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Course Descriptions and decolonization to name a few. Our task, then, is to carefully re-examine postcolonial literature from beyond the western metaphysical lens. Global Marker. Prerequisite: ENG 120. LIT 350 The Black Literary Tradition (3 credits) This course surveys African-American literature from its earliest roots through the slave narratives, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts movement, and into contemporary literature. Students will read works that illuminate both the history of African America and hotly debated ideas of racial identity. Course readings may include works by Washington, DuBois, Ellison, Brooks, and Morrison. Prerequisite: ENG 120. LIT 450 Seminar in American Literature (3 credits) This course uses a thematic approach to explore works by American writers. The specific selections and authors vary each term according to the theme. This is an upper-level course involving close reading, analysis and writing in a seminar format. Students will complete a seminar paper. Prerequisite: ENG 121. LIT 451 Seminar in British Literature (3 credits) This course uses a thematic approach to explore works of British writers. The specific selections and authors vary each term according to the theme. This is an upper-level course involving close reading, analysis and writing in a seminar format. Students will complete a seminar paper. Prerequisite: ENG 121. LIT 452 Seminar in Global Literature (3 credits) This course uses a thematic approach to explore works from any of the major literary traditions outside the British and American. The specific selections and authors vary each term according to the theme. This is an upper-level course involving close reading, analysis and writing in a seminar format. Students will complete a seminar paper. Prerequisite: ENG 121. LIT 480 Independent Study (3 credits) This course allows the student to investigate any Literature subject not incorporated into the curriculum. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: ENG 121. LIT 485 Senior Thesis in Literature (6 credits) This year-long course is an option for seniors of exceptional ability who are majoring in English language and literature and who wish to have a graduate-level research and writing experience in some chosen area of American, British or world literature. Students must petition to take the course. Students who receive permission from the area coordinator/department chair and their academic advisors must proceed to formulate a written thesis proposal and assemble a three-person academic support committee, equipped with relevant expertise, no later than March 30th of the junior year. The proposal will then be submitted for approval to the individual’s advisory committee. Assuming the project is universally approved, the student will meet with one or more members of the committee on a biweekly basis to review progress on research and written work. The final result will be a scholarly essay of 40 to 60 pages, to be pre-

sented as an academic paper in a public forum at least three weeks before graduation. Offered on an ongoing basis, as this is a two- to three-year research and writing project.

Learning Strategies LSS 100 Learning Strategies Seminar (3 credits) The Learning Strategies Seminar is a full-semester course designed to assist students with learning skills that are essential for academic success in college. Students will be taught a variety of learning skills, styles and strategies that will enable them to experience success in college classes and beyond. This seminar will assist students in becoming more independent learners and in maximizing their educational experience. Credits awarded for this course are in addition to the 120-credit minimum graduation requirement.

Mathematics A graphing calculator (Texas Instruments TI-83 or better) is strongly recommended for use in all mathematics courses with the exception of MAT 105, MAT 106, and MAT 206. MAT 050 Fundamentals of Algebra (3 credits) This course includes a review of basic arithmetic and an introduction to elementary algebra. Topics include signed numbers, linear equations, simple and compound interest, graphing linear equations, polynomials, quadratic equations and graphing quadratics. (Credits awarded for this course are in addition to the 120-credit minimum graduation requirement.) MAT 105 Merchandising Mathematics (3 credits) This course surveys the mathematics that are essential to the maintenance of the retail store operating statements, markup and markdown, average maintained markup, turnover, open-to-buy and other topics at the instructor’s discretion. (This course cannot be used as an elective by students who have already completed MAT 120, MAT 130, MAT 150, or MAT 106 and MAT 206. A waiver of this restriction is awarded to four-year retailing majors.) MAT 106 Mathematics for Elementary Education I (3 credits) This is the first course of a two-semester sequence which explores the mathematics content in grades K-6 from an advanced standpoint. Topics include: problem solving; functions and graphs; numbers and operations. This course is open to elementary education and early childhood education students ONLY. MAT 121 Mathematical Concepts and Techniques for Business (3 credits) An anthology for business majors, this course enriches and augments the techniques developed in MAT 120. Special attention is given to developing the topics using business examples and employing graphing calculators and computer packages. Topics covered include matrices and their applications, an introduction to linear programming, and an introduction to calculus applied to polynomials. Prerequisite: MAT 120, MAT 130, or MAT 106 and MAT 206. (Students who have successfully completed MAT 150 may not register for MAT 121.) 149

SNHU Undergraduate Catalog 2009-2010  

Southern New Hampshire University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog