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People’s right to wellness A weekly from Karachi Special focus on Friday, May 10, 2019 Vol V-VI No 52-1 12 Pages I Rs. 30

Health Education Environment

Public Transport

Fare extortion, discomfort continues By Mukhtar Alam KARACHI: Public transport operators have been charging exorbitant fares from the commuters for about two years under their selfmade fare lists in Karachi, while the sindh government is yet to notify any upward-revised rates, it emerged last week. A survey revealed that buses for various distance were charging Rs15 to Rs35 per passenger, while the wagons Rs15 to Rs35 and the so-called- special coaches Rs20 to Rs40. First they increased the fare in late 2017 and then twice during 2018. The conductors and drivers of buses, wagons and coaches in many cases pretend the new rates were from the government and they were compelled to charge high fares in the wake of CnG price hike. In addition, the Qingi rickshaw, widelyused as short-distance transport for citizens, were found charging Rs15 and above, in contrary to a fare list declared lately in their cases by the government. The officials concerned in the government when contacted, maintained till last week that no new fares of intra-city public transports have been notified so far and transporters were charging excessive fares on their own. “We do forward the complaints received from citizens and other rights groups from time to time to the Police for action against the quarters fleecing the passengers,” said an officer posted at the Regional Transport Authority (RTA), Karachi office. It was learnt that under the Provincial Motor Vehicle Ordinance 1965, the transport

KARACHI: Increment notices and discomfort for commuters go together — ST photo

department of the government is required to examine requests, if any made by the transporters, for enhancement in the fares and recommend to the Chief Minister for onward consideration and approval from the sindh Cabinet. Announcing the fare list in the case of Qingqi rickshaws, the sindh government in March had restricted the seating capacity of the rickshaws to four people at a time and said that they could charge an amount of Rs10 from a passenger travelling within six kilometres,

while those travelling around 10 kilometres could be charged up to Rs15. However, any real implementation of the said government notification remained a far cry, despite the fact that a minister concerned is on record saying: “Anyone violating the fare rates would face legal action, while the traffic police will register FIRs against the violators.” Citizens say that the public transport operators have illegally increased the fares and charging whimsical prices due to apathy of the authorities concerned. Thousands of

Doctors awarded fellowships at CPsP convocation

KARACHI: Prof of Cardiology, Dr S Nadeem Rizvi (Centre) receiving the fellowship from CPSP President Zafar Ullah Chaudhry .— ST photo

By Our Correspondent KARACHI: As many as 703 medical doctors were conferred fellowships and memberships in various disci-

plines of medicine and dentistry at the first segment of 53rd convocation of the College of Physicians and surgeons Pakistan (CPsP) held with President of Pakistan Dr Arif Alvi as the

chief guest, in Karachi last week. The postgraduates in question included Dr nadia nasir who was presented with syed Muzaffar Hassan Medal in haematology, Dr sidra Javed who got Anis & salim Medal in anaesthesia and Dr Hareem Fatima, the recipient of M H Mubashar Medal in psychiatry. In all 558 fellows (consultants) and 145 members (specialists) including four from Health Profession (MCPsHPE) were awarded degrees at the Karachi component of CPsP convocation. Addressing the convocation President Alvi advised fellows to cure a patient with empathy and care because if a patient is treated with just a placebo and empathy it will work amazingly as it gives a strength to patient. Continued on page 8

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working class people and students who use this commute are overcharged and misbehaved with if challenge the so-called fare lists. Passengers complained that the public transports plying on the city routes to different areas are arbitrarily overcharging fares frequently, violating the fares rates fixed by the government, but there was no check against the covercion. Continued on page 11

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Page 2 ‘Tobacco taking a toll on young people’s life’

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Page 8 ‘Environmental care is need of the hour’ Page 9 KU pays tribute to its departed VC Dr Khan

Page 4: Precautionary measures to take in Ramadan

Page 11: Dr Jalibi demise left people in grief

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2 I nEWs

I Friday, May 10, 2019

‘Tobacco taking a toll on young people’s life’ By Our Correspondent KARACHI: Criticising the use of tobacco products, mainly cigarettes, in children and youth of Pakistan, experts and child rights activist speaking at a forum recently, urged the quarters concerned to rise to the occasion as it is crucial for the country to limit children’s access to cigarettes. They said that Pakistan despite having anti-tobacco laws is under the threats of growing habits of smoking in youngsters. “stronger tobacco control measures must exist on ground across the country to reduce the social and economic costs of smoking”. Presentations were made about the prevalence of smoking among the youth, relevant health and psychopathy hazards at the “media orientation session on the impact of tobacco smoking on children” organised by society for the Protection of the Rights of Child (sparc) at a local hotel. The participants were also informed about an on-going campaign of the society aimed at making Karachi a smoke-free city. “sparc has already started the Karachi specific initiatives in some selective areas, which will continue in 2020 as well," said one of the organisers. sparc Project Manager sadia shakeel making her presentation on “Tobacco advertisement, sales and display of product around kindergarten, primary and secondary schools” revealed that sparc’s investigators recorded 719 instances of 39 tobacco brands being sold, advertised, or displayed near schools and school playgrounds. she further said that vendors sell cigarettes even in single stick, making the products cheap and accessible to children and youth around schools. “Vendors display tobacco products in ways that are appealing to children and youth.” According to researchers, 95% of displays were at 1 meter – a child’s eye level; 62% of the points of sale had no visible health warning; 94% of displays were beside candy, sweets and toys items marketed to children. Ms shakeel remarked that the placement provides easy access to tobacco products to school children. she held loopholes in existing tobacco control laws responsible of the situation and suggested complete ban on tobacco products display, ban on promoting tobacco products through attractive and eye-catching power walls or contracted boards and face inside retail shops, particularly the shops close to schools. There is a need to revisit the existing tobacco control law and bring it in conformity with the Article 13 of WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. “Federal government needs to reconstitute and activate Committee on Tobacco Advertisement Guidelines also.” Highlighting children’s exposures to tobacco smoking, sparc's media officer, Kashif Mirza, said that the smoking habits of youngsters could also lead them to drug addiction. He said that 70 per cent people in Pakistan fall prey to

KARACHI: Experts and participants during a media orientation seminar organised by Sparc at a local hotel, recently. — ST photo

second-hand smoke at indoor workplace which is equally damaging.

He said that youth and women are the prime target of tobacco industry. “Findings from the Global

Youth Tobacco survey revealed that 13.3 per cent boys and 6.6% girls (aged 13-15 years) currently

Tobacco donation raises concerns

KARACHI: Prime Minister Imran Khan receiving a cheque of Rs5 million from Guy Meldrum, Regional Director Asia Pacific & Middle East British American Tobacco (BAT) during a meeting with the latter at the PM House for Supreme Court of Pakistan and the Prime Minister of Pakistan Diamer Bhasha and Mohmand Dam Fund, recently. On the occasion, Pakistan Tobacco Company Limited also pledged a donation of Rs20 million towards PM’s Shelter Home project. – Photo, text courtesy PID Islamabad’s website.

KARACHI: The presentation of a cheque to Prime Minister Imran Khan on behalf of tobacco companies on the last day of April generated concerns among health professionals and other citizens, who believe that accepting such donations is tantamount to promoting hazardous tobacco products in the country. A press release issued by the Pakistan Medical Association (PMA) on May 4 said that the august body of medical practitioners in the country was concerned over the development at PM House. Dr s M Qaisar sajjad, the secretary general of the association, said that PMA believed that the prime minister should not have received the cheque from a tobacco company. “It is in total violation of article 5.3 of the WHO’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) to which Pakistan is a signatory, under this protocol representatives of the state cannot meet and receive funds from tobacco firms, even under the cover of corporate social responsibility.” According to PMA, such actions demonstrate that Pakistan as a country supports tobacco companies. “Presenting the cheque in a ceremonial way makes it promotional activity of tobacco.” While urging the government not to accept the tobacco donation in question, PMA demanded from it to ensure stringent and fool proof measures to curb the

use of tobacco in the society. “We also demand for imposition of heavy tax on tobacco, with 85% anti-smoking pictorial warning, in upcoming budget.” Legal Action: Earlier, referring to the relevant debate on social media, Health Minister Dr Zafar Mirza said the contribution to dam fund by a tobacco company has nothing whatsoever to do with anti-tobacco policy of the government. “The government under the leadership of Prime Minister Imran Khan is firmly committed to its Antitobacco policy based on Pakistan's obligations under the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control,” a government handout quoted the minister. He reiterated that taxation measures would further curb the prevalence of tobacco use, which reportedly causes over 160,000 deaths in the country annually. He further said that significant efforts have already been made for tobacco control in Pakistan, like banning sale of cigarettes in loose form, notifying increase in the size of pictorial health warning by 60 per cent on cigarette packs and banning import of sheesha. He revealed that recently the Ministry of Health has requested all the provincial chief secretaries and Chief Commissioner, Islamabad to issue necessary directions to the relevant authorities to launch legal action against the violators of tobacco advertisement guidelines. – News Desk

use tobacco," he added, saying over 160,000 people die of tobacco-related diseases per year in Pakistan. “In addition, the second hand smoke takes a toll on around 40,000 people annually.” At the session, the participants were told that about 5,000 Pakistanis land in hospitals due to tobacco smoking, while about 1,200 new children are resorting to smoking every day in Pakistan. Prof Dr Farah Iqbal, Chairperson of Psychology Department, University of Karachi, in her presentation maintained that cigarette smoking kills physiologically and psychologically. ”Tobacco is the only legal drug that kills many of its users.” Referring to the World Health Organisations studies, the professor noted that tobacco's use, smoke or smokeless, is currently responsible for the death of about six million people across the world each year with many of these deaths occurring prematurely. “This total includes about 600,000 people who die from the effects of second-hand smoke.” she added that smoking causes more deaths each year than alcohol misuse, HIV, illegal drug use, motor vehicle injuries and homicides combined. she said that there is more to cigarettes than just nicotine. “They contain over 4,000 chemicals – over 50 of which are known to be toxic in nature.” According to her, as adolescent brains are still developing, nicotine exposure during youth and young adulthood can change the way the brain works, leading to a lifetime of addiction and may cause long-lasting effects such as increased impulsivity and mood disorders and a host of other risky behaviours. “Apart from ectopic pregnancy, fractures, colorectal cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, fertility issues, gum disease, lung and heart diseases many psychological diseases are found linked with smoking: positive associations were found between undersleeping and smoking initiation, as well as between undersleeping and cigarettes smoked per day.” she continued, smoking is associated with a host of other risky behaviors. Fighting and engaging in unprotected sex, high chance of depressive symptoms also post-traumatic stress disorder, high chance of anxiety symptoms, panic problems and agoraphobia (fear of public places) demonstrated unique relations to smoking, the expert mentioned. sparc’s Regional Manager Zahid Thebo highlighted the crucial role of anti-smoking campaign in reducing the health risks in schools and colleges. “We have been working with the government and civil society to increase the taxes on tobacco products to stop the smoking habits in youngsters.” "Reduction in smoking rate will result in better health and decrease the government’s expenditures in the health sectors," he observed. sparc’s Manager shomaila Waheed Manager also spoke on the occasion.


OPInIOn I 3

I Friday, May 10, 2019

People’s right to wellness

A new health crisis in Sindh

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indh province already undermined for its rates of malnourished, stunted and underweight children has once again attracted the attention of media, people at the helm of affairs in the government and international health advisors for reporting extra ordinary rise in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among the general population, including children of Larkana district. news reports carrying a day-to-day details of the new HIV cases are hitting the headlines of print and electronic media for over two weeks, while the provincial health department is yet to come up with any finding or a plausible reason behind the disarray. Almost all big wigs and key offices appear concerned about the issue, but nothing pacifies the keen public health observers and the new patients in question and their families. such developments in a province of over 50 million human beings, amid increased rates of mortality and morbidity related to Congo fever, hepatitis, respiratory diseases, naegleria, measles, dengue fever, typhoid and polio, certainly create room for questioning the claims made by health authorities, their strategies for prevention and control of communicable and non-communicable diseases. sindh Aids Control Programme (sACP), sindh Blood Transfusion Authority, Regional Blood Transfusion Centres, Health secretary of sindh, the federal blood transfusion watchdog and UnAIDs among others should move as fast as they cannot hide anything and ensure due treatments and action in the case of the victims and those who slept over the development. Till the writing of this note, according to reports, the team Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (FELTP) with the support of sACP screened 6,166 persons during a period from April 26 to May 9, out of which 282 people including women and children tested positive for HIV. The male and female ratio was said to be around 50:50, while the most affected age group was 2-5 years. On the other hand, as per a quarterly HIV infection report, there were over 15,721 HIV positive cases and 239 Aids cases in sindh by the end of March 2019. On average 177 people were tested positive for HIV and registered with sACP centres every month in 2018. Majority of the people suffering from the deadly virus during the years in sindh were men (13,642), followed by 1,268 women, 333 children and 176 transgender people. Larkana also, about three years back, had reported over two dozen confirmed HIV cases in a month's time among dialysis patients taking treatment at Chandka Medical College Hospital. After all, things suggest that sindh has been failing even to cope up with the requisites of primary and secondary healthcare system. In the latest episode of HIV infection in Larkana, it is suspected that a number of patients were injected medicines through tainted syringes and needles. sadly, it can be concluded that children and adults were left at the mercy of infections for no fault of their's. sindh, like other provinces, has done little specifically to place an effective health awareness, prevention and control systems, in the largest interest of public health. The government should rise to the occasion and ensure no more innocence is nipped in the future across the province.

EXCERPTs Humans at the mercy of infectious diseases: The latest deaths due to the dreaded Naegleria fowleri or ‘brain-eating amoeba’ in the province are making the news headlines lately. The intensity of deaths caused by this deadly waterborne organism has remained high in the previous years too. ●

Has any concrete solution been taken? A so-called ‘focal group’ responsible for counting of Naegleria fowleri deaths and carrying out casual water samples testing is not enough. News reports claim the inefficiency of the group in terms of fund and intellect. With the newly reported deaths, the total number of deaths due to the brain-eating amoeba has reached 35 in the last three and a half years. However, any well-knit body of experts patronised by the power corridor is yet to be known. According to experts, water sampling and chlorination is not the answer to this growing threat. The province needs to address the issue holistically, involving all segments of the society and resources as Naegleria fowleri cases occur against the perception that the disease has its roots in swimming pool and ponds and is limited to any one certain season only. We need action, particularly at a time when Sindh like other provinces of Pakistan, presents an appalling scenario in the health sector. The most alarming thing is that certain viruses which have otherwise been controlled in other parts of the globe are still posing a challenge to the health planners and executors in Sindh. Sindh frequently reports cases of HIV/Aids, dengue, measles, Congo, naegleria, polio, and now chikungunya, which exposes the claims of health authorities. The province needs to have an effective policy for prevention and control of communicable and non-communicable diseases to avert financial losses to government exchequers and people’s pocket. The government needs to shun the history of neglect and accept its severe under-performance in the health sector. Social Track editorial, July 07, 2017

Health & diseases, literacy & education, ecology & environment, housing, nutrition, living and poverty, mortality & migration, women & gender empowerment, human resource, energy, water & sanitation, public utilities, public health, population parameters, labour force & employment, forest, fossil fuel, global warming, climate change, science & technology, sports & youth affairs, food & fertilizer, transport & communication, information technology, natural resources.

Is your city really serious about road safety? By Anna Bray Sharpin

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hirty-six people died in traffic crashes in Washington, D.C. last year, a 20% increase from 2017. Eight people, six of whom were walking or biking, have already been killed this year, prompting a major public rally just two weeks ago. Residents are angry that the city isn’t succeeding in curbing road deaths, despite the fact that Mayor Muriel Bowser committed to end traffic fatalities entirely by 2024. It’s a common plight. While more than 40 cities in the United states and many more around the world have committed to Vision Zero, a global movement to end traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries by taking a systemic approach to road safety, many are struggling to turn this vision into a reality. Citizens themselves can pursue road safety at many levels— in their schools, workplaces, streets and communities. But it’s the elected leaders who control budgets and priorities for their jurisdiction who really have the responsibility to catalyze lasting improvements that will save people’s lives. As Un Global Road safety Week kicks into gear this week, it’s time to ask the question: What does political leadership in road safety really look like? Three factors are important: Achievable targets to reduce road deaths Research on 14 countries that set quantified road safety targets between 1981 and 1999 led to significant improvements in road safety. A target of zero deaths sets the stage for action, but city leaders need to also set ambitious and realistic intermediary targets. This allows policymakers to monitor and evaluate progress, and then adapt programs as needed. Policymakers should also set context-specific targets and consider adopting additional indicators of success beyond reducing deaths and injuries, such as shifts in public perceptions or achieving systemic changes like setting appropriate speed limits. This allows policymakers to measure progress while waiting for the number of collisions, deaths and injuries to decline. London is widely recognized as a leader in taking

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a holistic, systemic approach to road safety. After reducing road deaths by 45% over the past decade by improving street designs and reducing speed limits, Mayor sadiq Khan formally adopted the Vision Zero concept in 2018. The commitment came with an Action Plan for eliminating deaths and serious injuries by 2041, including intermediary goals to reduce deaths and serious injuries 65% below 2005-09 levels by 2022, and 70% below 2010-14 levels by 2030. The plan also set many other measurable targets to meet along the way, such as specific reductions in fatalities involving public buses establishing speed limits of 20mph on certain streets. Integrated funding for road safety As more people realize that traffic deaths are one of the leading causes of deaths globally, many multinational and philanthropic road safety funds and networks have emerged to help address the problem. However, local leaders need to back up their commitments to reducing deaths by directly allocating funding for road safety improvements. In addition to the ethical imperative to save lives, this investment is economical: Dangerous roads generate costs in terms of lost lives and productivity, as well as negative impacts on development. A study by the International Road Assessment Program showed that it would only take 1–3% of road construction budgets to increase road safety, suggesting that the problem is more about awareness and perceptions rather than a lack of resources. studies also show the benefits of shifting from costly urban highways to well-designed streets with public transport and pedestrian and bicycling infrastructure. Because road safety is a multifaceted issue, budgets should not be allocated into road safety projects in isolation. Rather, any budget allocation for mobility – from street design to licensing to public transport planning – should be conditional on having a safety component. The Washington Area Bicycle Association (WABA) cited the lack of safe-street principles in major mobility projects as one of Washington, D.C.’s Continued on page 11

ADB’s novel initiative

he Asian Development Bank (ADB) must be commended for its initiative to float nepali currency bonds to the tune of $500 million in the international market to raise funds for construction of physical infrastructure projects in nepal. The funds raised through the sale of bonds are expected to help support the Manila-based multi-lateral lending institution’s non-sovereign – financing and investment operations that are not guaranteed by the state and mostly covering private sector transactions – operations in nepal. The ADB had shown interest in issuing the local currency bonds after nepal’s Finance Minister Yubaraj Khatiwada, who is in Fiji attending the bank’s annual meeting, had reminded the institution of its long overdue plan. In 2015, the government had allowed the ADB and the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the private sector lending arm of the World Bank, to issue local currency bonds worth $500 million each in the domestic market. But given the liquidity crunch caused by rapid credit expansion and slow growth in deposits, the government had asked the ADB to float the securities in the international market. Before things can happen, of course, a lot of details need to be sorted out, and a delegation of the ADB will be arriving in nepal soon. now that the ADB has taken the initiative, hopefully, the IFC will follow suit in raising another $500 million in the international market to push through infrastructure projects. The bonds, according to the finance minister, can be bought by non-resident nepalis, as well as well wishers of nepal, in international capital markets. Given the

sheer number of nepalis spread around the globe, the ADB should have little difficulty in mopping up $500 million in the international markets. But this will require educating the investors as it is the first time such bonds in nepali currency are being issued in the international market. The funds thus raised will be invested in physical infrastructure projects through the private sector and should help the country bridge the investment shortfall to some degree. Many a project promoted by the private sector has fallen through after failing to raise enough capital at home, much to the frustration of the promoters. nepal holds high ambition of becoming a developing nation in the next few years and a middle-income country in the next one decade. This means it has a lot of catching up do in infrastructure development, from roads, railways and airports to power plants and industry. This will require long-term capital investment, in which bond market development could play a crucial role. However, the nepali bond market is not big, and the nepal stock Exchange Limited is the only trading floor that buys and sells shares and a few development bonds. Hence, floating securities in the international markets is a viable option for raising money for both public and private infrastructure projects. Actually, many Asian countries do issue bonds in local currency to finance specific projects so that the appreciation of the Us dollar does not adversely impact the debt. How investors abroad react to the nepali currency bonds will show what needs to be done to raise more funds in the future.

From Asia

Editorial/The Himalayan Times, Nepal


4 I HEALTH

Experts ask to increase health, spending

I Friday, May 10, 2019

Precautionary measures to take in Ramadan

Prof Dr Atta ur Rahman

By Our Correspondent KARACHI: The chief guest of an international conference on Endorsing Health science Research, former Federal Minister for science and Technology and special scientist for the Prime Minister's task force of science and technology, Prof Dr Atta-ur- Rahman has claimed that Pakistan has left India behind in the field of research. He was addressing at the collaborated conference organised by Dow University of Health sciences (DUHs) and World Health Organisation, which was held at Dr Abdul Qadeer Khan Auditorium, DUHs Ojha Campus, recently. The conference was also addressed by the Vice Chancellor of DUHs, Prof Dr Mohammad saeed Quraishy along with others. Prof Atta claimed, “After the establishment of the Higher Education Commission, there was a significant boost in research.” He continued, “India was advancing in this field in 2001, but we were getting prepared for the high flight at that time. now we have left India far behind and we stand besides China in progressing towards research technology. “ He informed that the budget allocated to science and research has been raised from 1 million rupees to Rs20 million. He stressed the need to spend more on the private research sector as those countries where they spend more on the private sector can be seen progressing towards development. “China spends 60% on its private research sector.” He further lamented," We have been at a loss by ignoring science and technology." He also quoted the example of Korea and Austria, where the status of Minister of science and education is the same as that of Deputy Prime Minister. He also referred to the budget allocation of Rs300 million on 27 km for the orange train as compared to science and technology which has been allocated a budget of 1 million rupees only. Vice Chancellor Prof Quraishy suggested that medical practitioners should remain up to date with the advancements in medical sciences in order to coup up with the latest. He suggested that if medical education and healthcare sectors collaborate, an ease in the availability of facilities to the local public can be provided. Chairperson of the sindh Healthcare Commission, Prof Tipu sultan said: We as a nation should work on increasing the annual budget being spent on health. We are currently spending 0.6% of our total GDP on health. A city of 2.5 million population is providing a healthcare service which includes only 32 thousand beds, collective of all private and government hospitals, and this number are the same since the past 10 years.

KARACHI: Prof Dr Jamal Ara speaking at the KU awareness seminar on Ramadan and Health Issues, recently. — ST photo

By Our Correspondent KARACHI: Beforehand of Ramadan, awareness seminars were arranged to make people aware of their diets and consult doctors before fasting. For the millions of people with diabetes and other diseases, experts say that they should compulsory consult their doctors and reschedule their diet in order to avoid any inconvenience. At the 49th public awareness seminar on "Ramadan and Health Issues" which was held at Dr Panjwani Centre for Molecular Medicine and Drug Research (PCMD), University of Karachi, experts advised people with diabetes or any chronic health condition to consult with their physicians about the advisability of fasting. They said, “Fasting at Ramadan carries a very high risk for people with type-1 diabetes. Diabetic patients must keep themselves away from heavy physical exercise or work in the afternoon.” Prof Dr Jamal Ara, former head of the national Poison Control Centre at the JPMC Karachi, expressed, “Fasting regenerates entire immune system of the human body. Fasting improves metabolic function and helps to lose excess weight and

water. It can also help lower blood pressure, and flushes out toxins, she maintained. At the collaborated event of PCMD and Virtual Education Project Pakistan (VEPP), quoting a Quran reference, she said that physically sick people, travellers, women during menstruation, pregnant and nursing women should not observe fasting during Ramadan. she stressed the need for proper education especially for diabetic patients, and said that fasting, with the new safer formulation of insulin, may be possible but with possible compromise of inadequate control. Prof Jamal Ara pointed out that pre-Ramadan assessment and education of patients and their families who wish to fast should be done three months before. she advised the patients to have blood glucose monitoring at the presahr, post- sahr, midday, pre-Iftar, post-Iftar, whenever symptoms of hypoglycemia occur. she added that the midnight blood glucose test is also needed. she also urged diabetic patients not to change their antidiabetic drug intake during the holy month, without any medical supervision. she advised the citizens to have a healthy and balanced diet, and

KARACHI: Participants attending the session arranged by the Baqai Institute of Diabetology and Endocrinology, recently. — ST photo

avoid large quantities of fried foods and high cholesterol-meals in Ramadan. "Plenty of fluid during nonfasting hours is also highly recommended." Ramadan and diabetic patients: Another awareness seminar for patients was organised at the Baqai Institute of Diabetology and Endocrinology (BIDE) in Karachi which was addressed by senior diabetologists, endocrinologists, dietitians and religious scholars who spokes on different aspects of safe fasting, adjustment of dosage and timings of medicines, healthy and balanced diet as well as practices that do not lead to breaking fast. Prof Yaqoob Ahmedani, head of Ramadan and Hajj study group said that about around 30 million people living with diabetes in Pakistan would be fasting during the holy month, “but they should consult their physician as early as possible so that they could be given instructions to keep safe fasting.” Prof Ahmedani informed that people with diabetes should not indulge in exercise, brisk walk or hard labour while fasting and such patients could do their exercise after Iftar or before sahr timings. A clinical dietitian at BIDE,

Mariam Abdeali said patients with diabetes need to have their food in moderation at Iftar and sahr timings, as diet play an important role in preventing complications of diabetes. “Avoid drinking sugary drinks, juices, spicy food with lots of carbohydrates. Avoid fried items and also refrain from putting all the food available on the table at once at iftar timings”, she advised. Mufti saad from Jamia Binoria spoke on religious aspects of the fasting, saying people who are seriously sick, those who are travelling and pregnant women, who have been advised not to keep fast, are exempted from keeping fast while those who are sick and can’t keep fast for the rest of their lives, should feed poor and hungry as fidya. “Here I want to make it clear also that checking blood sugar by pricking, getting medicine through injection or drip and getting medicine in the eyes and ears does not lead to breaking the fast”, he said and advised the patients to follow the advice of their physicians. The seminar was also addressed by Dr saif-ul-Haq, Dr Asim and others while questions of the people with diabetes were also answered by the experts.

Pakistani youth endangered due to heart diseases By Our Correspondent KARACHI: Experts informed about the alarming situation of health among Pakistanis, especially children and youngsters, by stating that they are programmed to have heart diseases, diabetes mellitus and hypertension as compared to other ethnic groups in the world, due to their genes. Presidet of Pakistan Cardiac society (PCs), Prof Feroz Memon while addressing a news conference at his office, recently, suggested conducting research to collect data and find out causes in order to prepare strategies for this situation. He informed, “Pakistanis are at a higher risk of having hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD) due to their inherited genes, but also due to poor lifestyle, children are having high blood pressure, diabetes while youngsters are having heart attacks in their late 20s and 30s.” On this occasion, PCs and the Health Research Advisory Board

KARACHI: Representatives of Pakistan Cardiology Society and Health Research Advisory Board inking the MoU, recently. — ST photo

(HealthRab) signed a memorandum of understanding, following which the latter would finance 4th Cardiology Research Award to promote research in the cardiology field. As per MoU, top three researchers would be given cash awards on their papers during the annual conference of PCs to be held at Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology (AFIC) in October-november this year. Prof Memon said that due to unawareness, the ratio of people having heart diseases is constantly

increasing, which is alarming for the nation as well as authorities. Eminent dialectologist and Vice President of HealthRab, Prof Abdul Basit said that Pakistan lacks reliable data of diseases, “At the moment, we are relying on American, European and other countries facts and figures except for diabetes, but it is hoped that soon we would have enough data and research to know what should be done to prevent our people from communicable as well as non-communicable diseases”

Prof Basit suggested PCs to launch a national survey in collaboration with HealthRab and other stakeholders to get reliable data on heart diseases in Pakistan. He also urged the government to launch a national awareness programme to educate people about how to live a healthy, disease-free life. PCs also signed an MoU with sehat Kahani (sK) to provide cardiac-care facilities to people in remote areas of Pakistan through telemedicine. The MoU was signed between Dr sara saeed of sehat Kahani and Prof Ishtiaq Rasool, the General secretary of PCs. Titled as: “Pakistan Cardiac Awareness and Access Programme”, the MoU would lead to a working partnership between homebased female doctors and cardiologists belonging to PCs to provide healthcare facilities to people in remote areas through digital medium while sK experts would be taking care of diagnostic and other needs of the patients.


Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

Tuberculosis

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06

Disease/ Condition Malaria

Acute Viral Hepatitis (Acute Jaundice Syndrome)

Acute Diarrhea (non-cholera)

Acute watery diarrhea (AWD) / Suspected Cholera

21

22

Disease/ Condition Typhoid fever

20

19

S.No

Any person with 3 or more loose stools in the past 24 hours with severe dehydration or death from acute watery Diarrhoea

Any person with acute Diarrhoea (3 or more loose stools in the past 24 hours) with or without dehydration, and which is not due to bloody Diarrhoea or suspected Cholera.

Any person having acute onset of jaundice (yellow coloration of skin and sclera, dark urine) and severe illness (fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain) and absence of any known precipitating factors.

Suspected Case: A patient with persistent fever •38 °C) lasting 3 or more day And at least one of the following sign and symptoms: Relative bradycardia; Rose Spots, GIT Illness (abdominal pain, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and constipation); Muscle pain, Joint pain, neck pain or stiffness, chills, malaise, headache, sore throat and cough

Case Definition

Any person having had recent fever (>38°C in the last 48 hours) with or without other symptoms (chills, headache, body aches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, generalized seizures, low urinary output or dark urine, abnormal bleeding), in whom other causes of fever have been excluded.

Water Borne Diseases

07

S.No

Case Definition

Probable TB case will have at least 1 of the following signs and symptoms {cough 2 weeks, chest pain, low grade fever, night sweats, weight loss (poor weight gain in children), lethargy (reduce playfulness)} and a chest radiograph consistent with intrathoracic TB.

Suspected case: A person with a cough lasting at least 2 weeks with one of the followings: Paroxysms i.e. bouts of coughing; or Inspiratory "whoop" or Post-tussive vomiting (i.e. vomiting immediately after coughing) AND without other apparent cause.

Probable case: An acute illness characterized by an adherent membrane on the tonsils, pharynx and/or nose and one of the followings: laryngitis, pharyngitis or tonsillitis. Confirmed Case: a probable case who has been laboratory confirmed by culture or linked epidemiologically to laboratory confirmed case

Vector Borne Diseases

Diphtheria

04

•2 AWD cases OR any death due to acute diarrhea in •5 yrs age

2 times the mean number of cases of the previous 3 weeks for a given reporting unit

•3 cases

Alert Threshold •3 cases

Alert Threshold Case count >2 times the mean number of cases of the previous 3 weeks for a reporting unit.

1 Case

1 suspected case

1 probable case

1 lab confirmed case, or a cluster (6 or more suspected cases)

Cluster of cases

Cluster of • cases in one location with one lab confirmed case

Outbreak Threshold Cluster of • cases in one location with one lab confirmed case

In non-endemic area, evidence of indigenous transmission of Falciparum.

Outbreak Threshold In endemic area: Slide positivity rate above 50% or Falciparum rate above 40%;

Cluster of Cases

5 cases in one locality

1 lab confirmed case

Within 24 hours

End of Week

Within 24 hours

Reporting Timeline End of Week

Reporting Timeline End of week

Within 24 Hours

End of week

Within 24 hours

Scabies

Naegleria

Bloody Diarrhea (Dysentery)

Neonatal tetanus (NNT)

Measles

Disease/ Condition Acute Flaccid Paralysis

Skin infection characterized by rash or lesions and intense itching especially at night. Lesions are prominent around finger webs, wrists, elbows, axillaries, beltlines, thighs, external genitalia, nipples, abdomen and lower portion of buttocks. Head, neck, palm and soles of infants may be involved.

A person has illness sudden onset of headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck accompanied by positive Kernig’s and Brudzinski’s signs after a recent history of exposure to warm fresh water, tap water, pools etc into the nose

Acute illness characterized by frequent passage of scanty amount of stools, mostly mixed with blood and mucus and accompanied with moderate to high grade fever with or without severe abdominal cramps, tenesmus.

Confirmed Case: Any neonate with normal ability to suck and cry during the first 2 days of life but who between 3 and 28 days of age cannot suck normally and becomes stiff or has convulsions or both. Hospital-reported cases are considered confirmed.

Suspected Case: Any neonatal death between 3 and 28 days of age in which the cause of death is unknown OR any neonate reported as having suffered from neonatal tetanus and not investigated.

Any person with fever and maculopapular rash (i.e. Non vesicular) and atleast one of the followings; cough, coryza (Runny Nose) and conjunctivitis (Red Eye).

Suspected case: Any child under 15 years of age with recent onset of floppy weakness of any cause including Guillian-Barre Syndrome. OR any person of any age in whom clinician suspect Poliomyelitis.

Case Definition

26

S.No

Disease/ Condition Rabies (Dog bite)

A laceration or puncture wound made by the teeth of a rabid animal usually dogs. Initial symptoms of Rabies include fever with pain and unusual tingling/pricking or burning sensation at the wound site.

Case Definition

Other Diseases Under Surveillance

25

24

23

03

02

01

S.No

Vaccine Preventable Diseases

Alert Threshold 1 case

Case count •2 times the mean number of cases over the previous 3 weeks for a reporting unit.

1 suspected case

•3 cases

1 case (Suspected or Confirmed).

1 suspected case

Alert Threshold 1 suspected case

Outbreak Threshold Cluster of cases

Unusual Clustering of cases in a single location

1 Lab confirmed case

Cluster of cases: •6 in one location + one lab confirmed case for Shigella

Not applicable

1 lab positive case with • 5 suspected cases in an area over a 30 day period

Outbreak Threshold 1 lab confirmed case

Case Definitions for Identification of the Diseases/Condition with Alert and Outbreak threshold

EX I & I Depot Rafiqui Shaheed Road near JPMC Karachi Cantt, Phone # 02135167029, email: asif.mph@gmail.com

Directorate General Health Services Sindh @ Hyderabad

Regional Disease Surveillance and Response Unit FELTP-Pakistan

Reporting Timeline End of Week

End of Week

Within 24 hours

End of Week

End of week

Within 24 hours

Reporting Timeline Within 24 hours

I Friday, May 10, 2019

HEALTH I 5


1 case

1 Lab confirmed case

Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

13

ever Patient with sudden onset of illness with high grade fe (>38.5 °C) fo or >3 days and <10 days AND any one of the following symptoms: Headache, vomiting, bloody cough, blood in stools or from nose and muscle pain and does not respond to antibiotics or anti-malarial treatment. With or without H/O contact with animals/ meat/ suspected case of CCHF.

Visceral Leishmaniasis (Kala-Azar)

12

Appearance of one or more skin lesions, typically on uncovered parts of body (Face, Neck, Arms and Legs) which begins as nodules and turn into skin ulcers eventually healing but leaving a depressed Scar.

A person with acute onset of fever (102°F) or more with severe arthralgia or arthritis not explained by other medical conditions (fo or endemic area, dengue cases must be excluded)

Cluster of • cases in one location

1 lab confirmed case

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

11

Case presenting with H/O irregular fever (more than 2 weeks), Hepato/Splenomegaly, or with any one of the symptoms: anemia, enlarged lymph nodes, weight loss, fatigue, secondary infe ections such as Pneumonia. Clustering of cases above the baseline

1 case

Chikungunya

10

Within 24 hours Within 24 hours Within 24 hours Within 2448 hours Within 24 hours

14

S.No S.No

15

• 5 cases

A lert Alert T hreshold Threshold • 5 cases

Cluster of Cases

O utbreak Outbreak T hreshold Threshold Cluster of Cases

End of week

Repor ting Reporting T imeline Timeline End of week

Case Definition C ase D efinition

Any person with Acute onset of a diffuse vesicular rash developing within 24–48 hours and forming crusts (or crusting over) within 5 days

D isease/ Disease/ Co ndition Condition Mumps

Chickenpox

Children < 5 ye y ars: Any child presenting with cough or difficult breathing with any one of these:

Acute respiratory tract infection with the following: fever • 38°C ; onset of cough within last 10 days

1 case

Unusual rise in cases satisfying case definition

1 lab confirmed case

Cluster of cases

Cluster of cases

Within 24 hours

Within 24 hours

Within 24 hours

Fast breathing: (Less than 2 months: • 60 breaths/min; 2 - 12 months: •50 breath/min; 12 months to 5 years; • 40 breaths/min). Lower Chest wall in-drawing, Unable to drink or breastfeed, Difficulty to awaken, Fits / convulsions, Stridor in calm child.

Acute respiratory tract infection with the following: history of fever • 38°C, onset of cough within last 10 days AND requiring hospital admission.

Acute onset of unilateral or bilateral tender, self-limited swelling of the parotid or other salivary gland, lasting 2 orr more days and without other apparent cause.

Pneumonia

17

Influenza (Influenza Like Illness-ILI)

16

18

Severe Acute Respiratory Illness (SARI)

2 times the mean number of cases of the previous 3 weeks for a reporting unit

Respiratory Infections) Respiratory Diseases Diseases (Air-borne (Air-borne I nfections)

1 case in nonendemic areas, and cluster of 3 cases in endemic area. 1 case 1 lab confirmed case of DHF

1 case

ever and any A probable or confirmed case of dengue fe two of the following: Platelets <100,000/mm3, Petechial or purpuric rash, Epistaxis, vomiting with blood, cough with blood, blood in stools OR other hemorrhagic signs actor for hemorrhagic AND no known predisposing host fa manifestations.

Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF)

End of Week

09

Cluster of cases

Within 24 hours

Regional Disease Surveillance Response Regional Diseas e Sur veillance aand nd Re sponse Unit FEL TP --Pakistan Pakistan FELTP

As the disease progresses, acute neurological syndrome (encephalitis) appears, dominated by forms of hyperactivity (furious Rabies) or paralytic syndrome (dumd Rabies) that progress towards coma and death usually by respiratory failure within 7-10 days after first symptom. 1 case

End of Week

Cluster of cases: •6 cases in one location + 1 lab confirmed case in a period of 4 weeks

Snake bite

Not specified until infectious agent is identified

End of Week

1 case

27

Public Health Surveillance

Patient present with two puncture wounds, swelling and redness around the wounds, pain at the bite site; with one or more of the following: Difficulty breathing, vomiting and nausea, blurred vision, sweating and salivation, numbness in the face and limbs, drooping eyelids. Low blood pressure, shock, weakness, change of skin color, paralysis. With or without H/O snakebite. A patient having Fever of > 38.5°C for more than 3 weeks with no established diagnosis despite appropriate investigation forr 1 week.

Case count greater than 2 times the mean number of cases of the previous 3 weeks

Not specified until infectious agent is identified

Suspected Case: An acute febrile illness of >2days and <10 days duration with 3 or more of the fo ollowing: Headache, Retro-orbital pain, Myalgia, Arthralgia, Rash Haemorrhagic manifestations, Leucopenia, Platelets <150,000/mm3

28

Pyrexia of Unknown Origin (PUO)

Case Definations An aggregation of cases with similar symptoms and signs of unknown cause that are closely grouped in time and/or place.

Dengue Fever

29

2019 Unusual Disease Or Unexplained cluster of Health Events

Directorate General Health Services Sindh D epartment of of Health Health Sindh Sindh Department EX I & I Depot Depot R afiqui Sha heed Roa d near Rafiqui Shaheed Road J PMC Karachi Karachi C antt, Phon JPMC Cantt, Phone 02135167029 e#0 2135167029 Email: a Email: asif.mph@gmail.com sif.mph@gmail.com Unusual appearance of cases which are previously not known for the area or unrecognized health event

08

I Friday, May 10, 2019

6 I sPECIAL REPORT


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I Friday, May 10, 2019

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8 I EnVIROnMEnT / EnERGY

I Friday, May 10, 2019

‘FBATI-KU collaboration, win-win solution’ By Our Correspondent KARACHI: To further develop and carry out collaboration in academic and scientific research activities, the Chief Executive Officer, Federal B Area Trade Estate, Muhammad Babar Khan and the Vice-Chancellor, University of Karachi, Professor Dr Muhammad Ajmal Khan signed Memorandum of Understanding aimed at curbing environmental pollution, recently. The Federal B Area Association of Trade and Industry (FBATI) and KU intended to develop collaborative research and training activities in areas of importance and need on a mutual basis benefiting the two institutions. "This will help to achieve overall objectives and to also strengthen the research facilities, produce trained human resources and share resources to obtain maximum benefit and achieve scientifically excellence," a KU press release stated. The MoU includes arranging joint conferences, workshops and courses, research collaboration, staff training, internships for students, transfer and sharing of knowledge, accreditation from sindh Environment Protection Agency, environmental management plan, analysis of environmental samples and sharing of facilities.

KARACHI: KU VC Prof Dr M Ajmal Khan, late, and M Babar Khan exchanging documents after signing the memorandum of understanding, recently. — ST photo

A senior KU faculty member of the Institute of Environmental studies, Professor Dr Moazzam Ali Khan, would serve as the primary liaison between the two institutions to facilitate the development of future activities

while Muhammad Imran Qamar, member FBATI, would be the focal person on behalf of the Association. Muhammad Babar Khan expressed that there is no linkage between academia and in-

dustries in the country due to which industrialists found difficult to get suitable solutions at the grassroots level. “We need strong human resource related to address the technical shortfall in industries and academia is the best solution for us.” He mentioned the unfortunate situation in Pakistan where there was no direct connection between local industries and varsities while the whole world is taking advantage of closed working relation of academia and industries. KU VC Professor Dr Muhammad Ajmal Khan while appreciating said that first step in the right direction always matters a lot for the success and growth of organisations and this MoU would be the first step in the right direction. “There must be a practical approach to achieve our goals and we both know the fact that if academia and industries start working together then it will be a win-win situation for both parties.” He said that industries and universities have to work closely to fill the gap as we have to transfer the knowledge among our students to make them ready for the market while industries could get technical expertise from the faculty to gradually improve their business.

‘Environmental care is need of the hour’ By Our Correspondent KARACHI: Experts at a seminar stressed the need for promoting knowledge relevant to good environment and health-safety measures, particularly in the urban localities. A seminar on “Environment, Health and safety” was organised by an nGO at local hotel, which was attended among others by President KCCI Junaid Esmail Maqda, Pharma-industrialist and an ex-senator Abdul Haseeb Khan, ex-senator Jawed Jabbar, Mehmood Tareen of TPn, and a CsR actitivist Ateequr Rehman. speaking as the chief guest, Karachi Commissioner Iftekhar Ahmed shalwani underlined that the civil society should significantly endeavor to educate and aware the general public about their environment, health and safety purposes. “Every citizen should get good health, clean environment and ensure proper security and safety at every level. Mr shalwani further said, “The government is playing its due role in providing

KARACHI: Karachi Commissioner Iftekhar A Shalwani addressing the seminar on "Environment, Health and Safety" at a hotel, recently. — ST photo

good environment, health and safety to their people by doing a lot in this regard but is waiting to get a plausible response from individuals.” People belonging to various fields lack

training and capacity to tackle the issues. “We have experienced some sort of environmental and safety accidents, including fire and building collapses taking place in Karachi’s Malir, Gulshan and Boating basin areas, where things

could not be handled accordingly as people lacked the training and awareness about the issues and we faced problems and difficulties,” he added that some casualties took place in these events. It should be collective responsibility of everyone to play our due role and ensure education and awareness among the respective personnel in advance to avert any crises in future. He remarked that citizens are throwing their garbage in front of their houses and at the roadsides,which creates problems and degrades the overall environment. The government is taking steps to lift the garbage through a proper mechanism, while the city of 20 million people could not afford and resolve garbage and other issues through 9,000 sanitary workers. “Therefore, citizen should play their individual role to support and resolve the issues through social awareness and knowledge about their duties and responsibilities,” he added.

Doctors awarded fellowships at CPsP convocation Continued from page 1

"Treatment of a patient starts with sympathy from the concerned doctor. sympathy is an inherent quality of a person, which can not be taught in any university of the world”. The President felicitated the post graduate doctors and highlighted the cyclopean responsibility on their shoulders. He underlined malnutrition, infant mortality, stunted growth, population expansion and sanitary and clean water as major challenges confronted by the nation. “Practical steps and not mere recognition of issues would resolve the problems faced by the health sector.” He referred the high spending incurred on the training of the postgraduates and hoped that out-going postgraduate doctors’ first place of service would be Pakistan.

KARACHI: Doctors taking the oath during the CPSP Convocation last week.— ST photo

On this occasion, Dr Alvi also accentuated the need for public service messages in order to reach the people in far-flung areas. He emphasised that people need an equitable access to comprehensive healthcare, and CPsP is doing

a splendid job in this regard by producing graduating specialists in adequate numbers. CPsP Registrar Prof syed Waqar Ahmed administered the Oath to the graduates. CPsP President Prof Zafar Ullah

Chaudhry in his welcome address said that the CPsP training network today offers residency training in 300 institutions within the country and abroad with over 24,000 residents acquiring training under 3,746 supervisors.

He added, “CPsP has produced 23,140 fellows and 9,433 members to date. It keeps on introducing new fellowship programmes in emerging new specialties, and now the number of its fellowship programmes has gone to 74. The college today contributes 95% of specialist manpower of the country and almost 100% of Armed Forces.” He informed the gathering that CPsP plans to establish a model teaching hospital and a postgraduate nursing college in Lahore, as according to him, effective specialist care cannot be delivered without trained nursing staff. He said that CPsP had developed the academic linkages with Royal Colleges of the United Kingdom, Ireland and Canada, saudi Commission for Health specialties and institutions of PGME of Malaysia, China, singapore, Thailand and other AsEAn countries.


EDUCATIOn I 9

I Friday, May 10, 2019

KU pays tribute to its departed VC Dr Khan By Our Correspondent KARACHI: The University of Karachi lost its Vice-Chancellor on May 4. To pay tributes to Professor Dr Muhammad Ajmal Khan, it held a reference meeting at the Arts Auditorium. The participants prayed for peace to the departed soul and courage to the bereaved family to bear the irreparable loss. A politician, nD Khan urged that government should give the highest civil award to the late vice chancellor and also, arrange reference meeting to acknowledge his contributions in science and research. The widow of the late Professor, Dr Bilqees Gul shared, “Dr Khan was a caring husband and loving father and always encouraged youngsters who had goals and plans for their lives. Although late Dr Khan was aware of the fact that his health was not in good shape, he was more worried about the KU rather than his own health.” The Vice-Chancellor of Ziauddin University, Professor Dr Pirzada Qasim Raza siddiqui mentioned that being a vice-chancellor, a person has to face a lot of problems from every sector of society as they want to be entertained regardless if it was against the merit."standing firmly on merit is not easy at all. However, Dr Khan never compromised in his life as well as during his vice-chancellorship in the Campus." He noted that Dr Khan was an energetic and electrifying person

KARACHI: Prof Dr Pirzada Qasim Raza Siddiqi speaking at a reference meeting held at KU, recently. — ST photo

KARACHI: Faculty members and students attending the meeting. — ST photo

with a lot of ambitions about science and betterment of KU. "I always advised him to have patience as he cannot bring changes rapidly; it takes time to take its ground.” Prof Pirzada, who is also a former KU VC stressed the need to continue Dr Khan's work, especially in the field of research and fulfil his mission of converting the Alma Mater into a leading and top university of the world. Another former KU VC, Professor Dr Muhammad Qaiser shared that his relations with Dr Khan were like friends rather than teacher-student. He informed about struggles being a VC and said, “When I was KU VC I only got Rs200 million during my whole time, but Dr Khan managed to bring a good amount of money and lots of issues were addressed.” A former KU Pro-VC, Professor Dr shahana Urooj Kazmi expressed

demise of a former vice-chancellor Dr Jameel Jalibi was held at the same place. speaking at that meeting, Dr Ajmal Khan had talked about how significant individuals were leaving one after another for heavenly abode in quick succession. "Dr Khan urged him to preserve all the events that he had witnessed or knew of and write the history of KU." The Director Evening Programme, KU, Professor Dr Abid Hassnain, said that he was inspired by the vision of late Dr Khan and his dedication to resolving all issues of the varsity. Dr Khan wanted to serve the teaching and non-teaching community of KU and fought for their rights at every platform available. Vice-Chancellor shaheed Benazir Bhutto University Lyari, Professor Dr Akhtar Baloch, VC of Iqra University, Dr Waseem Qazi, a faculty member of the In-

that Dr Khan was a dynamic person. “He was recognised for his services in botany and halophytes and received a number of prestigious awards from the Pakistani government and around the globe.” A close friend of Dr Khan and the Director-General of Dr A Q Khan Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, KU, Professor Dr Abid Azhar said, “We, his close friends and some seniors decided that Dr Khan should be the next VC after Professor Dr Muhammad Qaiser.” He continued that Dr Khan was in Qatar when they prepared his CV and submitted at the CM House. “He asked us that we should know what we are doing and we told him that we know he is needed as the KU VC.” Dr shakeel ur Rehman Farooqi of Genetics Department, KU, expressed that only two days back, a meeting of condolences on the sad

Healthy lifestyle is a necessity: KU forum By Our Correspondent KARACHI: necessities for a stable healthy lifestyle are; the culture of smart eating, not allowing negative thinking to take control and, a habit of doing exercise regularly. Experts expressed these views during a seminar on "reproductive health, exercise and new trends in medicines" organised by the department of Health, Physical Education and sports sciences at the University of Karachi, recently. The KU Vice-Chancellor Professor Dr Muhammad Ajmal Khan shared his formula of healthy life with students and said, “Field experts can only advice you. It is you who has to implement all those things in your life to get better results. Good thinking has a direct impact on your body and mind which is very essential for a better lifestyle.” Dr Muhammad Usman Ghani Khan talked about good health misconception in the society and need to develop a culture which promotes clean eating as well as wiliness to remain fit. He advised participants "to not try to add more years to your life. It is better to try to add more life to your years," which could be achieved by taking responsibility. He also asked to give up on junk food and overeating rather eat in small portions and increase veggies and fruits intake. Referring to a recent study, he informed the participants that poor diet is more deadly than tobacco or high blood pressure as it is responsible for 1 in 5 deaths globally. He asked to avoid intakes of processed food, sugar, banaspati ghee, margarine, refined flour, deep fried items and broiler chicken as much possible. Professor Dr Qudsia Tariq of Department

of Psychology, told the audience that reproductive health addresses the reproductive processes, functions and system at all stages of life. “Reproductive health plays an important role in society and that individual psychological, behavioural and social factors affect reproductive health and vice versa.” she mentioned that trauma and distress due to reproductive ill health is common, and because of psychological treatment and professional support is largely unavailable, it leaves people suffering in the hands of traditional healing and rituals. she observed that infertility is ranked as one of the greatest stressors in life, comparable to divorce and death in the family while it is also regarded as a prolonged life crisis, associated with risk for depression, feelings of loss, guilt, isolation and meaninglessness, as well as sexual and marital problems. Dr K M shah, consultant orthopaedic surgeon, Liaquat national Hospital and Medical College, mentioned that around 45 million citizens are facing muscle-related pain across the country. Their lower back pain is one of the most common issues in Pakistan and it could occur due to various reasons. He further said that acute pain can last less than 3 months or can be directly related to tissue damage or injury whereas chronic pain are of 2 different types; chronic pain due to an identifiable pain generator (an injury) and chronic pain with no identifiable pain generator (the injury has healed). He informed that poor posture, back sprain and muscle spasms, lack of physical fitness, arthritis, disc protrusion, psychological factors and other miscellaneous causes are some causes of lower back pain.

stitute of sustainable Halophytes Utilization, Dr salman Gulzar, Director of the International Centre for Chemical and Biological sciences, KU, Professor Dr Muhammad Iqbal Choudhary, Dean, Faculty of Education, KU, Professor Dr nasir sulman, Dean, Faculty of Law, KU, Justice (Retd) Professor Dr Ghous Muhammad, Dean, Faculty of Management and Administrative sciences, KU, Professor Dr Tahir Ali, President KUTs, Professor Dr Anila Amber Malik, President Unikarians International, Professor Ejaz Ahmed Faruqi, Professor Dr Mehmood Ahmed, Professor Dr Afzal Kazmi, Professor Dr saleem Memon, Professor Dr Jamil Kazmi, Dr nadeem Ahmed Khan, Dr Basit Ansari and others also prayed and shared their memories on the occasion.

Experts highlight the good teacher-student relationship By Our Correspondent KARACHI: Experts at a seminar mentioned that a good teacher-student relationship is very essential for productive studies and results. A good teacher would always like to enhance the skills and talents of his students rather than imposing his teaching on them. The seminar on "Classroom: freedom and discipline" was organised by the Department of Education, University of Karachi, recently. The seminar suggested that teachers and students should have a vibrant and interactive relationship in classrooms in order to deliver the best results. "students must have the liberty to ask questions and they also give due respect to their teachers. In-charge KU Department of Education Dr safia Urooj, the Principal, The new Earth school system, saqiba Wahid, Montessori Directors and CED Parental Trainer sameera Ali, General secretary, society for Children with Autism and Learning Difficulties, Eliya Batool Haideri, and President, Blind Institute for national Awareness and Empowerment shared their experiences with the students. A couple of speakers observed that a teacher’s self-discipline attitude, and kind of activities that took place beside the teaching means a lot showing relationship between teachers and his pupils. “If a teacher is energetic and motivated

then it will reflect in his lectures as well as mood and behaviour of students, who are regularly attending his class.” It was further said that teachers who foster positive relationships with their students create a classroom environments more conducive to learning and meet students' developmental, emotional and academic needs easily as compared to conventional methods of teaching. The experts remarked that some teachers do not like questioning by their students and often took it personally. They also shared in rare incidents, it happened in the same way but not in huge number. They said if any teacher takes the matter personally, then his students do not give him due respect and such a scenario is not good for anyone. Dr Mahroof Bin Rauf of Department of Education said, “pin-drop silence and discipline are two different things." This is so unfortunate that we misunderstand the meaning and utilisation of discipline. He continued, in many classrooms, pin-drop silence is still considered as a discipline.” He said, “A classroom cannot be silenced, this only happened in graveyards. To make the classroom more lively and interactive, we must have management skills and ability to read the minds of our students.” He observed that discipline is directly proportional to the student’s age and class, it could be of different types depending upon the age group and class of students.


10 I ROUnD-UP

I Friday, May 10, 2019

KARACHI: President Dr Arif Alvi with senior medical professionals and rights activists at the launch of a report prepared by National Council for Human Rights, last week.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ST photo

KARACHI: Outstanding contestants standing with the Chief Guest and others after a speech contest, recently.

KARACHI: Deputy Mayor Syed Arshad Hasan being presented with the shield at an academic award ceremony, recently.

KARACHI: Mayor Waseem Akhtar unveiling the foundation plaque of the Sindh High Court Cooperative Housing Society, recently.

KARACHI: FPCCI Acting President Arshad Jamal Chaudhry being presented with a shield on behalf of the Society for Education and Environmental Development, recently.

KARACHI: Syed Faizullah Jawad, Director Marketing and Trade of Hamdard Pakistan and Muhammad Amir Memon, General Manager, PIA, signing the MoU under which Rooh Afza carbonated drink will be served to on-board passengers during Iftar time in PIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flights.


nEWs I 11

I Friday, May 10, 2019

Dr Jalibi demise left people in grief By Our Correspondent KARACHI: A renowned Urdu scholar and former Vice Chancellor of the University of Karachi, Dr Jameel Jalibi passed away, which caused a great loss to Urdu language and left people in grief. speakers paid tribute during a condolence reference in his memory, held at KU Arts Auditorium, recently. The renowned scholar and researcher’s Tareekh-e-Adab-e-Urdu, history of Urdu literature, in four volumes, is considered to be his greatest contribution to the Urdu literature. He had served as KU VC from 1983 to 1987. His literary works covered several fields, while the compilation of Qaumi English-Urdu Dictionary was one of his historic milestones. Dr Jalibi had also served as chairman of the national Language Authority and president of the Urdu Dictionary Board. He was also the honorary treasurer at Anjuman Taraqqi-i-Urdu Pakistan, in addition to holding other key-offices in the government. The KU VC Professor Dr

KARACHI: Prof Dr Muhammad Ajmal Khan-late addressing the condolence meeting held in memory of Prof Dr Jameel Jalibi at KU, recently. — ST photo

Muhammad Ajmal Khan recalled that late Dr Jameel was also known for his patience, knowledge, wisdom and, philosophical thinking. He expressed that Dr Jalibi was a great Urdu scholar and had command over literature and his work has custodian and historian of literacy in Urdu literature. The VC Khan said that Dr Jalibi will always be remembered as a legendary scholar in the history of

the literature. His description of Pakistani culture in his book received wide recognition in the literary circles. He expressed, “Dr Jalibi’s death is a national loss because the nation has lost the man of wisdom and knowledge.” The VC of Ziauddin University, Professor Dr Pirzada Qasim Raza siddiqui termed that Dr Jalibi was a great scholar of his era. He had

Fare extortion, discomfort... Continued from page 1

“They are so bold in their pursuits of extortion that sometime they indulge in altercation and resort to use abusive languages as well. some of the transporters also offload the passengers who do not succumb to their demands,” this was gathered from a couple of passengers travelling from sohrab Goth to Landhi/Korangi areas or north Karachi to Tower/Keamari areas. There have been claims that private transporters are running shabby old minibuses, involved in overloading, allowing commuters to sit on rooftop of the mini-buses, plying vehicles without proper engine fitness certificates, running non-environment and non-passenger friendly vehicles. A senior advocate requesting anonymity observed that the illegal actions of the private transporters are detrimental to public at large, while also indulging in acts of crime. "some of the civil society and rights activists have raised the issue of unlawful transport fares with RTA Karachi, but unbridled transports are continuing to violate the government notified fare list of January 2015," said a source adding the fare issue has always been a sensitive one, particularly in the wake of rise in fuel prices. “The government avoided putting its foot down and acted as a silent spectator waiting for development of any immunity among the commuters.” Justifying transport operators attitude, a mini-bus conductor said that prices in all sectors have shot up, then why not in the case of intra-Karachi public transports. Reacting to that an office-goer said that rates should be revisited but the increase of 100-125 per cent made in the last notified rates of the government by transporters is not fair. “Transporters irrational attitude is taking out Rs 600 to 900 every month from the pocket of a passenger travelling on a bus, mini-bus or coach, which for the sake of rationale should be given due care by people at the helm of affairs. According to the government’s fare lists in question that should technically prevail above all, the fare structure is: Buses – Rs10 upto 5kms, Rs13 upto 10 kms and Rs14 upto 15 kms; Mini Buses – Rs10 upto 5 kms, Rs13 upto 10 kms and Rs15 upto 15 kms; Coaches – Rs14 upto 10 kms and Rs17 upto 15kms. salim soomro, an officer at RTA said that the secretary of the authority has been vigilant on the

subject of transport fares and show cause notices were issued and fines were imposed against the quarters which failed to follow the official fare list or abide by other transport rules. While unable to exercise any magisterial power against the violators, RTA seeks support from traffic police to check the violations of fare lists and take actions accordingly. He confirmed that transporters were displaying fare rates in their vehicles after certain manipulation and were using bogus fare lists, which make them liable to legal actions by RTA. “If any transporter charges excess fare, the commuters should report that to RTA and traffic police," he added. Replying to a question, Mr soomro said that the government was in the process of finalising a new public transport fare lists, but till the time things are shaped up, transporters should refrain from detaching themselves with the official fare rates introduced in January, 2015. “The RTA will take action along with traffic and sindh Police on the complaint accordingly.” NEW RATES: In the meantime, a source in the provincial transport department said that a government constituted fare committee had already reviewed the existing fare structure of buses, wagons and coaches plying on intra-city routes in the wake of increase in fuel/CnG prices and various cost components of the capital investment early this year. During the meeting, managing director of sindh Mass Transit Authority presented a unified fare structure for all types of buses, mini-buses and coaches in view of services they provided and the operational costs, which was endorsed by other members of the committee including Karachi Transport Ittehad, who also placed some amendments, said the source. After detailed deliberations, the committee in a summary for the transport department recommended new fare structure of buses, mini-buses and coaches for the operation of public transport for the intra-city routes, which may be made effective only after the approval of the sindh cabinet, it was further learnt. The proposed revised rates are: Buses – Rs15 upto five kms, Rs20 upto 10kms, Rs25 upto 15kms and Rs30 upto 20kms and above. Mini-Buses/Coaches – Rs15 upto 5kms, Rs20 upto 10kms, Rs 25 upto 15kms and Rs30 upto 20kms and above.

also served other organisations before becoming the KU VC and the impact of his work could be seen easily at all those places. Professor Pirzada said that Dr Jalibi had never initiated a work which did not have a cause or impact on society. “He used to go to the library and always asked students about their problems, nonavailability of any book or other problems they were facing at the li-

brary, and got them resolved, he remarked. Another former KU VC, Professor Dr Muhammad Qaiser said that Dr Jalibi was very kind human being, teacher and renowned research scholar of Urdu, literary historian, critic, lexicographer and brilliant translator. He informed that Dr Jalibi has gifted his whole collection of books to KU and also donated money for the construction of a separate library, which is in the last stage. Professor Dr shakeel ur Rahman Farooqi, Department of Genetics, KU, said that Dr Jalibi has left behind an intellectual legacy which would not be filled easily. Although he did not spend more time with the KU, but during his tenure, he worked hard to improve the standards. The former Chairman, Department of Urdu, KU, Professor Dr Moin Uddin Aqeel, said that after Dr Ishtiaq Hussain Qureshi, Dr Jalibi was the last VC known for his composition and complication and extraordinary work. “Dr Jalibi’s name would be always alive in history.”

Is your city really serious about road... Continued from page 3

underlying barriers to achieving its Vision Zero commitment. The city currently lacks policies requiring that the millions of dollars to be invested in road infrastructure are spent on projects that achieve safe street designs. A willingness to make tough decisions to prioritize safety Cities that have emerged as true road safety leaders have made tough but crucial decisions to prioritize safety, like installing speed cameras, lowering speed limits and redistributing street space. These decisions often face initial resistance, but as lives are saved and unexpected co-benefits like reduced congestion emerge, popularity tends to grow. For example, Bogota, Colombia recently developed a speed Management Plan to help set and enforce safe speed limits. One of the actions involved reducing the speed limit from 60 to 50 kilometers per hour in five of the city’s most dangerous arterial roads, where about 150 traffic deaths are reported every year. The plan has already reduced traffic fatalities by 32%, saving 22 lives since late 2018. While the public and media initially criticized the move and worried it would increase traffic congestion, preliminary indications suggest that reduced speed limits may have actually improved traffic congestion by evening out traffic flows and reducing bottlenecks.

Many cities, such as Fortaleza, Brazil, are also experimenting with reallocating street space to better balance the space afforded to cars with areas for non-motorized and public transport. In order to mitigate public concerns, Fortaleza started with road safety projects that would have more community support, such as low speed zones around hospitals and schools and improving public spaces. The city only tackled traditionally unpopular measures, such as speed limit reductions, after the first projects yielded positive results and citizens had thenity to experience the benefits firsthand. For example, after 235 people died on two arterials between 2007 and 2017, the city reduced speed limits from 60 kilometers per hour to 50 kilometers per hour and installed new traffic lights, pedestrian signals, cycle tracks, a bus lane and more. The transformation reduced crash-related injuries 41% on one arterial alone. There’s no denying that city leaders face many complex pressures and competing demands from their citizens. Few parts of cities are more contested than the streets we live and travel on. Leaders can’t backtrack on safety interventions like speed limits in order to gain politically, nor should they sign up for commitments like Vision Zero if they don’t back up their words with action. The ultimate responsibility of leaders is to protect their citizens. Peoples’ lives should not be a political bargaining chip. Courtesy: WRI


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