air, dumping the load from above. I say “one-person” and not “one man,” because McCarthy assures

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South Brunswick Magazine

 Please have your trash out on the curb on time.

that GFL is an equal opportunity employer,  Please bag your trash “and we have a diverse because loose stuff blows onto the roads in group of employees windy conditions. working at all times.” Anyway, it seems  If you are driving behind the truck, obvious the one-person please pay attention crew does not burn many and be patient, calories. But what about because trying to pass the two-person teams? I on blind curves is promised my neighbor an dangerous for all answer. Lawson, who has involved. four and a half years of  And thank you for the service, says it this way: “I business! absolutely definitely can eat everything I want and never put on a pound.” Gaskin tells Lawson to speak for himself. He will only say he has been with the company “a long time.” And as a man a bit more senior, he is not so sure he can eat everything and anything anymore, even as hard as he works all day. They both agree, though, the job keeps them fit and strong. But a person doesn't have to be big and strong to serve on a crew, McCarthy says. It's all about rolling, tipping and angling rather than lifting, “and we have employees of all body shapes and sizes.” He adds, “We have a number of long-term employees, including some who have reached the 20- and 30-year marks.” And you might think the last thing these active employees would want is a fitness membership; however, McCarthy says,


believe it or not, some of the employees do go to the gym. Can you imagine working this hard and then lifting weights later for fun? He also notes that GFL encourages and coaches its employees to eat healthful calories instead of fatty foods and to stay hydrated day and night. The summer of 2019 was one of the hottest in recorded history. And there is potential for slippery roads this winter. I ask how the crews withstand these conditions. “If it feels like 110 degrees, you're going to burn some calories,” McCarthy says. “We provide plenty of water and sports drinks, and we encourage drinking one cup of water every 15 to 20 minutes in high heat conditions and sports drinks at the end of the day to replenish electrolytes. Employees know to take more breaks as necessary during excessive heat and/or get into the air-conditioned cabs. If conditions are too icy, we make the determination to suspend services.” While there are Brunswick residents who think GFL is a county service, McCarthy clarifies that the company is privately owned. Waste Industries recently merged with Green For Life and will soon re-brand its trucks with GFL's bright green colors. McCarthy says GFL offers a competitive salary and benefits program, which includes health and dental care and 401K options. The company website displays a litany of employee benefits, including life and disability insurance, paid time off and holidays, tuition reimbursement and more. Lawson says he enjoys the work, the pay and benefits. He also is pleased with the sports drinks and the clean washed uniforms the company provides the crews every week. He's particularly okay with the bonus pay treatment the teams receive for working Saturdays. 

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BEHIND THE BUSINESS

Moore Street Market Café and Deli husband and wife owners Andrew Laing and Bridget Reichhart hope to create a sense of community one cup or bite at a time.

P

What's old

is

NEW

The new owners of Moore Street Market Café and Deli remake a Southport favorite. STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAROLYN BOWERS

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A T R U S S T- W O R T H Y B U I L D E R

of Fine Homes

Trusst Builder Group is a locally owned and operated builder and developer of quality homes and neighborhoods throughout New Hanover and Brunswick counties. Since 1992, we have built more than 3,000 homes in the Cape Fear region. Trusst is unique in our ability to build value-priced, custom-quality homes where premier finishes are standard. Our developments include Whiskey Branch, a gated community just outside the Wilmington city limits off of South College Road; and Hearthstone, a charming neighborhood of brick homes off of Lanvale Road in Leland. Trusst is also now building in select neighborhoods in Brunswick Forest, Compass Pointe, Magnolia Greens, Palmetto Creek, Riverlights, RiverSea, St. James Plantation, Waterford and Winding River.

To Learn More Visit 56

South Brunswick Magazine

T R U S S T B U I L D E R G R O U P. C O M or Call 9 1 0 . 3 7 1 . 0 3 0 4


I

BEHIND THE BUSINESS

In the 14 months that husband and wife Andrew Laing and Bridget Reichhart have owned Moore Street Market Café and Deli, they have come up with several innovative ideas to make a good café and deli even better. First of all, they have a novel way to encourage all of us to clean up the town and the beach. Simply stop in their store in Southport and ask for one of their trash buckets. Then walk around town or go to the beach and fill it up with discarded plastics, trash and other litter and return it to the store. You will be thanked with a free cup of coffee. When Barbara Carey was there for breakfast one day she was intrigued by the idea, so took a bucket and walked along Waterfront Park, where she picked up several cigarette butts and candy wrappers. “I think this is a great idea,” she says. Andrew and Bridget have been promoting environmental awareness ever since they bought Moore Street Market last summer. They were the first store to carry the locally manufactured Sea Glass Designs glass straws, and they still sell a lot of them. More recently they replaced all of their Styrofoam carry-out containers with ones made out of a biodegradable material. They have made other changes to “The Best Coffee the store as well. One is to alter the in Town” sign was name, which has always been a misnomer. It given to Andrew and Bridget by is not now, nor has it ever been, a market. It an appreciative is a coffee shop and deli that serves an customer and is extensive choice of breakfast and lunch proudly displayed sandwiches and salads, along with a great on the front porch selection of coffee and tea. So, the name is of the pre Civil War now Moore Street Market Café and Deli. building. Patrons take In keeping with the new name and their advantage of Moore emphasis on improving the environment, Street Market Café and Deli’s free WiFi. they spruced up the yard, adding a

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Clockwise from below: Barbara Carey collects litter from Waterfront Park to exchange for a free cup of coffee. Online orders will soon be delivered via golf cart. Friends enjoy lunch in the newly restored Moore Street Market CafÊ and Deli courtyard. Top: A crowded courtyard of people listen to music while sipping mimosas — a common occurrence every Sunday.

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BEHIND THE BUSINESS

courtyard where their customers can enjoy having breakfast or lunch outside. On Sundays customers are treated to Mimosas and Music from 12 to 2 pm. If you don’t have time to eat there, they now offer online ordering and payment for quick pick-up. Their golf cart, which they refer to as their “mobile billboard,” advertises that you can order online and they will deliver; however, delivery service isn’t available quite yet as they are still waiting for approvals. For another option, you can stop in, grab a Grab ‘n’ Go sandwich and take it with you. It’s worth a trip to the store just to see the historic building. It was built before the Civil War, and, according to Andrew, was probably located somewhere else first and then moved to its present site at 130 E. Moore Street in Southport. There are three wonderfully decorated rooms upstairs with paintings, prints, photos and period artifacts and one larger room downstairs. They have free WiFi and encourage their customers to stay and enjoy the atmosphere while they do their work. This store is exactly what Bridget and Andrew dreamed of having when they retired. They were living in Boston; he was a tennis coach for a division one school and she was a stay-at-home mom after having been a school guidance counselor for years. One evening while Bridget was putting their 4-year-old daughter and not quite 2-year-old son to bed, Andrew was surfing the Internet looking for a good real estate investment. He found Moore Street Market in a town called Southport, which neither of them had ever heard of. But they both grew up in a small town and knew that is what they wanted for their children. So, they put a deposit on the place, sight unseen. And that day their retirement dream

became a reality, about 30 years before they had planned on it. For Bridget and Andrew, it’s all about creating a community feel, a gathering place for the locals as well as visitors, a place where everyone becomes a friend. And that is exactly what Moore Street Market Café and Deli has become. 

Want to go? Moore Street Market Café and Deli 130 E. Moore Street, Southport (910) 363-4203 moorestreetmarket.net

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South Brunswick Magazine


NONPROFIT

The Path to Healing At Brunswick Christian Recovery Center, men, and soon women, step through faith into recovery. BY DENICE PATTERSON

Brunswick Christian Recovery Center Executive Director Joshua Torbich will soon offer women's rehabilitation services in a converted bed and breakfast in Sunset Beach.

PHOTO BY MEGAN DEITZ

O

On a sleepy section of Ash-Little River Road, Brunswick Christian Recovery Center (BCRC) is a sparkling little campus on a former North Carolina Wesleyan Church property. The all-male, faith-based, 12-step drug and alcohol rehabilitation center is freshly painted and perfectly landscaped — obviously the work of many hands. BCRC has come a long, long way in eight short years, and Executive Director Joshua Torbich should know. He

graduated from the program six years ago. “I had overdosed on heroin and hit an 18-wheeler head on at age 22,” he confides. The Johnston County native’s parents were to their limit. Torbich was as well. “I headed to the center, and the rest is history.” It was here that Torbich recommitted himself to God and Jesus. “I feel at that moment, God had a plan as well,” he says. And in faith, Torbich asked to stay on at the center

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NONPROFIT

‘‘

‘‘

The participants volunteer to come here, either through an arrangement with the courts or through their own initiative.

when he graduated. “I started with the premise that I would drive the van,” he says. “That van was an old, stripped 13-seater with two lawn chairs in the back so we could seat 15.” BCRC began as an idea flowing among a group of local pastors and businessmen who saw the need for a men’s residential recovery center in Brunswick County. It was funded solely through church donations in the beginning. “We saw the opportunity for 62

South Brunswick Magazine

advancement and began writing grants and gaining contracts from the PGA and NASCAR to provide workers for large events,” Torbich says. The center also works closely with the United Way. The main campus sits on 2 acres among old family farms and includes three buildings. The former rectory is now administrative offices, a new fellowship hall includes a commercial kitchen, and the dormitory is housed in the former church building. The 16-bed

facility employs three full-time on-site counselors who rotate shifts and are available 24 hours per day. Tyler Smith is the director of operations, and Ridge Bell serves as the director of admissions. Down the road, the Ray campus nearly doubles residential capacity for men by adding 13 beds. The auxiliary campus is for sleeping only, as all the participants come to the main campus to work, eat, worship and attend recovery meetings. Days are


NONPROFIT

BCRC's main campus houses administrative offices, a fellowship hall and a dormitory.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

PHOTO BY MEGAN DEITZ

regimented and provide little distraction from the recovery process. GED tutoring is also available. To date, 470 men have graduated from BCRC. The success rates vary year to year, but the stakes are high. “To deem a graduate successful, he must meet three requirements: be clean and sober, have gainful employment and live in a stable home.” In 2017 57% of the graduates met these requirements — a huge success considering the hurdles. Most of the participants are local, from Brunswick, New Hanover, Columbus and Pender counties. But they have had men come from as far away as Alaska, Torbich says. Soon services will be available for women as well. BCRC has agreed to purchase the

Rose House, a Sunset Beach bed and breakfast, that will be converted into a 23-bed, self-contained women’s residential recovery facility — the first in Brunswick County. The current plan is to have it open for 20 participants and three staff members by March 2020. The Capital Campaign was kicked off on July 13, 2019, with an annual Charity Golf Tournament at Carolina National Golf Course. “We have raised nearly $150,000 of the $650,000 goal,” Torbich says, adding that he is confident the group will reach the goal. “This community has been so very supportive of all we do here. We could not do this without our many volunteers.” A large portion of funding for the center comes from their contracts with NASCAR and PGA, in which BCRCs provides labor for large PGA and NASCAR events. Upwards of 30 volunteers work on behalf of BCRC. Outside of large events, on a weekly basis, the center hosts about 15 to 20 volunteers. The no-cost recovery program is voluntary as well. “The participants volunteer to come here, either through an arrangement with the courts or through their own initiative,” Torbich says. The 16-week program is very intense. “Even before arriving here, participants have to go through a medically supervised detox for about six days,” Torbich says. BCRC partners with several local medical facilities

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NONPROFIT

The Rose House, a Sunset Beach bed and breakfast, will be converted into a 23-bed, self-contained women’s residential recovery facility.

PHOTO BY MEGAN DEITZ

so that recovery begins with the proper care. When participants arrive on site, they commit to 16 weeks of meetings, self-work and community work. “We begin at 7 am sharp,” Torbich says. “Devotionals on awakening, then chores and breakfast.” After breakfast, the men attend chapel, work on campus improvement projects and attend a share-partner meeting. After lunch, there is a 12-step meeting from 1:30 to 2:30, and then another afternoon recovery meeting before dinner. “After dinner, the men write in their journals or complete workbook assignments. Free time is from 8 to 11 pm, then it is lights out.” Most importantly, participants learn they are not alone on the path to recovery. Regular pastoral care and counseling is available, and support is provided every step of the way. The program includes an exit strategy so that graduates can prepare for success. 64

South Brunswick Magazine

This includes community service, day labor jobs and team-building experiences. Community outreach is important to the success of the BCRC, and the group participates in a variety of events. Through a partnership with Brunswick Family Assistance, participants volunteer for food drives, the Christmas toy drive and other activities. Celebrate Recovery is a faith-based, 12-step program held Friday nights at Beach Assembly of God Church on North Highway 17. Open to the public,

dinner begins at 6 pm, and the meeting follows at 7 pm. In a partnership with Brunswick County Schools, BCRC now provides the Alcohol and Drug lessons to the seven middle schools. “We take a few of the participants along to give testimony to the real effects of drugs and alcohol on their lives,” Torbich says. “The experience is not only good for the students but is a great opportunity for BCRC program participants to take their first steps back out into the community.” 

Want to know more about Brunswick Christian Recovery Center? For more information about the faith-based, 12-step residential recovery program, visit: bcrcrecovery.org facebook.com/bcrcrecovery Main campus: 1994 Ash-Little River Road in Ash (910) 237-4857


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Winter 2019-20

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BY TERESA A. MCLAMB

Leading

A

As he was growing up, Dr. Gene Smith spent a lot of time on his grandfather’s Smithfield farm. There he learned the importance of work ethic, for which he says he’s grateful. It served him well through school and his career, including his latest post as the fifth president of Brunswick Community College. Smith comes from a family of educators. His father was a teacher and coach. His mother worked in the computer technology area of Jerolb Corporation in Smithfield, but she also held jobs as an administrative assistant to the principal at various schools where his 66

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BCC into the Future

father taught. When Smith enrolled at East Carolina University, she took a job there. His brother Scott teaches biology and earth science and his brother Jon teaches marketing and is a baseball coach and athletic director. In high school, Smith played football, basketball and baseball, and a biology teacher, Donnie Parker, helped him develop a passion for biology, which would later become his college major. Smith thought he would walk onto the ECU baseball team, but that didn’t materialize. He did, however, spend four summers working for the minor league

Kinston Indians, now the Woodpeckers, as their clubhouse manager and bullpen catcher. After his undergraduate studies, he started working toward his master’s degree in biology. In addition to his course load, he taught freshman biology labs and realized he liked teaching. During that time, he applied for a job as an instructor at Wayne Community College. “I saw the ad in the News & Observer on Sunday, put the application in on Monday, went for the interview on Tuesday and was teaching on Thursday,” he says. He later learned that he was the

PHOTO BY AMBER BULLOCK

From farm life as a youth to a long career at Wayne Community College, Dr. Gene Smith brings a strong work ethic to his new post as president of Brunswick Community College.


PHOTO BY AMBER BULLOCK

last of several rounds of interviews that saved the class from being cancelled. With the new job, Smith moved to Goldsboro, where he taught while preparing to defend his thesis. A little over a year into his job at Wayne Community College, Smith married Jessica, his wife of 24 years. Their family includes ECU senior Kayleigh and Charles B. Aycock High School senior Keenan. In those early years at Wayne Community College, Smith says he learned to teach not just by teaching but by watching more experienced instructors. “There were five other members of that department who were 20 years older than me, who had experience and encouraged me and gave me insight into what needed to be done,” he says. In exchange, Smith brought technology to the department. “They were teaching with chalk boards; I brought in PowerPoint. In two years, all but one were teaching with PowerPoint.” Smith also was asked to partner with another instructor to coordinate Camp Exploration for eighth and ninth grade students. It was designed to introduce them to the college through entrepreneurial activities. Over the 10 years that the program ran, Smith says he developed relationships all over campus and learned a lot about leadership. When Smith was selected as the math and science department chair at Wayne Community College, he enrolled in ECU’s doctoral program for educational leadership/higher education administration. “I’d work, then at night read and write in my office,” he says. “Many nights security would come by at 1 or 2 am and ask what I was doing. I put a lot on Jessica while I was doing that. She sacrificed a lot for me to get the degree.” While completing his coursework, Smith was selected as division chair of arts and sciences. He took several years to write his dissertation in order to spend time at home with his wife and children,

Dr. Gene Smith, president of Brunswick Community College, is ever-present on campus and enjoys meeting and greeting students, faculty and employees.

and he finished in 2015. The work is titled Understanding How Institutional Initiatives Contribute to Minority Male Student Persistence and Success in a Community College Setting: A Comparative Case Study. During that time, Smith was named director of special instructional projects, then associate vice president of academic and student services at Wayne Community College, until taking the position of president at Brunswick Community College (BCC) in January.

The list of the desirable qualities Smith saw in BCC is long. “It’s a quality college,” he says. “Everybody I talked with [about BCC] said nothing but good things. Obviously, the location is a draw.” Also high on the list are community engagement through Odell Williamson Auditorium, continuing education, athletics, the fitness center and much more. “In addition to 1,470 curriculum students each semester and 4,000 continuing education/workforce Winter 2019-20

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PHOTO BY AMBER BULLOCK

development students, there is a lot happening on our campus,” Smith says. One point of Smith’s early concerns was the size of BCC’s budget versus that of Wayne Community College (WCC), which is a larger school. “Our equipment budget is 40 percent of what I had at WCC,” he says. “That requires deep thought. You have to be real intentional on everything. I have to work with the leadership to determine how we can stretch the equipment budget as far as we can.” Shortly after Smith arrived, BCC held groundbreaking ceremonies for its new

PHOTO BY DENNIS HETZEL

health sciences building. The facility includes renovation of the former early childhood education building and an addition of 13,750 square feet at a cost of more than $6 million from the Connect NC Bond and Brunswick County. It will house the ADN, LPN, medical assisting, phlebotomy, CNA and patient care technician programs and is expected to open in fall 2020. Space freed in Building B will be used by the emergency medical sciences program, and plans that could lead to a two-year degree in EMS are underway. “This is very exciting not just for the college but the whole region,” Smith says. “We’ll be able to train the healthcare providers of the future and attract more students.” Smith also notes that BCC received a BlueCross BlueShield grant to help fight the opioid crisis. The $200,000 grant 68

South Brunswick Magazine

will be used for equipment and scholarships for professional development, such as for paramedics, but may also be used for emergency funding for students affected by opioids. Part of the plan is to begin a curriculum program in emergency medical sciences, Smith says. That must be approved by the state and the accrediting agency, which may take a year or more. In the meantime, BCC will work with county partners, like paramedics already in the field, with the continuing education division of the college. Smith has recently signed partnerships with Western Governors University (WGU), UNC Wilmington (UNCW, UNC Pembroke (UNCP) and Fayetteville State University (FSU). The agreement with WGU benefits BCC faculty and staff. UNCW Pathways to Excellence, FSU and UNCP Brave Step Program are all co-admission programs that allow BCC students to declare their intention to attend one of the schools, thereby gaining access to some of the college’s amenities while attending BCC. Additionally, BCC has joined the National Coalition of Certification Centers, NC3, which will enable the school to provide industry recognized certifications in HVAC, welding, machining, horticulture, computer technology, electrical tech and several

others, Smith explains. “In a train-thetrainer way, the faculty will provide the curricula to our students to take the test for certification in each program. All are portable.” Sponsors for NC3 are businesses such as Snap-On, Trane, Dremel and others. Earlier this year BCC received N.C. Commerce Innovation Funding totaling $400,000 for trades education. It provides tuition and transportation for students who want to learn the traditional construction trades of carpentry, masonry, plumbing, electrical and HVAC, all skills that are needed in Brunswick County. Headed into the second half of his first year at BCC, Smith is focused on student success. “Because of the [positive] condition the college is in, we can continue to focus on growing rather than trying to fix something broken,” he says. “I attribute that to Dr. [Susanne] Adams and her leadership and the staff.” Heading into the future, Smith says, “We’ll continue to nurture the partnerships we have in place and find new ones and also look for avenues of opportunity for professional development and recognition for our faculty and staff.” Finally, he adds, “I’m thankful for all the support of the staff, the board of trustees, the foundation board and my family.” 


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PEOPLE

A Survivor’s New Life From fleeing violence in Vietnam to living and working around the world, Holden Beach resident Uyen Nguyen has lived a life that few Americans could imagine. BYJO ANN MATTHEWS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRENT GALLANT

After the fall of Saigon in 1975, Uyen Nguyen escaped Vietnam on a small fishing boat. Years later she found a new life and love in the United States.

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PEOPLE

Uyen Nguyen and husband Bob Bannerman met in Washington, D.C., traveled the world and have chosen to retire in Brunswick County.

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Uyen Nguyen (pronounced Win Win) had lived a comfortable life in Saigon, Vietnam, for her 23 years and earned a degree in chemical engineering from that city’s Polytechnic Institute. Her family was well known and well respected, but their status changed with the fall of Saigon in 1975. “My father was arrested in 1976 and was jailed,” Nguyen says. “I never saw him again.” She explains that her family had no future in Vietnam and felt their only option was to escape. They paid a man to smuggle her brother to a refugee camp in Thailand, but circumstances changed, and he was unable to go, so Nguyen took his place. She shared a fishing boat with 72 other people, “packed like sardines,” she says. “It was awful. The boat was stinky because people had [no toilet facilities].” The trip to Thailand took seven days before they arrived at the refugee camp of more than 7,000 people. “In the refugee camp you’re carefree,” she says. “The sad part was when you leave.” She planned to apply for asylum in Canada since she is fluent in French, but she applied for asylum in Vermont because an American aid worker at the camp said her mother would sponsor Nguyen. Six months later her request My father was was approved, and she spent the next arrested in 1976 six months on an island in Indonesia learning how to acclimate to the and was jailed,” United States. “We learned how the Nguyen says. U.S. lives, so we’re not foreign to it,” “I never saw she says. Driving in the United States, dressing for the changing seasons and him again. surviving in cold weather were among the lessons taught. “Vietnam is totally 72

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different,” she says. “It’s hot and hotter and wet and wetter.” In February 1981 Nguyen arrived in Bethel, Vermont, ready for life in America. Three months later she moved to Burlington and began working for an environmental lab and took evening English language classes at St. Michael’s College in Colchester. A counselor recommended she pursue a teaching certificate in English as a Second


PEOPLE

Language (ESL). Nguyen not only earned her master’s degree in ESL, but also became a certified science teacher. In 1986 she was sworn in as a U.S. citizen. Her mother and six of her siblings have also become U.S. citizens. Nguyen’s life changed again in 1994 when she met Bob Bannerman. Bob, a Wilmington, Delaware, native, earned his law degree at University of Minnesota and specialized in international trade law. He was studying Mandarin in Washington, D.C., in preparation for an assignment as U.S. Commercial Attaché in Beijing when he was invited to a children’s Vietnam Lunar New Year (Tet) program. It

happened that Nguyen had accepted an ESL teaching position with Fairfax County Public Schools and was at the event. Bannerman, who did not understand the program since it was entirely in Vietnamese, was next to Nguyen, and she explained what was happening. The two began dating, and Nguyen invited Bannerman to a ceremony at a pagoda in Arlington, Virginia, for the anniversary of her father’s death. At the ceremony he asked Nguyen to marry him. “I told him I had to ask my mother’s permission,” Nguyen says, adding that it’s the tradition in Vietnam to ask parents’ permission even though she was 36 years old. “I told him if Winter 2019-20

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Nguyen and Bannerman have collected art and memorabilia from around the world, and some of the items were displayed at the annual International Festival.

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my mother says ‘no,’ I can’t go against my mom.” After Nguyen and her mother discussed that Bannerman was divorced and had two children, “She gave her blessing,” Nguyen says. “We had a Vietnamese wedding,” she adds with pride. Bannerman then began his diplomatic career in the U.S. Foreign Commercial Service, and Nguyen began hers in the State Department. “In foreign service, there’s an effort to employ spouses,” Bannerman says. Besides Beijing, the couple have lived in Manila, the Philippines; Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Rome, Italy; and Dhabi, UAE. Bannerman helped U.S. companies export to new foreign markets, while Nguyen worked at embassies and consulates in a variety of roles. She issued student visas in China, was a community liaison officer in Vietnam and provided several duties for the Federal Aviation Administration in the Philippines. Bannerman was disappointed that in Foreign Service an


PEOPLE

employee must retire at 65 and explains that employees disappointed. “The old Vietnam, our Vietnam, is gone,” she receive one month leave each year, so the couple had been says. “It’s communized. It’s political. The youth don’t know visiting various parts of the United States to determine about the war and the culture.” She leans forward to where they would like to settle. emphasize her words. “We have “We wanted something not too 4,000 years of culture,” she says. cold, and I wanted a nice piece “I’m afraid all that tradition is The old Vietnam, our of land by water,” he says. In gone.” 2004 they bought their perfect Nguyen and Bannerman, Vietnam, is gone. It’s lot in the Holden Beach area and however, bring Vietnamese culture communized. It’s political. built their dream home in 2014. to Brunswick County through the We have 4,000 years of “It was a tough transition annual Intercultural Festival. culturally coming back here,” “We really enjoyed participating culture. I’m afraid all that Bannerman says of his return to in it,” Bannerman says. “We had tradition is gone. live in the United States after 25 amazing interaction with the years in other countries. “We [Vietnam] veterans.” miss the vibrancy of living in a “I can tell them about the places foreign culture.” they were,” Nguyen says. “We got spoiled because of our jobs,” Nguyen says. “We Although they enjoy traveling, they are now settled in are drawn to traveling.” Brunswick County and helping better it.  The couple visited Vietnam in 2008, but Nguyen was

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AROUND TOWN

Sharing the Music Members of the Coastal Carolina Chapter of the American Harp Society cultivate appreciation of the harp through performances, instruction and guest artist recitals. BY BETH KLAHRE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MUUSS

he resonant sounds of the harp, one of the world’s oldest instruments dating back to 3500 BC, can be frequently heard across the coast of North Carolina. Hailing from coastal towns spanning Wilmington to Myrtle Beach, members of the Coastal Carolina Chapter of the American Harp Society are bringing joy and knowledge to audiences, students and those struggling with life-threatening illnesses. The Coastal Carolina Chapter had its beginnings in September 2013, when Wilmington resident Carole Green, a professional harpist and proponent of bedside therapeutic music, invited 20 people who played the harp to a meeting in a church. It was something she had dreamed about for a long time. By November of that same year, professional harpist Christina Brier assumed the role of president and formalized the chapter through affiliation

Members of the Coastal Carolina Chapter of the American Harp Society, left to right: Christina Brier, Shelby Rowe, Beth Klahre, Susan Creasy, Susan Wilzer, Julie Rehder and Suzanne Sourwine.

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with the American Harp Society (AHS), the largest organization of harpists in the world. Brier, who is the principal harpist with the Carolina Philharmonic and Wilmington Symphony Orchestra, enjoys leading the chapter along with its eight-member volunteer board of directors. She views the chapter as a “way for harpists to connect with each other and be a part of the larger harp world through the AHS.” Brier impacts the chapter’s repertoire of music from Celtic to classical to contemporary influenced by her global teaching and performance experiences in the United States, India and Italy Suzanne Sourwine of Ocean Isle Beach also is one of the founding members. “I think most of us were amazed that there are so many people in the area who play the harp,” she says. A harp performance in the lobby of Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center sparked Sourwine’s interest in the harp. While she also plays piano, clarinet and hand bells, it is the harp she enjoys the most. “I have never enjoyed practicing musical instruments as I do the harp,” she says. “I sit down to play and lose all sense of time.” Sourwine performs several times a year at Seaside United Methodist Church in Sunset Beach and has played for the Waterway Art Association Annual Spring Art Show reception. “But I mainly play for my own pleasure and that of my two poodles,” she says with a smile. Sourwine makes it a point to attend the harp chapter meetings, which are often held at the Leland Cultural Arts Center. During these meetings, 78

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harpists bring their harps to learn and perfect new music. The musicians practice classical harp music, folk tunes, hymns and popular songs. “Most people I meet think playing the harp is very rare and special. And it is!” Sourwine says. “But being around other harpists is even more rare. Being in a harp circle is fun because we all speak the same language.” Nancy Brennand, who currently resides in Little River, was the very first chapter vice president. She is

local chapters in the various places I lived,” she says. “The harp chapter offers students an opportunity to hear other harpists and to compete and learn new compositions.” Susan Wilzer of Brunswick Forest is the chapter historian and also one of the founding members. In addition to ensemble performances, she plays at the Leland Cultural Arts Center on the second Tuesday of the month as well as at her church. “I fell in love with the harp when I was young,” Wilzer says. “Now retired, I have more time to devote to music. Chapter events provide opportunities for sharing music and offering a friendly environment for growth as musicians.” Annually, the chapter reaches beyond its membership to connect with the community through free performances. In October, chapter harpists performed for guests of Little Pink Houses of Hope, a

Most people I meet think playing the harp is very rare and special. And it is! But being around other harpists is even more rare. currently the principal harpist of the Long Bay Symphony in Myrtle Beach. Brennand has played harp on Broadway, was an entertainer on two cruise ships and has travelled to 60 countries with her harp. She currently owns five harps and performs in Southport and Calabash, often for art show receptions. “The harp has been very good to me and opened many doors!” Brennand says. Brennand recognizes the value of chapter membership. “I have been in

nonprofit that brought 11 families impacted by breast cancer to Oak Island to reconnect, rejuvenate and celebrate life. “By performing for free we are helping people see that a harp community exists here in coastal Carolina,” Brier says. “It's good to expose the public to the harp and it gives harpists a chance to play together.” The chapter also offers annual workshops and concerts that are open to members and the public. In spring 2020


AROUND TOWN

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the chapter will sponsor Wilmington Harp Day, a hands-on workshop led by a renowned guest artist, culminating with a free public concert. For some members of the chapter, there is an even higher purpose. Susan Creasy, Julie Rehder, Shari Hancock and Lynne Boney are Certified Music Practitioners (CMP™). Their certifications were obtained through the Music for Healing and Transition Program (MHTP™) accredited by the National Standards Board for Therapeutic Musicians.

These musicians have completed two years of coursework, including patient assessment and repertoire, music theory, physics of sound and music, etiquette and professionalism, and health and care of the dying. The certification also required a supervised, 45-hour practicum in a healthcare facility. Creasy, who completed her practicum at Novant Health Brunswick Medical Center, can be found playing with Rehder throughout the hospital. Creasy also plays her harp bedside at SECU

Hospice House of Brunswick. “It’s very fulfilling for me when patients tell me that I have taken them to another place with my music, Creasy says. “I’m glad to get them out of the medical environment mentally, if only for a few minutes.” Creasy would like to see the chapter grow, adding her favorite parts of the chapter are the friendships with other harpists and seeing her skill level continue to improve. Membership in the harp chapter has inspired admirable future aspirations for its musicians. Inspired by the therapeutic harpists, chapter member Andrea Kelly has recently started coursework and hopes to play for babies in the NICU struggling with drug detoxification. Brier, who is also the executive director of the Brooklyn Arts Music Academy, which offers lessons and comprehensive music education, envisions the local harp chapter expanding to children. “My hope is to develop programs for youth,” Brier says. “I would love to see more kids playing the harp. I also would like harpists from broader coastal Carolina towns to connect.” Wilzer sums it all up simply when she says, “Music is to be shared. It enriches those who play and those who listen.” 

Want to play along? The Coastal Carolina Chapter of the American Harp Society welcomes harp enthusiasts of all ages and skill levels from beginner to professional. For more information, visit coastalcarolinaahs.com or their Facebook page: facebook.com/groups/ CoastalCarolinaHarpCircle 80

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A Culinary

journey

Terry and Andrew Bland of ART Catering and Events and Purple Onion Cafe share their love of food with the people of Shallotte and Brunswick County. BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN

PHOTO BY BRENT GALLANT

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PHOTOS BY INDIGO SILVER

rom the very beginning, Terry and Andrew Bland’s relationship was shaped by fun and food. “He was such a flirt,” Terry says. “At the restaurant where we worked together, he would chase me around the kitchen with pig hooves left over from a pig-pickin!” Andrew is an award-winning executive chef, and together he and Terry own ART Catering and Events and Purple Onion Cafe in Shallotte. They first met in the town of Harrogate in North Yorkshire, England, where Terry was a waitress and Andrew was the chef at Menwith Hill Officer’s Club. Three decades later, they’re using their combined talents of cooking and business know-how to craft one-of-a-kind catering and event experiences that transcend the traditional wedding-food menu. Terry, a Southern girl who as a child vacationed at Holden Beach, where her grandparents lived, knew she wanted to come back to the United States. She and Andrew made the move across the pond, and in 1997 launched ART Catering & Events in Florence, South Carolina. Shortly after they moved to Boone, North Carolina, where Andrew worked as executive chef of Appalachian State University. When Terry decided she wanted to be closer to her mother, who lived in Shallotte, the couple moved their business and came home to Shallotte. Having already established themselves as a successful catering and event business, the Blands took the next step in their culinary journey and opened Purple Onion Cafe on Main Street in Shallotte. “We opened on the day of the Shallotte Christmas Parade in 2004,” Terry says. When it came time to pick a name for the cafe, the Blands first considered Watercolor Cafe but quickly decided it might not resonate with everyone. “We wanted a name that was welcoming and that made everybody comfortable,” Terry says. The purple onion was a staple in their menu and a namesake they kept coming back to, so the name stuck. The Southern-with-a-twist-inspired café is as popular with visitors as it is with locals. Customers come for the famous Purple Onion Club, Purple Onion Salad and Fried Green Tomatoes with Purple Onion Jam. Customers also love their signature breakfast dishes like Crabcake Benedict and homemade Blueberry Biscuits. The Purple Onion is open for breakfast and lunch seven days a week. So much of Purple Onion Cafe’s success comes from Andrew’s three main food philosophies: fresh, local ingredients, made from scratch and flavor in every bite. It all comes down to good food. Andrew has been interested in good food since he was a child. He admits his mother’s cooking was “basic” without much fanfare, “no flavorings or seasonings,” which perhaps led to his yearning to learn how to cook. “She just didn’t like to cook,” he says. He was 14 years old when he first worked in a kitchen at a local restaurant in England. “I was a dishwasher, and I helped make appetizers. I

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watched the chefs there and thought, that looks like fun, let’s do that.” He trained as a classic French cuisine chef from City & Guilds in Manchester, England. Andrew works with a passion to create menus that fuse the traditional with the contemporary, with a sustainable approach. He insists on using locally sourced ingredients, particularly seafood, whenever possible. ART Catering is a member of the local seafood recognition program called Brunswick Catch.

green beans wedding menu. There is no one-size-fits all menu at ART. The Blands look at every event as brand new and highly personalized. “All the items on the menu are just a guide for our clients,” Andrew says. “We like it when people bring us ideas. It challenges me.” Though he does like to try new things, he still has some favorites that will never get old, like his slow-roasted prime rib of beef served with au jus and horseradish sauce. They also take into consideration food allergies and other

PHOTOS BY INDIGO SILVER

The same three philosophies that Andrew applies to the café, he also applies to the award-winning ART Catering and Events. Where they really excel is in their mission to create a restaurant-quality culinary experience that goes above and beyond standard wedding or corporate buffet fare. Wherever did the assumption come from that wedding food had to be boring? There is a genuine difference in the way people think about event food today, as it’s a large part of the entire wedding experience. Clients are looking for a memorable dinner to share with their guests, and ART is rethinking the traditional chicken and 84

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dietary restrictions. “We can do vegetarian and vegan and gluten-free,” Andrew says. Connecting with guests is something Andrew enjoys. Traditionally chefs have stayed in the kitchen behind the scenes, but “the chef ’s role has evolved over the years,” Andrew points out, and now clients want him to come out of the kitchen and talk about the dishes he’s prepared and answer any questions they might have. It’s all part of the personalized service that ART offers. Many clients tell the Blands that their guests were still talking about the food weeks after the event. “That means we’re doing our job right,” Terry says. “We want everyone to enjoy what

they’re eating and to leave knowing they had a great meal.” It’s not just the food that keeps the Blands’ event schedule full. ART is not only a full-service catering and event company, but also they have an in-house rental and design team that takes care of linens, tables, chairs, dishes, table coverings, full-bar service and even color schemes. “We can do as much or as little as you’d like us to,” Terry says. ART caters between 30 and 40 events each month and is the exclusive caterer at Bricklanding Plantation in Shallotte. Whether it’s a milestone birthday you want to celebrate, an elaborate wedding, a family reunion or a corporate meeting, ART creates authentic, memorable and comfortable special occasions. Other than their amazing food experience, they have a strong commitment to customer service. Their sales consultants work closely with each client to make sure the event is everything they expected. “We manage all of the behind the scenes dining details so our clients can host their event and enjoy time with their guests without the worry,” Terry says.


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Giving back to the community that they consider home, the Blands take every opportunity to participate in local organizations. They are current members of Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce and North Myrtle Beach Chamber of Commerce and also support a long list of local causes, including Habitat for Humanity, Lower Cape Fear Hospice, PawsAbility and local schools, just to name a few. What does the future hold for the Blands? “We’ll continue to grow and support our community,” Terry says. “We’re thankful for the 16 years we’ve been here, and for the Purple Onion customers we’ve had from day one who we continue to serve today.” 

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PHOTOS BY BILL RITENOUR

Brunswick Community College Foundation to Host 4th Annual Bella Italia

Brunswick Community College Foundation (BCCF) has announced the date for its fourth annual Bella Italia fundraiser. Mark your calendars for February 8, 2020, for an evening of sipping fine wines and enjoying delicious Italian fare from Angelo’s Bistro and Maria’s Pizzeria. All proceeds from the event will benefit student scholarship support at Brunswick Community College. The event will begin at 6 pm as guests are greeted at the door of 101 Stone Chimney in Supply and ushered into the main ballroom for a culinary adventure. Allison Szafarski, general manager and wine director for Angelo’s Bistro, will

offer guests an opportunity to take a deeper dive and refine their palates with a special wine tasting during the event. She will share her expertise and tasting notes as guests swirl and sip their way to amateur sommelier status. The evening is sure to pique both appetites and curiosity as guests explore “the Boot” through delectable bites and sensational sips. Tickets, $100 each, are on sale now and may be purchased through the BCC Foundation by contacting Kathy Lukacz at (910) 755-7473 or lukaczk@brunswickcc.edu. Sponsorships are still available.

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

SNIPPETS

Southport’s WinterFest Southport kicked off the holiday season with a week of celebrations and events throughout downtown Southport. From December 7 to 14, adults and children of all ages enjoyed live theater, a WinterFest Tea Party, a cookie contest, supper with Santa’s elves, a showing of Polar Express, a costumed history tour, a Christmas fire engine parade, crafts, a book sale, performing arts, Santa’s workshop, a historic jail tour and the WinterFest Tour of Homes. The week wrapped with the Christmas Flotilla. 88

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SNIPPETS

2019 Women of Impact Awards  The Brunswick County Chamber Women in Business

PHOTOS BY BILL RITENOUR

Committee developed The Women of Impact Awards in an effort to champion women from diverse backgrounds and industries to ensure their achievements become part of the fabric of our community. The second annual luncheon was held on November 4 at the Brunswick Plantation Resort & Golf. Special keynote speaker Fran Scarlett encouraged attendees with her personal "Life Hacks for Success" before the awards were handed out to the following:

Regina Nichols, recipient of the Woman of the Year award, and Sherrill Nelson, RN representing Sponsor McLeod Health

Regina Lowry of Autumn Care of Shallote and recipient of the Hidden Gem award

Kerri Allen, Emerging Entrepreneur

Mary Pritchard of South Brunswick Interchurch Council and recipient of the Volunteer of the Year award

Sheila Smeltzer, Established Business Owner

Timothy Randall, D.U.D.E. award

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Calabash Christmas Tree Lighting and Parade The Calabash community came together to light the Calabash Christmas Tree, enjoy local talents and sing Christmas carols by candlelight at the 24th Annual Calabash Christmas Tree Lighting and Parade on December 6. Starting at Callahan’s of Calabash, the Spirit of Calabash Parade strolled down Beach Drive to River Road and was full of colorful and entertaining groups. Santa was transported to the event by the Calabash Fire Department, and the main tree lighting began immediately after the parade on the main stage. Santa was in the Santa Land tent during the event, visiting with children and taking letters, which were mailed from the official Calabash North Pole mailbox. There was 90

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also hot cocoa, coffee and refreshments. Tina Smith from Brunswick County’s SoundHouse was the featured vocalist for the Tree Lighting event. Local children also performed, including the Kindergarten Dancers from Dance Connection led by Ann Hucks and the Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary School children’s choir led by Kristi Smith. The event organizers collected toys, clothing, nonperishable food and monetary donations for needy children and seniors living in southern Brunswick County. Local merchants offered unique shopping, great dining and small-town cheer.


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NC Oyster Festival

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

was packed into one amazing day in 2019. While the Sunday events had to be cancelled due to bad weather, the festivities on Saturday, October 19 more than made up for the missed day. Saturday was full of toe-tapping music, culinary delights, unique shopping and, of course, the beloved oysters. Attendees were able to walk the grounds and peruse a variety of vendors showcasing their artwork and crafts. Many brought beach chairs to set up near the stage to listen to the featured entertainers. Oysters served in a variety of ways were the main draw. The 2020 NC Oyster Festival committee is already planning for next year and hopes it will be the biggest and best to date.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

All the fun of the NC Oyster Festival in Ocean Isle Beach

Dosher Memorial Hospital Foundation Golf Classic Dosher Memorial Hospital Foundation thanks all the golfers, volunteers and sponsors who participated in the Dosher Memorial Hospital Foundation Golf Classic on October 11 at Oak Island Golf Club. Golfers could register as a single player or a team of three, and the game was a captain’s choice event. Golfers enjoyed cash prizes for first, second and third place teams in each of the four flights. Dinner and awards followed the golf game. 92

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Clark’s Seafood and Chop House

C

lark’s Seafood and Chop House is a family-owned restaurant in Little River, South Carolina. Serving locally sourced seafood and modern American cuisine, it is located on the breathtakingly beautiful Coquina Harbor. “In fact, our waterfront view of the marina is something that sets us apart from other restaurants in the area,” says Debbie Mozzicato, director of operations. “That and our attention to detail for each dish and our exceptional service.” Mozzicato oversees the operations for all of the Callahan family restaurants, including Oyster Rock and Boundary House, both in Calabash. With an extensive menu, Clark’s offers a tasty and varied dinner experience. From fresh, local seafood and Southern dishes like shrimp and grits and fried chicken Marsala to their USDA choice beef and steaks, the menu is designed to please everyone. In addition to their signature items, they also have new and exciting daily features. “Some of our popular dishes include our fresh catch of the day, New York strip, Firecracker Shrimp, fresh oysters and our award-winning she-crab soup,” Mozzicato says. “We only serve the most tender USDA choice beef and the freshest of seafood available, so we feel confident in all of our menu items.” Since 2012, when Clark’s first opened its doors, they have strived to make the dining experience comfortable for any

night out, yet sophisticated for special occasions. Whether it’s their first visit or their tenth, diners can always expect professional and friendly service, an excellent atmosphere, soothing views, affordable prices and delicious, highquality food. A popular lunch time spot, Clark’s offers many of their dinner options beginning at 11 am, including soups, salads, burgers, steaks, seafood entrees and pastas. The restaurant is also housed

Business Profile BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN

in the same building as Sea Island Trading Co., a women’s clothing and gift boutique, so patrons can enjoy shopping before or after lunch with friends. In addition to their tasty food, Clark’s offers an extensive wine list, including a large selection of wines by the glass. They also have hand-crafted cocktails and specialty drinks, such as the Cucumber Martini and Blueberry Bramble, and popular craft and domestic beers. Clark’s offers daily discounted drinks and a delicious assortment of specially priced appetizers for happy hour between 4 and 6 pm. Clark’s Seafood & Chop House has a simple philosophy: relax. That’s what they want their guests to do. From the stunning backdrop of the harbor to the inviting ambiance, whether inside or at the outdoor bar, Clark’s is a place to unwind and put yourself in the hands of the staff. “At Clark's, our mission is to make each patron a returning guest. This is our highest compliment,” Mozzicato says. Clark’s Seafood & Chop House, a favorite for locals and visitors alike, is open seven days a week for lunch from 11 am to 4 pm and for dinner starting at 4 pm. They accept reservations online. Clark’s Seafood & Chop House 720 U.S. Highway 17, Little River (843) 399-8888 clarksseafoodandchophouse.com

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Sea Island Trading Co.

W

hen it comes to shopping these days, many are wooed by the convenience of online ordering or nextdoor stores in larger retail centers. But to the customers of Sea Island Trading Co. in Little River, South Carolina, it’s all about the irresistible experience of finding something unique and intriguing, no matter how far you drive to get there. “We know that whoever shops with us purposely comes to see us,” says Karen Wilson, buyer for Sea Island Trading Co. “We have regular customers who come from the Brunswick Islands, the Strand in Myrtle Beach, Murrell’s Inlet and Wilmington. We are truly a destination location.” Sea Island Trading Co. opened in 2012 with the mission of offering unique non-brand driven apparel, accessories and home decor that’s eclectic, unique, modern, classic and trendy, with a soft Bohemian flavor. Customers often compare their goods to those of national retailers like Anthropologie and Free People for their natural, freespirited style — a style that fits most women. Their target shopper is all women of all ages.

“From grandmothers to mothers and granddaughters, we purchase clothing that you can’t find anywhere else and clothing you might not think is for you — until you try it on and love it,” Wilson says. Sea Island Trading Co. isn’t a boutique but a lifestyle shop. When you walk through the door, the vibe greets you, and you know you’re going to have an experience. They take a balanced approach between home decor, accessories and apparel. They aren’t tied to certain brands, and they try new labels to keep the merchandise fresh with pieces that have personality and give shoppers an opportunity to “think outside of the box” when it comes to their personal style. “One of the most exciting clothing brands we’ve brought in this year is Barefoot Dreams,” Wilson says. “It’s a very Southern coastal chic style that can be worn as lounge wear or out for an evening. It’s incredibly versatile and fun in neutral colors. The feel of the fabric is something we can never describe online or in advertising. You have to come and touch it to get the experience.” Sea Island also carries unique brands

Business Profile BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN

like Quay, Sorel and Hey Dude. Unlike an online shopping experience, in a brick-and-mortar like Sea Island customers have the advantage of buying something they might never have considered. Here, the quality and uniqueness of their apparel begs to be tried on. “We’ve had several customers who are newly retired from a career where they had to dress very professionally,” Wilson says. “Now they’re looking for a new way to express themselves through their clothes. We can help them find their inner, independent free spirit. Even for the small size of the store, we can deliver that.” Housed in the same building as Clark’s Seafood & Chop House, Sea Island is located on the beautiful Coquina Harbor. Its connection to Clark’s makes it the perfect day trip for a shopping and lunch excursion with friends, family or just yourself. Sea Island Trading Co. 720 U.S. Highway 17, Little River, SC (843) 273-0248 seaislandtrading.com Winter 2019-20

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Picture Perfect

In Any Season

SPRING

2020

Shop, Dine & Enjoy Local Check out Holiday Promotions ShopSouthportOakIsland.com

Coastal Consumer Showcase Thursday, March 5th St. James Community Building 4pm—7pm

Oak Island Lighthouse Run Half Marathon * 10k * 5k* 1 Mile Saturday, April 18th Oak Island OakIslandLighthouseRun.com

Southport

Events of the...

Southport-Oak Island Area

Chamber of Commerce southport-oakisland.com 910.457.6964 98

South Brunswick Magazine

8848 River Rd. S.E Southport, NC 28461

(910) 477-6444


FACES & PLACES

2019 Holiday Banquet & Charity Celebration for the Rose House

Odell & Jessica Williamson, Clarice & Ronnie Holden

Jon David, Ashley Smith, Kaci Choate, Josh Torbich

Maegan Todd & Jayda Hinkle

Sam & Brittany Britt, Bobbi & Jonathan Oliver

Blanche & Mike Garrell

Kenneth & Samantha Lawson

Cindy & Brian Schachty

Cody Ijames, Jayda Hinkle, Stephen Mallard, Keith Green

Josh Torbich

Elizabeth & Thad Lewis

Richard & Sue Railing

Mike Forte

PHOTOGRAPHY: BILL RITENOUR

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

On October 16 Nocha White American Legion Post 503 gathered to recognize students from West Brunswick High School and Brunswick County Community College (BCC). In attendance were members of the American Legion and auxiliary, Sons of the American Legion (S.A.L.) and Legion Riders. S.A.L. Vice Commander Jim Giroud served as the Master of Ceremonies by welcoming the young men and women who attended Tar Heel Boys’ and Girls’ State and The North Carolina State Highway Patrol Student Trooper Program. The Post also honored BCC Nursing students who were awarded scholarships.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Nocha White Post 503 Recognizes Students

of emerging trends in the nonprofit sector, work effectively with other leaders across organizations and stakeholder groups to capitalize on opportunities for synergy in addressing critical social issues, and lead strategic change within their organizations. The Tom and Susan Rabon Charitable Foundation sponsored Stanley and Wassum in the program.

American Legion Post #543 Welcomes Guest Speaker Mark Bachara

Lynda Stanley, president of Dosher Memorial Hospital Foundation, and Elizabeth Wassum, executive director of Brunswick Community College Foundation, have received certificates in Executive Nonprofit Leadership from Duke University. The Executive Certificate in Nonprofit Leadership is a comprehensive program that offers experienced nonprofit professionals the opportunity to increase their capacity for effective leadership, enabling its graduates to gain awareness 100

South Brunswick Magazine

Sunset Beach CIS Thrift Shop Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary The first CIS Thrift Shop opened 10 years ago in Southport, and the second CIS Thrift Shop opened later that same year in a Sunset Beach shopping plaza on Chandlers Lane. Today there are four CIS Thrift Shops in Brunswick County, each a strong support to Communities In Schools of Brunswick County’s (CIS) mission to empower students to stay in school and achieve in life. CIS

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Dosher and BCC Foundation Leaders Earn Executive Certificates in Nonprofit Leadership

Attorney Mark Bachara was recently the guest speaker at a monthly meeting of the Richard H. Stewart Jr. American Legion Post #543 in St. James. Bachara spoke of estate planning to more than 60 members and guests and fielded many questions. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Dosher Memorial Hospital’s Guest Chef Program is the perfect venue for individuals to experience live, healthy cooking demonstrations performed by talented local chefs. Dosher kicked off its 2019–20 series on September 10. Dietary Manager Lisa Botnick taught attendees how to create healthier variations of a few classic fall recipes without sacrificing taste. Vicki Allen, Dosher’s director of outpatient diabetes education and weight management, organizes the program, which takes place the second Tuesday of every month in the second-floor conference room at the hospital, 924 N. Howe Street in Southport. Check the calendar at dosher. org for a full list of upcoming dates.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Dosher Kicks Off Guest Chef Series


WHAT’S HAPPENED

shops also serve as a place for the community to find highquality, name-brand merchandise at a fraction of department store prices. The nonprofit thrift shop was one of the earliest in the area for a long time. The Sunset Beach CIS Thrift Shop opened October 1, 2009, and only a few years after, other shops and restaurants started opening in the area increasing customers to the shop. After early years of struggling to become known and recognized as a high-quality merchandiser of donated items, the Sunset Beach CIS Thrift Shop has survived and thrived, setting the standard for the nonprofit thrift shop customer experience by offering personalized service, advice and some of the best customer service experience around.

Many townspeople came out to take part in Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce’s Holiday Happenings Event at Shallotte Middle School. This free event took place on November 2. Santa rode in on a red sleigh (a Shallotte firetruck), while attendees sipped hot chocolate and ate popcorn. More than 50 vendors participated, and the raffles and giveaways were a hit.

Dosher Volunteer Officers Are Reelected

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Brunswick County Chamber Holds Holiday Happenings Event at Shallotte Middle School

render a digital image in about five seconds, greatly increasing efficiency over current equipment. The new x-ray will expose patients to even lower doses of radiation as well as deliver higher-quality images. The portable unit will be used to support the Emergency Department and bedside images of patients who are unable to be transported to the X-ray Department.

Shallotte Holds Annual Christmas Parade CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Town of Shallotte held its annual Shallotte Christmas Parade on December 7. Along with the many decorated floats, cars and walkers handing out candy, Santa made an appearance.

Dosher Volunteers have recently elected officers for the 2019–20 term. Jeri Robinson is president, Ann Hollingsworth is vice president, Lorena Curry is treasurer, Donna Jenny is secretary, and Verda Darrell is chaplain.

Dosher Foundation Receives $100K Digital Imaging Grant The Dosher Memorial Hospital Foundation has received a $100,000 grant from The Cannon Foundation, a private foundation based in Concord, North Carolina, focused on healthcare, higher education and human services across North Carolina. The grant will help fund a new portable digital x-ray unit at the hospital, replacing the hospital’s computed radiology equipment. The new equipment is designed to capture and

The Carousel Center Opens New Brunswick County Office The Carousel Center (TCC), southeastern North Carolina’s only nationally accredited child advocacy center, has announced the opening of a new office in Supply to serve Brunswick County residents. Located at 20 Medical Campus Drive SW, Unit No 106, the new office effectively doubles TCC’s capacity to serve children who are victims of physical or sexual abuse and provides a child-friendly space for forensic medical exams, trauma therapy, family advocacy and professional and community trainings. Staffed by medical professionals, therapists and family advocates, the Brunswick County TCC office began seeing new patients on July 1 and is open Monday to Friday from 9 am to 5 pm. The public was invited to a ribboncutting ceremony, tours and a celebration at the new office on October 2.

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

W.J. and Sibyl McLamb Donate $50,000 Endowment for Hospice Care in Brunswick County

ATMC recently awarded $35,000 in grant funds to 27 educators and organizations for programs that expand educational opportunities for Brunswick County and Columbus County students. The cooperative held a reception in September at its Shallotte location to recognize the grant recipients. At the reception, recipients shared information about their programs and how grant funds will enhance the lives of the students and communities they serve.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Young Entrepreneurs Showcased at SouthportOak Island Area Youth Business Fair

The Southport-Oak Island Youth Business Fair on November 23 inspired children and youth to discover their inner entrepreneur. The Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce partnered with Action Academy and the Brian Hamilton Foundation in a one-day market to give children the opportunity to showcase their very own businesses. The young entrepreneurs created a product or service, developed the brand and marketed and sold it at the Youth Business Fair. Thirty-one young entrepreneurs participated in the market. Ages of the participants ranged from second grade to eleventh grade. The products and services varied widely and included dog treats and accessories, lip gloss, wood art, honey, face painting, jewelry, paintings, apparel, slime, cupcakes and grilled cheeses.

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South Brunswick Magazine

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

ATMC Awards $35,000 in Grants to Local Educators

W.J. and Sibyl McLamb donated a $50,000 endowment in September to Lower Cape Fear Hospice (LCFH) to provide care for those in Brunswick County who cannot pay for it, ensuring LCFH’s mission to provide access to care and support to all, regardless of ability to pay. The donation was given in memory of Mrs. McLamb’s mother, Leila Housand Bellamy, who instilled her love of gardening and nature in Mrs. McLamb. A plaque in her honor will be installed in the SECU Hospice House of Brunswick garden. The couple has a long history with Lower Cape Fear Hospice. When the nonprofit hospice first started, Mrs. McLamb attended training and informational meetings at the couple’s church, Camp United Methodist Church in Shallotte. When Mr. McLamb’s sister became sick, the family requested help from Lower Cape Fear Hospice. When the decision was made to build a care center in Brunswick County, the McLambs co-chaired the campaign to raise funds for the building. The SECU Hospice House of Brunswick opened to patients in 2012. The McLambs have a long history in Brunswick County, including involvement with Brunswick Community College, Hope Harbor Home and First Tee of Brunswick County. Mr. McLamb’s family has been in Brunswick County for at least eight generations, and Mrs. McLamb’s family has deep roots in Brunswick County and Horry County, South Carolina.

Shallotte Rotarians Participate in Rise Against Hunger Event Rotary is where neighbors, friends and problem-solvers share ideas, join leaders and take action to create lasting change. Rotary District 7730 of southeastern North Carolina is an extraordinary group of more than 1,800 Rotarians in 51 Rotary clubs who have donated millions of dollars to local communities in North Carolina. It was formed in 1954 as a separate Rotary District, and its legacy continues with


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

WHAT’S HAPPENED

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Furthermore, the girls participated in Sunrise Yoga, taught by Ms. Kelly from Breathing Space Yoga in Holden Beach. Youth were able to be in the present moment and not worry about the past or future. Hopefully, all the GEM young ladies who participated will not only use what they learned in their everyday lives, but also share it with others in the future as teen volunteers.

service projects like one they coordinated on 2 Saturdays in 2 locations. The Rotarians wish to thank every single person who gave, showed up, shared on social media and cheered on their recent fundraiser for Bahamian families impacted by Hurricane Dorian. Two mornings, 463 people and music resulted in 117,720 meals packed for relief efforts. Their partners, Rise Against Hunger, Onslow Community Outreach and the Town of St. James, helped the Rotarians prepare. The entire project was put together in less than four weeks with the help of other area civic organizations, churches and service-minded individuals.

4-Hers Get Experience in Mindfulness On September 21 and 22 Brunswick County and Pender County 4-H held a Wellness Retreat for middle school girls at the Brunswick County Cooperative Extension office. The purpose of the retreat was to teach the girls new techniques for stress relief and healthy living through 4-H curriculum GEM (Getting Experience in Mindfulness). They learned the importance of mindfulness through self-care, gratitude and using all five senses thoroughly. Lessons were taught by 4-H staff and volunteers, including teen volunteers Autumn Apple, Sydney Blair and Abbey Lute. The youth made a healthy dinner, bath products, gratitude boards and friends.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

BEMC Awards Grants to Educators for Bright Ideas

Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation (BEMC) awarded more than $31,500 in Bright Ideas education grants to 29 local teachers to fund engaging classroom learning projects. More than 7,300 students at schools in Brunswick and Columbus counties will participate in projects funded by BEMC this year. Now in its 25th year, the program has contributed nearly $800,000 to local teachers.

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SHALLOTTE INLET TIDE CHART

January February D a t e

High Tide AM Time (EST)

Low Tide PM

Height Time (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

D a t e

High Tide AM Time (EST)

March

Low Tide PM

Height Time (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

D a t e

High Tide AM Time (EST)

Low Tide PM

Height Time (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

1

12:08

3.6

12:36

4.1

6:16

0.7

6:48

0.5

1

12:54

3.8

1:23

3.6

7:14

0.8

7:30

0.4

1

12:04

4.1

12:40

3.6

6:35

0.8

6:45

0.5

2

12:59

3.6

1:24

3.9

7:07

0.9

7:35

0.6

2

1:43

3.8

2:12

3.5

8:14

0.9

8:23

0.4

2

12:55

4.1

1:31

3.5

7:28

0.9

7:37

0.5

3

1:48

3.7

2:11

3.8

8:05

1.0

8:25

0.6

3

2:34

4.0

3:04

3.5

9:20

0.9

9:22

0.3

3

1:51

4.2

2:27

3.5

8:32

1.0

8:39

0.5

4

2:36

3.8

2:59

3.7

9:09

1.0

9:17

0.5

4

3:28

4.2

3:59

3.5

10:24

0.7

10:21

0.1

4

2:49

4.3

3:25

3.6

9:42

0.8

9:46

0.3

5

3:24

4.0

3:49

3.7

10:10

0.9

10:09

0.3

5

4:24

4.4

4:54

3.7

11:20

0.5

11:17

-0.2

5

3:50

4.5

4:25

3.9

10:46

0.6

10:50

-0.1

6

4:13

4.3

4:39

3.7

11:05

0.7

10:59

0.1

6

5:20

4.8

5:49

4.0

---

---

12:12

0.1

6

4:50

4.8

5:23

4.3

11:42

0.2

11:48

-0.5

7

5:02

4.5

5:29

3.9

11:54

0.4

11:47

-0.2

7

6:13

5.1

6:40

4.3

12:10

-0.6

1:01

-0.2

7

5:47

5.2

6:18

4.7

---

---

12:33

-0.3

8

5:51

4.8

6:17

4.0

---

---

12:41

0.2

8

7:03

5.4

7:29

4.6

1:01

-0.9

1:48

-0.5

8

7:41

5.5

8:10

5.1

12:43

-0.9

2:22

-0.6

9

6:38

5.1

7:03

4.2

12:34

-0.5

1:26

-0.1

9

7:51

5.6

8:18

4.9

1:52

-1.2

2:35

-0.8

9

8:31

5.7

9:00

5.4

2:36

-1.2

3:10

-0.9

10

7:24

5.4

7:49

4.4

1:22

-0.7

2:12

-0.3

10

8:39

5.7

9:08

5.0

2:43

-1.3

3:22

-1.0

10

9:20

5.7

9:50

5.6

3:28

-1.4

3:57

-1.1

11

8:09

5.5

8:35

4.5

2:10

-0.9

2:58

-0.5

11

9:29

5.6

10:01

5.1

3:35

-1.3

4:09

-1.0

11

10:10

5.6

10:41

5.7

4:20

-1.4

4:44

-1.1

12

8:56

5.6

9:25

4.5

2:58

-1.0

3:44

-0.6

12

10:20

5.3

10:57

5.0

4:27

-1.2

4:56

-0.9

12

11:01

5.3

11:35

5.6

5:12

-1.2

5:31

-0.9

13

9:45

5.5

10:18

4.5

3:48

-0.9

4:31

-0.6

13

11:16

4.9

11:56

5.0

5:20

-0.9

5:45

-0.7

13

11:56

4.9

---

---

6:05

-0.9

6:20

-0.6

14

10:38

5.3

11:17

4.5

4:40

-0.8

5:20

-0.6

14

---

---

12:14

4.6

6:17

-0.5

6:38

-0.5

14

12:33

5.4

12:54

4.5

7:00

-0.5

7:12

-0.3

15

11:35

5.0

---

---

5:34

-0.6

6:10

-0.5

15

12:57

4.9

1:14

4.2

7:19

-0.1

7:37

-0.2

15

1:33

5.1

1:55

4.1

7:59

0.0

8:11

0.1

16

12:18

4.6

12:34

4.7

6:32

-0.3

7:05

-0.4

16

1:58

4.8

2:15

4.0

8:28

0.1

8:44

0.0

16

2:35

4.9

2:58

3.9

9:05

0.3

9:19

0.4

17

1:20

4.6

1:34

4.4

7:36

-0.1

8:05

-0.3

17

2:59

4.7

3:17

3.8

9:40

0.3

9:53

0.1

17

3:37

4.7

4:00

3.8

10:17

0.5

10:33

0.5

18

2:20

4.7

2:33

4.2

8:47

0.1

9:09

-0.2

18

4:01

4.7

4:19

3.7

10:46

0.3

10:57

0.0

18

4:38

4.6

5:01

3.8

11:23

0.6

11:40

0.5

19

3:20

4.8

3:34

4.0

9:58

0.1

10:12

-0.2

19

5:00

4.7

5:18

3.8

11:43

0.2

11:52

-0.1

19

5:37

4.5

5:59

3.9

---

---

12:18

0.5

20

4:20

4.9

4:34

3.9

11:02

0.0

11:11

-0.3

20

5:56

4.7

6:12

3.9

---

---

12:31

0.1

20

6:31

4.5

6:51

4.1

12:35

0.4

1:04

0.4

21

5:18

5.0

5:33

3.9

11:59

-0.1

---

---

21

6:44

4.8

6:58

4.1

12:40

-0.2

1:14

0.0

21

7:18

4.6

7:35

4.3

1:22

0.2

1:44

0.3

22

6:12

5.1

6:26

4.0

12:04

-0.4

12:49

-0.2

22

7:26

4.9

7:38

4.2

1:24

-0.2

1:53

-0.1

22

8:00

4.7

8:14

4.4

2:04

0.1

2:21

0.1

23

7:01

5.1

7:14

4.1

12:53

-0.5

1:35

-0.2

23

8:05

4.9

8:15

4.3

2:04

-0.3

2:29

-0.1

23

8:37

4.7

8:49

4.6

2:43

0.0

2:56

0.0

24

7:46

5.1

7:57

4.1

1:39

-0.5

2:17

-0.2

24

8:41

4.8

8:50

4.3

2:43

-0.2

3:04

-0.1

24

9:12

4.7

9:22

4.6

3:20

0.0

3:30

0.0

25

8:27

5.0

8:38

4.1

2:22

-0.4

2:57

-0.2

25

9:16

4.6

9:25

4.2

3:20

-0.2

3:38

-0.1

25

9:47

4.6

9:54

4.7

3:57

0.0

4:04

0.0

26

9:06

4.9

9:17

4.0

3:03

-0.3

3:35

-0.2

26

9:52

4.4

10:00

4.2

3:56

0.0

4:12

0.0

26

10:21

4.4

10:26

4.7

4:33

0.1

4:38

0.1

27

9:45

4.7

9:56

3.9

3:42

-0.2

4:11

-0.1

27

10:29

4.2

10:37

4.1

4:33

0.2

4:47

0.1

27

10:56

4.2

11:01

4.6

5:09

0.2

5:12

0.2

28

10:25

4.5

10:37

3.8

4:21

0.0

4:48

0.0

28

11:09

3.9

11:18

4.1

5:11

0.4

5:22

0.2

28

11:34

4.0

11:40

4.5

5:46

0.4

5:48

0.3

29

11:07

4.2

11:20

3.8

5:00

0.2

5:24

0.1

29

11:52

3.7

---

---

5:50

0.6

6:01

0.4

29

---

---

12:17

3.8

6:24

0.6

6:27

0.5

30

11:50

4.0

---

---

5:40

0.4

6:02

0.3

30

12:26

4.5

1:06

3.7

7:06

0.8

7:11

0.6

31

12:06

3.7

12:36

3.7

6:24

0.7

6:43

0.4

31

1:19

4.4

2:00

3.6

7:56

0.9

8:04

0.6

*TIDE CHARTS ARE ACCURATE TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE. IF YOU ARE CHECKING TIDES FOR NAVIGATIONAL PURPOSES, PLEASE VERIFY THESE TIMES WITH ANOTHER SOURCE.

104

South Brunswick Magazine


ADVERTISERS INDEX Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Ace Hardware of Southport....................................... 910-477-6444 98

Intracoastal Realty Corporation................................910-258-4503 9

Angelo’s Pizzeria and Bistro........................................910-754-2334 91

Island Classic Interiors...................................................910-579-8477 76

Arbor Landing at Ocean Isle...................................... 910-754-8080 86

Islands Art and Books.....................................................910-579-7757 22

Art Catering & Events................................................... 910-755-6642 14

J&K Home Furnishings.................................................. 843-249-1882

Austin Oral Surgery........................................................910-769-1605 12

Joseph's Italian Bistro...................................................910-454-4440 27

Bell & Bell Buick GMC.................................................... 843-399-8300 75

Kristin Dowdy, State Farm Agent............................ 910-754-9923 60

Bianchi Brickyard Supply............................................. 910-454-4445 98

Legacy Homes by Bill Clark.......................................... 910-363-1682 29

BlueWave Dentistry........................................................ 910-383-2615 7

Luxe Home Interiors.......................................................910-371-0464 65

Body Edge Fitness Solutions......................................910-575-0975 86

Maria's Pizzeria.................................................................910-579-3233 91

Boundary House.............................................................. 910-579-8888 6

McLeod Health.................................................................. 843-366-3891 38

Braddock Built Renovations........................................ 910-754-9635 14

New Hanover Regional Medical Center..................910-667-7170 BC

Brick Landing Plantation...............................................910-754-2745 53

Novant Health....................................................................910-579-8363 43

Britt's Steel Building........................................................ 910-612-5947 70

Ocean Isle Family Dentistry........................................ 910-579-6999 76

Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce......... 910-754-6644 IBC

Oyster Rock....................................................................... 910-579-6875 30

Brunswick County Dept. of Social Services........... 910-253-2112 105

Pinnacle Storage...............................................................910-287-5737 49

24 & 25

Brunswick County Habitat for Humanity.............. 910-579-8346 26 Pope Real Estate............................................................... 910-619-7673 22 Brunswick Forest............................................................866-765-9326 4

Private Italy Tours Ltd...................................................910-575-6735 3

Brunswick Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery............910-269-2420 85

Purple Onion Café............................................................910-755-6071 14

Callahan’s of Calabash...................................................800-344-3816 32

Realstar Homes................................................................ 910-579-6729 69

Carolina Plantations Real Estate - Seth Barbee.....704-589-2079 23

River Hotel of Southport............................................. 910-294-6070 93

Carolinas Oral and Facial Surgery............................. 910-762-2618 65

Sea Island Trading Co....................................................843-273-0248

Clark’s Seafood and Chop House.............................. 843-399-8888

96 & 97

94 & 95

Seacoast Building Company, Inc...............................910-880-3639 81

Coastal Insurance............................................................ 910-754-4326 15

Seaside United Methodist Church............................910-579-5753 53

Coastal Integrative Health.......................................... 910-755-5400 19

Smithfield's Chicken 'N Bar-B-Q............................... 910-754-5522 34

Coastal Kidney Center PA............................................ 843-497-7275 76

Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber....................800-457-6964 98

Coastal Spine Institute.................................................. 910-356-6100 93

Sunset Dental................................................................... 910-575-6300 IFC

Coastal Wine Room & Brew..........................................910-393-2125 46

Thalian Association Community Theatre................ 910-251-1788 65

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage.......................910-371-1181 17

Time 2 Remember Photography...............................910-253-7428 70

Complete Dental............................................................. 910-754-7700 5

Trest & Twigg, PLLC.......................................................910-575-7337 85

Crystal Babson — Century 21...................................... 910-393-9957 93

TruFit Gym......................................................................... 910-754-2270 60

Dosher Medical Clinics.................................................... 910-454-1192 13

Trusst Builder Group..................................................... 910-371-0304 56

EmergeOrtho................................................................... 910-332-3800 11

Wades Jewelers............................................................. 910-457-5800 59

Farm Bureau Insurance - Shallotte............................910-754-8175 54

Wilmington Health.......................................................... 910-371-0404 70

Hwy 55 Burgers Shakes and Fries........................... 910-371-6700 81

Winter 2019-20

105


CAPTURE THE MOMENT

PHOTO CAPTURED BY NICK NOBLE MILKY WAY AND THE NEW OAK ISLAND PIER

Have you captured the moment? If so, email your photos to capture@southbrunswickmagazine.com. If we choose your photo to be published on this page, you will win $25.

106

South Brunswick Magazine


Winter 2019-20

107


At NHRMC and NHRMC Physician Group, we’re leading our community to outstanding health by looking deeper and working harder to find innovative ways to deliver great care. We’re bringing health screenings to area neighborhoods, offering free exercise and nutrition programs, and volunteering with community partners throughout our region. And we’re just getting started. Join us at NHRMC.org. Together, we can make healthier happen.