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Sew  Fantastic

A long life love of music Musician Kevin Heinz brings his brand of eclectic blues-rock to local venues. By Karen Jarchow

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al endeavors, and that includes the world of music. Through weekend festivals, markets, Friday afternoon club events as well as the free Hot Summer Nights concert series, there is usually no shortage of music to sample. Kevin Heinz and Friends has been no stranger to any of the above opportunities. Their long line of appearances around the valley has made them a neighborhood favorite. The band has also hit the road throughout the state with gigs in Aspen, Telluride and Boulder. Heinz says one of his favorite places to perform has been at the Telluride Blues and Brews Festival in both 2009 and 2011. This festival is based at the Telluride Town Park that located at the heart of a breathtaking kaleidoscope of vast mountain views and has had a long history of impressive line ups, such as B.B. King’s performance in 2004. “Out of the 90 different countries I’ve been to, I’ve never seen anything more beautiful than what you have here,� King once told the crowd from the venue’s wooden stage. It is no question that with a statement like that from such an iconic performer of the world of blues, that Heinz was in good company at a world-class stage while in Telluride. It is no doubt that Heinz is a great example of what can come from following your passion. As most know, following the path of a professional musician cannot be easy. Often the journey up the ranks in the music industry can lead to many frustrations. Heinz is no stranger to this. “My advice to aspiring artists would be to recognize small successes like playing a gig, seeing people in the crowd dance, finishing a new song, playing new music, and not getting discouraged at the music industry while climbing the ladder in attempts to making it big,� says Heinz. All that being said, Heinz does not work as a full-time performing musician. And surprisingly, he isn’t a waiter, bartender, bellman, or any other typical Vail Valley cash job employee. Heinz maintains both his musical passion and career going while keeping his creative juices flowing through his “real job� as a videographer and creative consultant. He also teaches guitar lessons at Minturn Music. “I find joy in the balance between creative gigs,� says Heinz. This balance most definitely transcends into his music, and is a great example of living your life through your passion. You can catch Kevin Heinz and Friends at upcoming shows including the Vail Mountain FAC on Aug. 3, at the Minturn Market on Sept. 1 and at the Blues and Brews Festival in Telluride on Sept. 15. You can find his work online at kevinheinzmusic.bandcamp.com, and on facebook.com/ kevinheinzmusic. Check out Heinz’s work and be sure to say hello to this friendly musician at his upcoming shows.

he ever-evolving band Kevin Heinz and Friends rings a familiar tune throughout the Vail Valley, with its message of celebrating life’s friendships, love and wonder. Frontman Heinz can be found playing at various venues around town, with his soulful mix of acoustic and electronic blues-rock. SneakPEAK caught up with Heinz to discuss how he has created the band, how they have gotten to where they are today, and what helpful hints he has for other aspiring artists. Heinz’s infatuation with music started at a young age, and he has never been one to shy away from the stage. He dates the beginning of his performance days all the way back to the crib. From diapers he progressed to school and church performances. This aspiring musician was then soon provoked and encouraged to share his talent through backyard cameos for family and neighborhood friends. On and off stage, Heinz would always grab at the chance to sing or play guitar, both solo or with a group. Throughout his upbringing, he says his talents and passion for music were recognized and encouraged daily by his family. Heinz’s lifelong love of music has lead to him becoming the backbone behind Kevin Heinz and Friends. Heinz describes his band as, “an ever evolving entity, a rotating cast of fellow musicians that come together to perform my original songs, favorite covers and old standards.� The band is often in the form of a trio, featuring bass, drums, and guitar. However, they’ve been known to incorporate a variety of instruments including keys, saxophone, trombone, banjo, harmonica and washboard. As you can imagine, this combination and plethora of sounds can create quite an original tune. SneakPEAK writer Karen Jarchow can be reached at The Vail Valley community has always encouraged cultur- info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Into the

WILD BLUE yonder The Colorado River’s secluded Gore Canyon boasts world-class rapids - and no crowds. By Phil Lindeman. Photo/ cover by Zach Mahone

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ithin moments of floating her first Class IV rapids, Sheree Sutton was having second thoughts.

“My heart is pumping so fast right now,� Sutton said after running a quarter-mile section of the Colorado River’s legendary Gore Canyon. “I keep thinking to myself, ‘Oh my god, I’ve put my family in danger.’� Sutton’s assessment sounds macabre at first – I wasn’t having visions of watery death yet – but it was punctuated with bursts of laughter as the bright-blue raft exited the rapids and skirted along an eddy to a calm pool. The small, blonde Texas native sat near the back of the inflatable, clad like the rest of us in a full wetsuit, red life vest, bucket-like helmet and tennis shoes. She was separated from her thickly-built husband, Gary, by Billy Mattison, the co-owner of Timberline Guides and our group’s personal savior. We had just floated “Fisherman’s Nightmare,� a stretch near the mouth of the sevenmile-long canyon, when Mattison told us to head ashore. The Suttons and their son, Tyler, paddled in sync as Mattison steered and explained the art of “swimming,� a last-ditch skill for people who get tossed from the rafts. On many of the state’s most harrowing commercial routes – Shoshone in Glenwood Canyon, portions of the Arkansas River near Canon City – rapids are on the easy end of Class IV, and swimming is an anomaly. In the Gore Canyon, though, it’s a guarantee. As the river winds through the gorge, it leads to five straight miles of Class IV and V waters where victims (as the Timberline guides called us) are regularly dumped in the drink. Sheree Sutton looked slightly pale when we pulled our raft into the rocks and lined up for swimming practice. The Gore Canyon excursion was her idea – “I wanted something different and challenging,� she said. “I actually tried to talk her out of it,� Gary Sutton replied as our small band met up with about 30 other rafters and guides. We walked across dark rocks to a pool, where Mattison gave quick pointers on swimming. One by one, people stepped into the warm July water and drifted downriver to waiting guides, passing by boulders the size of sofas. “I really hate swimming,� Sheree Sutton said. “I never through they’d make us do this. I don’t think I’m ready.� And then she dove.

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The Colorado River’s best-kept secret For raft companies across the state, it’s been a bizarre season. Disappointing snowfall left favorites routes like the Royal Gorge woefully low – Class IV runs are barely high enough to qualify for Class III – but the Gore Canyon north of State Bridge is enjoying its best season in years. The Colorado River has remained immune to water woes, thanks in large part to the Shoshone Hydro Dam in Glenwood Canyon – a man-made failsafe the Arkansas River and other waterways don’t enjoy. “This year has been good. Typically, we don’t get on this trip until August when everything is cooler,� said Mattison, who led the first commercial group through Gore Canyon in 1990. “We just have the area to ourselves. It’s a classic stretch of whitewater that gives you solitude, beauty and challenge.� In the fledgling years of running the canyon, Mattison would only take two or three people at a time. The company is now one of five to regularly run the route, but the canyon remains obscure enough that floats are rarely interrupted by other rafters. On the shimmering mid-July morning of our trip, we were practically alone once we pushed off onto the calm, meandering water above the canyon. The trip is about 11 miles from start to finish, with four miles of easy paddling before a barrage of Class IV and V rapids. When we come to the mouth of the canyon, a safety kayaker pulled alongside our raft. These auxiliary guides follow the rafts to grab lost gear or help disoriented swimmers. Their skills are hardly in question: Timberline boasts several members of the U.S. Whitewater Rafting Team, and like Mattison, most have been guides for a decade or more. “Looks like we have the P90s in here,� the safety kayaker said to our crew. Tyler Sutton, a former college football player who’s muscular like his father and soft-spoken like his mother, looked confused. “What’s that mean?� he asked. The kayaker chuckled. “The big guns.� Enter “The arena� After “swimming practice� – Sheree Sutton made it through fine, letting out whoops of

[See GORE CANYON, page 13]

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Vail gets U.S. Open

Snowboarding to take center stage By Melanie Wong

The longest-running event in snowboarding history is coming to the slopes of Vail, and it may provide an opportunity for the mountain to gain a foothold in the wavering recreational snowboarding market. The Burton U.S. Open, previously held in Stratton, Vt., will be in its 31st year in 2013, featuring half-pipe and slopestyle contests. It will be the first major pro snowboarding competition Vail has hosted since the Honda Sessions ended in 2008. “Vail has a pretty great reputation with Sessions. Sessions has always been cited as one of the most well-run events,” says Anne-Marie Dacyshyn, global PR director for Burton Snowboards. Event organizers look to make the event reach beyond just snowboarding enthusiasts, to Top womens snowboarder Kelly Clark sails over the halfpipe at last year’s U.S. Open in Stratton, Vt. Next year the U.S. Open, one of the sport’s premiere competitions, comes to Vail at the end of February 2013, bringing Clark and other top pros to Golden Peak. Dean Blotto Gray photo.

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the target audience of kids and families. “We want this open and accessible to spectators. We want to make it interactive for everyone,” Dacyshyn says. “We’ll have jumbotrons at villages and it will be very family-oriented. We’ll also bring some of our learn-to-ride programs.” Vail has always been a “home mountain away from home” for Burton founder and snowboarding pioneer Jake Burton, so having Vail host the U.S. Open was a natural move for the competition. Vail Resorts and Burton representatives say they intend for the event to have a long-term home in Vail. The event will bring top athletes, such as Olympic gold medalist and five-time U.S. Open winner Kelly Clark. The 29-year-old half-pipe specialist says she considers the U.S. Open among one of the most prestigious events a professional snowboarder can win, right behind the Olympics and the X-Games. “I came as a spectator as a kid, and I competed in the pre-qualifiers for it,” Clark says. “Anyone who is anybody will be there.” Downhill trends The announcement comes after a couple of recent publications by the National Ski Areas Association documented a downhill trend in snowboarding participation. According to the study, conducted by Boulder-based RRC Associates, snowboarding participation numbers peaked and leveled after the 2001-2002 winter season. Across the board, snowboarders are aging, spending fewer average days on the mountain, buying less equipment, and perhaps most importantly, kids 14 years old and younger aren’t hitting the slopes as snowboarders. The number of younger kids getting into snowsports as snowboarders has declined since 2003, from 42.3 percent to a 12-year low of 35.7 percent in 2011. “What we’re witnessing is a maturation of a market,” says Nate Fristoe, director of operations at the Boulder-based research company RRC Associates. “Snowboarders came into the sport in the ‘80s and ‘90s, when they were young. Now they are in the family-building years, and what they’re saying is starting their kids in snowboarding doesn’t work. It’s much more practical to start them out on skis.” Fristoe also says the snowboarding world has a major gender disparity, with women dropping out of the sport at an alarming rate. “For beginners, the split is about 50-50,” Fristoe says. “Once you hit intermediate levels

[See U.S. OPEN, page 18]

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Reds, Whites and Brews Festival brings local brewers and unique vintners to Avon. By Phil Lindeman Jeremy Pluck, master brewer at Edwards’ Gore Range Brewery, displays a brew that will make an appearance at this weekend’s brew and wine festival. Billy Doran photo

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or the current breed of microbrew faithful, few things say summertime like a locally minded beer festival.

But this is the Vail Valley, where the wine list at a corner saloon wouldn’t be complete without a few high-end bottles from France and beyond. Yet one thing is for certain: Craft producers from both worlds find a captive market in the high country, where bold vistas make a near-perfect backdrop for experimental flavors and world-class variety. “When people can appreciate artisanal wines, they’re open and receptive to craft brews,” says Jeremy Pluck, the brewmaster at Edwards-based brewpub Gore Range Brewery. “It’s a great opportunity for some cross-marketing and exposure. There’s nothing wrong with liking both.” During this weekend’s aptly-titled “Reds, Whites and Brews Festival” in Avon, winos and brew lovers will mingle at one of the valley’s first fests to treat both beverages as equals. More than 200 offerings from 42 vineyards and roughly 15 breweries pour freely at Nottingham Park on Saturday, beginning at noon and ending at 5 p.m. For $25 in advance ($30 at the event), festival-goers get unlimited – yes, unlimited – tastings from a huge variety of producers,

including Pluck of Gore Range Brewery, his neighbors at Crazy Mountain Brewery and the owners of Garrett Estate Cellars, a small vineyard outside of tiny Olathe, Colo. “With this being the Vail Valley, we really wanted to add wine to our regular beer festival format,” says Holli Snyder, general manager of Avon’s NRC Broadcasting, which coordinates the festival with the Avon Rec Center. “It’s part of the culture here, and people expect it. I think it will attract a completely different crowd than you’re used to seeing.”

primarily by a laudable core of local breweries. People arrive in droves to pay dirt-cheap admission, see free bands and meet the folks behind their favorite Colorado beers. But Snyder saw an opportunity to expand the format for the inaugural Avon festival. Rather than focus solely on microbrews, she wanted to tap into the valley’s long-standing love of good, affordable wines. To make sure there wasn’t too much dissonance, organizers sought out winemakers from across the globe who are similar in spirit to stateside craft brewers. “A world of wine is coming to Avon, and it’s going to be fun,” says Veraison Distributing representative Bob Cohen, who is bringing wines from 40 producers to the festival. “I think the festival is a great combination. Whether it’s our What: Reds, Whites and Brews Festival world – the wine world – or the brewer world, it requires Where: Nottingham Park, Avon love, attention and pride. We’re talking quality, small-batch When: Saturday, Aug. 4 from noon to 5 p.m. products made by people learning as they go.” Regular cost: $25 advance, $30 at entrance Cohen works primarily with vineyards he describes as VIP cost: $65 advance, $75 at entrance (in“approachable and enjoyable,” the sort of husband-andcludes mug, private tastings and catered tent) wife operations that demystify the occasionally highbrow Free music throughout the day from Nate wine market. For Cohen, producers like Huia Vineyards – King and The Disintegrators, Finnders and a New Zealand-based company founded by a couple – are Youngberg and Hillbilly Hellcats. the vino equivalent of an up-and-comer like Eagle’s Bonfire More info: www.RedsWhitesAndBrews.net. Brewing. Along with bottles from Huia and another New Zealand vineyard, Cohen will bring wines from Argentina, Chile, Spain, France and Italy, along with stateside offerings Drinking locally, thinking openly For Snyder and other organizers, the festival is a chance to from Washington, Oregon, California and more. By the time replicate the success NRC Broadcasting sees with two events bottles and taps run dry on Saturday afternoon, brewers and in Breckenridge. Now in its ninth year, the summer version vintners alike hope to broaden their palates – not to mention [See REDS, WHITES AND BREWS, page 17] of the Breckenridge Beer Festival regularly sells out, fueled

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Martha Graham Dance returns

Progression and classics on the bill for iconic company By John O’Neill

The Vail International Dance Festival returns for the 2012 season featuring renowned dancers and eclectic styles of international dance. This year the festival will bolster a longstanding relationship with the Martha Graham Dance Company, as the renowned group brings a full troupe of dancers to the Vail mountains for the first time. Martha Graham Dance Company Artistic Director Janet Eilber will bring 16 dancers from the company to perform in three programs, one of which will be a world premiere and choreographed by Doug Varone. “We are the oldest modern dance company in the world,” Eilber says. “Martha Graham started the company in 1926 during a revolution of arts in America. A lot of what people can expect to see in Vail is the Martha Graham classics, but also the progressiveness of modern dance.” Martha Graham, a dancer and choreographer in the 1920s, came to be revered by the American public and artistic community. Much like what George Gershwin did for classical music in the early 20th century, Graham forged an American identity for dance. “We were sort of on a borrowed culture from Europe,” Eilber says about American dance style before Graham. “Then came Graham. She was athletic and risky. She began to make a statement about the human condition in America.” Art has a way of becoming timeless. It travels through decades and centuries, even, without losing its bond to the people. Graham’s progression of dance in the 1920s astounded onlookers and continues to do so nearly a century later. “(Graham) was powerfully emotional and expressive,” Eilber says. “People were shocked by how she used her body. She amazed and inspired dancers in America with her dancing. Her works, like any piece of art, still speaks. It is timeless.” Eilber says that Graham’s work has pushed American dancing to the popular state that it is in today. Television shows like “So You Think You Can Dance,” “Dancing with

the Stars” and “America’s Best Dance Crew” are a sampling of American dance programs that are now being replicated by the once dance-dominant cultures in Europe. “People see all of this on television and don’t realize where it all came from,” Eilber says. “In Vail people will be able to see that discipline on stage, in a theater, live.” Eilber continues Graham’s reach for progression in dance. She commands the dance company to expressive styles of dance that reflect the human condition today while accounting for the established dance culture set forth by Graham. In Vail, for instance, dancers from the Martha Graham Dance Company will execute a world premiere, performing a piece choreographed by Martha Graham herself. The rest of what will take place on the. Ford Amphitheater stage will be what Eilber describes as a “mixed bill.” “This is what we do at the dance company,” she says. “We become inspired. We use the past to launch us into the future.” The Martha Graham Dance Company will have appearances from Aug. 6 to Aug. 8 and will hold the stage themselves on Aug. 9. For more information and tickets, visit the dance festival’s website at vaildance.org Giving queues to a First Lady The first dance of the former First Lady Betty Ford came long before she and Gerald Ford took to the dance floor on their wedding night in 1948. Before she ever slipped on a wedding gown, she forced her feet into the binding shoe of a dancer alongside Martha Graham in New York City. As a single girl in the city, Ford drew from her early influences as a dancer to forge an iconic personality. She surrounded herself with confident women, such as Graham, who weren’t afraid to forge a new identity. During her husband’s time in office, Ford was deemed the “Fighting First Lady” and demanded equal pay for women. She wasn’t shy about sex, drugs and abortion and was revered by the American public, while loathed by public lead-

[See MARTHA GRAHAM, page 18]

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play Eagle’s first annual canine festival offers fun for dogs and owners. By Melanie Wong Dock Dogs, a water jumping competition, will be one of several events for canines at the Canine Carnival this weekend. Photo special to SneakPEAK.

W

hen Edwards resident Susan Lan lost her 7-year-old Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, Spring, she never imagined the search for the lost pet would bring together dog lovers from all over the area to form what is now a valley-wide nonprofit. Spring’s 13-day disappearance during a routine walk outside Wolcott made local headlines after Lan’s friends and other dog owners joined forces to comb the area and put up flyers. “We wanted to do something with all the dog groups in the valley. A lot of events have been canceled over the last few years because of the economy, and we decided we shouldn’t be cancelling these events because they are fundraisers,” Lan says. “We had all this momentum from 13 days of being so focused on finding Spring. That’s how Mountain Dogs came around.” This weekend, Mountain Dogs of Colorado, a new nonprofit formed in May, will hold the Canine Carnival, their first annual event in Eagle. The two-day festival will be a pooch extravaganza, with all sorts of dog-and-owner activities, demos, vendor booths, and dog-and-human treats. Doggie fun for all The carnival will feature a Doggie Mudder, the event’s take on the humans-only obstacle race, the Tough Mudder.

Dogs and owners run the mud-filled obstacle course together, and afterward can enter costume and talent contests. “(The group) has gotten such positive outreach from the community,” says event organizer and Mountain Dogs member Nikki Geraci. “We wanted to give back, and we all love our dogs so much. Our goal is to promote happy, healthy relationships between dogs and people.” Geraci says she and her Akita, Hachi, may run the Doggie Mudder together. Other events include Vail Pet Partners’ 5th annual 5K Doggie Dash run and Dock Dogs, a water-jumping competition that has been featured at Vail’s Teva Games and in previous years in Avon. The carnival not only provides different events for dogs and owners to do together, but also introduces dog-training activities from training professionals from around the state. “There are a lot of activities for dog and their owners that we don’t have access to up here,” Lan says. “This is a way to introduce people to these activities and maybe eventually get them to come up here.” Dogs can get a whiff of “scent work,” a skill taught to bomb squad dogs. A Denver-based training company, Guy and a Leash, will do demos and lessons throughout the weekend. Another trainer will hold demonstrations of agility and flyball drills. In agility drills, dogs complete obstacle courses, climb down ladders and weave around cones. In flyball drills, dogs run to a box and hit a lever with their paw to release a ball. The drill focuses on speed and coordination. And let’s not forget the Doggy Dance, which is sure to be a crowd favorite – in this event, dogs and owners learn choreographed dance routines set to music that they can perform together. Maybe your dog needs a little basic obedience training; Edwards-based dog trainer Mark Ruark will be on hand both

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mornings of the festival, giving free dog-training sessions. There will also be an adoption drive through the Colorado Animal Rescue Care from Glenwood Springs and the National Mill Dog Rescue. All events will benefit local dog organizations, and the cost is $5 admission per person, $20 for families of four or more, or $20 for dogs to participate in any of the events. Finding Spring Lan eventually found Spring when a caretaker at Diamond Star Ranch, a good distance from where Spring had last been seen, called in, saying he’d found the lost animal. The ranch’s sheep dog had come running up to the front door with another dog in tow. The caretaker immediately recognized Spring from her photos in the newspaper, and she responded when he called her name. Spring was tired and had lost considerable weight, but was otherwise unhurt. Other dog owners who had lost their animals started contacting Lan for advice, giving her the idea to set up a resource for owners. “The goal is to be a resource for people who want to find their dog but don’t know what to do,” Lan says. “We put up information on a website, www.findspring.net, with info on dog behavior when they’re lost, and compiled the resources of what we did step-by-step in our search.” Lan would like to expand the resource to offer a free service to people looking for their dogs. It would notify local media and law enforcement about the lost animal. She’s even thinking about starting a dog-print service, so owners might be able to better track their dogs in the event they get lost. For more information on Mountain Dogs events and how to get involved, see www.mountaindogs.org. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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The soup kitchen, redone

Empty Bowls fundraiser benefits local Salvation Army By Melanie Wong

It’s a well-known concept – those in need of a hot meal can come to the local community kitchen for a bowl of soup. But a group of local residents, nonprofits, restaurants and artists are taking the concept of a soup kitchen to the next level. Through money raised at the upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser in Edwards, organizers hope to give more than $10,000 to local families in need. Here’s how it works: Throughout the summer, local potters and volunteers have made, decorated and glazed almost 500 soup bowls, which will be used at a fundraiser meal held at Battle Mountain High School from noon to 1:30 p.m. on Aug. 9 to benefit the Vail Valley Salvation Army. Local restaurants and chefs are pitching in to provide gourmet soups, breads and desserts for the event. For $20, attendees will get a meal to eat and bowl to take home as a reminder “that there’s hunger in the community and in the world,” says Tsu Wolin-Brown of the Vail Valley Salvation Army. The fundraiser is in its fourth year following a big turnout last year, an event that brought out 300 people and raised $9,000. Local Diana Matthias says she first saw a similar event in Santa Fe and got together with two friends, Terry Smith and Annie Breckheimer, to start one in the valley. Matthias, who has taken CMC pottery classes herself, thought it was a great way to combine both local artists and chefs. “There is something very wholesome about working with clay, and it becomes very therapeutic,” Matthias says. “The reason that this event has resonated in the valley is that it is truly a coming-together of the community. We found that the food pantry at the Salvation Army needs much support, and this is one way that the restaurants and art community can help. The concept of Empty Bowls was started, and there are now many towns and communities across the States that run an Empty Bowl event every year.” There is still one more opportunity to help fire bowls for the event on Thursday, Aug. 2 at 5 p.m. at the Alpine Arts Center in Edwards. Call 970-926-2732 for more information. Soup, dressed up The event has gourmet restaurants – normally more accustomed to catering multi-course dinners and banquets – ladling out tasty bowls of soup instead. Participating restaurants include Larkspur, Sonnenalp, Alpenrose, Four Seasons, Westside Café, Ti Amo, Splendido, Grouse Mt. Grill, Golden Eagle, Columbine Bakery, Beano’s Cabin, Broken Arrow Café, Avon Bakery, Heidi’s Bakery and Vail’s Chaine des Rotisseurs. David Walford, executive chef and owner of Splendido at Beaver Creek, will be doing the event for the second year and plans to make a roasted tomato soup with tomatoes from the local farmer’s markets. “We roast and char the tomatoes in a wood oven, and the

A potter prepares a clay soup bowl, that will be painted and fired, for the upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser benefiting the Salvation Army. For $20, participants will get soup, bread, water, dessert and a bowl to take home. Photo special to SneakPEAK. soup itself turns out smooth and creamy,” Walford says. He believes the event is a good reminder that even in a community such as the Vail Valley, there are people in need. “When Splendido participates in an event, it’s either foodrelated or children-related,” Walford says. “We also always try to support local charities. There are down-and-out people that need to eat, and that I can do something about.” Chef Jason Harrison of Flame at the Four Seasons will be making the Flame Minestrone for the event. “It is a hearty soup made using local vegetables and homemade tomato broth,” Harrison says. “Yet it is not too filling that you can’t enjoy it on a summer night.” It is Flame’s first year participating, and Harrison says the hotel had been looking for local charities to help with time and expertise. “One of the things that all Four Seasons hotels prides themselves on is being a positive influence in the community and ensuring we have the opportunity to give back as often as possible,” Harrison says. Everything used for the event, from the venue, to trays, to water has been donated by local businesses, ensuring that all proceeds will go to the Salvation Army food pantry. “We’ve had a great turnout (in past years),” Wolin-Brown says. “We expect to seat 500 this year. It’s just become the popular community event to attend.” SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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Helping our four-legged friends Animal shelter takes a unique approach to abused pets By Phil Lindeman The Eagle County Animal Shelter offers something many communities simply can’t afford: a “central clearinghouse” for pets, according to director Shawn Markmann. As a government-funded facility under the direction of Eagle County Animal Services, the shelter is part of an overarching department dedicated solely to unclaimed animals, the majority of which are strays. From the moment a lost or abandoned pet is found, Markmann and his officers are part of every detail. Animal shelters aren’t few and far between – Colorado alone has more than 120 – but many are nonprofits and contract their services to town governments. Organizations like the Denver Dumb Friends League and Eagle County Humane Society can fundraise at will – both a blessing and a curse. The contract model means there is occasionally a gap between the county officers who pick up strays and the private shelters that care for them afterwards. “The fact we run a shelter at the same time up here is kind of an anomaly,” Markmann says. “Most others municipalities can’t oversee those services, but I think having both those services in one department is really nice. We have a foot in both worlds and that gives us a broader view.” A pet-friendly community In the small, pet-friendly communities of Eagle County, running a shelter with tax money is relatively easy, but the county’s all-in-one approach isn’t feasible for densely populated areas. Operating costs for an area with fewer than 60,000 permanent residents are more affordable than a city with 100,000 people or more. “Most towns don’t want to build large facilities for animals because they are money pits,” Markmann says, noting it takes roughly $2,000 to treat and shelter an animal once it arrives. “This setup gives you a total perception on what happens in the county as a whole. We have a more realistic expectation of how animals can be cared for.” Until 2008, the shelter had the best of both worlds through a partnership with the local Humane Society, but a nasty split that year separated the two organizations. Although the shelter lost volunteers in the wake of the feud, once Markmann took over in 2010, he built a model that now works well for his six full-time employees and, more importantly, the cats and dogs they encounter daily. Last year, the shelter found homes for 640 animals, and Markmann predicts nearly 700 will be adopted by December. These impressive numbers are due in part to the shelter’s humanitarian approach: It’s considered a “no-kill for space” facility, meaning animals will never be euthanized unless health or behavior issues leave no other option. “No animal that is healthy and adoptable will be killed here,” Markmann says, noting the shelter has boasted a five-percent euthanasia rate for as long as he can remember. “Sometimes, we have to put an animal to sleep if they are

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Where: 1400 Fairgrounds Road in Eagle Hours: Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Adoption costs: $100 for dogs, $70 for cats All dogs and cats are given health checks, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and microchipped before adoption.

just too sick or aggressive. There is really no such thing as a ‘no-kill shelter’ when you take in every animal.” As Markmann alludes to, the 80-kennel shelter looks after animals that wouldn’t otherwise receive help – say, an unidentified dog hit by a car – but is only able to house dogs, cats and other small animals like hamsters. Once a dog or cat is brought to the shelter, it has five days to be claimed by the owner. If no one comes forward, the animal becomes the property of the county and is assessed for adoption. It gets the works: a check-up, vaccinations, microchip, even a grooming if needed. When the pet is taken care of, it’s finally put up for adoption and generally finds a home within a few weeks. Although Markmann is proud of the shelter’s adoption rates, the main benefit of the Eagle County facility is what he dubs “re-housing,” or returning lost pets to their owners. Thanks to the all-inclusive model, officers are familiar with pets and stand a better chance of returning them to their owners. “It’s nice we have the ability to re-house animals – in a small community, you tend to know which animals belong to which people,” Markmann says. “In a worst-case scenario, the same animals will just get brought to us over and over.” Helping pets – and owners Despite the department’s catch-all approach to the process of animal care, it still encounters problems faced by shelters everywhere. The majority of in-need pets come from Eagle and Gypsum, where there are higher numbers of permanent residents than the transitional towns of Vail and Avon. For Markmann, one of the biggest hurdles is dealing with abusive or simply irresponsible owners. “It’s very frustrating to have an animal you can tell comes from a home, just because of their obedience training or grooming or how they look,” Markmann says. “You know someone owns the animal, but they just aren’t looking for them. That happens much more than I care to elaborate on.”

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Old Kentucky Tavern 223 Broadway Eagle, CO 328-5259 www.oldkentuckytavern.com Along with educating complacent owners, Markmann is constantly searching for volunteers. Markmann uses volunteers for most daily activities, from walking dogs to caring for kittens. This keeps overall costs low and helps take a small burden off his officers. When the county and Humane Society severed ties, the shelter lost more than volunteers – it no longer had funding from tax-free donations. The shelter makes enough off adoption fees to cover vaccinations and microchips, but the remarkably low cost is more about finding responsible owners than making a profit. In general, Markmann says people who can’t manage $100 for a dog won’t be able to care for it in the long run, but the cost is just low enough that animals don’t spend months without a home. “There’s a certain psychology to adoptions,” Markmann says. “We have a little easier time making people more responsible about ownership.” SneakPEAK reporter Philip Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

A dog at the Eagle County Animal Shelter peers through the links of the kennel fence. The shelter is one of the few government-run-and-funded facilities in the state that is a “no-kill for space” program. Kent Pettit photo.

GORE CANYON –––––––––––––––––––– laughter the entire time – we piled back into the rafts and pushed into the canyon’s jagged guts. The first obstacle was intimidating: Gore Rapids, made of smaller lines given cute names like “Scissors,” “Rodeo Rock” and “Pyrite.” When he first started, Mattison would take groups through the entire stretch, but with flows of close to 1,000 cubic feet for second, it’s safer to walk around a quartermile stretch that’s the river equivalent of a pinball machine. We pounded through a few more rapids, including a Class IV aptly named “Foreplay” that leads to the canyon’s marquee feature: Tunnel Falls, a narrow chute of whitewater surrounded by a rocky amphitheater known as “the arena.” As a precaution, everyone exited the rafts and checked the falls before making a descent, like scoping a powder line. The sight of gushing water and towering rocks was too much for Sheree and Gary Sutton. They opted out of the falls, leaving Tyler, Mattison and myself in the boat. To a novice rafter, the drop through Tunnel Falls felt like a stop-motion film – one second we were paddling for speed, the next we were tumbling through a rocky vise, and the next Tyler was swimming to the shore. Of the entire group, only one boat flipped completely, a nearly unavoidable hiccup on large trips. No one was hurt

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(the majority of injuries occur when portaging over rocks) but the guides have a way of ribbing each other for spills: Anyone who flips a raft buys shots for the whole team at the Minturn Saloon, Timberline’s traditional post-float haunt. After Tunnel Falls, the elder Suttons rejoined our raft for the final two rapids – “Raceline” and “Toilet Bowl” – before ending in a sedate two-mile stretch of Class II waters. Our crew was soaked, tired, sunburned and ecstatic. Over lunch, we recounted the past four hours with awe, although Sheree admitted once through the canyon was probably enough. But for a whitewater junkie like Mattison, the route is a well-kept secret that satisfies even after 20 years “This is real guiding,” Mattison said. “A lot of raft trips are just entertaining. This trip is a real challenge – you don’t have to tell stories about one-eyed Willie or something. The water and scenery speak for themselves.”

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Rest and recover right By John O’Neill The practical reasons for hitting the gym to crunch abs and curl biceps may include getting fit, being healthy, or nothing more than trying to “look good naked.” Whichever reason gets you to the gym, what you do afterward for recovery is equally as important as the workout itself. Often overlooked by recreational athletes, the importance of recovery may seem counter intuitive. One may think that the more they workout the more fit they will be. In reality, the human body actually gets weaker during a workout and only gets stronger when recovering. “Getting stronger is a muscle repair process,” says JointWorx physical therapist Sara Manwiller. “During a workout, muscles are broken down. It is after the workout, when you are recovering, that the muscles begin to build new tissue.” Manwiller, who is also a certified strength and conditioning coach and a certified athletic trainer, says the muscle-building process is a simple protein breakdown and then protein synthesis. In a valley where recreation abounds, Manwiller says that taking time between strenuous activities is one of the most important things people can do to ensure that their muscles are tip-top before going at it again. She adds that many of the injuries she and her colleagues at JointWorx in Edwards see are due to overuse – or not taking the time between physical activities. “The best thing people can do in this valley to stay healthy is make sure that they are doing nothing incredibly strenuous on the same muscles every day,” Manwiller says. So instead of running Berry Picker every day of the summer at max effort, instead try one day running and the next biking. By giving time between activities, your body will actually get stronger. The nutritional factor Other key factors in recovering in a place of altitude where climbing into bed can get you winded, is nutrition. A mix of protein and carbs should ideally be consumed within an hour of working out to maximize their recovery benefit, says Manwiller. Carbs allow for the body to quickly refuel, avoiding the groggy grips of exhaustion. Protein, on the other hand, follows a longer process of breakdown but is imperative to rebuilding muscle. Great sources of post-workout nutrition are recovery shakes that have scientifically balanced carb-to-protein ratios. Hydration is also key, says Manwiller. Dehydrated bodies have a hard time excreting many toxins created during a work-

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out. Hydrating during and after a workout allow the body to push out harmful toxins that act like acid in the body. Manwiller’s recommends adding a lemon to water consumed during recovery as a trick to feeling good. “When you finish a workout, your body is in an acidic environment,” Manwiller says. “It sounds weird to have a lemon because lemons are so citrusy, but it helps regulate the alkalinity in your body.” From watching the Olympics, viewers can see athletes going to extreme measures to recover. One such measure is the tortuous practice of an ice bath, or filling a tub with water and ice and sitting in it. First, this is not recommended for the men

Dos and don’ts of recovery

Do • Rest exhausted muscle • Alternate activities and muscle groups • Consume a carb/protein regimen within one hour of working out • Hydrate like crazy • Add lemon to your water Don’t • Overstretch • Overuse exhausted muscle groups • Heat acute injuries or swollen areas out there who are trying to look good naked. Second, icing can be a solid way to recover. The age old ice versus heat battle may never end, but both practices serve your body in recovering. By altering the normal temperature of certain areas of body, your heart sends a steady flow of fresh, oxygenated blood to that area, says Manwiller. This fresh blood helps repair broken-down muscle tissue. Finally, some things not to do when recovering. Manwiller says that a popular practice that perpetuates injury is overstretching. A good, light stretch is good to avoiding stiffness. Holding deep, heavy and long stretches harm the muscles and often aggravate injury. Working out the same group of muscles continually is harmful. Heating an acute injury or wherever there is swelling is also not a good idea. But let be known, couch potatoes, that while recovery is important to sculpting an Olympic body, you must first actually workout. SneakPEAK writer John O’Neill can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Featured Wedding of the Week

Sires-Merens Wedding Bride: Sarah Merens of Cleveland, Ohio Groom: David Sires of Cleveland, Ohio Married: July 14, 2012 Location: Vail Mountain

How they met David and Sarah were next-door neighbors. They first met in the stairway while on their way to work. A few days later Dave received a package for Sarah’s friend at his door, and he brought it over. “We talked in my doorway, with his mom and grandmother peeping around the corner, as they happened to be visiting that weekend,” Sarah says. “We were instant friends.” How he proposed It was two days before Sarah’s birthday, and the two were visiting Sarah’s parents in Tucson, Ariz. David planned a romantic birthday getaway and booked a room at a resort and spa. They checked into a spa for a couple’s massage, where the staff surprised her by singing “Happy Birthday” and presented her with a cupcake. “I thought it was the best birthday surprise.” Sara says. “Little did I know that Dave had been coordinating with the hotel and spa manager for weeks on planning this event so that when I was done with my massage, Dave would be there kneeling in front of me with a ring in his hand. Unfortunately I don’t remember too much of what he said prior to ‘Will you marry me?’ and of course I said yes.” The couple went back to the hotel for a private dinner on the balcony. “I was so excited and shocked that for the first time in my life I couldn’t eat anything,” says Sarah. Why they got married in the Vail Valley Sarah’s parents met at a ski club in Dallas, and went to Vail for their honeymoon. Her family had always spent their Christmas holidays in Vail since then. Favorite memories from the wedding day Dave’s favorite and most memorable part of the wedding is the first time he saw Sarah at the Vail wedding deck. Sarah’s favorite part was the exchanging of vows. “There was chaos all around us with rain and thunder in the background, and my matron of honor holding onto an umbrella for dear life while my veil and hair flew all around my face,” she says. “But everything seemed to still as we exchanged our vows, and nothing else mattered.” Colors: Black, white and green Ceremony: Vaial Mountain wedding deck Reception: Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa Vendors: JoAnn Moore with Mountains and Meadows, Pettit Photography, Rose Petals, Creative Mountains Images, Greatimes DJ (DJ Evans), Touch of Class, Pastor Rob Wilson and Eagle River Presbyterian, ShutterBooth, Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa at Beaver Creek (reception), Mom’s Best Friend and All Mountain Transportation

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courses, K9 nose work, a Doggie Mudder race, a 5K Doggie dash, a talent/costume contest, fly ball, sheep herding, dirty kid-dog mud run, product vendors and more. Event goes from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. See www.mountaindogs.org.

Saturday, Aug.4 Minturn Market

The original Vail Valley Market in its 13th season, the Minturn Market is a local’s favorite. The market features an assortment of items from farm-fresh and organic produce Come and enjoy the natural amphitheater setting below to great breakfast and lunch items to gourmet foods, gifts, Lion’s Head Rock. The concert is at Little Beach Park in clothing, jewelry, handmade crafts, items for the home, fine Minturn from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. This week features the BLT art and more. with Gary.

Thursday, Aug. 2 Minturn Free Concert Series

Saturday, Aug. 4 Chris Duarte at Beaver Creek

Thursday, Aug. 2 ShowDown Town Concert

The Chris Duarte Group brings their blues-rock sound to the Come see great local musicians in a cozy, small-town perfor- lawn at Strawberry Park. Concert starts at 6 p.m. and tickets mance in Eagle Town Park in Eagle at 6:30 p.m. Concert is are $10/$25 and are available at www.vilarpac.org, by callfree. This week brings blues group Markus James Trio and ing 888-920-2787 or in person at the VPAC Box Office in Beaver Creek. West African musician Mamadou Sidibe.

Thursday, Aug. 2 Silver Nights at the Donovan:

Come for wine, music and conversation with Bravo performers. This event features violinist Robert McDuffie, guitarist Steve Mackey and the Jasper String Quartet. Event starts at 6 p.m. at Vail’s Donovan Pavilion. Cost is $25.

Thursday, Aug. 2 to Sunday, Aug. 5 Yarmony Grass at State Bridge

Saturday, Aug. 4 BecTri Triathlon

The annual BecTri Sprint Triathlon takes place in Avon’s Nottingham Park. The race consists of a 400-meter swim in Nottingham Lake, a 15-km bike ride through Singletree neighborhood and a 5-km run/walk along the Eagle River path. This race is in memory of Becky Yarberry. Race begins at 8 a.m. For more info see www.avon.org.

Saturday, Aug. 4

The music festival returns with performances from Elephant Revival, Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real, Railroad Big Music for Little Bands: Piano Bash Earth and many more. For tickets and times, see www.state- Closing Night A two-piano extravaganza features Alessio Bax, Anne-Marie bridge.com. McDermott, Pedja Muzijevic and Stephen Prutsman for the closing performance of this year’s Bravo! Vail Valley Music Friday, Aug. 3 Festival. Show starts at 6 p.m. at the Vilar. Tickets are $35 Get Outside event at Bookworm and can be purchased at www.vilarpac.org, by calling 888This is a free family fun camp focused on getting outside, 920-2787 or in person at the VPAC Box Office in Beaver featuring authors with tips, tricks and activities. Make all Creek. your outdoor adventures a family success with this fun event featuring four authors with tips, tricks and activities. Event Sunday, Aug. 5 begins at 6 p.m. and is free.

Diana Krall at the Vilar

Grammy Award-winning musician Diana Krall will make her eagerly anticipated return to Beaver Creek this summer. Show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $160/$180 (based on seatAs part of the Vail International Dance Festival at the Ford ing) and are available and can be purchased at www.vilarAmphitheater, these shows bring inspired performances pac.org, by calling 888-920-2787 or in person at the VPAC from the best dancers the world over. Shows start at 7:30 Box Office in Beaver Creek. p.m. and tickets are $20/$70/$90 based on seating. See www.vaildance.org for more info.

Friday, Aug. 3 and Saturday, Aug. 4 International Evenings of Dance

Saturday, Aug. 4 and Sunday, Aug. 5 Mountain Dogs Canine Carnival

Monday, Aug. 6 Dunk-n-Dash in Avon

Avon brings its duathlon series once again for 2012. Cost per race is $15 and registration closes at active.com at 5 p.m. the The first annual Canine Carnival held at the Eagle River day before the race. Swimmers in the Dunk-n-Dash can opt Center in Eagle features a weekend of Dock Dogs, agility to make one or two 800-yard laps around Nottingham Lake.

Knows......Short Sales Short Sales allow you to sell your home for less than what you owe with the cooperation of your lender(s). Learn how they can protect your financial future. Many short sales allow the seller to walk away and owe nothing. Other options include deficiency negotiation, loan modification and contributing to the payoff. Call us to Understand your options and to possibly avoid Foreclosure or Bankruptcy.

Call us at 476-1600 or 328-2327 www.KWVail.com online or KWVail in the mobile APP store 16

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Thursday, Aug. 2 -Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012


The 5K run starts and finishes at the lake’s pumphouse.

Monday, Aug. 6 NOW Premieres

NOW Premieres, hosted by Damian Woetzel at the Ford Amphitheater is a medley of performances from some of today’s most acclaimed choreographers. Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20/$55/$75 based on seating. For more info go to www.vaildance.org.

Tuesday, Aug. 7 Dance for $20.12

The annual special performance of the Vail International Dance Festival brings a gourmet menu of performances at value meal prices. Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Reserved seating is $20.12, and lawn seating $12. See www.vaildance.org.

Wednesday, Aug. 8 Dancing in the Streets

Martha Graham Dance Company holds a free, interactive evening of movement and dance open to the public at Arrabelle at Vail Square as part of the Vail International Dance Festival. Event starts at 5:30 p.m.

REDS, WHITES AND BREWS –––

[From page 6]

connect with a curious group of festival-goers. “I enjoy being able to talk and meet with other brewers and beer enthusiasts,” Pluck says. “Since I work in a restaurant, I get to interact with customers, but at the festivals, I see people who wouldn’t otherwise visit us. A heady experiment Locally made beers are a relatively new treat in the valley, and an event like Reds, Whites and Brews is a chance to catch up with neighborhood breweries and sample new offerings. Pluck, who has manned the brewery at Gore Range for 15 years, will bring three standards – a lager, pale ale and his ever-popular Fly Fisher Red Ale – along with a saison, a summer seasonal that’s spicy and tart. An ownership change last October allowed him to play with new recipes (like the saison) and tweak old ones. Since they aren’t dedicated to a restaurant, Bonfire Brewery co-owners Andy Jessen and Matt Wirtz have been hitting the Colorado festival circuit hard, with appearances at Beaver Creek, Aspen, Telluride and Salida. The Eagle brewery has gained sudsy disciples with a dedication to experimentation: In two years, brewmaster Wirtz has crafted 27 different beers, many of which were only made once. “It’s always fun to do these festivals because you get bogged down in the daily grind of the brewery and taproom,” Jessen says. “We love meeting people from the area who don’t have a chance to come down valley.” Wirtz will attend the Avon festival in person, bringing with him the brewery’s popular Firestarter IPA, along with off-the-wall concoctions like the Pink-I, a raspberry IPA. The Firestarter IPA is the cornerstone of Bonfire’s new production line, which Jessen says is six times larger than the brewery’s current location in downtown Eagle. It will let Wirtz and Jessen bottle their beers in-house – a major plus for guys who brewed with homemade equipment for nearly a year – and expand beyond the taproom. “We’re sticking close to the valley with the festivals and distribution,” Jessen says. “We love hanging out with friends and people we know.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

Lunch Specials daily Mon – Street Steak Burrito Tues – Seafood Quesadilla w/ Gazpacho Wed – Seafood Flautas w/ Gazpacho Thurs – Fried Fish Tacos w/ Gazpacho Fri – Lobster Tacos

Grand Opening New location in Edwards Riverwalk

Next to the Pirate Ship Park 476-5847

Custom Metal Work Includes: • ornamental • architectural • artistic

949-0961 • 949-8125 41266 Hwy 6 Across from Route 6 Cafe

Fun Affordable Fashion 225 Main Street Edwards, CO 81632 970-926-5007

125 S. Main Street Breckenridge, CO 80424 970-453-9383

142 Beaver Creek Place Avon, CO 81620 970-748-5008

406 E. Hyman Avenue Aspen, CO 81611 970-920-4475

Thursday, Aug. 2-Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

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Discover the workout that is transforming bodies nationwide...

now offered in the Vail Valley!

U.S. OPEN –––––––––––––––––––––––– and higher, it’s dramatically male-dominated.” However, Burton’s vice president of global resorts, Jeff Boliba, says Burton is already leading the charge on changing those trends. He notes that the numbers leave out the youngest group of snowboarders, kids under the age of 7, which Boliba says is one of the fastest-growing groups. Burton’s “Learn To Ride” program began in 1998, aimed at this youngest age group. The company began making kidsized, learner-friendly boards, and their teaching programs were introduced at several major ski resorts across the country. They also developed a leash and reel system, allowing instructors to tow their students across the snow. The system allows kids to get the feeling of making turns and standing sideways, without the initial frustration of catching edges and falling. In 2010, Burton also began making teaching parks that featured progressive terrain for beginners. The parks begin with flat ground, transitioning into rolling terrain and ending with a mini-pipe and turn. “It makes people more used to putting their board to the fall line,” Boliba says of starting on flat terrain. “Most beginner terrain is slightly sloped, but what happens is that you get scared of picking up too much speed, and you lean back and all sorts of bad things happen. The whole idea is to show them a fun learning experience, and they learn these basic movements.” Burton will have their “Learn To Ride” program and learning park available at Vail during the U.S. Open. “If someone wants to start out going sideways, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t be able to,” Boliba says. “It used to be that you had to start out on skis, but that’s not the case anymore.”

“Sending a signal to snowboarders” While Vail Mountain isn’t known as a snowboarding mountain, the resort sees the U.S. Open’s presence as a way to change that perception. About 25 to 30 percent of winter visitors on Vail Mountain are snowboarders, says Vail Mountain marketing director Adam Sutner. “This is a way of potentially talking to a new audience: families,” Sutner says of hosting the U.S. Open. “We will definitely go out of our way to attract snowboarding families (to the event) from around the country who maybe haven’t considered Vail before. It’s a way to make sure we stay a leader in the industry. We hope to send a signal to snowboarders.” Aside from the competition, Burton and the resort plan to incorporate off-snow activities, an event village, free entertainment and ski-and-snowboard school programs into the week. The competition has drawn big-name snowboarders in past years, including Shawn White and Clark. Clark herself has been part of the effort to bring a new generation to the sport, sponsoring underprivileged kids to train at mountain academies – including the Vail Ski and Snowboard Club – through the Kelly Clark Foundation. The foundation has given out 25 scholarships over the past three years and targets potential athletes who might not have the chance to climb the ranks in the sport and get noticed. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

MARTHA GRAHAM ––––––––––––––––––

™Çä°ÎäÈ°£Î£äÊUÊÜÜÜ°«ÕÀiL>ÀÀi°Vœ“ iÝÌÊ̜Ê-ˆviÀÊ iÈ}˜ÊUÊ,ˆÛiÀÜ>Ž]Ê `Ü>À`Ã

ers. “Betty Ford, as a young woman and before she was married, danced for Martha Graham,” Eilber says. “She saw Graham as powerful, as an example of a woman taking charge.” Ford, who retired to Vail with her husband and former president, had an instrumental role in bringing the Dance Festival in Vail to life. Eilber and the Martha Graham Dance

O Su pen n 11 day Hou am Au se -3 g. pm 5

[From page 5]

[From page 7]

Company say that they are honored to dance in Vail, a place Ford loved so much. “She (Ford) used to come around rehearsal whenever she was in town,” Eilber says. “It’s a great for us to come to Vail. We feel a lasting connection with Vail.” SneakPEAK writer John O’Neill can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Thursday, Aug. 2 -Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

2 012 VAIL MOUNTAIN SCHOOL

HOME TOUR Opening Doors to Homes & Providing Opportunities for Education in the Vail Valley

Tour eight of Vail’s finest homes and enjoy a luncheon by Larkspur at the Vail Mountain School campus. All proceeds benefit the school’s tuition assistance program.

sunday, september 16 WWW.VMS.EDU/HOMETOUR • 970-477-7170 • HOMETOUR@VMS.EDU


Agave | 1060 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.8666 Avon Bakery & Deli | 25 Hurd Lane | 970.949.3354 Cima | 126 Riverfront Lane | 970.790.5500 Blue Plate | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.2252 Bob’s Place | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.8566 Carniceria Tepic | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.6033 China Garden | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.4986 Columbine Bakery | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.1400 Domino’s Pizza | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.3230 Fiesta Jalisco | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.8088 Geno’s Sandwiches | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.0529 Gondola Pizza | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.6000 Loaded Joe’s | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.1480 Montanas Cantina and Grill | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.7019 Northside Coffee and Kitchen | 20 Notingham Rd. | 970.949.1423 Nozawa Sushi | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.0330 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.6093 Subway Avon | 47 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.1312 Swiss Hot Dog Company | 101 Fawcett Rd. | 970.467.2013 Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas | 91 Beaver Creek Place | 970.845.7959 Ticino | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748-6792 Vin 48 | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.9463

Mexican & Tex/Mex

LD

Organic Deli

BLD

Contemporary Latin

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Chinese Cuisine

LD

$

European Cafe & Bakery

BLD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Italian Sandwiches

LD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Southwest Grill

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Sushi & Asian, Thai

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Hot Dogs & Soup

L

$

Mexican

LD

$

Italian Food & Pizza

LD

$

Rustic American

D

$$

Organic/Local American Cuisine

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

American Comfort

LD

$$

Pizza & Sandwiches

LD

$

Tex-Mex

BLD

$

Steakhouse & Saloon

LD

$$

BBQ & Deli Sandwiches

LD

$

Asian Fusion & Sushi

LD

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$$$

Seasonaly Focused Fine Dining

D

$$$

Coffee/Breakfast/Wine/Tapas

BLD

$$

French Cuisine

D

$$$

Tapas Bar and Lounge

D

$$

Gelato, Chocolate & Wine

LD

$

Classic American Grill

BD

$$

Contemporary Colorado Cuisine

D

$$$

Seasonal American

D

$$$

Rustic American & Seafood

D

$$$

Italian Pasta Grill

D

$$$

$ $

BEAVER CREEK 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill | Park Hyatt Beaver Creek | 970.949.1234 Beano’s Cabin | 210 Plaza Way | 970.754.3463 Beaver Creek Chophouse | Beaver Creek Lodge | 970.845.0555 Black Diamond Bistro | 120 Offerson Road | 970.949.1251 Blue Moose Pizza | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.8666 Coyote Cafe | 210 The Plaza | 970.845.9030 Dusty Boot Saloon | 210 Offerson Rd. | 970.748.1146 Flying Pig Sandwich Shop | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.0333 Foxnut Asian Fusion and Sushi | 15 W. Thomas Place | 970.845.0700 Golden Eagle Inn | 118 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.1940 Grouse Mountain Grill | 141 Scott Hill Rd. | 970.949.0600 The Metropolitan | 210 Offerson Road | 970.748.3123 Mirabelle Restaurant | 55 Village Rd. | 970.949.7728 Osprey Lounge | 10 Elk Track Ln. | 970.754.7400 Rimini Cafe | 45 W. Thomas Place | 970.949.6157 Rocks Modern Grill | 27 Avondale Le. | 970.845.9800 Saddleridge | 44 Meadow Ln. | 970.754.5450 Spago | The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch | 970.343.1555 Splendido at the Chateau | 17 Chateau Ln. | 970.845.8808 Toscanini | 60 Avondale Ln. | 970.754.5590

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

AVON

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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No need to get decked out on our deck. Friday Afternoon Casual

F.A.C.

The Lazy, Hazy

Mongolian BBQ and Asian Cuisine

Lunch Buffet

Days of Summer Starts Friday at 5pm

7 days a week, 11am-2pm

25% off all Carry Out

4 U-Call-It

$

Fridays (all day)

926.6628 • GobiRestaurant.com

69 Edwards Access Rd., Unit 6, Edwards • 1/2 mile from I-70, in Alpine Bank Bldg.

• • • •

sponsored by: Vail PM & Double Diamond Ski Shop

Late Night Bar Menu til 1am Thurs, Fri, Sat

Free keg of Crazy Mountain draft every Friday on the deck starting at 5pm.

DJs spinning your favorites Drink specials Tequila tasting Games & giveaways

82 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. AVON • 970.949.7019 Thursday, Aug. 2-Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

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4 Eagle Ranch | 4091 Highway #131, Wolcott | 970.926.3372 Adam’s Mountain Country Club | 1094 Frost Creek Drive, Eagle | 970.328.2326 Baboune’s | 0131 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2425 Bonfire Brewing | 0127 W. 2nd St., Eagle | 970.422.6258 The Bowlmor Café | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.BOWL Brush Creek Saloon | 241 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5279 Dietrich’s Cafe | 313 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.5021 Dog House Grill | 10663 Highway 6, Gypsum | 970.524.1660 Dusty Boot | 1099 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.7002 Eagle Diner | 112 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.1919 Ekahi Grill and Catering | 116 Park Street, Gypsum | 970.524.4745 El Pariente Mexican Restaurant | 0050 Chambers Ave. #E, Eagle | 720.289.8782 Fiesta Jalisco | 0701 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9300 Gourmet China | 0212 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.0866 Grand Avenue Grill | 678 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.328.4043 Gypsum Grill Steakhouse | 686 Trail Gulch Rd., Gypsum | 970.524.7365 H.P.’s Provisions | 1160 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5280 Heidis Brooklyn Deli | 150 Cooley Mesa Rd., Gypsum | 970.777.3663 Luigi’s Pasta House | 1143 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5400 Mantos | 106 Oak Ridge Ct., Gypsum | 970.524.6266 Moe’s Original BBQ | 630 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.337.2277 Old Kentucky Tavern | 225 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5259 Paradigms | Corner of 4th and Capital St., Eagle | 970.328.7990 Pastatively Roberto’s Italian Cuisine | 94 Market St., Eagle | 970.328.7324 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.337.9900 Red Canyon Cafe | 128 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2232 Yeti’s Grind | 330 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9384

L

$

Eclectic American & Sunday Brunch

LD

$$

Omelets, burritos and more

BL

$

American Cuisine/ Bowling

LD

$$

TexMex

BL

$

Coffee, Sandwiches, Soups, Ice Cream

BL

$

Rustic Home Brew Pub / Music / Patio

LD

$

Steakhouse/American Cuisine

LD

$$

Traditional American Diner

BLD

$

Hawaiian Style Food

LD

$

Authentic Mexican

LD

$

Mexican

LD

$

Chinese

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

Steakhouse

LD

$

BLD

$

Soups & Sandwiches

BLD

$

Pasta & Pizza

LD

$$

Pizza

LD

$

Barbecue

BLD

$

Southern Eclectic

BLD

$

Creative American

LD

$$ $$

Classic Italian

LD

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches

BLD

$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Italian, Pasta

LD

$$

Eclectic American

BL

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Homemade Bakery & Soup

BL

$

Coffee & Crepes Sandwiches

BL LD

$

American

B LD

$

Contemporary Italian

BLD

$$

High End Tapas

D

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Tasting/Wine Bar, Paninis

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

EAGLE-VAIL Ristorante Ti Amo | 40982 US Highway #6 | 970.845.8153 Route 6 Cafe | 41290 US Highway #6 | 970.949.6393

EDWARDS Balata | 1265 Berry Creek Rd | 970.477.5353 Bonjour Bakery | 97 Main St. | 970.926.5539 Bookworm | 295 Main St. | 970.926.7323 Belmont Deli | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1796 Cafe 163 | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1163 Cafe Milano | 429 Edwards Access Rd. #A208 | 970.926.4455 Dish | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.3433 E town | 295 Main St. | 970.926.4080 Eat! Drink! | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1393 Fiesta’s Cantina | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.2121

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Thursday, Aug. 2 -Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Ranch Western Atmosphere

Pricing

EAGLE/GYPSUM

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gobi Mongolian BBQ | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henry’s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050 Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joe’s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Marko’s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woody’s Kitchen & Pub | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

Colorado Wild Game Grill

LD

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

Contemporary American

D

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

American/Mexican

BLD

$

American Grill

LD

$$

Pizza & Pasta

LD

$

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Contemporary American

D

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

$

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

BL

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

European American Bistro

D

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

New American

D

Contemporary American

BLD

$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, AprĂŠs and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, AprĂŠs,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$

Asian Cuisine

LD

$

$ $$$ $

$$

$$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magusto’s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nicky’s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Alpine Tavern | Vail Racquet Club, East Vail | 970.476.7888 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yeti’s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Billy’s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagle’s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blu’s | Downstairs from Children’s Fountain | 970.476.3113 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinÊBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elway’s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkel’s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789 Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570

7 In-house beers on tap!

NEW SUMMER MENU! Happy Hour Daily 4-6 pm

3 Pints, Bud, & Bud Light bottles, $5 Selected glasses of wine $4 Well cocktails, $4 special cocktails, $5 Selected glasses of wine

$

105 Edwards Village Blvd Edwards, CO 970.926.2739

$ $$$

$ $$$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

EDWARDS

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • •

•

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• •

•

Open Daily for Lunch and Dinner Happy Hour 4-5:30pm Beer and 2 tacos $6 Big Margarita $5 7BJM7JMMBHFt Thursday, Aug. 2-Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

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Joe’s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Children’s Fountain | 970.476.5828 Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.476.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwig’s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market Café | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moe’s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osaki’s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepi’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russell’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Sandbar Sports Grill | West Vail Mall | 970.476.4314 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970-476-1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendetta’s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Wendy’s Alpine Coffee Shop | 4695 Racquet Club Dr. Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yeti’s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Creative American

LD

$$$

French and American

D

$$$

French

D

$$$

$$$ $

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

$ $$

International Café

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Modern Italian

ld

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

$ $

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Americana

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

Pastries

BL

$

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Daily Happy Hour • All Locations avon Vail eagle 949-9900 476-9026 benchmark 337-9900 shopping ctr. eagle crossing shopping ctr. Village center Mall Across from Solaris Open 11a.m. Daily

across from christie lodge open 11a.m. daily

above the bowling alley open 11a.m. daily

Global

Child

children’s resale Think Green. Think Global.

Back to School Clothes Both Edwards and Eagle stores have a huge selection!

Open now in Edwards! Right next to the Post Office Edwards (970) 926-4733 • Eagle (970) 328-5012 GlobalChildResale.com • Like us on

Go Green. Buy and sell at Global Child. 22

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Thursday, Aug. 2 -Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

Save Our Planet. Re-Selling is Recycling

Serving the vail valley’s favorite pizza, pastas, calzones, subs, salads and more since 1990!

Save Our Planet. Re-Selling is Recycling

Re-using is Rewarding. Go Green.


Interior design I at its best for less!

Personally selected furniture packages with our designers. Personally selected Two bedroom condos from $25,000

Hip Pain

f you ever had hip pain you know how agonizing it can be. Several years ago I developed hip pain without sustaining any significant trauma or injury. I received various treatments without seeing any improvement. I was told I had bursitis and having surgery done could correct the problem. In searching for a conservative solution. I met a sports injury specialist who was developing a dynamic new treatment for soft tissue (muscles, tendons, etc) injuries. This treatment is called Active Release Treatment (ART). He examined my hip and found a muscle that had gotten so tight it created a “false hip arthritis�. After three treatments, my hip pain was gone and I have been running pain free ever since.

G e n e r a l l y, we see this very common type of muscle imbalance in runners and skiers. Over the last eleven years I have developed expertise in using ART as a treatment. If you are having hip pain, make an appointment to come and see us. By the end of your appointment, you will know what is causing your pain and also see some significant relief. One exam and treatment will tell us whether this progressive treatment of sports injuries will be a solution to your problem.

Dr. Daniel Chesney, DC Dr. Tina Bragg, DC Active Release Technique (ART)

    949-0153

Benefit from the same techniques the PGA & NFL use.

(970) 949.6244

LPINE HIROPRACTIC & Soft Tissue Diagnostic Center

BUY YOUR NEW FLOOR TODAY... WE CAN INSTALL RIGHT AWAY Beautiful new floors have never been so easy, and affordable. • Find Huge Savings - Using the combined buying power of 1000 Carpet One stores, we have been able to stock up on incredible deals. We are passing Huge Savings on to our customers. In Stock Now - With 140 wall-to-wall Carpet and Hardwood Floors

In Stock, You will be sure to find one that is just right for your home. We can install your new floor right away.

140

CARPET & HARDWOOD FLOOR CHOICES IN STOCK Ruggs Benedict - Voted 2009 Business of the Year

Lifetime Installation Guarantee - Because the

installation is an important part of a beautiful floor, we employ a great staff of fully trained professional installers. We stand behind your new floor with a lifetime installation guarantee.

“Great Values are still available in Beautiful New Flooring!� Roger Benedict

President, Ruggs Benedict Carpet One

Serving the Vail Valley since 1972 810 Nottingham Road, Avon 970-949-5390 • www.ruggsbenedict.com Thursday, Aug. 2-Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

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East Vail's Neighborhood Tavern!

g n i v r e s w No PIZZA t s u r c e z i s personal

Great Bar Menu including: • Hamburger • Fish and Chip s • Roasted Lamb Sandwhich

u n e M m o o R g Dinin Includes:

ar s e a C n o m l a S • Grilled p i r t S k r o Y w e • 16 oz. N se e n g o l o B i n i c • Fettu d e t s a o r / w i n i c • Fettu m o o r h s u m d l duck wi e c u a s m a e r c e white win Free Parking!

Reservations suggested Closed for a private party on 8/4

476-7888

Restaurant & Bar 4695 Vail Racquet Club Dr., East Vail 24

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Thursday, Aug. 2 -Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012

SneakPEAK August 2,2012  

Rafting the Gore Canyon, Reds, Whites and Brews along with US Open coming to Vail.

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