Page 1

The Churches’ Magazine

O U T LO O K

The Churches of the Sodbury Vale Benefice Chipping Sodbury, Old Sodbury, Horton & Little Sodbury

March 2017 1

Jane is enrolled as a Companion of thewww.svbcofe.org.uk Society of St Francis by Brother Damian. See 1


Churchwardens

Contacts Rector

Chipping Sodbury

The Revd. Canon David Bowers 01454 313159, [Day off Monday] email rector@svbcofe.org.uk

Joy Gibson 01454 319288 Jane Jones-Williams 01454 324970

Associate Priest The Revd. Yvonne Brae 01454 325160, [Day off Monday] email yvonne@svbcofe.org.uk

Old Sodbury

Karen Hunter If you would like to know more about the 01454 319903 Christian faith or are thinking about baptism or confirmation please speak with one of the the ministerial team

Little Sodbury Brenda Cordy 01454 316447

Church Office

Open during school term time Mon - Tue - Thu mornings 9.00 - 12.00 Horton Tina Hildick-Smith Administrators: 01454 325160 01454 320380 Michelle Jenkins, Trish Gailey Richard Needs email: office@svbcofe.org.uk 01454 329890 Web Site: www.svbcofe.org.uk

Advertising: Volunteer required

This magazine is brought to you Free by the four churches of the Sodbury Vale Benefice. If you would like to make a small donation towards production costs (about 70p per magazine) that would be most welcome. Thank you.

Editor: Michael Stephenson 01454 314094 email outlook@svbcofe.org.uk

Nominated Person: Mrs Hilary Holder 01454 327118 This is the person to contact if you wish to express concern about suspected abuse of a child or vulnerable adult

April Deadline Can you have all copy to Michelle in the Church Office by Mar 15th at the latest please.

Front Cover- Daffodils By Michael Stephenson

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FROM THE RECTOR Dear friends In January Judith and I enjoyed a pilgrimage to the Holy Land as our postChristmas break. It was our second visit and was particularly geared towards clergy and spouses who were thinking about leading a group in the future. More about that in a moment! A visit to the Holy Land is a way of understanding the Bible, especially the Gospels, in a new and vivid way. As we stood on the Mount of Olives or in the High Priest’s house, or prayed by the Western Wall, it felt amazing to be in the places that would have been so familiar to Jesus. We spent most of the time in and around Jerusalem, still a busy and crowded place in the old city, and then a few days in Galilee, a much more peaceful setting and the location of the early ministry of Jesus. Of course, the political differences are always evident, even though we felt safe at all times. Despite the political and religious divide it was interesting to see ordinary Jews, Muslims and Christians coexisting as they went about their daily lives in the streets of Jerusalem. The call in Psalm 122.6 to “pray for the peace of Jerusalem” is one that is as urgent as ever. We plan to organise a pilgrimage from our Benefice to the Holy Land from October 9th – 18th in 2018 and I hope the leaflets and booking forms will be available soon in each of our churches. This is a great opportunity to visit these holy places for yourself, as well as to meet some of the Christians who live and work there. The group will spend 6 nights in Jerusalem and 3 nights in Tiberius in Galilee, staying in very good hotels and with a local Christian guide. If you have any questions in the meantime, please contact me or Judith. David Bowers

Prayer For The Month This month’s prayer is from St Augustine, Bishop of Hippo in North Africa (354-430), a man whose life was radically transformed by God’s grace and who became one of the most influential teachers of the early Church. The choice of this prayer was inspired by reading the fascinating recent biography of Augustine by Robin Lane Fox. You created me in order to find you; you gave me strength to seek you. My strength and my weakness are in your hands: preserve my strength, and help my weakness. Where you have already opened the door, let me come in; where it is shut, open at my knocking. Let me always remember you, love you, meditate upon you and pray to you, until you restore me to your perfect pattern. 3


March 26th (4th Sunday of Lent, Mothering Sunday) Exodus 2: 1 - 10 2 Corinthians 1: 3 - 7 Luke 2: 33 - 35 Psalm 34: 11 - 20

Baptisms: We welcomed into the Church: Zachary Dudley, Kacie Woods, Jacob Woods and Millie Woods at St John’s Chipping Sodbury on 5 February

Lent Course “Receiving Christ”

Funerals:We extend our sympathy to the families and friends of:

Wilfred Brian Barton at St Adeline’s, Little Sodbury on the 30 January Ivy Jean Smith at St John’s, Old Sodbury on the 15 February

This year’s Lent Course will be on Wednesday evenings at 7.30pm and on Thursday mornings after the 10.00am Holy Communion in the Church Centre, Wickwar Road, Chipping Sodbury. running from March 8th to April 5th

Principal Service readings March March 1st (Ash Wednesday) Joel 2: 1 - 2, 12 - 17 2 Corinthians 5: 20b - 6: 10 Matthew 6: 1 - 6, 16 - 21 Psalm 51: 1 - 18 March 5th (1st Sunday of Lent) Genesis 2: 15 - 17, 3: 1 - 7 Romans 5: 12 - 19 Matthew 4: 1 - 11 Psalm 32

The course is based on five s e s s i o n s , reflecting on John 1.12: “To all who received him …. he gave power to become children of God” In each session there will be an introduction on audio CD from a number of Christian leaders and writers and this is followed by a time of discussion. Please come and join us and be open to learning from each other and from God.

March 12th (2nd Sunday of Lent) Genesis 12: 1 - 4a Romans 4: 1 - 5, 13 - 17 John 3: 1 - 17 Psalm 121 March 19th (3rd Sunday of Lent) Exodus 17: 1 - 7 Romans 5.1 - 11 John 4: 5 - 42 Psalm 95 4


Holy Week Services Palm Sunday 9.15am Procession from near Moda House, followed by Parish Communion CS 11.15am Family Communion OS 11.15am Matins Horton 6.00pm Evensong LS

Monday of Holy Week 7.30pm Compline and Meditation LS

Tuesday of Holy Week 7.30pm Compline and Meditation CS

Wednesday of Holy Week 7.30pm Compline and Meditation OS

Maundy Thursday 7.30pm

Holy Communion

F. WOODRUFF

Horton

Local Family Cremation and Funeral Directors

Good Friday 11.00am Walk of Witness – meet at Chipping Sodbury Baptist Church 2.00pm Good Friday service CS

24 Hour Service 2 High Street, Winterbourne Tel: (01454) 773776

Holy Saturday 8.00pm

Easter Vigil

LS

118-120 Station Road,Yate Tel: (01454) 320005

Easter Day 6.00am 9.30am 11.15am 11.15am 6.00pm

Dawn Service OS Parish Communion CS Holy Communion OS Holy Communion Horton Holy Communion LS

192 Badminton Road. Coalpit Heath email:info@funerals.uk.net Private Chapels of Rest at Coalpit Heath & Yate

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Old Sodbury Church History

These metal plaques used to be displayed in the chancel in Old Sodbury Church. If anyone has any information about them please would you contact Karen Hunter on 01454 319903. Many thanks

Happiness Pudding

Lent Lunch - Old Sodbury

To equal quantities of generosity and thoughts for others Add a few dozen pleasant smiles The soup and cake on offer may differ from those shown here

Followed by the same number of kind words Sprinkle freely with fun and merriment

Please join us for a

Lent Lunch of Soup and Cake at St. John's Church, Old Sodbury on Sunday 5th March at 12:15.

Flavour with wit and humour Mix thoroughly with the spirit of love Warm with bright looks and serve often.

All donations will be given to 'Embrace' for their work with refugees.

Contributed by Jean Bennett 6


Living as adventurous followers of Jesus Christ

Pray with a Bishop this Lent Bishop Rachel and Bishop Robert will each be praying in three churches across the Diocese of Gloucester. Following on from last year’s Ascension Day prayers at Gloucester Cathedral, and as part of the LIFE vision, you are invited to join them at whichever church and date suits you for a mixture of active, creative, and reflective prayer stations, reading from scripture, and concluding with a time of prayer with the Bishop.

Enabling people to discover new depths to prayer and spiritual growth, individually and together. During the many conversations that took place around the Diocese last summer, the theme of prayer and longing for God was immensely strong: ‘We’d like to know more of God’, ‘I would love to be able to pray more, and more deeply’, ‘Help us to find the “One thing necessary”’ When Jesus is at the home of Martha and Mary (Luke 10:38-42) Martha is busily cooking and serving, Mary sits at Jesus’ feet. Both sisters are very close friends of Jesus – this is his ‘home from home’ and he spends a good deal of time in their company. On this occasion, in his love for Martha, he tells her she is distracted by many things, and that Mary has chosen the better part – she has found the one thing necessary. This priority is at the very heart of our life together in this Diocese. It is about keeping company with Jesus just as he longs to keep company with us. It is about making our hearts and lives and communities his ‘home from home’ just as he invites us to find our home in him. It is about recognising the distractions and being still for long enough to find that God is here, right here, in the heart of it all. And that is the adventure. The Ven Jackie Searle Archdeacon of Gloucester

Bishop Robert Springett will be at St John’s Chipping Sodbury at 6:00pm please join him there if you can. From “The Messenger” www.gloucester.anglican.org

Giftings and their use In February’s edition of the Outlook there was much reference to people’s gifts and their use of them. For example, The Children’s Society, the encouragement to meditate, the efforts of all who made their contributions to The Crib Festival, the use of sport as a route to faith and much more. Sometimes I wonder whatever kind of gifts can I, an “oldie” at 88 years, offer to God. Please don’t come back with the answer “You can pray!” This is not true for me at least. My mind wanders off track, or I nod off to sleep! My prayer-time instead of being ordered, is “bitty”. It’s a good thing that Father God knows what I am trying to say, otherwise I’d be wasting my time. I am not even able to get to church these days, except when we have a 10:30 am Holy Communion Service (every 3 or 4 months), but I must give credit where it is

From “The Messenger” www.gloucester.anglican.org

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due, thanks to those who bring me Home Communion, usually once a month. Now I must be positive! Those who remember me, will note that I was a great talker – always the last to finish coffee! I find I can still write letters – a fading art. So, I try to write or email a letter once a day. Fortunately, I have a large family and many friends. As I get replies, I can’t be too boring! So, I thank God for at least one gift. If you wish to contact me, my address is on the electoral roll. If you wish to visit, my telephone number is 01454 327707. A call before a visit is valued. Your invisible fellow church member David Webster

Bishop Rachel says Synod debate was excellent Contrary to headlines in the media, the General Synod was not voting on samesex marriage. The Synod was voting on whether or not to ‘take note’ of the framework the bishops were outlining for a way forward. The motion to ‘take note’ was not carried. It was an excellent debate and a place of encounter. Indeed, throughout the meeting of Synod there has been the opportunity for conversation and the deepening of relationship. For me, that will always be important because in discussing human sexuality we are not merely discussing theological viewpoints – we are talking about people’s lives and our life together. During the debate people were ‘taking note’ of the contributions of different members of Synod, expressing the enormity of our differences on this matter. Speeches were heartfelt and the pain in the Body of Christ was palpable.

As I said in my speech yesterday, all the bishops had agreed to present this report to Synod as a framework for a way forward, bringing into focus the common ground on which we could stand together. However, it was not presented either as a unanimous view or as the end of the process. It was a place to pause and to hear the responses and reflections of the Synod in the hope that more work could then be done. The next steps are not yet clear, but as a member of the House of Bishops I am certainly not despondent. I echo what Archbishop Justin has said about the way forward: It needs to be “about love, joy and celebration of our humanity; of our creation in the image of God, of our belonging to Christ – all of us, without exception, without exclusion.” Bishop Rachel 8


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common sense, will always need to be applied.

Fake News: Countering the Culture of Deception

In this age of information overload and ‘like’ buttons, it can be so easy to accept things without proper thought, to forward or ‘like’ things that may be inaccurate or heavily biased. I know I’ve been guilty of this.

‘Fake news’ has received much media attention lately. The spread of disinformation, propaganda, and fabrication of fact is hardly new: humans have been spreading mistruths through trusted sources for years. What has taken it to a new level, however, is the way it is now spread: social media.

Even beyond social media, though, news has become increasingly concise, presented in bite-sized portions for us to easily digest as we rush from one task to another. The communication norms of our culture make it ever easier to share information, and even to relate, in a superficial way. Nuances and truths get lost in the sound-bites of news headlines and our personal updates.

So how are we to respond to this as Christians seeking to engage with conFake news items can pop up on our social media stream at any time and, being temporary culture? How do we maintain one of myriad other pieces of information integrity, authenticity and honesty in our passing before our eyes, they are easily speech and relationships both online and offline? And what ‘false news’ might read without care for checking the source. Add to this the fact that they are we be presenting about our own lives? usually sensational in content, can be Switching off, both metaphorically and shared or liked in just one click, and you literally, is tempting and even necessary have the ingredients for gossip and lies at times but cannot be a long-term soluon a global scale. tion. We’re called to be salt and light, to be wise as serpents but innocent as doves. When reading the news, whatever form that takes, how often do we check the source, find out what other news sites are saying, and critically weigh up agendas? Looking at ourselves, it’s good to consider how much space we give to genuine, honest and open relationships in our own lives that go beyond the sound bite.

Some media organisations are taking measures to fight back by hiring companies to check facts or design algorithms to stop the spread of fake stories. Yet even the best software is never 100% successful. Human wisdom, or just basic

Siobhan O’Reilly Calthrop

Source - London Institute for Contemporary Christianity www.licc.org.uk.

Siobhan writes, blogs, and tutors in St Albans when she’s not walking the dog or feeding her family. You can find her blog at www.everyoneelseisnormal.com

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job? We need to ask what is its job? Do we just want to let church people know I often wonder, as I sit in front of my what is going on around our four churches computer for the few days each month that or should Outlook be a magazine that we it takes to compile this magazine, whether can give to those not yet in the church that anyone actually might make them think that we seem to reads Outlook, or be a nice bunch of people who enjoy being does it just go Christians, that there might be something straight into the in what we all believe and it might be worth recycling pile? Of joining in with us? course, as you are reading this that is one more reader. Perhaps you feel it does not contain anything relevant to you, nothing much about my church, too much about the diocese, or do we want to know what is going on beyond our own boundaries? Perhaps you feel Outlook does a good job. I don’t know because no one tells me. No, that is not true. I do know that we have It costs the churches £195 each month to at least one reader, let’s call them print the magazine. Of course, some of “Reader1”. Reader1 writes to me, tells me that cost can be offset by advertising, but when I have done a good job in selecting as no one has volunteered to take on the content for the magazine which is very vacant job of looking after the advertisers rewarding. Reader1 also tells me when I we don’t even have that benefit now. Are have not done such a good job, which is we getting value for money, or should we still a good thing because it means I can save that money and scrap Outlook do something to make it better in future altogether? What do you think? issues. The Editor. One of the problems is that I am the editor, but I have no reporters. I need you to be Geriatric Trekking - on Mount the reporter. As an example, I put in Meru, February 2006 adverts about events going on in the [What some church members do in churches of the benefice, but I don’t find their spare time] out how well it went, if anyone turned up, was it a success. If you want to know what I have just paid a deposit for another trek, having promised my family that I would is going on in the benefice and in your ‘never do it again’ and this prompted me to church let me know so I can publish it so look back at previous adventures! that at the least you and I and Reader1 Several years ago, I asked a business will know about it!, acquaintance, then heavily in to activity This is not just a rant from one sad old sports, in particular hang gliding; ‘how did bloke who nobody talks to, but it is a you get started? Did he first jump off a box, serious question that we, as a benefice, then off a chair, then off a wall, then out of need to think about. Is Outlook is doing its a tree etc. etc.? He considered my question

Does anyone read Outlook?

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for a moment and responded “that you should have your brain removed first”. I would have done well to remember this when, after probably one glass of wine too many, a very good friend of mine decided that he wanted to climb Mt Kilimanjaro again. He announced with bravado that this was to be his next challenge having completed the trek originally when at school in Nairobi. I, in a similar foolish moment, forgetting the hang gliding analogy, said that I would join him to celebrate his and my 60th year on this Mount Meru planet. We agreed that we should first complete a four day climb of Mount Meru, a little-known mountain some 60 miles from Kilimanjaro with an altitude of 4,566m, to acclimatise for the “real thing”. Little did we know that Meru was to prove tougher in many ways than Kilimanjaro? The latter being almost the same height as Everest base camp, at 5,895m. Meru was formed thousands of years ago as the result of a volcanic eruption and the original lava cone is still visible. At the end of January 2006, we both flew out to Tanzania and after a wonderful three-day safari in Tarangire National Park we set out on our climb of Mount Meru, starting off from Momella Gate at an altitude of 1,500m, in the Thaddeus blazing midday sun. Mad dogs and Englishmen come to mind but thankfully it took us no more than a sustained 3 hours of steep climbing through a mix of forest and dense scrub to get to Miriakamba Hut at 2,514m. Our guide Thaddeus, who was an Eddie Murphy look alike with humour to match, soon knocked us into shape insisting that we walk very slowly; “kwenda pole, pole” he said and to

drink a minimum of 3 litres a day to avoid dehydration. If we had thought that the first day was steep, our next day’s climb to Saddle Hut at 3,570m made that seem like a stroll. However, we made it, secured our berths and had lunch. After an hour’s respite, we climbed the nearby Little Meru at 3,800m to assist our acclimatisation. Climb high and sleep low we were told. It was steep and the terrain took us both by surprise; deep gullies and walking on what seemed like marbles. To reach Mount Meru summit, ‘Socialist Peak’ by sunrise we left Saddle Hut at 0130. It was a steep climb and the terrain was hard with a mix of sand, gullies and scree. At 0330 we took a breather at Rhino Point, about a third of the way to the top. Our guide-book said the ash cone to the volcano should have been visible but as our illumination comprised only of head torches it was somewhat difficult to see. Thaddeus urged us on. In front of him was our Ranger, Johannes armed with a rifle. We thought that we had completed the hard part, as “the guide book” stated and that we would now walk around the ash cone to the summit; it sounded easy but little did we know that this would be a very tough test. With 13 peaks to negotiate either by climbing over or around them; our challenge was just beginning. As we descended about 150m our hearts sank knowing that we were going to have to recover the lost height. The route became very rocky and we found it easier to scramble using hands feet and anything else that came our way. As we struggled over yet another narrow ridge we were unaware that there was a 600m drop on either side of us but we were hopefully optimistic that by now we must be approaching the summit. We were to be disappointed; as dawn broke we could not believe our eyes. Ahead of us was what seemed to be an almost vertical wall of rocks; in reality a 70 degree slope some 150m high. This was not a hike and Meru

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was proving to be no pussycat; it was the next thing to rock climbing without ropes! It was as this point that I began to question whether I had the strength and capability to make it to the top? We pressed on and tried not to look too far ahead, ignoring our aching legs. Our rests became more frequent as the air became thinner. The realisation that at 4,300m the body takes in 50% less oxygen than that at sea-level became very apparent. The climb seemed endless then suddenly a large board suddenly appeared announcing ‘Socialist Peak’ – 4,566m. We had made it, exhausted but elated, just finding the strength to take the customary photographs! It was 0645 and the sunrise over Kilimanjaro and the views in general were stunning. By the light of the dawn we realised that the slightest slip would take us 1,000m down the side of the mountain. We now had a difficult fourhour descent to Saddle Hut for a welcome rest before tackling the last steep leg down to View from the top of Miriakamba Meru Hut. On arrival, our legs were like jelly and we collapsed in a heap! We had been on our feet for over 12 hours and it felt like it! However, the next day we were surprised at our level of recovery although a little stiff we descended a further 14k to Momella Gate to receive our certificates and celebrate with a few beers with Thaddeus and the team. After lunch, we were driven to our hotel in Moshi for a day’s rest before attempting the climb of Kilimanjaro. We were filthy and smelt like a pair of pole-cats! All we wanted was a shower to remove four days of dust and grime, together with a decent sleep and then onwards to the highest mountain in Africa!!!

Richard Needs

A message from Bishop Rachel to the Diocese: “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 Pray without ceasing Last year we began our vision shaping process with 10 days of prayer. We did so from Ascension Day to Pentecost; that period when the early Church waited in faith, trusting in Jesus’s assurances for the blessings of the Holy Spirit to come. I continue to give thanks that our LIFE vision is now planted — but I also know that without our prayer, it will neither take root nor grow. I have heard people talk about ‘Bishop Rachel’s vision’. This is our vision, and more than that, it is God’s vision. That was what the prayer, energy and wisdom so many gave to the vision shaping process was to discern. Bishop Rachel

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Sodbury Vale Benefice Regular Weekly Events Monday

7.30pm

Bell Ringers’ Practice CS

Church Tower, Chipping Sodbury

Tuesday

8.30am

Morning Prayer

Church Centre, Upper Room,Chipping Sodbury

9.15pm

Stor'k'ies

St John's Church, Chipping Sodbury

8.30am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

730pm

Bell Ringer’s Practice Horton

St James’, Horton

8.30am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

7.00pm

Benefice Choir Practice

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

8.30am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

7.00pm

Youth Club (age 11-18)

Baptist Church Centre

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Note: No Morning Prayers on Bank Holidays

Sodbury Vale Benefice Forthcoming Events Sun

9th

July

Afternoon tea and musical Village Hall, Old Sodbury entertainment with ‘Gabriela’ hosted by Friends of Old Sodbury Church

If you don’t see your event in the list above please let me know, once it is on this calendar other people can put it on theirs! All times are subject to change look out for further details closer to the date. Michelle 01454 325160 office@svbcofe.org.uk

Magazine Advertising Organiser Wanted Sylvia Franklin is standing down from the role and we thank her for the great work she has done over the years. As a result the editorial team needs a volunteer who will look after the advertising for the Outlook magazine. The job entails keeping in contact with the advertisers, persuading them to renew their adverts when the time comes and looking for new advertisers in the local community. If you are able to help please initially contact Michelle in the Church Office 01454 325160 or by email at office@svbcofe.org.uk


Sodbury Vale Benefice Calendar March 2017 Wed

1st

7.30pm

Ash Wednesday

St John’s O/S

Thurs

2nd

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

9.30am

St John’s Praise

St John’s, C/S

11.15am

Mattins

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Family Communion

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Evensong

St Adeline’s L/S

6.00pm

Prayers with Bishop Robert

St John’s, C/S

Sun 5th First Sunday of Lent

Tue

7th

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, C/S

Thurs

9th

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

9.30am

Parish Communion

St John’s C/S

11.15am

Holy Communion {BCP}

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Family Service

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Evensong {BCP}

St Adeline’s L/S

Sun 12th Second Sunday of Lent Mon

13th

2.00pm

Mothers’ Union

Church Centre, C/S

Tues

14th

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, C/S

3.00pm

Meditation Meeting

Ring 327118 for venue

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

7.30pm

Joint PCC Meeting

Village Hall, O/S

9.30am

Family Communion

St John’s C/S

11.15am

Morning Prayer

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Holy Communion

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Evensong {BCP}

St Adeline’s L/S

Thurs

16th

19th

Sun Third Sunday of Lent

Tue

21st

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, C/S

Thurs

23rd

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

9.30am

Parish Communion

St John’s C/S

Fourth Sunday of 11.15am Lent 11.15am (Mothering Sunday) 6.00pm

Holy Communion {CW}

St James’ Horton

Morning Praise {CW}

St John’s O/S

Holy Communion {BCP}

St Adeline’s L/S

Tue

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, C/S

2.00pm

Tea and Chat

Church Centre C/S

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

Sun 26th

Thurs

28th

30th

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One Day God Got My Attention… By Frank Gray No doubt many of you could tell a story that began like that... We can recall how God has been at work in our lives – whether we were aware of it or not... It may have been many years ago – or it may have been just recently. A common theme that came out of our Engaging Through Communications workshop on February 11 was the need for writers to produce short articles – for Outlook and web site in particular. We all have something to write about – memories of growing up, our personal journey of faith, interesting tales from our past – or what being a follower of Jesus means to us in our lives today. It is these kinds of things that people want to read – but more importantly they speak of a living God and a living faith that makes a difference to our daily lives. If learning how to write articles appeals to you then do let us know. We are looking at ways of providing training and starting a writers' support group for those who are interested in taking the first steps – and we know of a few. Or you could simply tell some of your stories by mouth and we can turn them into short articles. At the workshop we also made an action to re-design the pew sheet to make it more informative and interesting. We shall be looking critically at the Outlook magazine, too, to see how we might make it more contemporary and appealing to those outside of our churches. If you have any thoughts on this do let us know. We are also considering the possibility of

placing articles in other local circulars and publications. When asked why he told stories, Jesus said this; "You've been given insight into God's Kingdom. You know how it works. Not everyone has this gift, this insight... Whenever someone has a ready heart for this, the insights and understandings flow freely. But if there is no readiness, any trace of receptivity soon disappears. That's why I tell stories; to create readiness, to nudge people toward receptive insight...." (Matt 13:10-12) The Message.

Interested?

Contact Frank (310084) or <fgray@integralgc.com>

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March Outlook 2017  
March Outlook 2017  

The monthly magazine of the Sodbury Vale Benefice of churches

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