March/April Shore 2023

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MARCH/APRIL 2023 MAGAZINE CELEBRATING 5 YEARS OF NOVEMBER 2022 MAGAZINE The Sporting Life BOURBON TRACKING DOWN THOSE HARD TO FIND BOTTLES FAMILY HONORING LEGACIES AND RICH HISTORY RETRIEVERS RAISING THE BEST HUNTING DOGS AROUND
MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 3 PUCHASE TICKETS AT ANNAPOLISBOATSHOWS.COM

(Katie Willis,

The Eastern Shore is a special place and Shore Magazine has been able to capture the stories of inspirational and iconic people who we each encounter every day in our jobs, our volunteer work, and through our hobbies and recreation here. I loved being one of the editors of the magazine in the past and now as one of its contributors. Being able to meet and tell the stories of the people who make this region so special has been the highlight of my career as a writer. Congratulations on 5 years!

“Amazing to see what started as a small planning meeting of 5 people turned into 5 incredible years of Shore Magazine.”

“I am grateful for the opportunity to have worked alongside the Shore Monthly team as its inaugural editor. It was one of the highlights of my professional career to help create a remarkable product that truly sets itself apart and is a wonderful addition to our already extraordinary community.”

“As a husband and wife creative team, Stephen Walker and I thoroughly enjoyed capturing images through our photography that truly illustrated what it’s like to live, work and play in the Mid-Shore. From rich farmlands to painted basketball courts, our pictures of people in their environments were paired with well-written stories describing passionate vocations and lifestyles. Hopefully our contributions provided exclamation points for the reasons why we all love to love here.”

-

During my time at the magazine COVID-19 began. I discovered much about the strength, courage, and resilience of the people in our community. At Shore Magazine, we focused our stories about our real neighbors being stronger together by helping each other in the face of adversity. Indeed, my take away from the magazine is that on the Shore no matter what, we are stronger together.

- Manning Lee Co Editor 2019 -2021

“I loved the “Strange Tales” articles about different animals/wildlife stories from around here. The birds of prey piece was especially fun for me since I got to get up close and personal with the owls and hawks rescued by the rangers at Tuckahoe State Park to photograph them (even though I didn’t get my letter to Hogwarts)”

“Shore Magazine will always be a personal favorite project, as well as a professional milestone for me. It was the first publication that myself and my team (Katie Willis, the late Gail Ruppe, Jon Ekroos, and Betsy Griffin) were really given free rein to create with, and I think we created something really special. It was a vessel to showcase the beauty of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and a chance to showcase what we could do when we worked together as a team.”

-

late Gail Ruppe, Jon Ekroos, and Betsy Griffin) were really given free rein to create with, and I think created something really special. It was a vessel to showcase the beauty of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and a chance to showcase what we could do when we worked together as a team.”- Greg Mueller During my time at the magazine COVID-19 began. I discovered much about the strength, courage, and resilience of the people in our community. At Shore Magazine, we focused our stories about our neighbors being stronger together by helping each other in the face of adversity. Indeed, my take away from the magazine is that the Shore no matter what, we are stronger together. - Manning Lee Co Editor 2019 -2021 “Amazing to see what started as a small planning meeting of 5 people turned into 5 incredible years of Shore Magazine.” - Paul Wesley Hagood “I loved the “Strange Tales” articles about different animals/wildlife stories from around here. The birds of prey piece was especially fun for me since I got to get up close and personal with the owls and hawks rescued by the rangers at Tuckahoe State Park to photograph them (even though I didn’t my letter to Hogwarts)” - Arden Haley The Eastern Shore is a special place and Shore Magazine has been able to capture the stories inspirational and iconic people who we each encounter every day in our jobs, our volunteer work, and through our hobbies and recreation here. I loved being one of the editors of the magazine in the past and now as one of its contributors. Being able to meet and the stories of the people who make this region so special has been the highlight of my career as a writer. Congratulations on 5 years! Amelia Blades Stewar“Shore Magazine will always be a personal favorite project, as well as a professional milestone for me. It was the publication that myself and my team (Katie Willis, the late Gail Ruppe, Jon Ekroos, and Betsy Griffin) were really given free rein to create with, and I think we created something really special. It was a vessel to showcase the beauty of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and a chance to showcase what we could do when we worked together as a team.”- Greg Mueller During my time at the magazine COVID-19 began. I discovered much about the strength, courage, and resilience of the people in our community. At Shore Magazine, we focused stories about our real neighbors being stronger together by helping each other in the face of adversity. Indeed, my take away from magazine is that on the Shore no matter what, we are stronger together. - Manning Lee Co Editor 2019 -2021 “Amazing to see what started as a small planning meeting of 5 people turned into 5 incredible years of Shore Magazine.” - Paul Wesley Hagood “I loved the “Strange Tales” articles about different animals/wildlife stories from around here. The birds of prey piece was especially fun for me since got to get up close and personal with the owls and hawks rescued by the rangers at Tuckahoe State Park to photograph them (even though I didn’t get my letter to Hogwarts)” - Arden Haley The Eastern Shore is a special place and Shore Magazine has been able to capture the stories of inspirational and iconic people who we each encounter every day in our jobs, our volunteer work, and through our hobbies and recreation here. I loved being one of the editors of the magazine in the past and now as one of its contributors. Being able meet and tell the stories of the people who make this region so special has been the highlight of my career as a writer. Congratulations years! - Amelia Blades Steward “Shore Magazine will always be a personal favorite project, as well as a professional milestone for It was the first publication that myself and my team (Katie Willis, the late Gail Ruppe, Jon Ekroos, and Betsy Griffin) were really given rein to create with, and I think we created something really special. It was a vessel to showcase the beauty of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and a chance to showcase what we could do when we worked together as a team.” - Greg Mueller During my time at the magazine COVID-19 began. I discovered much about the strength, courage, and resilience of the people in our community. At Shore Magazine, we focused our stories about our real neighbors being stronger together by helping each other in the face of adversity. Indeed, my take away from the magazine is that on the Shore no matter what, we are stronger together. - Manning Lee Co Editor 2019 -2021 “Amazing to see what started as a small planning meeting of 5 people turned into 5 incredible years of Shore Magazine.”- Paul Wesley Hagood “I loved the “Strange Tales” articles about different animals/wildlife stories from around here. The birds of prey piece was especially fun for me since I got to get up close and personal with the owls and hawks rescued by the rangers at Tuckahoe State Park to photograph them (even though I didn’t get my letter to Hogwarts)”- Arden Haley The Eastern Shore is a special place and Shore Magazine has been able to capture the stories of inspirational and iconic people who we each encounter every day in our jobs, our volunteer work, and through our hobbies and recreation here. I loved being one of the editors of the magazine in the past and now as of its contributors. Being able to meet and tell the stories of the people who make this region so special has been the highlight of career as a writer. Congratulations on 5 years! - Amelia Blades Steward “Shore Magazine will always be a personal favorite project, well as a professional milestone for me. It was the first publication that myself and my team (Katie Willis, the late Gail Ruppe, Jon Ekroos, and Betsy Griffin) were really given free rein to create with, and I think we created something really special. It was a vessel to showcase the beauty of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and a chance to showcase what we could do when we worked together as a team.”Greg Mueller During my time at the magazine COVID-19 began. I discovered much about the strength, courage, and resilience of the people in our community. At Shore Magazine, we focused our stories about our real neighbors being stronger together by helping each other in the face of adversity. Indeed, my take away from the magazine is that on the Shore no matter what, we are stronger together. Manning Lee Co Editor 2019 -2021 “Amazing to see what started as a small planning meeting of 5 people turned into 5 incredible years Shore Magazine.” - Paul Wesley Hagood “I loved the “Strange Tales” articles about different animals/wildlife stories from around here. birds of prey piece was especially fun for me since I got to get up close and personal with the owls and hawks rescued by the rangers Tuckahoe State Park to photograph them (even though I didn’t get my letter to Hogwarts)” - Arden Haley The Eastern Shore is a special place and Shore Magazine has been able to capture the stories of inspirational and iconic people who we each encounter every in our jobs, our volunteer work, and through our hobbies and recreation here. I loved being one of the editors of the magazine in past and now as one of its contributors. Being able to meet and tell the stories of the people who make this region so special has been the highlight of my career as a writer. Congratulations on 5 years! - Amelia Blades Stewar“Shore Magazine will always be a personal favorite project, as well as a professional milestone for me. It was the first publication that myself and my team (Katie Willis, late Gail Ruppe, Jon Ekroos, and Betsy Griffin) were really given free rein to create with, and I think we created something really special. It was a vessel to showcase the beauty of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and a chance to showcase what we could do when we worked together as a team.”- Greg Mueller During my time at the magazine COVID-19 began. I discovered much about the strength, courage, and resilience of the people in our community. At Shore Magazine, we focused our stories about our real neighbors being stronger together by helping each other in the face of adversity. Indeed, my take away from the magazine is that on the Shore no matter what, we are stronger together. - Manning Lee Co Editor 2019 -2021 “Amazing to see what started as a small planning meeting of 5 people turned into 5 incredible years of Shore Magazine.” - Paul Wesley Hagood “I loved the “Strange Tales” articles about different animals/wildlife stories from around here. The birds of prey piece was especially fun for me since I got to get up close and personal with

myself and my team
the
MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 5
CONTENTS TASTE BUDS: Undaunted Rise Nancy Minahan’s desire for farm to table 8 HEARTHBEAT: The Mains Gate The Mains family has big plans for Langdon Farm 18 PROFILES: Lens-ing a helping hand Photographer Mary Ella Jourdak advocates in Queens Anne’s County 35
TABLE OF
14
STAGE LEFT:
Making music in Kent County Ashton Mooday on being a musician and music teacher
26
WAYFARING:
Visionary Adrian Holmes inspires change

EDITORS’ NOTE

Celebrating over 5 years of innovation and inspiration

Just over five years ago, an idea was launched to bring insight and intrigue to the unique lifestyle of what is known as the five Mid-Shore counties on Maryland’s beautiful Eastern Shore. That idea came in the form of a glossy magazine, aptly called SHORE.

Over the years, SHORE has ebbed and flowed like the inviting tide that makes our region so lush. Within the past two years, APG Media of the Chesapeake (ownership company of SHORE and The Star Democrat), worked on updating its branding statement to more succinctly reflect its mission and goals.

What followed was a riveting planning process that brought us to three keywords: Inform; Innovate; Inspire. Being a media company, we know it is our duty to inform the public. With the ever-changing landscape of this industry, we know we have to innovate how we deliver the news and on which platforms to use to get to our audience. Lastly, we strive to bring inspiration to our community through engaging stories about the wonderful people that call this area home.

And

now it all comes full circle.

After five wonderful years of publication, we coincidentally decided the theme of this edition would be “inform, innovate and inspire.” Undoubtedly, you will see those three words perfectly describe the types of stories we have in the pages to follow. These aren’t government officials or major media influencers, either; they are your neighbors who are doing their best to innovate and inspire change right here on the Eastern Shore.

Here’s to five more years of SHORE (and beyond!) and here is to those who inform, innovate and inspire.

President Jim Normandin

Editors

Eli Wohlenhaus

Jonathan Carter

Regional Advertising Director

Betsy Griffin

443-239-0307

Creative Director

Jennifer Quinn

Page Design

Jennifer Quinn

Meredith Dean

Community Coordinator

Amelia Blades Steward

Contributing Photographers

Jennifer Quinn

Arden Haley

Tracey F. Johns

Amelia Blades Steward

Conrad Arnold

Contributing Writers

Katie Melynn

Debra R. Messick

Amelia Blades Steward

Tracey F. Johns

Niambi Davis

Editorial Contact

443-666-4419

Submissions

submissions@shoremonthly.com

Subscriptions

410-770-4005

6 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023 Shore Magazine is published by The Star Democrat. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without written permission from the publisher.
MD
29088 Airpark Drive Easton,
21601 www.shoremonthly.com
— Jonathan and Eli Eli Wohlenhaus Jonathan Carter
MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 7 Data /Mesh Networ ks SONOSAmazon Alexaand Google Home Installations ww wustreamwificom 5Star Rating 410. 253.1933 HomeTheater Systems Whole Home Music Smar tHome Installations andTutor ials SpaceX Star Link Custom Installs Internet That Worksfor Rural Living WiFi forBoats andRVs 410 2 3 1933 ProudlySer ving MD,VA, DE andBeyond! w w w.ustreamwifi.co Localtothe EasternShore of Maryland

A RELUCTANT RESTAURANTEUR’S UNDAUNTED RISE

To the delighted diners coming from near and far to experience Caroline’s in Denton, it’s often a surprise to learn that the driving force behind the comfortably upscale farm to

table isn’t, in fact, someone named Caroline, or even a restauranteur.

The fact that Nancy Minahan has made Caroline’s burgeoning success seem, well, seamless, is due in large

TASTE BUDS
Story by Debra R. Messick| Photos by Arden Haley

part to an intrepid spirit, her 40 year business owner’s acumen, and a burning desire for a fresh, fabulous, locally sustainable and succulently crafted meal in her adopted county.

Despite her busy schedule operating three businesses, Minahan said she “always loved good food and loved to cook.” Raised to enjoy the bounty of her family’s large home garden on the Western Shore, the taste expectation bar was set high early on.

Until starting elementary school, she had never tasted anything but freshly shelled peas, and was less than impressed with the far less appealing imposters on her cafeteria plate.

Fresh meat raised on relatives’ small farms provided the animal protein enjoyed at family meals.

Minahan’s own mom, a Marine during WWII, canned tomatoes, bottled homemade salsa and dutifully “cooked, not because she necessarily enjoyed it, but because we had to eat,” she recalled with a smile.

A lurking love of adventure and desire to travel propelled Minahan to embark on an exchange semester in Switzerland during High School, “where I learned to love trying foods I never found in Mom’s kitchen,” she said.

Despite a desire to become a fashion designer, with superb

math and science skills she was pressed to pragmatically follow in her industrial engineer grandfather’s footsteps.

“Needing to decide what specific field to follow, I chose chemical engineering because it seemed most similar to cooking,” Minahan said.

For a while she found her happy place working at Procter and Gamble. But the family concrete business, begun by her grandfather and continued by her dad and uncle, soon needed her at the helm. She returned to Mayer Brothers’ expansive Elkridge plant and ran it for the next 40 years, along with several other related ventures, including a sewage treatment operation based in Denton.

With an eye to eventually retiring in the Denton area, Minahan and her husband put down roots there, reverse commuting daily to Elkridge for 10 years, in itself a daunting accomplishment.

Then, in January 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic was poised to alter everyone’s operational ‘normal,’ the decision was made to sell off Mayer Brothers’ physical plant assets while retaining product manufacturing licenses, enabling business to thrive remotely.

Still amazed at the incredibly optimal timing of her business operation transformation, Minahan joked that “sometimes the bear gets you, and sometimes you get the bear.”

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 9
10 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023

Ever a fan of good food, when Harry’s on the Green opened its Denton location, the Minahans quickly became regulars, fostering a friendship that would impact their lives in unforeseen ways, interrupted by COVID’s arrival, temporarily, or so they thought.

But once the world opened back up, Harry’s owners, in their 70s, were eyeing an offramp to transition into retirement.

Minahan jumped on board to help, diving headlong into learning the quirks setting the restaurant industry apart from those she had known.

Despite several months’ effort, Harry’s closed for good. Among the locals left to grieve its demise were the Minahans and former Caroline County Tourism Director Kathy Mackel.

To that end, Mackel helped connect Micheal McCrea, who owned the vacant mansion property at 406 Market Street, once site of a well known Denton doctor’s home and practice. Most recently, the building housed the Joviality gift shop and a hair salon, until that tenant succumbed to a non-COVID illness two years ago.

While vacant, McCrea began helping his daughter renovate the old doctor’s practice side building which had also housed a music store, among other enterprises) into a coffee shop, starting to install a semblance of kitchen operation. (The structure became The Side Bar, serving drinks and light fare such as sourdough pizza, charcuterie boards featuring homemade fermented mustard and local cheese and other light fare).

Viewing that, and the rest of the building, brought Minahan to entertain getting fully on board with bringing a brand new restaurant to the county, primarily as a developer, with the long range goal of eventually turning the enterprise over to a chef desirous of becoming an owner/operator.

“Many chefs want to do that, without having a way to accomplish it,” said Minahan. “It was my idea to present a way for someone else to fulfill their dream, while also giving me a great place to go out to eat nearby when I’m 80.”

Enter classically trained Chef Adam Flood, who had lived in Maine since moving from the Shore at age 10. Flood and wife Nancy (also a chef), originally from Quebec, now live in the private apartment on Caroline’s top floor, while working their magic in the restaurant’s compact but stateof-the-art kitchen.

Flood, whose parents and brother had in recent years returned to this area, relished the opportunity to do the same, while following his own dream.

While Chef Flood’s culinary talents and family ties helped him score major points towards winning the job, a dash of karma didn’t hurt; not only is his wife also named Nancy, his mother’s name is Caroline.

Along with partner McCrea, Minahan organized the project under the working title, Denton Restaurant Group. During a later brainstorming session with relatives around

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 11
It was my idea to present a way for someone else to fulfill their dream, while also giving a place to go out to eat nearby when I’m 80

her kitchen table, a cousin proposed Caroline’s, honoring its namesake’s home county.

From there, Minahan proceeded to steadily gather as much realistic information about operating a restaurant from friends including Easton’s Our of the Fire owner Amy Haines, to Bartlett Pear Catering’s Jordan Lloyd and Nicki Gladu (get full name), who had previously worked for 15 years at Kent County’s Hemingways, who became Minhan’s right hand as kitchen manager.

Accustomed to seeking our available government money in her other businesses, she applied for and received funding from Maryland’s Project Restore Program, which supports startups breathing new life into vacant buildings.

But despite the influx, numerous challenges remained and more arose, among them, the considerable cost of converting the space into a building code and fire marshal certifiable restaurant.

To help keep refurbishing and outfitting costs down, wherever possible, with help from enlisted friends and family, Minahan rolled up her sleeves to paint, construct small furnishings, and sew seat covers, along with crawling

under the building when required to make minor repairs.

With the sidebar’s successful summer featuring outdoor seating, in October Caroline’s opened for full dinner service and brunch. Next up is the front porch service set to begin as the weather warms up. But even while getting fully up to speed, Minahan is formulating plans to convert the property’s old carriage house into a local farmers market.

Located on Google and now on Open Table, Caroline’s growing reputation is being bolstered by being centrally located on the Delmarva Peninsula. Recently, two customers, one from Rehoboth Beach, the other from Baltimore, drove to Caroline’s to meet up. And over the holidays, the restaurant served as a reunion point for three families coming from separate areas.

Moving ever forward on her unexpected restaurant journey, Minahan especially loves the way the restaurant is helping spread the word about “this wonderful little town and all it has to offer.”

For more information, visit https//www. carolinesindenton.com, or call 410.490.4495. S

12 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023

DiscoverCarolineCounty, MD –aregion brimming with outdoor adventures! Caroline’s8,000+acres of wildlifesanctuaries, nature preservesand parks provide trails and waterwaysperfectfor exploringyear-round. Be open foradventures! Go to VisitCaroline.org.

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 13
EN
R
EXPLORERS OP
FO

Music

Music MAKING

IN KENT COUNTY Y

ou may walk into Ashton Mooday’s classroom, but there’s a pretty good chance that you’ll start dancing once you arrive. The elementary school musicians will encourage you and may even join in!

An elementary school music teacher, Mooday works with grades pre-Kindergarten through 5th at two schools in Kent County. She splits her time between Galena Elementary and Rock Hall Elementary, working with students across grade levels to introduce them to the basics of making music. Students attend music class as one of their “specials,” classes designed to introduce elementary kids to the arts and other specialized instruction.

When she’s not teaching, Mooday works on her own music as a singer/songwriter. “I used songwriting as a way to cope with trials and tribulations that I experienced growing up and then it turned into an outlet to express emotions.” She recorded her first EP in 2017 and is releasing a third album, “Unapologetic,” in March.

Mooday’s love of music began early in life. She sang as a young child and used music to express herself. With a newly-purchased flute, Mooday

joined her school band in 7th grade. After moving to Maryland, she started to get serious about music in high school. It became an outlet for her.

“As I got older, music was the one thing that made me excited, not just to come to school, but made me excited in general,” she said. “It got me out of the house, got me away from what was going on at home. I just really connected with it. I knew early on.”

She earned a B.S. in Music Education and a B.A. in Flute Performance from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania. While attending, she participated in marching band, symphonic band, concert choir, flute ensemble, and a saxophone quartet. With plenty of performances under her belt, she was ready to embrace her passion for music education after graduation. After returning to her home community in Maryland, becoming a music teacher was the next step.

“I always wanted to be a teacher and when I got interested in music, I thought it makes sense that I should be a music teacher because that’s what I’m really passionate about.”

In addition to working with kids across both elementary schools in class, Mooday also leads before-school rehearsals, practice sessions for

Story by Katie Melynn Photos by Jennifer Quinn
MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 15
STAGE LEFT

various instruments and sections in the band, and a weekly after-school music club.

DEVELOPING MUSICIANS

Like most teachers, Mooday teaches so much more than just how to play instruments. While students are strumming on their ukuleles or pounding on bucket drums, they are also practicing social-emotional and team-building skills. The preKindergarten class learns how to take turns and support each other while practicing keeping rhythm. Older students put on concerts and learn the basics of reading music and performing as a group. Students also get to watch the middle and high school students during their annual Winter Tour, getting inspiration about what is possible in the music department.

Every spring, students participate in a showcase. “The elementary band, middle school band, high school band all play,” said Mooday. “You get to see the progression.”

Growing up in Kent County, Mooday has a strong connection to her community. When Galena Elementary was a middle school, she was actually a student there. Now, she gets to walk the halls and make music as a teacher. The size of the band at Galena doubled this year and she gets to rehearse with them in the morning and during class.

“The kids just love music,” she said. “They love creating. They love instruments.”

The Rock Hall Elementary kazoo band is known through the community for their fun performances and parade appearances. They rode on a float in multiple parades, performing pieces on kazoos to bring the joy of music to the community and introduce them to performance. The band is formed of students in grades 3 through 5 at Rock Hall Elementary.

“I love working with kids, we as teachers–especially in the arts–we have so much influence in their lives and how they’re going to cope with situations and how they express themselves,” said Mooday. “I love seeing their joy and seeing them learn how to express themselves through music.”

If you want to spend the day tapping your toes and smiling as young musicians get introduced to a passion that can guide their life, just like it did for Ashton Mooday, just go to a performance. You’ll walk out of an auditorium dancing or spend the morning in the sunshine at a parade. You can also catch her live performances of original songs, listen to her music on all streaming platforms, or follow her on social media @ashtonmooday.

Katie Melynn is a Marylandbased freelance writer and teaching artist. Her work has appeared in The Spruce, People, At Ease, and other print and digital publications. When she’s not writing, she teaches creative writing with the Apex Arts Magnet Program in Anne Arundel County. You can follow her on social media @katiemelynnwriter.

16 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023
The kids love music. They love creating.
S
- Mooday
MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE Accent 17 Long & Foster. For the lo e of home.TM B e c a u s e o u d o n’ t a n t t o j u s t l i e i n i t . o u w a n t t o l o e i t I f ou ould lik a free mark et anal sis of our home’s alue please call one of our offices and a licensed ag nt ill be happ t help ou Easton St. Michaels Sale Center 410-770-3600 / 10-7 5-0283 Denton 410- 79-1200 Cambridge 410-228-2050 long andfost er east er ns hor e. com

The Mains Gate at LANGDON FARM

Do you ever find yourself saying, “If I ever win the lottery, I am going to . . .?” A young couple found themselves asking that question of themselves two years ago when they stepped out in faith to purchase one of Bay Hundred’s iconic historic estates. But it wasn’t a lottery win that inspired Arlene and Tye Mains to leave their comfortable suburban lifestyle in Northern Virginia, to take over ownership of Langdon Farm in Sherwood. It was a project they had dreamed about years before that they called “Imagine” that motivated them to uproot their family and create a new lifestyle on the Eastern Shore.

In 2017, Tye was commuting to Dallas, Texas, building high-end custom-built homes with his company Mains Signature Homes. His wife Arlene was working in real estate in Northern Virginia. The two played tag team raising their three young daughters.

“One night when Tye was in Dallas, our house got broken into while I was alone with our three girls,” said Arlene. “That was the impetus for us to decide to leave the area. It was a really scary experience.”

The couple had already been feeling like change was

in the air as their youngest daughter who was nonverbal had been recently diagnosed with autism.

“We were beginning to see that every child has different needs and the idea of unplugging from the rat race we were experiencing in Northern Virginia was something we had talked about,” said Arlene. “We were imagining what it would be like to raise our children reconnected to community and a home in a more rural area.”

The couple decided to put their house on the market. When it sold immediately, they moved in with family, not knowing where they would go. In 2019 when Tye returned from Dallas, they began looking at farms.

“We both really like history,” Arlene said. “Langdon Farm in Sherwood, Maryland came up in our search, but it was on the market for $10 million, and we couldn’t afford that. We both even said to each other, ‘If we win the lottery, we will buy it.’”

The 153-acre waterfront historic property which was originally listed at $15 million in mid-2007, experienced several price reductions. When the price of the property was reduced to $6.5 million, the couple took notice again. Something was drawing them back to it.

18 S HORE Accent | MARCH/APRIL 2023
by Amelia Blades Steward | Photos by Jennifer Quinn
HEARTHBEAT

“We were not the traditional buyer to purchase a property like this. We realized that if we could purchase the farm, it had to be a business,” said Arlene.

They had good credit and some assets to put toward the purchase but needed to create a business plan about how they would generate income from the property. After exploring every angle they could through the USDA and Farm Credit, the seller then agreed to temporarily hold the financing until the couple could secure permanent financing. That sealed the deal and the couple purchased Langdon Farm in December 2020 for $4.2 million.

“We never thought this would happen,” Tye said. “When I took my family to see the house, my brothers

shocked me when they told me that our father, who lived in Virginia, had put an offer on the house in the mid70s that wasn’t accepted. What a coincidence. We then knew this was supposed to be our home.”

Buying a historic property of this size during the pandemic created immediate challenges for the Mains in terms of generating income even though both continued with their day jobs. Their business plan included having shortterm rentals in the main house on the property and leasing its farmland.

To initially deal with the costs of stabilizing the property, the Mains did short-term rentals. One of their first

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE Accent 19

show in the main house. The couple learned a lot about the wear and tear on the property with this type of rental and have adapted their rentals to small CEO retreats and intimate family gatherings.

“We are now very cautious about who comes to stay because people often don’t always care for it the way we do,” Arlene shared. “We are hands-on owners with Tye doing repair work and upkeep and me cleaning the rooms.”

“Tye has always been one to swing for the fences,” quipped Arlene. Tye added, “I like to go above and beyond for the excitement and thrill of doing something different.”

Both credit their parents and ancestors for giving them their fortitude for a challenge. To leave their legacy on the farm, the couple decided to name the farm The Mains Gate at Langdon.

“We want to allow the property to show itself and be aligned with its original purpose,” stated Arlene.

The main house on the property was built circa 1769. A former property owner won it in a bridge game so it was named Bridge’s Chance by his daughters. As with many Bay Hundred mansions, the house saw many historical events, including being occupied by British soldiers during the War of 1812.

The main house has 10 bedrooms and 9 bathrooms, 11 fireplaces, a swimming pool with a hot tub, a pool house, a cabana, and a 280-foot deep-water dock. There is a traditional English boxwood garden and a kitchen garden, as well as apple orchards and a graveyard. The 18 outbuildings include the main house, the overseer’s house, a springhouse, a woodshed, a garage, a chicken house, a greenhouse, a smokehouse, a slaughterhouse, a storage building, a machine shed, a barn, and a linear complex containing a stable, a carriage house, a storage shed, a machine shed, a granary, and a corncrib. The farm boasts roughly 4,000 feet of waterfront footage on Harris Creek and Dun Cove and is located off Tilghman Island Road to the north of Tilghman Island.

Mabel Lindsay Gillespie, a Pittsburgh heiress, developed the entire farm complex as a summer home for herself between 1929 and 1969. Locals reported to the Mains that at some point she used

it as a school for underserved children and that her farm helped supply food to locals.

“Bay Hundred houses like this have so much history and are often tucked away from the community. Our dream is to allow the property to be utilized by the community,” Arlene said.

“I used to dream about this place I called ‘Imagine’ –a farm where people worked in the gardens, where kids came and learned about the natural environment, and where there were apple trees,” she said. “When we came here so much of what I was dreaming about was here.”

“You must walk between your imagination and reality,” Arlene continued. “We want to do this to inspire people to get into their bigger life, which means trusting their instincts. If you have a reoccurring thought as we did, there’s something to it and that’s leading you to a cool place that you think is out of your reach.”

The couple has enjoyed sharing the property with local organizations. The Avalon Theatre held its 100th Anniversary party at the mansion, the Girl Scouts met on the property, and they hosted activities of the Plein Air Festival. They also allow a local yoga instructor to provide classes to the community on the farm in one of its buildings.

“Our goal is to put the farm back together and keep the integrity of this historic property,” Arlene said. “To do

20 S HORE Accent | MARCH/APRIL 2023
You must walk between your imagination and reality
- Arlene Mains

Thisbeautiful 1.54 acre waterfront home hasaccess to the ChesterRiver with privateboatramp.The 3-car garage is completelyfinished in drywall. Thishome is served with a250-gallonoil tank with hot waterbaseboard heat and3zone centralair conditioning. Largewindowsoffers waterviews from many standingpoints. Alarge eat-in kitchen,sunroom with wall-to-wallwindowsand skylights. The first floorhas an additionallounge area, bedroom,laundryroom, anothersitting areaand full bath.The second floor hasthe masterbedroom with largewalk-incloset andfull bath.This property is 1.5 hours away from Baltimore, Philadelphiaand lessthanahalfhour to Kent Island or to taxfreeshopping in Middletown, DE.House wilrequireflood insurance. $575,000 MDQA2005552

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Locatednearroute 301 for easy commuting north andsouth,this4 bedroom,2bathhome hasafull basement andoversized garage thatcould easily accommodate up to four cars, with aflooredattic Wood floorsinthe living andinone of thediningareas,plusthe kitchen hasCoriancounters with center island.Enjoy theinground swimming poolwithconcrete patio that surrounds thepool. Has2-200 amp panelsand a50amp RV hookup.Theboilerisnew this year.Theseptic systemisbeing replaced. Currentlythe MDEhas approvedthe design type andlocationofseptic andanapplicationhas been submitted to the Kent County EnvironmentalHealthDepartmentfor approval. The septic contractor bids will be going outsoonfor the jobtoinstall anew Drip Dispersal Septic System.

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Well maintained 4bedroom,1.5 bath home with hardwood floors throughout this 3level home! This home hasbeena rental for afew yearsand owners are workingona fewtweaks. The newowners could explorethe possibility of abuildinglot on the Lynchburg side with local zoning approval. Only four blocks to downtownshopping andrestaurants,close to Rail to Trails,Washington College, restaurants,artists community, music, farmer’s market, charming shopsand CountryClub! Like to kayakand canoe? Youcan easily do both on the ChesterRiver,orRadcliffeCreek $319,000 MDKE2001774

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Three bedroom,3bathhome with afamily room with agas fireplace andisopentothe diningarea. The kitchen offers upgraded countertops, plenty of cabinetspace anda breakfast area. There is alaundry room with adoublesink, andplentyofstoragewithbuilt-in cabinets andcountertops. The two-car garageisimmaculate!Amenitiescontinueintothe bedroom areaswithseparateclosets in the main bedromand alarge walk-on shower in the privatebath. The yard hassome beautiful established beds, afencedbackyardand asmall greenhouse.Heather Heightsisa welcomingneighborhood. So much to live in this home.

$490,000 MDKE2002336

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that we want to encourage people to do what they love on the farm. We currently have Jenna Paice of Spirit Grower who is leasing a two-acre plot and has access to our barn and greenhouse on the farm to grow organic produce. By working with these partners, we can put funds back into the historic farm, restoring the diminishing shorelines and refurbishing the fencing and historic barns.”

Plans for Project Imagine include offering a CSA with heirloom vegetables, fruits, and flowers from the farm’s organic gardens, therapeutic riding programs, endangered farm animals, and children’s programming. To help fund the restoration plans and expanded programming, the Mains hope to sell their 24-acre parcel of property in conservation easements on Tilghman Island Road to a local nonprofit organization to benefit the youth and community of the Bay Hundred area. The Mains hope that the property can be used to develop natural forestry programs, offer walking trails and have an educational component for teaching kids about the environment on the Eastern Shore.

“Because we purchased the farm during the pandemic, it was a blessing of sorts,” said Arlene. “It gave us the time to slowly get integrated into the Tilghman community and to determine some of the local needs of the community. We have never felt more supported than we do here. People are so kind and inviting. We determined access to a central community space was one of the highest needs. Project Imagine will be giving land back to the community and creating community programming for everyone, including children with special needs like our daughter.”

Redrock Productions visited The Mains Gate at Langdon to discuss a network potentially wanting to capture the couple’s adventure as it unfolds.

“We have merged the farm and Project Imagine in our minds creating a place owned by no one and built for everyone where people can really grow and ultimately help to change the world,” said Arlene. “We didn’t get here logically and we’re not going to stay here logically. We kept following our intuition and were open to every destination that came up. Once you set an intention that clears the path to your dreams, you just have to be brave enough to follow a path you can’t see with your eyes. And that’s how we got to The Mains Gate at Langdon.”

To follow The Mains Gate at Langdon, visit themainsgate.com or follow them on social media. S

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE Accent 23
24 S HORE Accent | MARCH/APRIL 2023
MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE Accent 25

WAYFARING

VISIONARY Inspires Inspires ADRIAN HOLMES

change

Adrian Holmes of Cambridge is a respected change agent in her community. The role is deeply rooted in her fearless passion for progress and reinforced with reverence and persistence, traits shared by her parents and American hero and Dorchester County native, Harriet Tubman.

IN THE BEGINNING | FOSTERING COMMUNITY AND CREATIVITY

Holmes grew up in Philadelphia, Penn., as the oldest daughter and one of five ‘preacher’s kids,’ as she says. She and her siblings attended public schools and regularly heard sermons from their father while attending Christ Baptist Church.

“My love for creativity began at a very young age,” Holmes said. “I

learned to sew by hand and then on a machine from my mother, and I especially loved creating dolls made of paper and other materials, which is something I continue to do today.”

Her late parents, Mary and the Rev. John Green Jr., also taught her the importance of supporting women and children and providing economic stimulus through job training, summer camps, and after-school programs for children through the Rev. Green’s para ministry, Alpha Genesis, Inc.

She joined the military in 1984 and continued cultivating a life well suited for adapting to and encouraging change. Holmes served 15 years in the United States Air Force, during which her love for collecting art and a worldly perspective grew through two tours at San Vito dei

26 SHO RE MAGAZINE | M ARCH/APRIL 2023
STORY & PHOTOS BY TRACEY F. JOHNS

Normanni Air Station in Italy, and one at Tempelhof Air Station in Berlin, Germany.

Stateside, Holmes was stationed at bases in Texas and Maryland, serving as a staff sergeant in charge of 20-person units. After her military service, she lived in Upper Marlboro and Bowie and homeschooled her two daughters — Misha and Chanice — now in their 30s and living in Baltimore and Chicago, respectively.

“I remember we were working on a Maryland state history lesson on Harriet Tubman while we were living in Upper Marlboro,” said Holmes. “I couldn’t believe we were so close to where she was born and made such an impact. Maps were immediately pulled out and a day trip was planned to Dorchester County soon afterwards.”

A MOVE TO THE SHORE | SHARING LEGACY

Harriet Tubman Club leader. Holmes says Walker was instrumental to igniting her passions for learning and sharing more about Harriet Tubman.

Harriet Tubman — born enslaved as Araminta Ross in Dorchester County — is a hero of worldly, if not biblical proportions. A deeply spiritual person also known as the Moses of her people, Tubman dedicated her life to freedom as one of the most recognized Underground Railroad conductors, carrying herself and approximately 70 others away from slavery and into safety and freedom.

Art connects our experiences in profound ways

That trip was later followed by a permanent move to the Eastern Shore, beginning with a move to Hurlock in 2003 before making Cambridge her home in 2013. During that time, Holmes met Linda Pinder Walker, who was serving as North Dorchester Middle School

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Sharing Tubman’s legacy is also the driving force behind the nonprofit founded by Holmes, Alpha Genesis Community Development Corporation (CDC) — named in honor of her father’s ministry in Philadelphia.

A BEACON OF HOPE | INSPIRING COLLABORATION

“While America was taking down statues, we were putting another up,” said Holmes, reflecting on the nonprofit’s recent project and the enormous outpouring of community support behind the Harriet Tubman “Beacon of Hope” statue.

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The statue was unveiled in September 2022 as part of the annual Day of Resilience celebration and stands on permanent display where enslaved people were once auctioned and sold at the Dorchester County Courthouse. Future improvement plans for the statue’s lawn include a memorial wall including the names of enslaved people from the region. It’s one of many collaborative projects in Holmes’s vision bringing diverse audiences of people together to build a unified community in Cambridge.

Adrian was the lead organizer of the historic Day of Resilience, commemorating the 400th anniversary of the transatlantic slave trade. The day also included a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the nationally renowned Harriet Tubman mural “Take My Hand” painted by local artist Michael Rosato. This mural has touched millions of people from around the world and has drawn thousands of visitors to Cambridge.

“The mural also reflects the power of our collective voice, our unity, and creativity which are essential to building a thriving community,” said Holmes.

Holmes serves on the board of Habitat for Humanity Choptank and is also spearheading a $20M revitalization plan for the historic downtown F. W. Woolworth Co. property where Alpha Genesis CDC currently operates. Fundraising for renovations to the historic building is currently underway, with the project recently awarded $4.5M in tax credits from the Maryland Historic Trust.

A $2M improvement plan for a new pavilion at the Harriet Tubman Mural, located at the neighboring Harriet Tubman Museum and Educational Center, is also part of the vision Holmes sees for Cambridge’s future.

A BRIGHT FUTURE | BUILDING THE VISION

Alpha Genesis CDC’s mission is to build a vibrant, thriving community by strengthening strategic partnerships through arts and culture in Dorchester County. The nonprofit is dedicated to enriching local neighborhoods by providing spaces to inspire conversation, embrace and celebrate diversity, and foster economic development while showcasing the community’s unique history and proximity to the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway.

“We provide programs that help connect our community through the shared experience of art and culture,” said Hughes. “We are working from within the community to build unity where there has been a long history of division.”

The nonprofit’s work is supported by hundreds of volunteers and the dedication of the nonprofit’s staff, including Executive Director Jermaine Anderson, and Sound Engineers Mike Bryan and Joe Manokey.

“I could not have achieved any of this without my Alpha Genesis Board, partner Jermaine Anderson, and my community at large,” Holmes said.

At the center of building unity through art and culture is North Star Village, the complex of businesses managed by Alpha Genesis at 420 B Race Street. The historic building has sections dating as far back to 1919 and pays homage to Tubman’s faith in and reliance on the North Star to guide enslaved people to their freedom.

North Star Village comprises 26,000 square feet of meandering spaces for ArtBar2.o, Café Underground, the Alley Bar, Great Escape, and Deeply Rooted. Proceeds benefit the cultural projects supported by Alpha Genesis.

The Alley Bar is accessible from Race Street, with exposed brick and warm, dramatic lighting that transcends the visitor to a place of cool vibes and great libations.

28 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023

In the back is the ArtBar 2.0 Art Gallery and Event Venue, a large, airy space that seats 120 people comfortably, and feels more like a dance club. The name is a nod to the first ArtBar on High Street that closed in 2018.

Tucked away from the ArtBar2.0 is the private Great Escape room that can seat up to 80 people and gives the feel of a New York City clubroom. Café Underground is part of the complex facing Race Street, and offers breakfast, coffee, and more while guests check out mixed media and fiber arts at the adjacent Deeply Rooted retail space.

Throughout the entire space — just like in Adrian Holmes’ life — is the presence of creativity in the art that adorns the walls and spaces throughout the property. Brightly colored portraits of the Jackson 5 and that of a Rastafarian first capture the eye, before perusing the spaces for all the special touches and creative work at the core of inspiration for Alpha Genesis.

“Art connects our experiences in profound ways,” Holmes said. “Art has played an integral part in bringing Harriet Tubman’s stories and legacy to light, and I’m hopeful our work will bring more unity and understanding to larger audiences as we move forward together.”

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 29
Art has played an integral part in bringing Harriet Tubman’s stories and legacy to light, and I’m hopeful our work will bring more unity and understanding to larger audiences as we move forward together.

Alpha Genesis CDC PO Box 125, Cambridge, Md., 21663

410-490-1520

www.alphagenesiscdc.org

Art 2.0 Art Gallery & Event Venue @ the Harriet Tubman Mural 420 B Race Street, Cambridge, Md., 21663 443-988-1554

https://www.facebook.com/artbar2.0eventspac

Contact: adrianholmes@alphagenesiscdc.org, 410-490-1520

30 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023
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LENS-ING a helping hand

PROFILES

Mary Ella Jourdak was born in Annapolis but considers herself “so Kent Island that there’s no “t” at the end of that word!” Her parents Mary and Charlie are from northern Minnesota and Virginia, respectively, but measured in Queen Anne’s County years, they’ve been here since there were street lights up and down Route 50.

She’s the sister of Timothy and Thomas and aunt and godmother to “two tiny fierce little humans” who are part of what keeps her tied to the Shore. Just before the pandemic, Jourdak and her husband, soundman and DJ Adam Halliday, moved to Annapolis near land populated by deer and foxes. But to Jourdak, Kent Island is home.

Jourdak’s career as a photographer began with her affinity for art.

“I quickly realized it might not be a viable way to live,” she said.

On a trip to Georgia, she discovered the Savannah College of Art and Design and its photography program from which she graduated three years later. Her wedding photography career began twenty minutes from Savannah when she took the place of a previously scheduled photographer at the Tybee Island Inn.

Now, although she describes her photography studio’s offerings as “all over the place”, weddings are its bread and butter.

“One of my teachers told us ‘you have to feed yourself before you feed your passion.’” And for Jourdak, that passion is travel.

“I didn’t get a passport until I was 25,” she recalled. “And after that first international trip, I knew travel was what I wanted to do. I set a goal to have 29 beers in 29 countries by my 29th birthday.”

She put her head down, worked as much as she could, and by May 2019, could mark the first of many travel goals

as complete. Her other self-described obsession is scuba diving. She was certified in St. Croix and has dived in Belize, Puerto Rico, Honduras, and Mexico. So far, Turkey is at the top of the “coolest places to dive” list. She takes

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 35
Story by Niambi Davis Taken via remote after a photoshoot in DC. Photo of Mary Ella Jourdak by Mary Ella Jourdak

her camera underwater with her, encased in a protective housing, and “encourages the sharks to come close so I can photograph them.”

Jourdak credits her parents’ influence as the foundation for her activism. On Kent Island, the Jourdaks owned a produce stand from which they donated unsold items to families struggling to make ends meet. She recalls the Christmas her mother purchased a cow and three goats for a family in another country, an act she explained to her daughter as caring for neighbors, not just those next door but global neighbors. The lesson stuck.

“Now all I want for Christmas is for people to donate to the charities I love,” Jourdak said.

Globally, the list includes Charity Water, a nonprofit that brings safe, clean water to communities across the world. Nationally she’s committed to the work of the Equal Justice Initiative and its mission to end mass incarceration and wrongful convictions.

Locally, Jourdak supports the work of Haven Ministries and their service-driven dedication to providing shelter, clothing, food, and support for Queen Anne’s County’s residents in need. With the Sunday Supper Community, an organization formed to promote the improvement of race relations within the community, she moved from behind-the-scenes volunteer to serve as event Master of Ceremonies and social media/marketing manager.

“Part of the reason I have such a love/hate relationship with the area is that there are so many people who sit on the fence and tap-dance around honest discussions about race and inclusivity,” she said.

For Jourdak, activism has been a double-edged sword. A relatively recent series of events may have tarnished her name with some members of the community but Jourdak remains undaunted. Instead, she considers them to be a blessing in disguise.

“I’ve been pushed to stand up for what I believe,” she said.

Last year, for example, because the county has no pride group or much outreach, she and her husband started the Queen Anne’s County Queer Alliance.

“It is still in its baby stages but it does exist,” said Jourdak.

36 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023
I’ve been pushed to stand up for what I believe in
- Jourdak
Marching with members of the Queen Anne’s County Queer Alliance in the Annapolis Pride Parade. 2021
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Photographer, adventurer, activist and ally, Mary Ella Jourdak is all of these. As a wedding photographer, she considers herself lucky to be with people on the best day of their lives. And in her own words, as an activist, she describes herself as a member of this community determined “to use my small (but mighty!) platform to educate and inspire others.”

MARCH/APRIL 2023 | SHORE MAGAZINE 37
Marching with neighbors in Grasonville. 2020 Photo credit: Charlese Phillips
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Sunrise in Punta Cocles, drone photo. By

Leavingalegacyisimportant forusall,but leavingan explanation of that legacyismuchmore beneficial to those left behindand generationstocome. We often findthe writeups in thenewspaper answering aseries of questions: Born on…diedon…wenttoschoolat…married to And thelistjustkeeps going. But, do thesequestionsreally explain thelifeofsomeone?B etteryet, does thepersonality come throughbyanswering questions, or shouldwelook at this differently? Perhaps we need to eliminatethe ideaof listingfacts, andinstead look at writingabout thehighlights of alifelived with thepersonality of that individual shining through. Let’sreplace an obituary with what I’dliketocall a ‘LifeHistory’.

The best lifehistory is autobiographical –written by thepersonthatlived thelifebeingremembered, andwell in advance. Second to that andmostcommonly, is a collectedeffort from closefamilyand friends collaborating over thewaystheyweretouched throughthe lifejourney of theindividualbeingremembered. There shouldbe no restrictiononlength, what shouldorshouldnot be included, or whoisorisnot mentioned. Most importantly, thewritershouldnot feel limitedtoanswering thestandard handful of questions. The recordingofalifeshouldshine with thepersonality of that individual andnot just be a recitation of facts that is differentfrom anotherpersononly by afew dates. Technolog yallowsmodernundertakers to showcasethe individual’s full lifehistory forall to find without costlynewspaper fees that restrict thenumberof wordsone caninclude.Inaddition,photosand background images canbeincludedinthe modernundertaker’s offerings to reflect the personalityofthe lifehistory created.

Agreat example of this waspublishedinMarch of 2019. Seeifyou canpickout thepersonality of this individual,in thefirst twolines alone: “Tim Schrandt(Spillville) made hislastinappropriate commentonMarch 29, 2019. If you are wonderingifyou mayhaveevermet him, youdidn’t -because youWOULD remember.” Within thosefirst two lines, andthere wasmuchmore to follow,futuregenerations

will know that their friendand relative wasquite acharacter andfull of personality! Nowifatypical funeraldirector wouldhavewritten that openinglinefor thefamilyit wouldmostlikelyhavebeenwritten like so:“Schrandt, Tim(Spillville) passed away on March29ofcancer.He was63”.Major difference betweenthe two, right? The first sentence aloneexplained thelifeand personalitybehindthe individual as opposed to astranger’s dr yrecitationofthe facts.

Ever yone that read that Life Histor yofMr. Schrandtcould easily imaginewhathemusthavebeenlikeand that he trulylived lifetothe fullest. The rest of hisLifeHistory was equallyreflective of hisunique approach to life. It wasnoted that he wouldberememberedfor “alwayswearing hisshirts unbuttoned threequartersdown” andmypersonalfavorite, that “…he did notlosehis battle to cancer,thatcancer departedwhenhedid,sotechnicallyitwas atie.” What trulyhitshomeisthe factthatout of this Life Histor yalone hisfamilywill receive thestrongest therapy available–an openingfor friends,familyand acquaintances to freely share memories of what made Tim, well,Tim.

What if thepersonality is abit softer? Notaproblem. That in itself is themessage to portrayinthe Life Histor y. “At theage of 63, Sallyleft this worldpeacefully, at herhome, overlookingher garden, surrounded by family,tobewith herSavior.”This tellsusthatSallywas apeaceful person, with strongfaith andalovefor gardeningand family.You canalmostpicture thepersonbefore you.

Take thetimenow to simply list thehighs andlowsinlife, record thestories that showcaseyourpersonality,and make anoteofthe memories youholdespeciallyclose. Each of us has astory to tell,and by letting your personalityshine, you’ll paintthe pictureofyourlifelived.LifeHistories arecreated to allow an avenue of healingthrough shared memories. More importantly, they provide arecord of personalitysothatone is foreverremembered.

38 SHORE MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2023
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