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Recruitment Information

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W E LCO M E

Join us for great career prospects MORE than a million outpatient appointments, day cases and inpatient admissions take place at the Trust each year. With over 7,500 staff working across a whole range of specialties, a campus-style hospital linked directly to the University of East Anglia, great research facilities and even a seaside minor injuries unit at Cromer, we are proud to be one of the top ten biggest Trusts in the UK. Our hospital is close to beautiful countryside, waterways and beaches, and predominantly serves the people of Norfolk and north Suffolk, although some patients are referred from further afield especially to access specialist services available at this Trust. We want to recruit people who are looking for new

A modern and stylish atrium greets staff and visitors at the hospital.

challenges and opportunities, share our values and want to be part of our vision to provide every patient with the care we want for those we love the most. This pack contains lots of information about working at the Trust and living in the area. It shows the benefits and opportunities to develop professionally here, and also includes stories of colleagues who inspire us all by providing the very best care, day in, day out. We hope you will find this interesting and look forward to hearing from you. You can find out more about coming to work with us at jobs.nnuh.nhs.uk or check out our social media on Facebook at facebook.com/NNUH.nhs or Twitter by following @NNUH

Idyllic countryside is one of the many bonuses of working and living in Norfolk.

A student studies anatomy at the University of East Anglia Medical School.

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FO R E WO R D

Staff knowledge, dedication and commitment are vital WELCOME to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust recruitment brochure. I want you to know that I am extremely proud of all our staff throughout our whole organisation, from our professional admin and clerical staff, and our talented scientists and therapists, to our nurses and doctors. It is their knowledge, dedication and commitment which enable our Trust to be a leader in care, treatment and research and to be so highly rated by our patients. In these pages we take a brief look at some of our exciting departments, meet their colleagues and get insights into their work for our patients. This is a vibrant, people-focused

By Trust Chief Executive

Mark Davies

teaching hospital which invests in staff training and career opportunities and is committed to lifelong learning. This is evident in our amazingly comprehensive apprentice programme, and for

both clinical and non-clinical staff, our forward-thinking professional development and training courses – many of which are in partnership with the University of East Anglia, which like NNUH is part of the world-leading and unique Norwich Research Park (NRP). Here you will also be able to pursue research interests at a high level – at the moment we have more than 300 active research studies and there will be many more in the future, for example through our partnership in the Quadram Institute, the pioneering new

facility for food and health research. Our new state-of-the-art endoscopy unit will be in the Quadram Institute and NNUH will also run the clinical research unit. Our PRIDE values – People-focused, Respect, Integrity, Dedication and Excellence – underpin how we work and everything that we do, whether supporting our colleagues or caring for our patients. Come and join the team here at NNUH where you will find many opportunities for learning and development, a range of specialist departments with state-of-the-art equipment and colleagues whose care and dedication make a difference to our patients across our hospitals every day.

The main entrance to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L B E I N G Walking to stay healthy are hospital employees, left to right, Nursing Assistant Jade Middleton, Clinical Educator Dave Guttridge, Senior Sister Site Operations Rosie Govier, Matron Site Operations Jo Trundell and Nursing Assistant Sally Hellewell.

Working on good health OUR health and wellbeing team has a long standing commitment to staff which is most recently illustrated in the award of a national accreditation. It has also been recognised nationally for its quality of service. The team work with the organisation to not only support work and health requirements – for example, immunisation protection and advising on work adjustments if required – but also provide proactive opportunities to maintain and support your wellbeing.

These include proactive training on subjects such as stress control, mindfulness, wellbeing and resilience as well as providing regular health and wellbeing groups such as a weekly running club or yoga sessions, a monthly walking group and a weekly choir. The team produces a monthly newsletter so you can keep up to date with all activities. As part of the proactive measures we undertake we have also been very successful in our flu vaccination programme and last year

79 per cent of our staff were vaccinated. We think it is important that all health care workers take personal responsibility for having this vaccine. Reactive support is also available in the event that you are struggling with a health condition. The NNUH provides an excellent employee support programme for counselling advice as well as a physiotherapy service for physical issues. Both of these are available via a self-referral route.

Patients rate the Trust highly on quality of care WE employ 7,500 staff and provide acute hospital care for a population of around a million people. Patients are referred by around 100 local GP practices in Norfolk, neighbouring counties and further afield as well as other acute hospitals around the country. World class facilities are based on two sites – the state-of-the-art NNUH complex on the Norwich Research Park, the

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newly-built Cromer Hospital which offers outpatient services, day procedures and a minor injuries unit. We work closely with the University of East Anglia’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences – which shares the Norfolk Research Park site, which provides a joined-up approach to research and training. As well as world-class facilities, NNUH can boast highly skilled staff and low

infection rates. Our patients consistently rate the organisation highly on quality of care and having friendly, approachable staff. In 2014 a £4.5 million radiotherapy cancer treatment unit was opened at the site while the Bob Champion Research and Education building is helping to pioneer new techniques and practices and break new ground in medical science.

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S P E C I A LT I E S O V E R V I E W

Wide range of careers are on offer for staff CLINICAL services are structured across four divisions offering a wide range of careers to new staff of all disciplines. Our four divisions are Medicine, Surgery, Women’s and Children’s and Clinical Support Services. We always strive to hit the highest standard in each of these areas including pioneering treatments and the best career development for employees. In addition, the Trust provides a full range of more specialist services such as Oncology and Radiotherapy, Neonatology, Orthopaedics, Plastic Surgery, Ophthalmology, Rheumatology, Paediatric Medicine and Surgery. Medicine is comprised of Cardiology; Respiratory Medicine; Stroke; Nephrology; Gastroenterology; Allergy; Older People’s Medicine; Endocrinology; Neurology; Rheumatology; Emergency and Acute Medicine; Oncology an Palliative Medicine and Haematology. Surgery consists of General and Thoracic Surgery; Dermatology; Urology; Head and Neck; Ophthalmology; Orthopaedics; Plastic Surgery; Anaesthetics, Critical Care, Pain Management, Sterile Services and Theatres and the Day Procedure Unit. Women’s and Children’s Services consists of Obstetrics; Gynaecology; Paediatric; Medicine, Paediatric Surgery and Neonatology. Clinical Support is comprised of Nuclear

Staff Nurses Karen Berry, left, and Hillary Burgess take part in Cannulation training.

Technical specialists are a vital part of the hospital team. Our picture shows Senior Radiographer Nicky Want.

Medicine; Cellular Pathology; Laboratory Medicine; Therapeutic and Support Services; Radiology; Pharmacy; and Health Records. Each department has its own dedicated staff, resources, equipment and wards or offices. For instance the Maternity Department is a shared midwife and consultant service, which comprises of two wards, a 15-room delivery suite and a water birth pool. The midwife-led Birthing Unit provides women with a

home-from-home environment in which to give birth naturally. Exciting work is in progress with the neurology unit being collocated and working closely with the hyperacute stroke unit to create a neurosciences centre. The hospital supports clinical education for a range of students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. With our breadth of services we have the ideal environment to enable specialist learning and training.

Administration offers great career opportunities. Pictured is Receptionist Kayleigh Ladbrooke.

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S TA F F D E V E L O P M E N T

Employee benefits package is extra incentive AS a modern and progressive employer, we aim to make sure all employees get the rewards and benefits their hard work deserves to make working life easier and personal life more rewarding. When employees join their package will include: PENSION – the NHS offers new employees a pension package based on their pay over their whole career.

Commitment to lifelong learning ONGOING staff development is paramount at NNUH and this is illustrated by a strong commitment to lifelong learning. The Trust is a large teaching hospital providing a full range of acute clinical services. It plays an important role in the teaching and training of health professionals, in partnership with the University of East Anglia, City College Norwich and University Campus Suffolk. Staff are supported in continuing their professional development through courses including Critical Care, Coronary Care, and Older Person’s Medicine as well as mentoring qualifications. In addition to academically accredited study we offer a range of study days, more information on which can be found in our training prospectus.

There are also a range of apprenticeships in non-clinical areas such as Business Administration, Customer Service, Management, Leadership and Management, and Accountancy. Apprenticeships are a framework of qualifications that are available to all new and existing staff in bands 1 to 4, who are between the ages of 16 to 69. In addition, Project SEARCH is an employment focussed education programme designed to give students with learning disabilities and/or autism the opportunity to get hands on experience in the workplace, develop employability skills combined with classroom sessions. It is a multi-agency partnership, bringing together the expertise of the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Serco, City College Norwich and Remploy.

PAY – incremental scales subject to annual appraisal review. HOLIDAYS – at least 27 days holiday a year, rising when employment milestones are reached. Holiday minimums exclude Bank Holidays which are given over and above. CHILDCARE SUPPORT – flexible working patterns. CARER SUPPORT – flexible working and special leave policies. FLEXIBILITY – scope for part-time working, job sharing, term-time working as well as evening, weekend work and career breaks.

Dementia Support Nurse Jennifer Woolgrove, left, tutors Student Nurse Becky Herdman.

TRAINING – full or part-time learning opportunities to help you realise your potential. EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY – we make positive efforts to recruit from the many diverse sections of society to ensure all staff are treated fairly. NHS DISCOUNTS. TAX FREE CYCLE TO WORK SCHEME. TAX FREE CHILDCARE VOUCHERS.

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THE NNUH also has an established preceptorship academy and development programme to support the transition from Student to Registered Health Care Professional to build a confident, competent Practitioner. It commences with a two week structured induction programme combined with supernumerary time in practice; followed by themed study days during the

preceptorship year. We take a whole team approach to supporting Preceptees in practice involving named Preceptor, dedicated Preceptorship lead and Clinical Education team to provide ongoing support and advice throughout the preceptorship year and beyond. Preceptorship can be used to commence the first step on the Regional leadership pathway.

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L E A R N I N G A N D I N N O VAT I O N

THE Sir Thomas Browne Library is a multidisciplinary healthcare library which aims to provide a high quality and responsive library service to support NHS staff information needs and contribute to our high standards of patient care. The extensive resource, which has more than 9,000 books and a collection of other media, supports clinical governance, professional development, teaching and learning, evidence-based practice, research and development and current awareness. The library is open to all Trust employees as well as local NHS and social care staff and students. They have 24 hour access to the library using the NNUH Trust ID badge.

Occupational Therapist Jo Dawson makes the most of facilities and resources in the Sir Thomas Browne Library.

Links with university CLOSE links with the University of East Anglia both geographically and academically ensure the best education programmes for both clinical and non-clinical employees. The University shares the Norwich Research Park site with NNUH which means that the School of Health Sciences is situated close to the hospital leading to shared practice and shared facilities. The UEA offers a comprehensive range of health related courses leading to

professional registration and the School of Health Sciences offers a superb learning environment that enables students to fulfil their potential and ensures graduates are fit for practice in the modern and ever-changing health and social care sector. World-class research underpins all of their courses, and clinical

through the £19 million medical research centre, named after a former Grand National winning jockey and cancer survivor. The Bob Champion Research and Education Building houses researchers finding treatments for diseases affecting ageing populations and a unique bio-bank facility to store DNA and tissue samples, as well as undergraduate and postgraduate education. Based on the Norwich Research Park and operated by the UEA in partnership with the NNUH, the centre provides state-of-the-art laboratories for researchers to explore new treatments for diseases from prostate cancer and antibiotic resistance, to musculo-skeletal and gastrointestinal diseases. The Bob Champion Cancer Trust, set up in in 1983, donated £750,000 to the project, helping to take charitable funds raised by a UEA funding campaign The Bob Champion over two years to more Research and Education than £2.2m.

practice sees the Trust working in partnership with healthcare providers in the region to offer a variety of high-quality practice placements during which there is collaboration with service users and carers throughout. The School of Health Sciences also offers Masters level courses and post graduate research opportunities as well as Continuing Professional Development courses for qualified professionals. The strong relationship between the two organisations is best illustrated

Building.

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DEMENTIA CARE The iconic Britannia Pier at Great Yarmouth.

Acclaimed s across the h Norfolk is a great place to work... and to live AT the heart of some of the UK’S most breathtaking countryside, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Trust is not only a great place to work... the area is a great place to live too. Norwich is ranked as one of the UK’s top shopping destinations, and with its 140 restaurants, cobbled medieval streets and world famous football club, the Canaries, there is definitely something for everyone. Only a short drive away are some of the country’s most beautiful and varied coastlines, from cliff-lined beaches at Hunstanton, to Sheringham, where visitors can watch the sunset and the lovely seaside

villages of Wells and Brancaster. Train services to and from London run every 30 minutes, and the area has good road and public transport links. It’s a great place for cyclists, from the flatlands of West Norfolk to the beaches of the East. Norfolk is a haven for wildlife, especially rare birds like marsh harriers and red kites, and Norwich is the UK’s only UNESCO City of Literature. The county has many opportunities for sailing, both coastal and inland on the Broads at the bustling villages of Wroxham and Horning. Not only do we “wish you were here” – we hope all these attractions mean you will wish you were here too.

Picturesque Sheringham beach.

THE Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital’s widely admired Dementia Services span all departments offering personalised care for patients. A unique Dementia Support team works right across our hospital, covering every area of specialisation as well as the Older People’s Medicine wards. A Dementia Staff Nurse and three support workers liaise with inter-disciplinary colleagues to identify and support people who may be in need of specialised dementia care. Many referrals come from Elsing ward, one of the Older People’s Medicine wards which has a special focus on caring for people with dementia.

After contacting relatives the dedicated team oversees the compilation of a “This Is Me” patient-held booklet setting out individuals’ interests, preferences and hobbies which helps individuals involved offer person centred care. The support workers engage patients in activities to help their wellbeing while offering support and information to relatives. The Staff Nurse assists nursing staff who may have concerns about patients with eating and drinking difficulties due to dementia, working with family and carers. There are five Dementia Care Coaches throughout the hospital and the Dementia Service Team is

Finding fulfilment in pers DEMENTIA Support Worker James Artherton-Howlett loves helping patients living with dementia by ensuring he “brings a piece of home into hospital”. Speaking to patients, family and carers he gathers information about people including their family background, likes and dislikes, sleep patterns and personal care preferences. Along with his Support Worker colleagues James is then able to make the patients feel reassured and in touch with home comforts by introducing them to meaningful activities. James, 31, who has a background of working as an Occupational Therapy Assistant, also offers support by being present at medical procedures and spending time with patients on the older people’s medicine wards. “I love the variation my role offers but most of all there is so much fulfilment in delivering person-centred care and helping all those involved on the journey,” said James.

Photographs courtesy of www.tournorfolk.co.uk

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DEMENTIA CARE The iconic Britannia Pier at Great Yarmouth.

Acclaimed services across the hospital Norfolk is a great place to work... and to live AT the heart of some of the UK’S most breathtaking countryside, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Trust is not only a great place to work... the area is a great place to live too. Norwich is ranked as one of the UK’s top shopping destinations, and with its 140 restaurants, cobbled medieval streets and world famous football club, the Canaries, there is definitely something for everyone. Only a short drive away are some of the country’s most beautiful and varied coastlines, from cliff-lined beaches at Hunstanton, to Sheringham, where visitors can watch the sunset and the lovely seaside

villages of Wells and Brancaster. Train services to and from London run every 30 minutes, and the area has good road and public transport links. It’s a great place for cyclists, from the flatlands of West Norfolk to the beaches of the East. Norfolk is a haven for wildlife, especially rare birds like marsh harriers and red kites, and Norwich is the UK’s only UNESCO City of Literature. The county has many opportunities for sailing, both coastal and inland on the Broads at the bustling villages of Wroxham and Horning. Not only do we “wish you were here” – we hope all these attractions mean you will wish you were here too.

Picturesque Sheringham beach.

THE Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital’s widely admired Dementia Services span all departments offering personalised care for patients. A unique Dementia Support team works right across our hospital, covering every area of specialisation as well as the Older People’s Medicine wards. A Dementia Staff Nurse and three support workers liaise with inter-disciplinary colleagues to identify and support people who may be in need of specialised dementia care. Many referrals come from Elsing ward, one of the Older People’s Medicine wards which has a special focus on caring for people with dementia.

After contacting relatives the dedicated team oversees the compilation of a “This Is Me” patient-held booklet setting out individuals’ interests, preferences and hobbies which helps individuals involved offer person centred care. The support workers engage patients in activities to help their wellbeing while offering support and information to relatives. The Staff Nurse assists nursing staff who may have concerns about patients with eating and drinking difficulties due to dementia, working with family and carers. There are five Dementia Care Coaches throughout the hospital and the Dementia Service Team is

in touch with Dementia Links and Champions on wards and departments across the Trust. Screenings are carried out on people who are suspected of having dementia with information being passed on to colleagues in mental health services for specialist assessment. Dementia Services, which won our Team of the Year Staff Award in 2015, has a close working relationship with the University of East Anglia, and is looking to enhance the relationship through the creation of a Professor of Dementia post. Our Dementia Services were highly rated recently by a Dementia Care Mapping evaluation which showed how patients’ wellbeing was improved by involvement from the support workers. Elsing ward is a dementia-friendly environment with special colour-coding and wayfinding, and other parts of the hospital are following suit.

Finding fulfilment in person-centred care DEMENTIA Support Worker James Artherton-Howlett loves helping patients living with dementia by ensuring he “brings a piece of home into hospital”. Speaking to patients, family and carers he gathers information about people including their family background, likes and dislikes, sleep patterns and personal care preferences. Along with his Support Worker colleagues James is then able to make the patients feel reassured and in touch with home comforts by introducing them to meaningful activities. James, 31, who has a background of working as an Occupational Therapy Assistant, also offers support by being present at medical procedures and spending time with patients on the older people’s medicine wards. “I love the variation my role offers but most of all there is so much fulfilment in delivering person-centred care and helping all those involved on the journey,” said James.

Dementia Support Worker James Artherton-Howlett discusses a “This Is Me” patient-held booklet with Health Care Assistant Sally Potter.

Dementia Support Worker Claudia Rumford talks with patient Marguerite Perrott.

Arts and crafts can help nurture sense of wellbeing DEMENTIA Support Worker Claudia Rumford’s background in the arts comes in useful in her work at NNUH. As part of the team dedicated to helping patients with dementia she engages them in a wide range of activities which nurture their sense of wellbeing. These include arts and crafts-based activities during which she can draw on her experience on her degree course at the Norwich University of the Arts where she gained a BA in Visual Studies. For her final project on her course she ran an interactive community-based arts project. “Art can help people express how they are feeling in so many ways,” said Claudia, aged 25.

“It improves their mood and they get a real sense of achievement.” Acting on referrals Claudia works throughout the hospital as she helps patients, gives emotional support to carers and signposts them to support in the community. Patients living with dementia respond positively to music, painting, sensory stimuli such as hand massage and different ways of reminiscing. “I recently supported a patient who made a watercolour painting of Salcombe, prompting memories of her time there when younger,” said Claudia. “One gentleman enjoyed discussing the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight because he had worked on aeroplanes as an engineer.”

Photographs courtesy of www.tournorfolk.co.uk

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STROKE SERVICES

First of its kind in UK THE Combined Stroke Unit at NNUH is one of the five largest in England. It is also one of the most advanced in the field with a monitoring system that is the first of its kind in the UK. New technology means that a patient can be monitored specifically for atrial fibrillation (abnormal rhythm) from admission rather than post-discharge, lowering the risk of a further stroke. The early diagnosis is not currently available elsewhere in the UK. The Hyper-acute Stroke Unit is on Heydon Ward where consultants make ward rounds seven days a week and patients are monitored 24/7. In the Acute Stroke Unit on Dunston Ward there are 37 beds.

Stroke care is delivered by a close-knit multi-disciplinary team including seven full-time consultants. The team includes doctors, nurses, speech and language therapists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, dietitians, a psychologist, social workers and the stroke research team. Emergency assessment and treatment including clot busting thrombolysis therapy are administered in the first few hours after a stroke. Stroke Alert nurses in A&E are uniquely authorised to request CT head scans, enabling them to fully pursue the philosophy of “Time is Brain”. Our Stroke Service also offers treatment for transient ischaemic attacks in a daily clinic and a wide-ranging rehabilitation

Senior Assistant Technician Chris Kett at work in the hospital pharmacy.

programme is in place. A ground-breaking project to design an App to deliver functional strength training to people after stroke has been made possible by

£55,496 funding from the Health Foundation which recognised NNUH’s status as a finalist in the Health Enterprise East Innovation Awards.

Passionate about a life enhancing service ACUTE Stroke Unit Ward Sister Jane Shemilt, pictured, is a great advocate for the life-enhancing value of Stroke Services. “I have been working in Stroke Medicine for 14 years and that is where my heart lies,” she said. “As a nurse I witness on a daily basis how much you can do for people who have had a stroke. “We are passionate about putting the patient at the forefront of our care and we work as a dedicated team. It’s an exciting field because over the years there have been huge advances in the way we treat patients.” A self-styled “Norfolk Girl”, 44-year-old Jane left the county to train but returned to home turf to work at NNUH in various disciplines including Neurology. She has in the past acted as a

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Stroke Alert Nurse but in her current position works with her team to monitor acute patients continuously while also supporting longer-stay patients and relatives. Jane, who this year marks 25 years’ service in the NHS, is trained to Swallow Assess patients within four hours of admission. She is also trained to request CT head scans and carotid dopplers – as are the Band 6 Stroke Nurses (NNUH was one of the first stroke centres equipped for this procedure). Along with a Healthcare Assistant she runs a relatives’ clinic in an open room on the ward, giving people the opportunity to share and discuss their concerns. “Communication is key,” said Jane. “The relatives have experienced a traumatic time and it is very emotional for them.”

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C A R D I O LO GY

Cath Lab Practitioner has variety of roles EMMA Timbers, pictured, enjoys the variety of her role in Cardiology where she deploys her expertise in a number of key areas. Her primary role is as a Band 6 Radiographer in the Cardiac Cath Lab, using diagnostic imaging equipment to visualise the chambers and arteries of the heart. Nursing is an extension of the role so she also works on the wards and act as a scrub nurse for cath labs for diagnostic angiograms, angioplasties, pacemaker insertions and electrophysiology procedures. She can also circulate to give patients pain relief and sedation while also taking care of them pre-and post-procedure. “A Cath Lab Practitioner can be an effective team player in

the Cardiac Cath Lab, especially with the demands that are placed on present-day health care delivery,” said 37-year-old Emma who has a degree in Radiology. “The variety is great. I could be involved in patient education, giving moderate sedation, management of cath sites or the continuity of care of patients. I find that I can help my colleagues and I have also learned a lot more about the different aspects and specialities that all come together in the Cardiac Cath Lab.” Emma’s varied way of working has proved highly beneficial and the Norfolk and Norwich NHS Trust is keen to develop and expand it to other members of staff.

Lead on coronary care Cath Lab Sister Michelle Perry talks with patient David Brooks.

NNUH is renowned as a leading centre for cardiac care. The hospital is a designated heart attack centre for East of England serving around one million people. Specially-trained nurses deliver high quality care in the Coronary Care Unit (CCU), Kilverstone Ward and the Cardiology Elective Bay. Each year the 12 consultant cardiologists attend to patients with a variety of problems including palpitations, angina, heart failure, narrowed or leaky valves, blackouts and murmurs. As well as the Consultants there is a part-time Professor of Cardiology. The Consultant Cardiologists carry out various procedures including Cardiac Catheterisation, Angioplasty, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PPCI), Permanent Pacemaker and CRT Insertion, Internal Cardioverta

Defibrillator Insertion, Loop Recorder Insertion and Electrophysiology Study. Cath Labs play a key role in the Cardiology department as specialised “theatre” areas where angiograms, PCI and pacemaker programmes are carried out. Cardiology works closely with the Norfolk Heart Trust which has raised around £2 million to improve cardiology services in Norfolk. The Trust has enabled the development of the PCI service, and has also helped fund staff training. The NNUH Cardiology department has several nurse-led services including Elective Cardioversions, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Techniques and clinics for Syncope. Our nurses work closely with doctors and administrative staff to plan procedures and run services.

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C R I T I C A L C A R E A N D T H E AT R E S

Highly skilled team supports each other OUR Critical Care complex currently has 24 beds but plans to extend this number to 28 by the end of the year. Fourteen beds are in the High Dependency Unit (HDU), available to patients undergoing lengthy surgery and needing sustained care for conditions such as single or multi organ failure or renal failure. Ten beds are in the Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU). The Critical Care department runs on a flexible basis and HDU beds can be converted into ITU beds as and when required. The department is staffed by highly skilled doctors, nurses, dietitians, physiotherapists, airway technicians and pharmacists. A Speech and Language Therapist is also attached to the unit. The Critical Care Consultants are a team of nine specialising in anaesthesia and intensive care.

Trainee Staff nurses can take a Critical Care course run by the University of East Anglia. Critical Care Matron Annie Large said: “We are very supportive of each other. New members of the team are supported under a buddy system where they work alongside experienced staff nurses. We are forward thinking, very keen on developing our staff to be the best they can.” Annie, who still participates in patient care while running the multidisciplinary team, added: “You get to know everything about your patient and you have a close relationship with their nearest and dearest,” she said. “It is satisfying to know when you leave at the end of the day you have done everything you possibly can for the patient.”

Critical Care Matron Annie Large.

Theatre Support Worker Max Jackson, left, in discussion with Operation Department Practitioner James Noble, centre, and Theatre Nurse Jane Jennings.

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University degree course helped Debra progress

Staff Nurse Debra Manning.

DEBRA Manning praises the support she has been given on her career pathway to becoming a Staff Nurse in Theatres. She joined us as a Healthcare Assistant on the Care of the Elderly ward and transferred to become a support worker in Theatres in 2006. After completing NVQ Levels 2 and 3 in Perioperative Care she obtained a Foundation Degree Band 4 qualifying her for perioperative work in Theatres. “With lots of encouragement from my team leader Karen Tozer I then took GCSEs in English and Maths to get

Surgery specialities

on a three-year nursing course,” said Debra. The nurse, who successfully completed her University of East Anglia course in 2015, carries out general health and safety work and acts as a scrub nurse for surgical procedures in the General and Thoracic theatres. “I am still learning though I have already accumulated a lot of knowledge,” she added. “The best thing about my work is that I am able to be the patients’ advocate, putting them first. “We work closely together as a team and there is always a lot of support for new starters from colleagues.”

Sister Jazz Tanday marks up the surgical allocations board.

OUR Main Inpatient Theatres department incorporates 20 Operating Theatres and a central recovery unit. Speciality teams include General, Vascular, Orthopaedic, Plastic, Gynaecology, Urology, ENT, Maxillo-facial, Paediatric, Thoracic and also a comprehensive 24-hour emergency service. Vascular Surgery has a team of seven consultants who perform a variety of procedures, with a high proportion of these being urgent or emergency operations. Operations include carotid endarterectomy, open and endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair, upper and lower limb bypass, amputations and renal access surgery. Many procedures are carried out in collaboration with the Interventional Radiology Unit. Varicose vein procedures are usually performed in day case theatres. The Vascular Unit is one of the busiest in the UK and undertakes more open and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs than anywhere else in England. Its programme for complex endovascular AAA repair is an exciting development and has expanded rapidly over the last three years.

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ENDOSCOPY

Unit set to be biggest, most dynamic in UK

A computer generated image showing how a central atrium in the Quadram Institute will look.

NNUH’s Endoscopy Unit is officially recognised as the busiest in the country. When it moves into the purpose-built Quadram Institute close to the hospital next year it will be the most dynamic and biggest in Europe. Our Unit is a National Bowel Cancer Screening Centre and a centre of excellence for Endoscopy training providing approved training courses for doctors and nurses. Fully accredited by Joint Advisory Group in GI Endoscopy (JAG) the Endoscopy Unit provides a diagnostic and therapeutic service to a population of around 750,000. Regularly audited against the Endoscopy Global Rating Scale it consistently rates high scores for quality of care. The endoscopy team has been congratulated by JAG for providing high-quality patient care across all disciplines. High-quality training is paramount at the Unit and there

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is an ongoing focus on equipping staff with the skills to become expert practitioners in the speciality for both nurses and doctors. The role of Assistant Practitioner has developed to match service need and now includes additional duties unique to the Trust such as fibro scanning of the liver to support the specialist nurse clinic and inputting data to support the bowel cancer screening programme. It is envisaged that when our Endoscopy Unit moves to the nearby Quadram Institute there will be even more opportunities for training and progression of staff. The Institute, a newly-built international food and health research centre situated at Norwich Research Park, will house research teams from NNUH, the Institute of Food Research and the University of East Anglia. The state-of-the-art five-storey building features integrated

clinical and research spaces for 400 scientists and clinicians. Gastrointestinal endoscopy patients will benefit significantly from the new facilities which allow for close collaboration with researchers studying gut health.

The Quadram Institute will contain a clinical research unit run by the NNUH which will be equipped for clinical trials and will feature assessment rooms, a participants’ lounge and kitchen space alongside the laboratory.

Endoscopy Consultant Ian Beales.

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Recruitment guide p14-15

6/4/17

16:07

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Senior Sister relishes the variety of dynamic department

Senior Sister Tracy McDonnell, right, with Matron Kay Marrison.

TRACY McDonnell, Senior Sister in Endoscopy, has had a long and varied nursing career. In 1992 she joined our Endoscopy Unit and has found the work dynamic and varied. “The service is growing at such a fast rate that the opportunities in nursing are immense,” said Tracy. “Endoscopy is so exciting as there are technical advances happening all the time and we are involved on a daily basis with treating a wide range of conditions including life-threatening gastro intestinal bleeds.” Tracy is proud to be part of a busy team of nurses and endoscopists delivering safe high-quality care to a large population. “We have five endoscopy rooms that run continuously all day long and this is set to increase in 2018 with the move to a brand-new purpose built endoscopy unit,” she said. “The staff and I are looking forward to the challenges and changes that lie ahead with the move to the new Quadram Institute building.”

Endoscopy Staff Nurse Caroline Eaglen.

Health Care Assistants Carol Macdonald, left, and Jayne Gilman prepare to take sanitised endoscopes from a drying cabinet so they can be used in adjoining rooms.

WISH YOU WERE HERE...

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Recruitment guide p1-16

6/4/17

12:39

Page 1

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Colney Lane, Norwich, NR4 7UY website: www.nnuh.nhs.uk/ latest vacancies: jobs.nnuh.nhs.uk/ Telephone: Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital: 01603 286286 Cromer Hospital: 01263 513571 Vacancy details: 01603 287578

NNUH Recruitment Information  

A guide to the University Hospitals of Norfolk and Norwich – Recruitment Information.

NNUH Recruitment Information  

A guide to the University Hospitals of Norfolk and Norwich – Recruitment Information.