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Small Press Distribution POETRY, FICTION AND LITERARY NONFICTION

FALL 2011 SPD is a non-profit organization


     

           

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SPD SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, INC.

Contents New Publishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Poetry, Prose Poetry, Cross-Genre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Fiction and Drama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Literary Nonfiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Magazines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Author Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Title Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Publisher Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Multicultural Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Friends of SPD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 SPD Publishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 HOW TO USE THIS CATALOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Order Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 CONTACT

VOLUNTEERS

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E-mail: orders@spdbooks.org www.spdbooks.org Fax orders to: (510) 524-0852 To order call toll-free: (800) 869-7553 In the Bay Area call: (510) 524-1668 Business hours: 9 A.M. – 5 P.M. (Pacific Time) Monday-Friday

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Teresa Buzzard, acrylic paintings “Mona Teresa, Korova Milk Bar, 1977,” “Mona Teresa, Woodstock, 1969,” Mona Teresa, Cotton Club, 1925,” and “Mona Teresa, Kabul, 1996.” From the book Re:Telling, edited by William Walsh, published by Ampersand Books, p. 61. PRINTED BY BAY AREA GREEN BUSINESS PROGRAM PRINTER: Cover paper contains

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Fall 2011 Poetry, Fiction and Literary Nonfiction 493 New Books MISSION STATEMENT

Small Press Distribution (SPD) connects readers with writers by providing access to independently published literature. SPD allows essential but underrepresented literary communities to participate fully in the marketplace and in the culture at large through book distribution, information services, and public advocacy programs. SPD nurtures an environment in which the literary arts are valued and sustained. SPD BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Joshua Cohen, President Alan Bernheimer, Secretary David Rothenberg, Treasurer Andrew Day Jonathan Fernandez Michael Morgan Ethan Nosowsky Rena Rosenwasser Mary Shapiro Juliana Spahr SPD STAFF

Executive Director Jeffrey Lependorf Deputy Director Laura Moriarty Operations Director Brent Cunningham Sales & Marketing Manager Clay Banes Business Manager Andrew Pai Warehouse Manager John Sakkis Customer Service & Development Associate Zachary Tuck Warehouse Assistant Julia Jackson Administrative Associate Meg Taylor

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New Publishers Once again we welcome a prodigious number of exceptional new independent presses to the SPD family. This catalog introduces the books of seventeen new publishers from eleven states and one province. THE CENTER FOR THE HUMANITIES, THE GRADUATE CENTER, CUNY/ NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Ammiel Alcalay, Editor, Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, Series 2 DARK SKY BOOKS/ VASHON, WASHINGTON

Seth Berg, Muted Lines from Someone Else’s Memory Michael Bible, Cowboy Maloney’s Electric City Kevin Murphy, Editor, Dark Sky Magazine Ben Mazer, January 2008 Ethel Rohan, Cut Through the Bone Gregory Sherl, I Have Touched You Stephen Sturgeon, Trees of the Twentieth Century GUERNICA EDITIONS/ TORONTO, CANADA

Mary Bucci Bush, Sweet Hope Giuseppe Conte, Angelina’s Lips Thomas DePietro, Editor, Frank Lentricchia: Essays on His Works Richard Gambino, Blood of My Blood: The Dilemma of the Italian Americans Lorenzo Madalena, Confetti for Gino HORSE LESS PRESS/ DENVER, COLORADO

Richard Froude, FABRIC: Preludes to the Last American Book Susan Scarlata, It Might Turn Out We Are Real LIGHTFUL PRESS/ IOWA CITY, IOWA

Sasha Chernyi, Poems from Children’s Island MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS/ FORT COLLINS, COLORADO

Ben Brooks, An Island of Fifty Sasha Fletcher, When All Our Days Are Numbered Marching Bands Will Fill the Streets & We Will Not Hear Them Because We Will Be Upstairs in the Clouds Molly Gaudry, We Take Me Apart Norman Lock, Grim Tales Michael Stewart, The Hieroglyphics PORTABLE PRESS AT YO-YO LABS/ BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

Paul Foster Johnson, Study in Pavilions and Safe Rooms

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RED MOUNTAIN PRESS/ TOWSON, MARYLAND

Susan Gardner, Drawing the Line Susan Gardner, Stone Music: The Art and Poetry of Susan Gardner Ford Robbins, Connections: A Visual Journal Marc Talbert, Altogether Ernest RESCUE PRESS/ MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Shane McCrae, In Canaan Madeline McDonnell, There Is Something Inside, It Wants to Get Out Marc Rahe, The Smaller Half Andrea Rexilius, To Be Human Is to Be a Conversation Zach Savich, Events Film Cannot Withstand SHORT FLIGHT/LONG DRIVE BOOKS/ ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Mary Miller, Big World Adam Novy, The Avian Gospels, Book I Adam Novy, The Avian Gospels, Book II SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS/ ALEXANDER, ARKANSAS

Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 01: A Journal of Gay Poetry Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 02: A Journal of Gay Poetry Raymond Luczak, Road Work Ahead Steven Reigns, Inheritance Theresa Senato Edwards, Voices Through Skin Ocean Vuong, Burnings SOBERSCOVE PRESS/ CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Robert Goodnough, Editor, Artists’ Sessions at Studio 35 (1950) Kristin Lucas, Refresh Nancy Shaver, Henry at Home SOLID OBJECTS/ NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Jim Shepard, Master of Miniatures Mac Wellman, Left Glove SPIRE PRESS, INC./ NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Christina Olson, Before I Came Home Naked Anthony Russell White, The Faith of Leaping TAVERN BOOKS/ SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

Leonardo Sinisgalli, Night of Shooting Stars David Wevill, Casual Ties WEAVERS PRESS/ SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Syed Afzal Haider, To Be with Her WORDFARM/ SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Alan Michael Parker, Whale Man Paul J. Willis, The Alpine Tales

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Ad Page

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Standing Sto S ne Books are available in print or eb e ook format at www.Stand n ingStoneStudio dios.org

Love-Noise

Elizabeth Tw widdy

Love-Noise by Elizabeth Twiddy

Haunted by the surge andd aftermath of eros, yet buoyed by ann empathy for all she encounters, Twiddy widddy’s poems fearlessly explore the noise and deafening silence that caan surround our deepest loves.

ALASKAN: Stories from m the Great Land

New ws from the World at My Birth: B A History

by John Elvis Smelcer

by Petter Weltner

Written over the course of a quarter century by one of Alaska’s best living writers, these two dozen stories embody the spirit of Alaska—stories based on historry, headlines, and experience; stories abbout Alaska’s colliding cultures, l iits maagnificent ifi beaut b y, andd iits dangerously unforgiving environment.

Set in the era of World War Two, Weltner’s narrattive poems evoke a time and peoplee whosee stories, charged with erotic intensity sity and paain, speak to how the passions and strugggles of past generations still haunt us todday

951 Comstock Avenue, Syracuse, racuse, New York 13210 U.S.A. Email: info@standingstones estudios.org Web: www.standingstonesstudios.org SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION · order@spdbooks.org · edi orders via pubnet.org (san #106-6617) · 800-869-7553 · Fall 2011

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New Books

from

Jen Benka Pinko “Some of her loveliest writing…a fresh, optimistic and instructional book” – Kevin Killian. “I’m a huge fan…it’s an anti-war book, a sweet book, a powerful witnessing one” – Eileen Myles. “Elegant and superbly crafted poems” – Elaine Equi. Paper, $18.

Pablo Medina The Man Who Wrote on Water The Havana-born poet’s new work “delves deep into the heart and the mind and the world” – Joan Larkin. “Graceful, deeply felt and fluent poems” – Chuck Wachtel. “Wild and playful…lasting work” – D. Nurkse. Paper, $18.

Hanging Loose Press

Elizabeth Swados Waiting: Selected Nonfiction

Terence Winch Falling Out of Bed in a Room with No Floor

Composer, novelist, performer, director, teacher – Elizabeth Swados now shares her extraordinary life and career, writing with grace and humor of her family and travels, and her work with Joseph Papp, Ellen Stewart, Helen Mirren, Peter Brook, Meryl Streep, Sean Penn, and many more, some famous, some just beginning to fulfill their promise. Paper, $18.

“He writes with a sure hand and fine sense of the playful slipperiness of language” – Billy Collins. These poems are “wonderfully droll, selfdeprecating, hard-hitting and deliciously comic” – Marjorie Perloff.

William Corbett The Whalen Poem Inspired by Philip Whalen’s Collected Poems. About his book-length work, Corbett writes: “No book I have written, poetry or prose, has given me the deep pleasure I felt in writing The Whalen Poem.”

Paper, $18.

Gerald Fleming Night of Pure Breathing “His prose poems sing and tell stories; they are crystal clear, pure, and deeply refreshing” – Keith Taylor. “I’ve just picked myself up off the floor….This is an amazing collection” – Shirley Kaufman. A “remarkable collection….Hold onto your socks; you’re in for a ride” – Gary Young. Paper, $18.

Paper, $16.

And keep in mind – 3/03, Chuck Wachtel, $18 Vacations on the Black Star Line, Michael Cirelli, $18 Hold Tight: The Truck Darling Poems, Jeni Olin, $18 The World in a Minute, Gary Lenhart, $18 Tourist at a Miracle, Mark Statman, $18 Dialect of a Skirt, Erica Miriam Fabri, $18 When We Were Countries: Poems and Stories by Outstanding High School Writers, $19.

Hanging Loose Magazine #98 Art by Louise Hamlin. Writing by Cathy Park Hong, Breyten Breytenbach, David Kirby, Sharon Mesmer, Colin Greer, Stephen Lewandowski, Stuart Friebert, Elizabeth Swados, Mark Pawlak, Joanna Fuhrman, Sarah White, Kiyomi Dong, John Jones, Michael Cirelli, and many more, including our regular section of wonderful high school writing. $9.

See our backlist and much more at hangingloosepress.com

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Poetry, Prose Poetry and Cross-Genre Writing

Listed alphabetically by author. See also Fiction and Drama (p.51), Literary Nonfiction (p.63), and Magazine sections (p.73)

Seth Abramson Northerners 978-1-930974-96-8, $15, paper, 72 pp.

Will Alexander Compression & Purity 978-0-87286-541-9, $13.95, paper, 100 pp.

NEW ISSUES POETRY & PROSE 2011

CITY LIGHTS PUBLISHERS 2011

Poetry. Winner of the 2010 Green Rose Prize. “From the first line of the first poem, this book takes us into mythical territory: mankind is walking backward, and it’s back into the garden, yet this is not regressive, nor is it redemptive. A little later, an apple appears.... Seth Abramson’s genius lies in the ability to condense the power of our culture’s founding concepts into their particulars, and then to show how those particulars are every bit as alive today, and as relevant. And he shows it more through language’s muscle than through its meaning, for while he says a lot in this collection, it’s the torque and snap of the medium, used as a material for art rather than as a vehicle for ideas, that keeps the reader on the page, becoming a part of it” —Cole Swensen.

Poetry. African American Studies. Few poets writing today can compare with L.A.-based surrealist Will Alexander in terms of the intensity of his imagination or his radically experimental approach to language as material object. Through the use of automatic writing, Alexander practices a surrealism of the word, creating densely textured layers of signification from its sounded and written forms. COMPRESSION & PURITY, volume five of City Lights’ Spotlight poetry series, is Alexander’s seventh full-length collection. Known for his visionary epics influenced by poets like Césaire, Artaud, and Lamantia, Alexander here returns to shorter forms to address his ecological, cosmological and historical concerns. Highlights include monologues from the perspective of “The Blood Penguin” and “The Pope at Avignon,” a song by the “Water on New Mars,” and an homage to César Vallejo, “Combustion & Leakage.” In true surrealist fashion, the book also includes both an autobiographical lyric essay, “My Interior Vita,” describing the evolution of Alexander’s artistic consciousness through jazz and surrealism, and his disavowal of the autobiographical process, “On AntiBiography.” An imaginative tour de force, COMPRESSION & PURITY confirms Alexander’s reputation among surrealism’s foremost contemporary practitioners.

Akbar Ahmed Suspended Somewhere Between: A Book of Verse 978-1-60486-485-4, $15.95, paper, 152 pp. PM PRESS 2011

Poetry. Middle Eastern Studies. Akbar Ahmed’s SUSPENDED SOMEWHERE BETWEEN is a collection of poetry from the man the BBC calls “the world’s leading authority on contemporary Islam.” A mosaic of Ahmed’s life, which has traversed cultural and religious barriers, this book of verse is personal, with a vocal range from introspective and reflective to romantic and emotive to historical and political. The poems take the reader from the forbidding valleys and mountains of Waziristan in the tribal areas of Pakistan to the think tanks and halls of power in Washington, DC; from the rustic tranquility of Cambridge to the urban chaos of Karachi. Through the poems, the reader gets fresh insights into the Muslim world and its struggles. Above all, they carry the eternal message of hope and compassion. Ammiel Alcalay neither wit nor gold 978-1-933254-84-5, $14, paper, 80 pp. UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. While putting together a manuscript of work written between 1975-1990, Alcalay became dissatisfied with the notion of a “selected poems.” As a response, he began to comb through photographs, correspondence, memorabilia, journal entries, and newspaper clippings from the era, and incorporated them into his book; the result is a personal investigation into the relationships of context to text, memory to nostalgia, and present attention to the multiple traces of the past. “Ammiel Alcalay is that rare thing— a gifted prose writer and poet, an accomplished intellectual and a true, as well as inventive, comparatist”—Edward Said.

Paula Gunn Allen America the Beautiful: Last Poems 978-0-9816693-5-9, $14.95, paper, 100 pp. WEST END PRESS 2010

Poetry. LGBT Studies. Native American Studies. These poems, written in the last decade of Paula Gunn Allen’s life and the first years of the new century, capture the variety, ingenuity, and complexity of this beloved and influential Native American critic and poet. In the lexicon of Paula Gunn Allen, what makes America beautiful may come as a surprise: its horrors confront its hopefulness; its absurdities challenge its promise. A powerful, sustained lyrical and narrative sequence written in the midst of political and personal catastrophe (the second U.S. invasion of Iraq, a disastrous home fire, her own battle with lung cancer), Allen’s last book of poems is at once a bonfire made up of the ruins of civilization, a call for one more effort to set things right, and a gift to us all from this fertile and generous writer. Nin Andrews The Book of Orgasms 978-1-880834-48-0, $14, paper, 80 pp. CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY POETRY CENTER 2000

Poetry. A series of wry meditations on the relationship between the ordinary and the extraordinary, the human and the divine, everyday experience and the limits of bliss, THE BOOK OF ORGASMS maps the imaginary terrain of the upper realm, the place where euphoria endures. In Nin Andrews’s highly original conception, orgasms represent peak moments that take the form of invisible creatures waiting to lift us up into the air, out of the ordinary and into a place just above our heads, just beyond our fingertips. And yet—curse or blessing— the gravity of our own desire, the weight of out humanness continually pulls us back from the splendid lightness of euphoria.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Gennady Aygi Into the Snow: Selected Poems of Gennady Aygi 978-1-933517-53-7, $16, paper, 128 pp.

Aliki Barnstone Bright Body 978-1-935210-24-5, $16, paper, 96 pp.

WAVE BOOKS 2011

WHITE PINE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Translated from the Russian by Sarah Valentine. “It’s possible to be an experimental humanist.” Animated by an elemental sense of life, mortality, and humanity, the Chuvash poet Gennady Aygi wrote poems that fused his experience of ethnic difference with an avant-garde aesthetic. Artfully translated from the Russian by poet and scholar Sarah Valentine, these strong, precise poems challenge language to plumb the depths of human feeling and simultaneously attune to linguistic experimentalism.

Poetry. In BRIGHT BODY, Aliki Barnstone seeks to unite mind and body, spirit and matter, the individual and the body politic. Many of the poems are set in Las Vegas, a monument to materialism. This city of extremes informs Barnstone’s vision and serves as a backdrop for her meditations on American history, war, the environment, erotic love, and the love of mother and child. “For Aliki Barnstone, poetry seems a natural medium. The vision and cadences of these poems suggest a sensibility for which poetry is as inevitable as breathing or eating” —Robert Pinsky.

Troy Burle Bailey The Pierre Bonga Loops 978-0-9813906-0-4, $22, paper, 192 pp. COMMODORE BOOKS 2010

Poetry. African American Studies. A documentary poem that lays bare the black presence in the northwest, THE PIERRE BONGA LOOPS is also about fathers and sons, now and then. Born in the 1780’s, Bonga was the son of freed slaves who worked for J. Sayer & Co. in 1795 at Fond du Lac. He was employed by the North West Co., the South West Co. and the American Fur Co. in their Fond du Lac departments. Using images and text from documentary sources including the Hudson’s Bay Company Archive, Bailey has constructed an important, innovative and exciting book. Micah Ballard Waifs and Strays 978-0-87286-544-0, $13.95, paper, 100 pp. CITY LIGHTS PUBLISHERS 2011

Poetry. The second full-length collection by Cajun poet Micah Ballard, WAIFS AND STRAYS recombines the allure, fixations, and diction of the metaphysical poets with the alert and streetwise urban fracturing and amazements instantaneous in contemporary San Francisco. With the haunted elegance of Charles Baudelaire and the handmade warmth of Semina, WAIFS AND STRAYS is a rejection of a slick and disposable culture. Jessica Baran Remains to Be Used 978-0-9793627-4-3, $14, paper, 72 pp. APOSTROPHE BOOKS 2010

Poetry. Jessica Baran’s ekphrastic poems challenge the way we encounter the aural, visual, and textual artifacts of artists and thinkers as varied as Sergio Leone, Lewis Carroll, Sigmund Freud, Alfred Hitchcock, and Hank Williams. Strange and intriguing, Baran is a voyeur who provides heuristic glimpses into new aesthetic experiences. These poems peek into the tangling and untangling complexities of a performance by Jan Bas Ader, a poem by Wallace Stevens, or a video installation by Eija-Liisa Ahtila. Baran is as wildly adept in her investigations of the filmic gaze in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly as she is in her poetic misprision of Derrida’s Specters of Marx or in her inhabiting of a song by Metallica. REMAINS TO BE USED invites and disorients, changes lenses, and ultimately trespasses the interior worlds of objets d’art.

Dennis Barone Parallel Lines 978-1-84861-162-7, $15, paper, 84 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2011

Poetry. “Dennis Barone pays attention. His keen eye and ear let the luminousness of the ordinary detail light up even his most abstract ruminations, just as his sly humor lies in wait behind the most earnest of them. In these poems, you will for the first time smell ‘the oil / leaking from the car that has stopped at / that stop light just long enough to note / that ‘so much depends’“ —Barry Schwabsky. Ed Barrett Down New Utrecht Avenue 978-0-9831975-2-2, $14, paper, 88 pp. PRESSED WAFER 2011

Poetry. “Opening Ed Barrett’s DOWN NEW UTRECHT AVENUE is like happening on a mint-condition, hitherto unknown set of chromolithograph baseball cards of an unimaginable rarity. Yes, but what do I do with them? You don’t have to do anything, the ‘unimaginable’ takes care of that. Just sit and let them wash over you pleasantly but firmly, like ‘a three-game series raveling and unraveling the hajj of things drifting through you’”—John Ashbery. Dan Beachy-Quick Circle’s Apprentice 978-1-932195-97-2, $16.95, paper, 90 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2011

Poetry. Dan Beachy-Quick has produced six collections of solo or collaborative poetry and a unique prose companion to Moby Dick. In the process, this amazingly productive writer has become recognized as one of the nation’s most exciting dramatists of the mind in ferment, and of our urgent and ongoing connections with a tradition that extends back to the origins of literature. After a series of book-length poems, Beachy-Quick’s new volume is as carefully structured as a suite of chamber music pieces, yet made of distinctly individual poems. “Dan Beachy-Quick’s splendid new collection reveals the echoes between the measure of verse and the measure of time.... CIRCLE’S APPRENTICE vividly reminds us that all our human life may be marked by ritual but it is returned to us through song”—Susan Howe. Robin Behn The Yellow House 978-1-933132-76-1, $14, paper, 74 pp. SPUYTEN DUYVIL 2011

Poetry. “In the allegorical world of Robin Behn’s marvelous THE YELLOW HOUSE, the landscape and the characters and the sequence of events enact the very fact and drama of human language and human voice. Part abstraction, part narration, all lyrically alive, wildly so, in a musical composition that we don’t want to stop listening to”—Ralph Angel.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Marvin Bell Vertigo: The Living Dead Man Poems 978-1-55659-376-5, $16, paper, 120 pp.

Anselm Berrigan Notes from Irrelevance 978-1-933517-54-4, $16, paper, 80 pp.

COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

WAVE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Marvin Bell is one of America’s great poets, and his legacy includes the invention of a startling poetic form called the “Dead Man” poems. The Dead Man is alive and dead at once: not a persona, but an overarching consciousness, embedded in poetics and philosophy. VERTIGO is the latest from the Dead Man— a brilliant, enigmatic, wise, and wild book.

Poetry. I don’t really see / the difference between / modernism and Al Qaeda. This generous book-length poem is an investigation of the author’s unique personal history as it entwines with his present role as poet, citizen, and “one of the six billion-plus.”

Martine Bellen Ghosts! 978-1-933132-41-9, $14, paper, 82 pp.

Stephen Bett Track This: A Book of Relationship 978-1-60964-033-0, $16, paper, 148 pp.

SPUYTEN DUYVIL 2011

BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “Contemporary poems on the ancient past have to be ghosts. They are dragged through the inscriptions of strangers until they become something ethereal and gray. And in that spectral light, as we know, colors become brighter as if shining from rain. This is how I read these poems and find them fresh”—Fanny Howe.

Poetry. In Bett’s new book, TRACK THIS, we see a surprising, but highly engaging shift in sensibility. TRACK THIS is a risk-taking, stunningly beautiful book of poems that “tracks” an evolving love relationship. The poet employs his considerable technical skill to steer well free of clichéd, lyric sentiment by making use of Louis Zukofsky’s still relevant, but rarely achieved dictum “upper register: music.” The language of these minimalist, short-line poems truly “sings” as the poems move and turn on the page. This is a poet who inherits the mantle from Creeley, Dorn, et al., but whose voice and ear for language are entirely his own. An utterly unique and gifted voice, intelligently hip, making postmodern language reach toward music.

Jen Benka Pinko 978-1-934909-04-1, $18, paper, 64 pp. HANGING LOOSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Jen Benka’s elegant and superbly crafted poems reinvigorate our notion of the lyric. Welding language from diverse spheres—military, political, legal, literary, pop—she enlists the reader to help in this renewal process, urging: “trespassers take up your tools.” “I’m a huge fan of Benka’s PINKO. It’s an anti-war book, a sweet book, a powerful witnessing one. I’m all for its exact experience”—Eileen Myles. Guy Bennett Self-Evident Poems 978-0-9845289-0-5, $12.95, paper, 96 pp. OTIS BOOKS/SEISMICITY EDITIONS 2011

Poetry. This new collection of brief conceptual poems strives to demonstrate Jacques Roubaud’s axiom whereby “poetry says what it says by saying it.” Openly self-referential and stylistically sincere, they eschew aesthetic subterfuge in favor of direct, manifest expression. In their utter plainness, these self-evident poems aspire to a “writing degree sub-zero.” Seth Berg Muted Lines from Someone Else’s Memory 978-0-615-35717-1, $12, paper, 79 pp.

Guy Birchard Further than the Blood 978-0-9824100-8-0, $12.50, paper, 102 pp. PRESSED WAFER 2010

Poetry. FURTHER THAN THE BLOOD is Guy Birchard’s complete poems to date. In his “Forword” Birchard writes, “I have loved the world and admired the graces and laws by which it runs.” Birchard has also loved the word and served its many and various forms with grace and an uncommon music. Francesca Lia Block Fairy Tales in Electri-City 978-0-9794208-7-0, $13.95, paper, 80 pp. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S PRESS 2011

Poetry. Elves and centaurs, nymphs and fauns inhabit this new collection of magical, erotic poems about a girl yearning for and searching for love in present-day Los Angeles.

DARK SKY BOOKS 2010

Poetry. “MUTED LINES FROM SOMEONE ELSE’S MEMORY is a heartfelt and gutsy investigation into the human brain’s infinite possibilities, possibilities that remain potential in most of us, but geyser forward from Berg’s consciousness in every poem. Nowhere in this book are we safe from clownfish in straitjackets, from wizards playing piccolos, from children with ‘fleshy little prods.’ Berg’s world is rife with the nightmares and euphorias of his own relentless imagination, one that not merely burns, but is fire itself, sweeping the cortex, the hippocampus, the frontal lobe, re-forging the cerebral universe in the most pleasurable manner imaginable. The only thing wrong with this book is the title—there is nothing muted about any of these lines. They scream at maximum volume. They break glass. How could they not when every syllable is so utterly alive?” —Larissa Szporluk.

Dan Boehl Kings of the F**king Sea 978-0-9826177-4-8, $18, paper, 116 pp. BIRDS, LLC 2011

Poetry. Art. Images by Jonathan Marshall. “I often have a difficult time distinguishing between the memories of my childhood nightmares, the movie Time Bandits, and now KINGS OF THE F**KING SEA. At the heart of each is an unrecoverable distance from home. In Dan Boehl’s poems, the sea is not home. If we stay on it, we will eventually drown in it, but there is nothing we can do. His poems are unforgivably wise. Like the sea, they are an unafraid mirror. And though they remind us it’s always too late—that our adventure is a constant failure—their beauty keeps us afloat for just long enough”—Zachary Schomburg.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Robert Bohm Closing the Hotel Kitchen 978-0-9826968-1-1, $13.95, paper, 108 pp. WEST END PRESS 2010

Poetry. CLOSING THE HOTEL KITCHEN is about war. It is also about falling apart when that is the only route left to sanity. It takes place during the 1960s and early 1970s, from New York’s streets to Vietnam and India. Untouched by nostalgia or baby-boomer sentimentality, these poems offer a searing, visceral look at the narrator’s attempts to find hints of coherence within a violent world unexplained by his inherited Christianity or his family’s patriotism. “This is a guide to a whole new way to write”—Sharon Doubiago. Roger Bonair-Agard Gully 978-0-9819131-5-5, $12.95, paper, 112 pp. CYPHER BOOKS 2011

Poetry. African American Studies. Roger Bonair-Agard’s new book, GULLY, journeys from the subverted sport of English gentlemen to the place where a black man might be swallowed up in the throat of trouble. These poems show us GULLY’s trickster position, the source of song, the lurking place on the pitch that requires quick hands. GULLY is metaphor for the subject position of these first-person lyrics filed with a street’s athlete’s dynamism and energy. GULLY is the site of risk and swagger that swings from cricket bats to the diamond crusted smile of Lil’Wayne. Daniel Borzutzky The Book of Interfering Bodies 978-0-9844598-2-7, $15.95, paper, 106 pp. NIGHTBOAT BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Beginning with an epigraph from the 9/11 Commission Report, THE BOOK OF INTERFERING BODIES re-imagines the poet as bureaucrat, barbaric writer, and terrorist. In this book, poems that invoke the role of the writer in society alternate with apocalyptic prose pieces that recall Borges’s “The Library of Babel.” In the process, Borzutzky creates a 21st century response to our most enduing twentieth century writers, from Beckett to Lispector. Michael Boughn Cosmographia: A Post-Lucrecian Faux Micro-Epic 978-1-897388-69-3, $20, paper, 194 pp. BOOKTHUG 2010

Poetry. Butt out, Dante. Move over, Milton. Piss off, Pound. Outta the way, Olson. Here comes COSMOGRAPHIA: A POST-LUCRECIAN FAUX MICRO-EPIC, the latest ground-breaking incursion into the ever popular spectacle of the Epic Poem. Tracking the classic epic journey through the unfolding cosmos toward home, though occasionally disoriented by milling cows with similar intent, COSMOGRAPHIA teems with nasty political invective, scurrilous spiritual slander, and endless exploitive sexual innuendo. Taking as its muses Cab Calloway and Charles Mingus, by the time it gets home, COSMOGRAPHIA has subjected the epic to unspeakable acts in the name of linguistic rectumtude, dada terrorism, and sporadic ejaculations of selfexpression. Oh yeah!—poetry will never be the same.

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Megan Boyle selected unpublished blog posts of a mexican panda express employee 978-0-9822067-2-0, $12, paper, 88 pp. MUUMUU HOUSE 2011

Poetry. Megan Boyle’s debut poetry collection is at once confessional, sociological, emotional, detached, funny, sad, delightful, reckless, and meditative. Written in the naturally meticulous, defaultedly complex, always affecting voice of a person too imaginative and selfaware and intelligent to be fully consumed by depression and loneliness but too aware of the meaninglessness and ephemeral nature of existence (and too depressed and lonely) to write on any level but an existential, emotionally-driven, unsimplified one, Megan Boyle’s debut poetry collection is the rare work of art that conveys troubling and scary information, undiluted, about humans and the universe but in a way, ultimately, that makes you excited to be alive, eager to be troubled and scared, grateful to simply be here. Joseph Bradshaw In the Common Dream of George Oppen 978-1-84861-149-8, $15, paper, 90 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Literary Nonfiction. Comprised of both poetry and essays, Joseph Bradshaw’s IN THE COMMON DREAM OF GEORGE OPPEN makes its premise to imagine what bodies of work might exist in Oppen’s fabled 25-year silence. By turns, the book forcefully projects a singularly fabricated biography onto the figure of Oppen, then selfreflexively retracts, divagating through a poet’s desire for mentorship and community. Bringing in everything from ruminations on blurry memories of Idaho’s landscape, to dialogues held across centuries and continents with the likes of figures such as the Elephant Man, IN THE COMMON DREAM OF GEORGE OPPEN brushes up against the fragile boundary between the finished and the unfinished poem, or a finished or unfinished life. John Brandi Seeding the Cosmos: New & Selected Haiku 978-1-888809-60-2, $14, paper, 248 pp. LA ALAMEDA PRESS 2011

Poetry. “A student looking at modern haiku for the first time often asks, ‘Why does haiku look like it does today? What happened to the rules?’ A simple answer, to quote Zen teacher Joko Beck, is: ‘A good practice is always undermining itself.’ Continent to continent, culture to culture, language to language, haiku has made itself new. During this transformation, practitioners parted ways with rules that worked best for Japanese speakers. New languages, geographies, climates, and cultural environments triggered new approaches. The essential core ideas of Basho’s time are with us, though. Keep it brief, let it jump, follow the natural world through its seasons, but do not forget the seasons of the heart” —from the Afterword.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Per Aage Brandt These Hands 978-0-924047-83-1, $30, cloth, 183 pp. 978-0-924047-74-9, $15, paper, 183 pp.

Louis Daniel Brodsky Seizing the Sun and Moon: Volume Three of The Seasons of Youth 978-1-56809-136-5, $15.95, paper, 76 pp.

HOST PUBLICATIONS 2011

TIME BEING BOOKS 2010

Poetry. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Danish by Thom Satterlee. THESE HANDS is an extraordinary bilingual poetry collection from renowned Danish poet Per Aage Brandt. The uniqueness of this work comes from the uniqueness of the person himself: unlike many other professor-poets, Brandt’s academic discipline is not literature but semiotics, a field in which he has authored a dozen books and roughly two hundred and fifty articles. Many of the poems in this collection read like thought-experiments—as if the cognitive scientist made poetry his laboratory and theories his poems. But Brandt’s work is also rich with humor and humanity. His poetry has a sense of playfulness and a sense of a personhood—someone behind the poem who doesn’t take himself too seriously, even as he addresses profoundly serious subjects such as language, consciousness, and existence, mixing comedy with critique. In this exuberant and sharp-minded collection, Brandt re-sets the limits of language and creates a new kind of verse, prompting one Danish critic to remark that his work “bears more resemblance to a brainwave than a book of poems.”

Poetry. The third volume of THE SEASONS OF YOUTH celebrates the author’s growing family, with the birth of a son. Father and mother revisit the daily joys and challenges of seeing a child flourish from infancy into the preschool years, while they marvel at their daughter’s rapid physical and social development, as she progresses from age three to six and a half, exhibiting the first hints of who she’ll be as an adult. In thirty-nine poems that poignantly dramatize the interweaving of four lives, Louis Daniel Brodsky shares myriad rituals of childrearing (bathing, meal time, school days, pets, playing, first words, getting ready for bed), all of which offer chances to experience the coming-of-age wonders of early maturation and the rites of initiation into love’s simple complexities—opportunities to seize the sun and moon.

Jason Bredle Smiles of the Unstoppable 978-0-9841406-1-9, $11.95, paper, 76 pp. MAGIC HELICOPTER PRESS 2011

Poetry. A limber and vivid sad clown routine of a collection, reading SMILES OF THE UNSTOPPABLE is like knowing the secret password to an illegal speakeasy of imagination. From knife fights between Sharks and Jets to Chewbacca Last Suppers, these are poems that belong in the cold kitchens of the heart: hilarious and swooning, caramel in sensibility, and endless in feeling. “Jason Bredle roams like a cartoon jaguar and swims amid squid and jellyfish that can’t be touched and might as well be hamsters and it’s as if drifting and roaming need never end”—Mark Halliday. Daniel Brenner June 978-1-934200-43-8, $15.95, paper, 88 pp. FENCE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. JUNE takes up the whirlpooling, epic project of Daniel Brenner’s prizewinning THE STUPEFYING FLASHBULBS. Narrative emerges despite the “pleasurable obstacles” (as one reviewer called them) of these poems, which, in hallucinatory, luminous, yet spare verbiage trace the obscure appearances of “perfumed people,” pioneers all—including one Xi An, a “guardian of paradise”—as they weather a flood, butchery, and “blistering synthesis.” Louis Daniel Brodsky At Dock’s End: Poems of Lake Nebagamon, Volume Two 978-1-56809-140-2, $15.95, paper, 152 pp. TIME BEING BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Perhaps the only thing as dear to Louis Daniel Brodsky as the beauty of the written word are his memories and experiences on the shores of Wisconsin’s Lake Nebagamon, which the poet describes as “glory’s hinterlands.” The combination of his two passions is a wonderful example of the poetry of place—the kind of soul-forming and life-affirming locale that we all have somewhere in our lives. What the open road was to Whitman, the North Woods are to Brodsky.

Julian T. Brolaski gowanus atropolis 978-1-933254-81-4, $15, paper, 104 pp. UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. GOWANUS ATROPOLIS attempts to reconcile the toxicity of the titular Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn and the east river in “Manahatta” with the poet’s search for the pastoral in New York City. A queer elegy for when language might have been prior to thought, where the phrase becomes the thought, rather than the other way around—so that the dystopic might become, if not utopic, at least measurable / pleasurable, “melodious offal.” “Once in a while there are poems which create entire fresh terrain. And I’m saying too that it’s hard to come home from it, locator dials set anew. I’m jangling from the return, like the world had descended upon me so quickly through the poems it was some time before I realized I was still in one piece, and minted with a beautiful little scar. Julian’s deviance is a hazard of poems which bend the muscle of light. I can hardly wait to share our extra strength when we’ve all read them!” —CAConrad. Stephanie Brooks Love Is a Certain Kind of Flower 978-0-9820292-2-0, $10, paper, 52 pp. THE GREEN LANTERN PRESS 2009

Poetry. LOVE IS A CERTAIN KIND OF FLOWER is an extensive index of love metaphors culled from poems ranging from the classics to sentimental greeting card verse. Continuing in Brooks’s deconstruction of romance, LOVE IS A CERTAIN KIND OF FLOWER provides an amusing and sometimes poignant reference for emotive description. Derrick Weston Brown Wisdom Teeth 978-1-60486-417-5, $14.95, paper, 136 pp. PM PRESS 2011

Poetry. African American Studies. To consider WISDOM TEETH is to acknowledge inevitable movement, shift, and sometimes pain. There’s change hidden just below the surface and, like it or not, once it breaks, everything has to make room. So goes the aptly titled debut poetry collection from poet and educator Derrick Weston Brown. WISDOM TEETH reveals the ongoing internal and external reconstruction of a poet’s life and world, as told through a litany of forms and myriad of voices, some the poet’s own. “Full of wit and whimsy, WISDOM TEETH postulates a poetics of heart-whole appreciation and honesty—for love and life, for family and friends, for literature and history, for pop culture and the poet’s ever-cognizant powers of observation”—Tony Medina.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Laynie Browne Roseate, Points of Gold 978-0-9819808-3-6, $15, paper, 108 pp.

Michael Burkard lucky coat anywhere 978-0-9844598-1-0, $15.95, paper, 158 pp.

DUSIE PRESS 2011

NIGHTBOAT BOOKS 2011

Poetry. “These poems might be dreamt from the moon, where water and wombs are under their own observation, and the body is ‘as morning frost scored/into dark pavement by a passing silver shoe.’ What really is inside a body? Oftentimes, another body. This pearlescent meditation explores the forms of the mind as it shapes itself around the body and a body that issues from it, till the delicate movements of the mind crown, like a baby’s head leaving the mother’s body, ‘in the manner of exhaling a bird’”—Eleni Sikelianos.

Poetry. In his first collection of new poems since Unsleeping, Michael Burkard presents an array of verse and prose forms dense with allusion, emotion and sensuality. Drawing on his own strand of the confessional lyric—a peculiar combination of dreams, personal disclosure, and matter-of-fact accounts of daily life—these poems rinse perception and allow one to actually see the world, free of simulation and stimulation, for what it really is. “He gives us the wisdom of indescribability and the mystery of beauty and wonder”—Malena Mörling.

Mahogany L. Browne #Dear Twitter: Love Letters Hashed Out Online in 140 Characters or Less 978-0-9841513-9-4, $15, paper, 66 pp.

Jorge Carrera Andrade Micrograms 978-1-933517-55-1, $16, paper, 96 pp.

PENMANSHIP BOOKS 2010

WAVE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. African American Studies. This new novelty item is a hit for anyone with a friendly addiction to twitter, love, and laughter. “Mahogany L. Browne has her own style of Tweeting, her own unique Twitter voice. She can talk about being her and still make it universal”—Touré. “Writers are too verbose for plays; poets make better playwrights. Poets might tweet better too. Mahogany’s #DEAR TWITTER is proof”—Miles Marshall Lewis.

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Translated from the Spanish by Alejandro de Acosta and Joshua Beckman. Deliberately anachronistic and delightfully extractable, the microgram is a metaphor itself for that which is well worth the digging. Equal parts essay, anthology, and poetry, and weirdly postmodern in structure, MICROGRAMS embodies the work of Jorge Carrera Andrade, illustrating his claim that the impulse toward the microgram has always existed. Illuminating the form in its many incarnations (most famously the Japanese haiku), Carrera Andrade points to the richness of possibility contained therein.

Sarah Browning Whiskey in the Garden of Eden 978-0-915380-66-4, $15, paper, 80 pp. THE WORD WORKS 2007

Poetry. Published in the Hilary Tham Capital Collection, Browning explores the meaning of political activism and personal responsiblity in a time of war, while mapping the capital city—its changes, its history, its beautiful variety. Martín Espada said: “This poet has the courage to say what needs to be said, from the personal to the political (and often the two are intertwined). Sarah Browning takes on the hard questions—war, race, urban poverty—and never loses her cool. Her voice is tough and funny and smart.” Sommer Browning Either Way I’m Celebrating 978-0-9826177-5-5, $16, paper, 96 pp. BIRDS, LLC 2011

Poetry. Comics. “‘All objections to progress,’ writes Hans Blumenberg, ‘could come down to the fact that it hasn’t yet taken us far enough.’ That’s philosophy—and it’s funny—but no one would ever level the same complaint at pain or laughter, this fine book’s subjects and two phenomena that can take human beings great distances almost immediately. Absolutely modern—but never resolutely maudlin—Sommer Browning doesn’t settle for making it new; rather, she lets it bleed and gets us there on time”—Graham Foust. Marie Buck Life & Style 978-0-9818970-0-4, $15, paper, 56 pp. PATRICK LOVELACE EDITIONS 2009

Poetry. In this book of poetry, Marie Buck collages text from MySpace, translating poems by Emily Dickinson, Charles Baudelaire, William Butler Yeats, and others into socially-networked lyrics of teen sexuality and boredom. Buck torques the mundane addresses of the comment stream and the celebrity mag, and teenaged femininity comes to appear thrillingly creepy.

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Mary-Marcia Casoly, Katherine Hastings, Melanie L. Moro-Huber, and Jack Foley Ahadada Reader 3 978-0-9812744-9-2, $15, paper, 162 pp. AHADADA BOOKS 2011

Poetry. AHADADA READER 3 is a compendium of four chapbooks: Australia Dreaming by Mary-Marcia Casoly, Fog and Light by Katherine Hastings, The Memory of Paper by Melanie L. Moro-Huber, and A Disordered City by Jack Foley. “The poems in this collection, despite the interestingly various voices of the four poets, have one thing in common: they do what poems are meant to do, take you to places you’ve never been, show you things you’ve never seen, test the limits of what we’ve come complacently to accept as poetic language, and take the risk of being honest to themselves. How exciting to see four poets doing their own thing, the real thing” —R. H. W. Dillard. Travis Cebula Under the Sky They Lit Cities 978-1-60964-025-5, $16, paper, 100 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “In careful, crafty knots of language, Travis Cebula walks us through the veined structure of a city where, as in a poem, life splinters into its constituent parts: a car lot lit like Casablanca, a river of black leather and wool, nodding Santa Claus displays, snow falling in clumps. Cebula ties together the ‘tensile thunder’ of this city without a sinecure, and though this may be ‘how the thinker litters,’ there’s no need to ‘clamor for grist.’ UNDER THE SKY THEY LIT CITIES has plenty” —Erik Anderson.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Sasha Chernyi Poems from Children’s Island 978-0-9822471-4-3, $18, paper, 64 pp.

Victor Coleman The Occasional Troubadour 978-1-897388-68-6, $18, paper, 96 pp.

LIGHTFUL PRESS 2011

BOOKTHUG 2010

Poetry. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Russian by Kevin Kinsella. Illustrated by Jessica Seamans. Before Daniil Kharms and Nikolai Zabolotsky, there was Sasha Chernyi (1880-1932) with his brilliantly satirical poems, caustic wit, and verbal caricature. One of the best satirists of his generation, Chernyi wrote humorous poems that took aim at politicians, intellectuals, a bourgeois merchant class pandering to European sensibilities, and the backward lives of ordinary Russians at the start of the twentieth century. Chernyi was also a beloved children’s poet, and the author of some twenty books for young Russian readers. Even Chernyi’s writing for children contains his characteristic bite, and the little animals and gnomes that inhabit POEMS FROM CHILDREN’S ISLAND have much to say about how silly a place the world can be. This is the first English-language edition of Chernyi. “Not recommended for adults! as these rimes are far too clever, and besides adults don’t like poetry”—Charles Bernstein.

Poetry. Art. THE OCCASIONAL TROUBADOUR is a series of 52 portraits of friends, acquaintances, and cultural favourites generated by applying the mesostic form to a late nineteenth century English text (in two volumes) by Justin Harvey Smith: The Troubadours at Home, Their lives and personalities, their songs and their world (G.P. Putnam’s Sons, New York & London, The Knickerbocker Press, 1898-99). Readers of the late, great American composer/writer John Cage will be familiar with the mesostic form. Readers of Victor Coleman’s 1972 book, AMERICA, will probably have registered that it contains a series of poems which are both acrostic and telestich. The poems in THE OCCASIONAL TROUBADOUR are “occasional” poems, because the initial composition was written for the 60th birthday of one of Coleman’s oldest friends and Coach House colleague, photographer/writer David Hlynsky. This book is a departure from Coleman’s LETTER DROP trilogy in that these poems are in no way lipogrammatic, although he does consider it to be an extension of his OuLiPo practice.

Michael Cirelli Everyone Loves the Situation 978-0-9831219-3-0, $15, paper, 104 pp. PENMANSHIP BOOKS 2011

Poetry. In this ecstatic third collection, Michael Cirelli once again flips the cultural zeitgeist on its (gelled and sprayed) head, as he deftly surveys MTV’s hit reality show Jersey Shore. In signature Cirelli fashion, he pulls off the unlikely: from defending the Guido and elevating Snooki, to reinterpreting the train wreck of reality stardom “to produce something vital and eye-catching and new” (David Lehman). His lines measure the bitter politics of subculture and assimilation, while finding a humanizing compassion even when everything goes wrong. These are authentically American poems for fans, critics, and even those who have never seen the pop phenomenon known as the Jersey Shore. Kate Colby The Return of the Native 978-1-933254-77-7, $14, paper, 72 pp. UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. THE RETURN OF THE NATIVE is both a pastoral and its counterpoint. A series of 23 poems, it enacts a struggle between the romance of recorded history and the social conditions of the global present. Topical threads include New England colonial, American folk, and Native American history; the construction of the Quabbin Reservoir in central Massachusetts; and the specious gloss of American “road” culture, all filtered through a fine mesh of Thomas Hardy. rd coleman beach tracks 978-1-935520-27-6, $16.95, paper, 208 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Poetry. BEACH TRACKS suggests a passing, a journey, and this book is very much that. The very first poem, “American,” was written and published in the early sixties. This book chronicles that next forty plus years of writing and publishing that is rd’s writing career to date. With varied styles but consistent voice, these poems take place in the subways and buses of the City, some in the City’s homeless shelters, some in rd’s apartment, and some in his mind; some are literal, some pure imagination, but all are the music a poet hears.

Peter Conners The Crows Were Laughing in Their Trees 978-1-935210-20-7, $16, paper, 96 pp. WHITE PINE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Conners’s prose poem is not just a beautiful quirky moment that gives us a glimpse of the miraculous, but also an attempt to become a myth in itself. That Conners seems to get it all into one book is simply amazing. What can I say? A literary master”—Ilya Kaminsky. “Conners writes with the playfulness and kinetic energy of an action painter. His spatters of images and fragmented narratives assume the condition of an exuberant non-sense that, in changing perspective, asserts a logic of its own”—Stuart Dybek. Matthew Cooperman Still: Of the Earth as the Ark Which Does Not Move 978-1-933996-24-0, $15.95, paper, 120 pp. COUNTERPATH PRESS 2011

Poetry. STILL: OF THE EARTH AS THE ARK THAT DOES NOT MOVE attempts that rare “theory of everything,” the implications of which are, it goes on...wave upon wave of stuff, categories, speakers, news. Employing quotation, catalogue, a roving, sometimes aerial point of view, and an ingenious use of the colon, STILL is at once a formal argument of containment, and the trajectory of twilightmodernity jacked on too much “product.” William Corbett The Whalen Poem 978-1-934909-13-3, $16, paper, 64 pp. HANGING LOOSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “I spent the summer of 2007 reading the galleys of Philip Whalen’s Collected Poems. I was in Vermont and had the leisure to read slowly, ten or so pages a day. About halfway through the master’s poems I began to write THE WHALEN POEM. I kept at it until just after Halloween. No book I have written, poetry or prose, has given me the deep pleasure I felt in writing THE WHALEN POEM”—William Corbett.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Steven Cordova Long Distance 978-1-931010-62-7, $10, paper, 72 pp.

Cyril Dabydeen, Editor Beyond Sangre Grande: Caribbean Writing Today 978-1-894770-66-8, $28.95, paper, 200 pp.

BILINGUAL REVIEW PRESS 2009

TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. Latino/Latina Studies. In LONG DISTANCE, the fourth title in the Canto Cosas poetry series, Steven Cordova vividly portrays the life of a young, gay, HIV-positive man living in New York. Cordova uses ironic humor to advance AIDS poetry, dissolving the figurative ghetto associated with it and describing a general human condition in which people of many backgrounds come to terms with a wide range of problems, some of them life-threatening.

Poetry. Fiction. African American Studies. Latino/Latina Studies. Caribbean literature has always been exciting and diverse, including over the past decades some of the world’s most regarded writers. BEYOND SANGRE GRANDE: CARIBBEAN WRITING TODAY brings together a contemporary selection from key poets and fiction writers living in Canada, the US, the UK, and the Caribbean itself. Fusing creole and other cultural streams from a changing world, these writers capture the cadences and rhythms of the Caribbean while admitting other influences to demonstrate the vigour and vitality of Caribbean writing today. Whether in the poetry of Kamau Brathwaite, Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott, David Dabydeen, Dionne Brand, or in the fiction of Shani Mootoo, Austin Clarke, or Elizabeth Nunez, this remarkable collection represents a range of writing that constitutes the rich tapestry of Caribbean literature in new and exciting ways!

Joshua Corey Severance Songs 978-1-932195-92-7, $16.95, paper, 84 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2011

Poetry. Winner of the Dorset Prize, selected by Ilya Kaminsky. In his third full-length book of poems, Joshua Corey puts the sonnet to the test with this sequence of fractured, ventilated, and unrhymed poems written in the aftermath of 9/11 while Corey was living at a pastoral remove from war and terror in upstate New York. The tension between idyllic personal circumstances and horrific world-historical events led Corey to produce this series of layered poems, variously sardonic and sincere in tone. “These songs shuttle between a past and a future, cast adrift or severed from a violent, ashen present into a necessary untimeliness.... What then of the sonnet, repository of desire and enemy of time? It is, as ever, that form by which we re-imagine subjectivity to confront altered circumstances, and to assess ‘the shipwreck of the singular’ in the maelstrom of the many...”—Michael Palmer. Brad Crenshaw My Gargantuan Desire 978-0-9655239-6-7, $16, paper, 64 pp. GREENHOUSE REVIEW PRESS 2010

Poetry. Brad Crenshaw’s formally paradoxical prose sonnets combine wild control and wacky gravity, clinical description and lyric incantation, story and song, memory and vision. His book lives up to its Rabelaisian title with abundant energy, sensory richness, and extravagant wit. Resonating with humor, pathos and searing intelligence, MY GARGANTUAN DESIRE is preoccupied in the deepest sense with mortality and the epic nature of our seemingly mundane lives. Whether parsing the intricate syntax of a marriage or teasing out the mysteries of the human brain, each poem in this masterful collection is mythic in scope but obstinately down-to-earth. In language rich and haunting, these poems reveal the heroic grandeur of our ordinary, blessed lives.

Rachel Daley Plasmos 978-1-880855-19-5, $15, paper, 70 pp. FIFTH PLANET PRESS 2011

Poetry. “PLASMOS is not avant-garde; it is advanced.... Rachel Daley curates a major retrospective of forms she has invented. The galleries are beautifully built but functional, the art.... More is gained from just looking at these poems than from reading many another. One doesn’t ‘just look’ at them.... Not all fragments are created equal, nor all ellipses full or fully empty. What in most hands (could they get their hands on them) would be mere fragments are composted here. The ellipses allow for aeration.... Sonic, ideational, narrative humus, mature compost.... The mixture of the absolutely impeccable rhythms (lyric, metallic, flat, pert, steady, scholarly, exasperated, reproductive) and the absences and silences deployed over the field of the page is virtuosic. The punctuation itself... The book is humane and knowing; it does not know everything. An advantage is thus gained—it is the most surprising book since The Tennis Court Oath (was), or any other, i.e. in ages. You do not know what is happening—though you can [feel see hear] it doing so. It is not a competition (is it?) but you cannot beat this book.... Daley is brilliant here...throughout.... The best book to read right now is PLASMOS...of the highest order—a benchmark. A book to return to. The bubble in the level”—Andrew DuBoisi. Glover Davis Spring Drive 978-1-893670-55-6, $15, paper, 68 pp. TEBOT BACH 2010

Garin Cycholl Hostile Witness 978-1-935402-42-8, $15, paper, 80 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2009

Poetry. “Cycholl’s descent in HOSTILE WITNESS into America leads us through baseball parks and boxing arenas, along the banks of rivers and back alleys to smoke-filled room political deals as only a poet of Cycholl’s power could manage. The collection is masterful and epic—and ultimately essential” —Bill Allegrezza. “With an anger that cauterizes the wound, Cycholl has plumbed the depths of darkness and corruption in recent times. He lives with our good songs and knows our most radiant light as well as our compromising and disabling impoverishments. It is with a profound compassion that he reveals our vapid will to be cold and do harm. And crucially, HOSTILE WITNESS lays bare our possible terrifying future, so as to help us navigate a way to a better place”—Roberto Harrison.

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Poetry. “Conversational eloquence is always a given in Glover Davis’s poetry. Ordinary men and women are lifted by the clarity and intimacy of their observations to something resembling a state of grace. From the carnal meat both animal and human that he considers in his sequence of poems based on paintings by Chaim Soutine to his vision of deliverance in the collection’s concluding poem, ‘Burial Dream,’ Glover Davis has placed the question mark of mortality, inverted like a hook, hanging before our eyes. Maturity and experience are said to breed wisdom. You are holding a book of profound wisdoms in your hands”—David St. John.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Donna de la Perrière Saint Erasure 978-1-58498-076-6, $13.95, paper, 71 pp.

Michael Dickman Flies 978-1-55659-377-2, $16, paper, 96 pp.

TALISMAN HOUSE 2010

COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Anyone who still wants to view experimentation as a purely intellectual exercise will be convinced otherwise by Donna de la Perrière’s exquisite second collection. Under the threat or promise of erasure and at the edge of silence, the poet deftly leads us through a shifting, minimalist landscape. Wrestling with change and stasis, with the resistance and sudden give of the real, she delicately monitors each stage of what feels like a pilgrimage, while defamiliarization pressures vision and makes each breath at once artful and endlessly brave. SAINT ERASURE saves us by exposing the beauty of our vulnerability: ‘Welcome to the new body / tonight we lose everything’”—Laura Mullen.

Poetry. Winner of the James Laughlin Award for the best second book by an American poet, FLIES presents an uncompromising vision of joy and devastating loss through a strict economy of language and an exuberant surrealism. Michael Dickman’s poems bring us back to the wonder and violence of childhood, and the desire to connect with a power greater than ourselves. “Hilarity transfiguring all that dread, manic overflow of powerful feeling, zero at the bone—FLIES renders its desolation with singular invention and focus and figuration: the making of these poems makes them exhilarating” —James Laughlin Award citation.

Shira Dentz black seeds on a white dish 978-1-84861-128-3, $15, paper, 90 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2010

Poetry. The poems in BLACK SEEDS ON A WHITE DISH spring from the search for what is generated and discovered when loss and desire occupy the same space. But lamentation is not the primary focus—by destabilizing everything in its reach, loss disables rigidity. These poems shift widely in form and tone, and seeds invoke the creative germ that spurs the metamorphoses occupying them: “Nothing to do but let the form of things take over.” Shapes themselves, including punctuation, become a language throughout. Regina Derieva Corinthian Copper 978-1-934851-28-9, $14.95, paper, 88 pp. MARICK PRESS 2010

Poetry. Translated from the Russian by J. Kates. “Intimate variety. Regina Derieva is remarkable for the range of voices she deploys”—Les Murray. “Regina Derieva’s best poems are simultaneously elusive and immediate, striking and understated, personal and distanced. Few poets attempt such transformation in so few words”— Tim Liardet.

R. H. W. Dillard What Is Owed the Dead 978-0-9840698-8-0, $14, paper, 53 pp. FACTORY HOLLOW PRESS 2011

Poetry. R.H.W. Dillard’s long-awaited seventh collection consists of a sequence of fifty-two poems, each sixteen lines long, each addressed to a dead poet or several times to more than one dead poet. Each is a meditation of sorts upon that poet’s work, secondarily that poet’s life, and ultimately, all together, upon the life of poems themselves in a continually violent and inherently unjust world. The syntax of these poems is shattered, interrupted by bits and pieces of other poems, memories, reflections, echoes, dates, journal entries, explosions, &c., &c, constituting in part a “demonstration” of how the mind actually deals with poems (and, for that matter, with the business of living). They are poems that, while obviously and purposefully belonging to the great tradition and continuum of poetry (what is owed the dead), are entirely unfamiliar and new. The full collection, for all the violence, depression, hurt, betrayal, anger, and suffering in it, is nevertheless a celebration of the resilience of poetry. Tim Dlugos A Fast Life: The Collected Poems of Tim Dlugos 978-0-9844598-3-4, $22.95, paper, 512 pp. NIGHTBOAT BOOKS 2011

Joanne Diaz The Lessons 978-1-878851-59-8, $14.95, paper, 72 pp. SILVERFISH REVIEW PRESS 2011

Poetry. “THE LESSONS is driven by the poet’s passion for natural history, for the marvels and horrors of science, for the people closest to her, and, in every way, by music. The risks Diaz takes in this beautiful first book are the profound risks of art and of love”—Gail Mazur. “Excitedly descriptive, sinuously rhythmical, and vividly perceptive, Joanne Diaz’s poems ‘wring the roots of thought’ and fill the mind’s eye with scenes of the paradoxically sensuous richness of longing—homesickness, sorrow, love. In this book, ‘desire’ is not just an erotic longing but an existential one; that is, it is our capacity and hunger for meaning” —Reginald Gibbons. Paul Dickey They Say This Is How Death Came into the World 978-0-932412-99-7, $14.95, paper, 78 pp. MAYAPPLE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Many, many lives converge in THEY SAY THIS IS HOW DEATH CAME INTO THE WORLD like the illusion of parallel lines converging on the horizon. What seems quiet layers ice on a roiling maelstrom. We skid from poem to poem and when we break through we have a new home and a new idea for uttering familiar words” —Gian Lombardo.

Poetry. LGBT Studies. Edited by David Trinidad. A FAST LIFE establishes Tim Dlugos—the witty and innovative poet at the heart of the New York literary scene in the late 1970s and 1980s and seminal poet of the AIDS epidemic—as one of the most distinctive and energetic poets of our time. This definitive volume contains all of the poems Dlugos published in his lifetime, a wealth of previously unpublished poems, and an informative introduction, chronology, and notes assembled by the volume’s editor, poet David Trinidad. “The Frank O’Hara of his generation”—Ted Berrigan. Sandra Doller Man Years 978-0-9831150-2-1, $14, paper, 87 pp. SUBITO PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Sandra Doller is a pinball wizard, her attention to ricocheting through America’s flashy dystopias where, as she points out, ‘The award goes/to the inventor of the situation/we’re now in.’ We pose briefly in the ‘trauma tutu we’ve toted’ and then we’re off again ‘like a Bumstead falling down a stair.’ If you’re looking for ‘rested totality,’ you won’t find it. MAN YEARS keeps you up and ready for anything”—Rae Armantrout.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Denise Duhamel and Amy Lemmon Enjoy Hot or Iced: Poems in Conversation and a Conversation 978-0-9820626-4-7, $15, paper, 28 pp. SLAPERING HOL PRESS 2011

Poetry. Marking the 25th published collection from Slapering Hol Press, this chapbook takes the reader out on the limbs of relationships gone bad. From Duhamel’s hilarious “Madonna and Me,” to Lemmon’s wistful “Enjoy Hot or Iced,” this wide-ranging collection reminds us of the fragility of love and the bitterness of love lost. Patrick James Dunagan There Are People Who Say That Painters Shouldn’t Talk: A GUSTONBOOK 978-0-942996-73-9, $15, paper, 96 pp.

Elaine Equi Click and Clone 978-1-56689-257-5, $16, paper, 136 pp. COFFEE HOUSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. CLICK AND CLONE explores American life as it has been altered by our technological revolution. Elaine Equi’s style is sophisticated, yet always accessible and truly democratic in approach. Whether she is writing about art, pop culture, consumerism, or reality TV, Equi does so with clarity and wit. “”Equi seems to know all our foibles and, instead of edging toward the door, reports the latest developments with precise, loving equanimity. Her voice is unique, poised, witty, intimate, and somehow interstellar. It’s as if she’s visiting from a future where we all appear transparent. CLICK AND CLONE is an electrified pleasure field”—Aram Saroyan.

THE POST-APOLLO PRESS 2011

Poetry. Written in and around the Spring of 2009, composed of short, fragmentary blocks of verse and prose, including several quoted sources, GUSTONBOOK is a workman’s notebook of sorts sketched out in response to several years spent contemplating the work and life of painter Philip Guston in relation to the ongoing world, i.e., exhibitions, books on/about Guston, other books/art works amid daily walks, drinks, and talks. More explorations than explanations, the entries contained herein situate the eye of memory as witness to the immediate surrounds of now: day to day, hour by hour, the concern never (always) changing. As Guston once said, gesturing out the window, “Who wants that? and you can’t have it anyway.” Quinton Duval Like Hay 978-0-9793745-7-9, $16, paper, 87 pp.

Seyhan Erözçelik Rosestrikes and Coffee Grinds 978-1-58498-073-5, $14.95, paper, 116 pp. TALISMAN HOUSE 2010

Poetry. Translated from the Turkish by Murat NemetNejat. Seyhan Erözçelik’s Gül ve Telve (ROSESTRIKES AND COFFEE GRINDS) is one of the major works of Turkish poetry in the last twenty years. In it, two strands of the Turkish culture and history come together. The “Telve” section, which consists of twenty-four coffee grounds readings, spins a Shamanistic yarn of hope and desire going back to Central Asian animistic traditions and bringing their language to the twentieth and twentyfirst centuries. The “Gül” section, which also consists of twenty-four poems, creates stunning variations around the image of the rose—a central image in Islam and in Sufism—mirroring the “Telve” section, the two parts together making a poetent, poetic statement.

BEAR STAR PRESS 2011

Poetry. LIKE HAY brings together the last poems of Quinton Duval, beloved poet and teacher, also the editor of Red Wing Press. “His poems show Quinton as he was—a person of such charm that he could afford to be wry in his ironies.... His poems preserve the small minutes of things, the poetic perishables, and love itself is the chief item with its shine of frequent use illuminating so many of his poems”—Dennis Schmitz, from the Foreword. Joshua Edwards and Van Edwards Campeche 978-1-934819-18-0, $22, cloth, 112 pp. 978-1-934819-19-7, $15, paper, 112 pp.

John Estes Kingdom Come 978-1-936196-02-9, $14.95, paper, 132 pp. C&R PRESS 2011

Poetry. “These are the poems of the perplexed. More specifically, they are the poems of the perplexed but good-humored, the perplexed but well-disposed— an all but forgotten species of intellectual whose lineage includes Chesterton, Orwell, and Lippmann. They are, moreover, poems that treat domestic life—life in common—with due respect, and with intermittent awe. John Estes has employed a remarkable range of learning, and remarkable skill in shaping these lines, and pressing them into service”—Scott Cairns.

NOEMI PRESS 2011

Poetry. Photography. Titled after pirate Jean Lafitte’s name for Galveston Island, CAMPECHE is a cautionary lyric composed of poems and photographs in which a real place is overlaid with the parable of a mythical world on the verge of an apocalyptic flood. Like the body fishermen of the Yellow River, this book combs water for remains and meditates on evidence, while attempting to reckon with the self as a troubled song within a greater song. “If the soul is a souvenir in human shape, / the sun is half its shadow and discloses / who is what when in public.” This is the first book of Joshua Edwards’s eschatological trilogy.

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Scott Ezell, Yusef Komunyakaa, Mike O’Connor, and Thomas Merton Songs from a Yahi Bow: A Series of Poems on Ishi 978-1-929355-67-9, $13.95, paper, 68 pp. PLEASURE BOAT STUDIO 2011

Poetry. Native American Studies. Edited by Scott Ezell. With poems by Scott Ezell, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Mike O’Connor. With an essay by Thomas Merton and paintings by Jeff Hengst. In 1911, Ishi emerged from an isolated hunting and gathering lifestyle in the foothills of northern California. Called the “last wild American Indian,” he was taken to San Francisco, where he lived until his death in 1916. SONGS FROM A YAHI BOW, the first published book of poems on Ishi, consists of work by three poets, written across four decades, and coincides with the 100th anniversary of Ishi’s emergence from the wilderness. This collection includes an introduction to recent discoveries about Ishi, as well as Thomas Merton’s 1968 essay “Ishi: A Meditation.”

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Gil Fagiani Chianti in Connecticut 978-1-59954-015-3, $10, paper, 86 pp.

Robert Fernandez We Are Pharaoh 978-0-9822376-5-6, $14, paper, 136 pp.

BORDIGHERA PRESS 2010

CANARIUM BOOKS 2011

Poetry. “Gil Fagiani’s muse is Italian American memory. These are poems of origins and belonging, of family, culture, politics. These are recollections, both elegiac and ironic, of a world Gil Fagiani observes from the privileged perspective of an insider who does not feel bound to the need to eulogize his community. They function as archival records, a museum of language in which a gallery of characters and objects and moments are captured in lines that vibrate with a sound, a touch, a presence”—Edvige Giunta.

Poetry. WE ARE PHARAOH is the debut collection from Robert Fernandez, native of Miami, recipient of a PIP Gertrude Stein Award for Innovative Poetry, and resident of Iowa City. Like a fever or a fire, this book sweeps across our contemporary cultural landscape, setting aglow and surveying its elements, then cataloging the embers. “WE ARE PHARAOH is a luscious saturnalia of language, adapting New York School painterliness to an erotic tropical sensibility: ‘A mandrill clutching the throat in the billiard hall of Pele.’ Its magic raises the pulse” —Ange Mlinko.

Patricia Fargnoli Then, Something 978-1-932195-79-8, $16.95, paper, 76 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2009

Poetry. THEN, SOMETHING has won the Sheila Motton Book Award from the New England Poetry Club, the Silver Award for 2010 Poetry Book of the Year from ForeWord Magazine, the 2010 da Vinci Eye Award, and Honorable Mention for the 2010 Eric Hoffer Award. “Patricia Fargnoli...does not miss a stitch of beauty, neither does she avoid the darker aspects of our own human awareness of our continual aging, to which she gives sharp and poignant attention. I have been her champion since her first book Necessary Light was published, and I continue to be so”—Mary Oliver. Alboqasem Ferdowsi The Teller of Tales: Stories from Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh 978-1-881523-22-2, $14, paper, 82 pp. JUNCTION PRESS 2011

Poetry. Middle Eastern Studies. Translated from the Persian by Richard Jeffrey Newman. “In this compelling translation of the Iranian epic, Richard Jeffrey Newman has given a new generation of readers access to this classic tale of politics, devotion, war and peace-making. Corrupt kings, rebel princes, dragon-sorcerers, and resourceful cooks travel through this poetic history of an ancient and storied civilization. Newman’s own narrative and lyric gifts as a poet make this a must-have volume”—Kazim Ali. Josh Fernandez Spare Parts and Dismemberment 978-0-9722958-5-7, $12.95, paper, 71 pp.

Thomas Fink Peace Conference 978-0-9841177-7-2, $15, paper, 94 pp. MARSH HAWK PRESS 2011

Poetry. Beginning with “Generic Whistle Stop,” a long poem that rings myriad changes on political rhetoric, PEACE CONFERENCE goes on to extend such poetic series from prior books as the linguistically hybrid “Yinglish Strophes,” the rocking/rolling “Dented Reprise,” and “Nonce Sonnet.” Thomas Fink’s seventh collection also initiates two new series, “Goad” and “Dusk Bowl Intimacies,” which, in different ways, force bits of individual psyche to butt heads with the social. The curvilinear twists and torques of many of these poems enable visual and verbal gestures to swing together and apart. Norman Finkelstein Inside the Ghost Factory 978-0-9841177-5-8, $15, paper, 69 pp. MARSH HAWK PRESS 2010

Poetry. “INSIDE THE GHOST FACTORY finds Norman Finkelstein returning to his pre-TRACK fascination with the Coleridgean fancy, first delineated in Restless Messengers. Here, however, Samuel Coleridge meets William Gibson and the result is a retro-Blakean myth for the age of Text and Tweet. These transmissions from ‘elsewhere,’ manufactured on the assembly lines of ‘Ghosts, Incorporated. Poetry, Incorporated’ (Limited, I might add), are gleefully dissected by Finkelstein as so much ‘clap-trap.’ Still, there’s no correcting the blur of occultation and occlusion for the poet who believes ‘Books were made for secrets they cannot/keep: this is what it means to be/read’”—Tyrone Williams.

R. L. CROW PUBLICATIONS 2011

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Josh Fernandez’s poems come at you with teeth flared—don’t be frightened. From a life of spare parts and dismembered pieces Fernandez puts together a mismatched puzzle that shows a young Latino’s struggle to climb into his own skin. How far does he go, how loud does he get? Very. At other times he comes at you with hand on heart, almost repentant for the sins his struggle has offered. Be frightened—because when he talks in those low tones, he talks of a world gone mad, a world we are all part of, a world fashioned from SPARE PARTS AND DISMEMBERMENT. “This is a poet to watch, to take serious, to support and love!”—Jimmy Santiago Baca.

Roy Fisher Selected Poems 978-0-9819520-6-2, $15.95, paper, 192 pp. FLOOD EDITIONS 2011

Poetry. Edited by August Kleinzahler, SELECTED POEMS presents the remarkable range of Roy Fisher’s restless and exploratory poetry. Stripped of ornament, skeptical in temperament, these poems find music in sudden disruptions, hesitations, and silences. They often move through post-industrial landscapes of Birmingham and the English Midlands, registering crepuscular half-tones, “the dog odour / of water,” and “malted-milk brickwork.” Beyond such literal subjects, Fisher captures the intermingling of fancy and perception, the play of light and shadow in the mind itself. As Kleinzahler suggests in his foreword to this volume, “The eye darts about in Fisher’s poetry. It abhors the object at rest, framing of any kind. It’s like a camera, jerking and swiveling on an unstable tripod. Early and late, the poetry is about the eye in motion. The shifts may be subtle or vertiginously abrupt. It’s best not to get too comfortable as you progress through a poem because you’re not going to be where you think you are for long.”

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Kyle Flak The Secret Admirer 978-0-9822495-8-1, $16, paper, 24 pp. ADASTRA PRESS 2011

Poetry. In these seventeen poems of sprung rhythms and playful language, the author creates poetic fictions that are witty and hip in the new funk style: “History is a/tiny wrinkle we might as well just/forget about unless/it’s going to/save us.” The accumulative effect is mysterious, entertaining, and delightful. Limited to 200 copies of hand-set Goudy Old Style types letterpress printed on recycled and acid free Environment Felt text, hand-sewn, and covered in wraparound Classic Laid in Denim. “As long as fine literary presses continue to handcraft handsome books like these from Adastra, serious readers of the twenty-first century can rest assured, the book is alive and well”—American Book Review. Gerald Fleming Night of Pure Breathing 978-1-934909-15-7, $18, paper, 70 pp. HANGING LOOSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “These dark fables, written in a language ‘born of rage,’ furiously peel back the veneer of the world we think we know. Part fairy tale, part dream, these poems explore a region where the ordinary and the fantastic overlap, where a smile can get a job, and where identities are fluid and interchangeable. Many poems are set in exotic locations—Corfu, Bali, Mexico, Ukraine— but they all merge to create a discrete, elemental landscape, a poetic geography where this remarkable collection plays out. In one poem, ‘a boy and girl court each other by telling ghost stories.’ Gerald Fleming’s NIGHT OF PURE BREATHING is a collection that seduces the reader in just that way. Hold onto your socks; you’re in for a ride”—Gary Young. Brad Flis Peasants 978-0-9818970-1-1, $15, paper, 72 pp. PATRICK LOVELACE EDITIONS 2009

Poetry. In Brad Flis’s first collection, PEASANTS, the reader is shuttled through a timeless allegory of the Nation taking new form in a new era. Compiling language rich with rhetorical cadence and alliterative fluency, the book exalts in the organization of our collective experience while lamenting the human as sacred organism of violence, the pursuit of happiness as the pursuit of enemy combatants. Poetic form, dramatized throughout, becomes the pleasure-stimulus for language at once familiarly embracing and clinical. PEASANTS is both a recovering of meaning in the postWTC ruins of ideals, and, as it’s playable lotto-scratchticket bookcover suggests, a willful uncovering. Josey Foo and Leah Stein A Lily Lilies 978-0-9844598-5-8, $15.95, paper, 80 pp.

Gabe Foreman A Complete Encyclopedia of Different Types of People 978-1-55245-244-8, $15.95, paper, 96 pp. COACH HOUSE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Gabe Foreman’s A COMPLETE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF PEOPLE is not your average reference book. It turns a series of sociological case studies into a functional encyclopedia that doubles as a unique, achingly funny, always engaging collection of poems. “Bridesmaids,” “Day Traders,” “Entomologists,” and “Number Crunchers” are all dutifully catalogued in a series of luminously strange, compellingly original lyric and prose poems. Sanford Fraser Among Strangers I’ve Known All My Life/Parmi Les Etrangers Que J’ai Connus Toute Ma Vie 978-1-935520-33-7, $14.95, paper, 112 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Poetry. Bilingual Edition in English and French. In this bilingual collection of lyrical poems, the narrator, who is usually a character in them,travels from poems in which he lives in a state of alienation to poems in which he has empathy with others.... This book is particularly appropriate for students of both English and French as each poem is presented in both languages on facing pages. Andy Frazee The Body, The Rooms 978-0-9831150-1-4, $14, paper, 76 pp. SUBITO PRESS 2011

Poetry. In the precise peregrinations of Andy Frazee’s first book, what is at stake is nothing less than what it means to write lyric poetry now—thrown into conflict with itself as it has been by the hallmarks of our cultural moment: irony (“irony beyond irony”), hyper-selfawareness, the constant interruptions of calamity far and near. In THE BODY, THE ROOMS, Frazee manages to turn self-consciousness into a virtue—into the lyric material itself. “Do we believe in anything” a poem asks—without a question mark. Even grief comes to us mediated, and so Frazee invents an elegy for the twenty-first century. Formally daring and beautifully written, this book braves its own questioning—and triumphs. Emily Kendal Frey The Grief Performance 978-1-880834-94-7, $15.95, paper, 72 pp. CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY POETRY CENTER 2011

Poetry. “Emily Kendal Frey performs grief and dread as a graceful dance, the kind the tree you cut down in your backyard might do on your heart. This work is light, deft, dangerous. There are perfect poems here, such as ‘The End,’ which enacts a simple, startling twist on the hoary injunction to ‘Walk towards the light.’ See, everything you know is wrong. You really have to read this book” —Rae Amrantrout.

NIGHTBOAT BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Photography. Literary Nonfiction. Dance. A cross-genre book of poetry, photography and notes for choreography, A LILY LILIES maps space through language, language through movement, and both space and movement through pictures in sections that move from immense spaces of the American Southwest to a dance stage in Philadelphia to the space of the self. “Mapping across space/time, cultures and sensibilities A LILY LILIES expresses the interweaving of the poetry of dance and the dance of poetry. Beautiful work!” —Pauline Oliveros.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Elisabeth Frost All of Us 978-1-935210-23-8, $16, paper, 76 pp.

Fergal Gaynor VIII Stepping Poems & other pieces 978-1-4507-3710-4, $15, paper, 80 pp.

WHITE PINE PRESS 2011

MIAMI UNIVERSITY PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Frost’s debut collection, ALL OF US, uses the seemingly narrative prose poem to turn the unconscious conscious. What is unseen but seen and what is unspoken but spoken becomes apparent, as quotidian moments create layers to a voice that probes its own resonance only to find itself to be in all of us. Through the deep intelligence of these poems, Frost has composed transparent channels into our own lives— a stunning achievement”—Claudia Rankine.

Poetry. VIII STEPPING POEMS & OTHER PIECES brings together ten years of work from Irish poet, critic and art practitioner Fergal Gaynor. This is poetry in the modernist tradition, often in experimental forms. The Stepping Poems make apparent a surrounding silence or inarticulacy; the terse, gnomic triads of the Runes are based on Old Irish riddling forms. Through these forms recurring themes are refracted: location, especially Gaynor’s native Cork City and Munster region; the presence of history, often as fossilized remains, in XI Pieces for Austria-Hungary; and the contemporary, as something alien and urgent, the subject of science fiction. VIII STEPPING POEMS & OTHER PIECES is at once learned and passionate, impersonal and highly individual.

William Fuller Hallucination 978-0-9819520-7-9, $14.95, paper, 96 pp. FLOOD EDITIONS 2011

Poetry. William Fuller’s HALLUCINATION negotiates between worlds of the living and the dead, shifting mercurially from verse to prose and from parody to parable. Along the way, Fuller draws our attention to the ineffable qualities of experience, proposing that “Matter is a fog one looks through toward pale headlights...” Through these glancing observations and surreal memoranda, the mysteries appear more vivid, our follies more desperate and absurd. Drew Gardner Chomp Away 978-0-9728880-5-9, $13.95, paper, 98 pp. COMBO BOOKS 2011

Poetry. “To read CHOMP AWAY is to take a crash course on the notion of dread as primal poetic value, with a consciousness filter bent towards humor. Every poem contains transparent seams managing a trophy wall of tortured, ordinary, far-out-to-far-in syntaxes that Gardner deftly parodies, ultimately generating wild, empathetic voice-structures—the longer poem “Twilight System Joy Mechanics” being an especially masterful example of this—aimed at unbridled power and its supporting cast of popular deflections” —Anselm Berrigan. Susan Gardner Stone Music: The Art and Poetry of Susan Gardner 978-0-9799865-0-5, $26.95, paper, 96 pp. RED MOUNTAIN PRESS 2007

Poetry. Art. Susan Gardner is an exceptionally accomplished painter, photographer, and poet. STONE MUSIC, a large format collection with 44 color plates, features Gardner’s work in each of these art forms. It presents a rich blend of classic aesthetics and personal insight. The book is an object of visual delight fully in keeping with the elegant, compelling nature of its content. Her visual and literary art still reflects the style of forceful spontaneity and directness she developed early in her career. “Her art speaks of what is not seen yet is present, of what is common yet irredeemably precious”—J. W. Mahoney.

Jean Genet The Genet Translations: Poetry and Posthumous Plays 978-1-926616-19-3, $20, paper, 165 pp. POLEMIC PRESS 2010

Poetry. Drama. Translated from the French by Mark Spitzer. “Mark Spitzer has worked on these translations with a monastic patience and a martyr’s zeal, and they require both ardor and dedication, since they are dense, heavily coded, daringly pornographic at times, and at other times far more lushly over-the-top than English comfortably tolerates.... No reader can truly understand Genet’s plays or novels without grasping his poetry— which Mark Spitzer has made available in a convincing, accurate translation for the first time”—Edmund White. “A book with guts and integrity...a true work of scholarship and poetry...the quintessential English translation of the poems...plus impeccable translations of two groundbreaking posthumous plays [Splendid’s Hotel and The Pope]”—The New Yorker. Morgan Gibson Nonzen Poems 978-1-933606-22-4, $15, paper, 100 pp. PRINTED MATTER PRESS 2010

Poetry. “I love Morgan Gibson’s poem for Kenneth Rexroth!”—Robert Bly. “After years of keeping these poems’ treasures to himself, Morgan Gibson has unleashed the floodgates of his poetic stream of consciousness in a much-awaited book. Paying homage to Beats, beggars, and bodhisattvas everywhere, this poetry sings of the destitution, the beauty and the holy in the world and in one word. Is is Zen? Is it Nonsense? It’s Nonzen—’strong. wise, compassionate, free’” —Leza Lowitz.

Molly Gaudry We Take Me Apart 978-0-9830263-2-7, $12, paper, 100 pp. MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS 2009

Poetry. Nominated for the 2011 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. “Entwining the trance that is childhood around the hallucination that constitutes adulthood, Molly Gaudry’s WE TAKE ME APART is a bewitching and carefully barbed tale. A cross between silence and a fairy tale, Gaudry’s Beckettian narrative sews bright bits to near-faint whispers, slowly swaddling us in quiet and darkness”—Brian Evenson.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Lawrence Giffin Sorites 978-0-9833931-1-5, $12, paper, 44 pp.

Nada Gordon Scented Rushes 978-1-931824-40-8, $13.95, paper, 103 pp.

TEA PARTY REPUBLICANS PRESS 2011

ROOF BOOKS 2010

Poetry. “While the fables which are enfleshed in us surpass in hysteria even the least remittent syndromes of infotainment, we are inured to overexcitement just as we beg the favor and discipline of the decider, though he zeroes us, abetting the containment of our contaminants a long way from the house. It is within this perverse epoch that SORITES protrudes itself, ensconcing the prismatic caress between those ‘noble lies’ and the ‘splendid men’ who engender them as a golden shower of grammatical derivatives. We groom ourselves in a landscape barren of any ‘reified’ language in need of resuscitation, but rather lamped in the utter ambiguity of violence inherent in reception and address, ‘The word as such strikes/ ... As a bridge for the new man.’ But emergence belies the heap. When the efficacy of speech appears to reside in its substancelessness, what is it to awake to find ‘your bodily eikon dematerialized?’ As Gertrude Stein, in ‘Poetry and Grammar,’ evokes her willed desecration of substantives and nouns when she suggests that the ‘intense existence’ of objects is contingent upon its being felt without its being named, SORITES bends Stein’s inquiry toward our own democratic substantiations where the suckling of ‘free speech’ and the matasuegras of disinterested judgment develop out of pace, ‘What is that/ is not yet/ depends on whose/ thought can think/ thought as/ such.’ We are asked, ‘“Is the public not the greatest/ Sophist,” especially when its word fails?’This pubescent indebtedness to future-users here cannot resolve itself in lunch-hour testimony, louching through great halls that the boards endeavored to erect without a body and without license. We may intuit that what is ‘true/ for all is/ what makes what/ ought to be for all/ a fact’ but this sapience leaves us no nearer the advertised mood. As man, among men, who has no use but uses, there is no adultery that cannot be disposed of before poetry. Our conjectural prosody will be upskirt” —Brad Flis.

Poetry. “Is poetry alive? It is part of the human body and seems to look like the human mind. But it is almost never as lively, voluptuous, dancing as these poems of Nada Gordon. She seems to be using her own dictionary and idiolect and innocence. Her work is a cadenza ad lib and seems unflawed as a Bollywood movie unfolds with increasing intensity. This is some of the freshest work of her generation: she helps create the new comedy, where jokes are not needed to be happy. She has what a painter once told me was absolutely necessary: shamelessness. This is like rock and roll from another planet for another time”—David Shapiro.

Johannes Göransson Entrance to a colonial pageant in which we all begin to intricate 978-0-9825416-5-4, $16, paper, 100 pp. TARPAULIN SKY PRESS 2011

Poetry. Cross-Genre. Fiction. Drama. “It would take a miracle to perform this pageant. For a start, you would have to reanimate Charlotte Brontë, Adolf Loos, and Ronald Reagan, and you would need an ungodly amount of wax. Most of the action is obscene, and therefore takes place offstage. The actors enter and report on scenes of spectacular violence that go on all the time every day. The audience is part of the spectacle too. We are all transformed into images somewhere in this script. At one point, all of Hollywood appears onstage on the form of dead horses, perhaps because Hollywood film continues to rely on narrative conventions that it exhausted long ago. The entire world also appears, played by a boy who, in a series of rapid costume changes, puts on increasingly pretty dresses” —Aaron Kunin.

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Renée Gregorio, Joan Logghe, and Miriam Sagan Love & Death: Greatest Hits 978-1-893003-03-3, $15, paper, 190 pp. TRES CHICAS BOOKS 2011

Poetry. LOVE & DEATH selects poems from the publications of co-conspirators, friends for over twentyfive years, and founders of Tres Chicas Books Renée Gregorio, Joan Logghe, and Miriam Sagan. As poets with intertwined geographies, friendships, and loves, the poems show the threading as they’ve fallen in love, mourned deaths of beloveds, and let that passion inform their poetry. They deliver a triptych of poetry in one cover, hoping to create not just a book but a sense of community. Gerry Grubbs The Girls in Bright Dresses Dancing 978-1-933675-51-0, $14, paper, 65 pp. DOS MADRES PRESS 2010

Poetry. “Gerry Grubbs’ poems are of making and unmaking, of loss and recovery, of absence and presence, of all that abides and all that does not. They are open, honest, and direct, with a metaphoric power that takes us into the mysterious heart of things. Grubbs writes about family, about nature, about love. But his deepest subject is the ineffable, which casts its shadow upon his words, ‘Leaving us wondering / What has been lost / And how its absence / Effects everything that follows’”--Norman Finkelstein. Helen Guri Match 978-1-55245-243-1, $14.95, paper, 80 pp. COACH HOUSE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Robert Brand has given up on real women. He has, however, found a (somewhat problematic) solution, a new feminine ideal: the 110-pound sex doll he ordered over the internet. Showing an uncanny access to the voice of the rejected, unimpressive, emotionally challenged modern male, Helen Guri’s debut collection explores Robert’s transition from lost and lonely to loved, if only by the increasingly acrobatic voices in his mind. MATCH’s touching, whip-smart poems chart the limits of the mind/body relationship in decidedly virtual times. Does our hero’s lovesick, wry, self-searching and often self-annihilating gaze signal some catastrophic aversion to depth or a feverish (if unsettling) reassertion of the romantic impulse? Can anything good really happen when the object of one’s affection is, literally, an object? And if she looks like a human being, can you ever know for sure she isn’t one?

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Arielle Guy Three Geogaophies: A Milkmaid’s Grimoire 978-0-9819808-2-9, $15, paper, 70 pp.

Amira Hanafi Forgery 978-1-4507-4212-2, $20, paper, 80 pp.

DUSIE PRESS 2011

THE GREEN LANTERN PRESS 2011

Poetry. THREE GEOGAOPHIES follows the travels of the poet through seven years and three cities: San Francisco, New York, and Gothenburg, Sweden. Weaving in mysticism, Tarot, and foreign and imaginary language, the story is one of phenomenal romanticism searching for home and, ultimately, love. “THREE GEOGAOPHIES is a travelogue, translating speechridden distance with fragile romance and accident music from San Francisco to New York to Sweden. ‘There is always something we hunt: skin.’ Be it others’ or our own (‘I wasn’t intact and impermeable then’) with the intractability of space skewering geography and time-space changing story in all of its senses. What there is breathes: ‘geometry is all about living’; what there isn’t facilitates: ‘patterns of light cause accidents to happen’ and the longer the distance, the more adventurous the storytelling” —Edmund Berrigan.

Poetry. Limited Edition. Literary Nonfiction. Collaged from language collected using the obscure keyword “Finkl”—obituaries, case histories, old Chicago legends, gossip columns, political speeches and online posts— FORGERY is a lyrical essay on industrial and personal dislocation—a strange choreography of urban conquest and collapse—centered on a 130-year-old Chicago steel forge. Founded in 1879 by German immigrant Anton Finkl, A. Finkl & Sons Co. still operates today on Chicago’s Near North Side. Last vestige of an industrial era, the company produces die forgings noisily and with a good deal of dirty emissions alongside one of the city’s more affluent neighborhoods, where spas and plastic surgeons, shops for handmade cosmetics and luxury chocolates extend off one of the busiest commercial corridors in Chicago. Starting from this intersection of forces, the narrator embarks on a walk to the seven forgotten homes of the forge’s founder, on the way meeting settlers, Indians, Bob Fosse and Richard Daley, gangsters, workers, a K-pop girl group, and a cast of other peculiar characters whose fused stories recount the multifarious history of an evolving city. Whether tied up at gunpoint in the garage of a basketball player or floating at the bottom of Lake Michigan, FORGERY revels in disorientation. Printed in an edition of 500 with silk screen covers by Crosshair and an introduction by Stephen Lapthisophon.

Rachel Hadas The Ache of Appetite 978-0-914278-84-9, $12, paper, 64 pp. COPPER BEECH PRESS 2010

Poetry. The always elegant, often heart-wrenching poems in Rachel Hadas’s eleventh collection are no-holds-barred dispatches from the front lines of a loved one’s surrender to dementia. “Stunning” —Molly Peacock. “Harrowing”—A.E. Stallings.

Drum Hadley The Light Before Dawn 978-0-925904-97-3, $16, paper, 94 pp. CHAX PRESS 2011

Poetry. “In The Voice of the Borderlands, we have stories remembered as poems, picaresque vignettes and campfire tales rendered in the original voices—as faithfully and fully as by fellow cowman Will James. In LIGHT BEFORE DAWN, we have the koans of mortality faced as quietly and introspectively as Emily Dickinson. Hers: ‘I heard a fly buzz when I died.’ The fly outlived the protagonist. But the poem, as information, is forever: Drum’s—’He knew who he was, And then he was gone.’ The poem is a declaration that he knew who he was— which is a rare feat for any sentient being—and the poem—as information, is at the deepest level, immortal. Nice trick for an old cowman, Drum”—James Northrup. Hai Zi Over Autumn Rooftops 978-0-924047-75-6, $35, cloth, 271 pp. 978-0-924047-76-3, $15, paper, 271 pp. HOST PUBLICATIONS 2010

Poetry. East Asia Studies. Translated from the Chinese by Dan Murphy. In the six years prior to his death, Hai Zi wrote over 250 short poems, a number of poetic plays, long poems totaling over 400 pages, and several short stories. His verse illuminates the poverty and desperation of his peasant upbringing, reflects on China’s literary and cultural history, and touches down on the grasslands and wheat fields of western China, but he is not simply a cultural poet or a nature poet— his poetry transcends all of this. In OVER AUTUMN ROOFTOPS, Host Publications is proud to make available to English-speaking audiences the work of this profound and beloved poet.

Edward Harkness Beautiful Passing Lives 978-1-929355-73-0, $15, paper, 100 pp. PLEASURE BOAT STUDIO 2010

Poetry. Ed Harkness is very good at shining the poet’s light on natural details and puts this to good use in poems that go outside his more familiar environs, such as looking at the English Channel: “The Channel looks benign,/a road of hammered silver. Unglamorous,/ windswept, this beach is no Riviera./Here you feel the slap of the beyond.” And, looking even farther: “the Dog Star, lifting its drowsy head,//guarding the dog house of heaven/with its one yellow eye.” Harkness extends his range when addressing social issues: “but the horde of you—the majority—/have gone remote control,/ignorant of our sacrifices...” Ed Harkness does not squint when he looks at the world and we are rewarded with a full and multi-leveled world in these poems. Megan Harlan Mapmaking 978-1-886157-77-4, $13.95, paper, 66 pp. BKMK PRESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY 2010

Poetry. Winner of the 2009 John Ciardi Prize for Poetry. “The poems in this book exhibit the poet’s great attention to and skill with form, sound, and language. The poems are constantly surprising, taking us to the far corners of the poet’s metaphorical maps, and, in her words, ‘gesturing us to go further.’ This is imaginative writing at its very best—visual, aural, metaphorical, ethical, and adventurous. The poet constructs genuinely new topographies for us that offer significant and original inroads into our understanding of what it means to be human”—Sidney Wade, Judge, John Ciardi Prize for Poetry.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Carla Harryman and Lyn Hejinian The Wide Road 978-0-9823387-4-2, $16, paper, 148 pp.

Matthew Henriksen Ordinary Sun 978-0-9844752-2-3, $14.95, paper, 120 pp.

BELLADONNA* 2011

BLACK OCEAN 2011

Poetry. Fiction. Cross-Genre. What would have happened had Thelma and Louise not driven off the cliff but stayed on the road? In Carla Harryman and Lyn Hejinian’s picaresque novella, friendship lives on to follow eros through a polymorphic landscape where their fearless, inquisitive “we” encounters “hunger in two places at once.” THE WIDE ROAD was collaboratively composed by Carla Harryman and Lyn Hejinian between 1991 and 2010. The cover art was drawn for this manuscript by the artist Nancy Blum, and this first edition is printed with two different cover designs.

Poetry. Henriksen opens ORDINARY SUN by insisting that “an eye is not enough.” Resisting solipsism, these poems negotiate that conflict between the mind and what exists outside the mind. Though pain intrinsically resides in that conflict Henriksen strives for an honest happiness, a kind of gorgeous suffering that blesses our days. To this end, these poems emerge from images of all those innumerable things that embody both visceral and ethereal beauty—rocks, trees, broken glass, baseball, angels.... Here we find immediacy immersed in the image, and in the reading of these poems becomes ourselves immersed in the immediate.

j/j hastain asymptotic lover//thermodynamic vents 978-1-934289-93-8, $16, paper, 81 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2009

Poetry. LGBT Studies. “This book, which is unlike anything that has ever been seen before, brings something with it from the under-parts of sensation. This is the definition of vibration, of a book as the only possible membrane, the only future for a body so new it’s still forming: j/j hastain gives us this”—Bhanu Kapil. “This work is consistently imaginative and beautifully controlled. Very musical and theatrical and intimate. The work is inspiring yet it’s not easy or facile” —Junior Burke. j/j hastain Prurient Anarchic Omnibus 978-0-923389-83-3, $16, paper, 128 pp. SPUYTEN DUYVIL 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. “A work of rich clear sensual language, of ‘thermal tremble and juice,’ these poems and photos pull the weaver’s threads together, bring focus to ‘wherein we can be a root to the sea.’ Sinewy lines are constantly ‘quoting my biology back to me as vow’ and display a ‘multi-creative musculature’ we desperately need and desire. j/j is the real deal, reclaiming a space for engendered anarchy, opening Pandora’s secret treasure trove, playing with fire, sound and love”—Anne Waldman. Elizabeth Hatmaker Girl in Two Pieces 978-1-935402-59-6, $16, paper, 94 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “Elizabeth Hatmaker has a quiet way of crunching up our world. She excels in shaking out the dirty little corners of the mind, particularly the mind of misogynist history. In the person of Elizabeth Short, the so-called ‘Black Dahlia,’ she has found her heroine, the way Leonard Cohen found Joan of Arc—or perhaps how Raymond Queneau found Zazie in the métro—for in GIRL we see Elizabeth Short refracted and perfected through multiple stylistic prisms and processes. The matter of the Black Dahlia is, of course, gigantic, but Hatmaker has it all in the palm of her hand, and locates the world’s pain and hope and justice in the figure of her girl in two pieces. Hatmaker is an exquisite writer, and better than that, she cares about something—the life and death of a lost girl—something tiny yet immense”—Dodie Bellamy.

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Gerrit Henry The Time of the Night 978-1-877593-10-9, $14.95, paper, 112 pp. THE GROUNDWATER PRESS 2011

Poetry. Edited by Marc Cohen. Foreword by John Ashbery. “Gerrit Henry didn’t publish enough in his lifetime to be considered a ‘neglected or overlooked poet.’ THE TIME OF THE NIGHT is the best and only introduction we have to one of the great poets of my generation. Be prepared to take a roller coaster through hell (or is it Manhattan?), if only to see what illusions of bliss and tatters of happiness still remain to be had. Always a witness to the highs and lows of life, Henry is a poet of disturbing rhyme (unsettling connections) and wrenching lyricism (think singer/composer). In fact, his work stands right next to that of Thom Gunn, but, make no mistake, it is all his own. Gunn would have deeply loved a poet who could write: ‘My affair with Alfred Hitchcock / Consisted of a fat, black silhouette, / And a skinless Cornish hen.’ If these poems don’t knock your socks or knickers off, then you are a lot deader than you think”—John Yau. Colin Herd too ok 978-1-60964-049-1, $16, paper, 62 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2011

Poetry. “Colin Herd’s TOO OK is a treasure trove of razzle-dazzle stylings, superfine wit, charismatic discretion, and a vacuuming tenderness. Herd’s gift for words is exquisite and adventurous and armed to the teeth, and these poems are its perfect measurements” —Dennis Cooper.

Jeff Hoffman Journal of American Foreign Policy 978-1-930974-97-5, $15, paper, 77 pp. NEW ISSUES POETRY & PROSE 2011

Poetry. Winner of the 2010 New Issues Poetry Prize, Selected by Linda Gregerson. “The way memory and grief and love compose the stories that enable us to go on living. The toxic mix of innocence and inadvertence, wishfulness and making-do that comes to look like purpose. Which on the scale of nations we call ‘policy.’ These brilliant poems have leverage on it all: micro- and macro- and the sorry, human mess we too often make of both. They also have so masterful a way with idiom and timing that even the sternest insight is leavened with a measure of joy. Tonic intelligence, exhilarating craftsmanship: Jeff Hoffman’s fine first book is a gift to us all”—Linda Gregerson, from the Judge’s Citation.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Harmony Holiday Negro League Baseball 978-1-934200-42-1, $15.95, paper, 88 pp.

Zora Howard Clutch 978-0-9831219-0-9, $15, paper, 94 pp.

FENCE BOOKS 2011

PENMANSHIP BOOKS 2010

Poetry. African American Studies. Winner of the Motherwell Prize, this debut collection represents the fullness of “Thoughts on Fire” in living color, solid sound, barely arrested motion.

Poetry. African American Studies. “[Zora Howard’s] youth inspires hope and her writing inspires those of us aging warriors who have tried to mend so many things in life that have cracked. Reward yourself and let Zora into your life”—Harry Belafonte. “Zora Howard is a poet beyond her years. Her work exudes the detail that comes with decades of practice, the honesty and bravery that many poets never achieve. Her impact on youth poetry in New York City and nationally started when she was a rising freshman at age 13, and is still profound as she enters her first year at Yale. For me, the joy of watching her grow was not in the numerous accolades she has won, but in the evolution of Zora the artist, activist, and scholar. CLUTCH is a monument that details it all” —Michael Cirelli.

Bob Holman Picasso in Barcelona 978-0-9831606-1-8, $17, paper, 96 pp. PAPER KITE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Bilingual Edition. Translated into Spanish by Sol Gaitan. PICASSO IN BARCELONA is Bob Holman’s fifteenth book, if you count CDs, videos, anthologies and translations, which he does. In it, he takes on Pablo Picasso, and it’s pretty much a draw. But then, it is Picasso at age 15, so somewhat unfair, and of course Pablo doesn’t give us his version of what went on. Still, it smells of poetry, and it rings like truth. The dance mix is guaranteed to get you moving, and the Spanish translation (thanks to Sol Gaitan) will come in handy when you are asking for directions in Barcelona. Bruce Holsapple Vanishing Act 978-1-888809-59-6, $10, paper, 144 pp. LA ALAMEDA PRESS 2011

Poetry. By turns mischievous and passionate, by fits lyrical and foolish, the poems of VANISHING ACT map a sustained interrogation of the interior, taking as territory the lyric subject itself. The content derives from daily life, financial worries, washing the dishes, advancing age, but as poems proceed to impasse and insight, shifts in tone, focus, and rhythm transport those concerns. Considered as a whole, VANISHING ACT involves the “depth we feel” and “shadow we cast,” the possibility of falling through one’s self to “the view looking.” Joan Houlihan The Us 978-1-932195-77-4, $16.95, paper, 65 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2009

Poetry. THE US, Joan Houlihan’s tantalizing third book of poetry, is a poetic sequence spoken in the collective voice of nomadic hunter-gatherers. Incompatible with a stronger, more advanced culture (“Thems”), the Us must live outside civilization in order to be free and fully alive. Practical and canny, the Us are also possessed by a sense of awe expressed in superstition and ritual. With echoes of classical mythology, age-old legends, and resilient allegory, this is an absorbing and altogether unique book of poetry. Houlihan’s language is ancient in sound and texture yet entirely modern in impact.

Uyen Hua a/s/l 978-1-934639-09-2, $12, paper, 64 pp. IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI 2011

Poetry. Asian American Studies. The personal is the cultural! A thrilling introspective descent into the inferno of popular culture, where one’s psychic life is a complex and troubling web of personal relations with spectacular icons. None of the postmodern snark, all of the nuanced horror of a world where there is nothing but fame, but fame itself has become an entirely naturalized and even banal colonization of the human condition. A daring and implacable diagnosis of capital’s imageworld, and the fate of the unhappy consciousness within it. Also: hilarious. Will Hubbard Cursivism 978-1-933254-79-1, $14, paper, 88 pp. UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. The prose poems in CURSIVISM, like the form of writing after which the book is named, approach their subjects boldly, parsing instants of memory with complex, unbroken strokes. “I love Will Hubbard’s CURSIVISM. In discrete little blocks of prose that move like poems Hubbard achieves a humble universality and a beautiful amalgam of public and private mysteries. There is something about the deftness with which he speaks of books, family—especially his father—and the changing light and passing qualities of the natural world that is a great comfort to read. In this miniature space he’s created that is both private and public, both a physical space and a mental space, I feel welcomed” —Matthew Rohrer. Adam Hughes Petrichor 978-1-935520-35-1, $14.95, paper, 128 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Poetry. In his debut collection, Adam Hughes announces himself as a bold new voice in contemporary poetry. Whether discussing family, God, or simply the search for something just over the horizon, the poems in this collection are sure to stir the mind as well as the heart. From the scent of departed rain to the first moments of fatherhood, Hughes gives new words to the mundane and miraculous.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Carrie Hunter The Incompossible 978-0-9825731-3-6, $15, paper, 120 pp.

Sheniz Janmohamed Bleeding Light 978-1-894770-63-7, $17.95, paper, 64 pp.

BLACK RADISH BOOKS 2011

TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2010

Poetry. “Every once in a while there’s a collection of poems that cancels my way of thinking for a better way. Carrie Hunter’s THE INCOMPOSSIBLE divines ‘The decapitated head of Lack.’ Over and over she does this, ‘To say we are reversed now.’ She admits, ‘I can see you and see through you’ and those superpowers are invoked by the reader only through the reading, a gouged track in the soil of our minds for the trickling, soon rushing images renewing our senses. Thank you for the superpowers, thank you for the poems of the new mind”—CAConrad.

Poetry. BLEEDING LIGHT is a collection of ghazals tracing the steps of a woman’s journey through night. In order to witness dawn, she has first to travel through dusk. Throughout her journey, she is caught between West and East, religion and heresy, love and anti-love, darkness and the knowledge of light. Each couplet of a ghazal is an independent thought and reflection, a pearl strung into a necklace. BLEEDING LIGHT is fraught with opposing, stark, and often violent imagery heavily influenced by Sufi philosophy.

Christina Hutchins The Stranger Dissolves 978-0-9819816-2-8, $16, paper, 88 pp. SIXTEEN RIVERS PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Christina Hutchins’s THE STRANGER DISSOLVES is an exquisite debut volume. This superb collection is elegant, impassioned, and consistently wise in its reckonings. Few poets so carefully embody the mind’s oscillations during reflection, and the beauty of Christina Hutchins’s poems is simply beyond measure. More than any first collection I know, THE STRANGER DISSOLVES melds both mind (intelligence and thought) and heart with a startling complexity, intricacy, and intimacy. This is a volume to keep at one’s bedside”—David St. John. Jason Irwin Watering the Dead 978-1-886350-42-7, $14, paper, 80 pp. PAVEMENT SAW PRESS 2008

Poetry. “‘And now that I’ve left I dream only of returning’ says Jason Irwin in WATERING THE DEAD. In this debut— part love song, part elegy to the dying factory towns of America—nothing is lost, nothing forgotten. These poems swivel on bar stools and race trains on back roads. Boys leave small towns for war or prison and fathers talk about ‘someday’ like it’s a day on the calendar. These are poems of honor and witness; they pray and rage. Irwin gives us no easy vision of escape, instead in this powerful first collection he gives us poems of rough beauty”—Victoria Redel. Inge Israel Beckett Soundings 978-1-55380-112-2, $15.95, paper, 100 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2011

Poetry. In this collection of poems, Inge Israel works through Samuel Beckett’s letters, his biographies, and his actual plays and novels to probe the imagination that created his artistic works. Arguably the preeminent avant-garde and most influential writer of the 20th century and a legend in his own time, Beckett presents many glaring paradoxes. Beckett was born in a country ruled by the Catholic Church yet raised by a strict and devoutly Protestant mother. He loved the King James Bible and knew long passages of it by heart but did not believe in it. He loved his mother but fought to free himself of her influence. He loved Ireland but left to live in France. He loved the classics yet despaired of language being able to express anything meaningful. He dearly loved to be in the company of close friends yet even in their midst remained a solitary man, almost misanthropic. His outlook was gloomy, but he also had a streak of humor. Israel’s poems open a new and remarkable window on this writer of many contradictions.

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Dale Jensen Auto Bio 978-0-9825066-9-1, $5, paper, 32 pp. BEATITUDE PRESS 2010

Poetry. “Jensen’s work constantly allows itself to move back and forth between the fanciful and the real in an effort to reach that abyss of consciousness which resists any more straightforward method: ‘cut it open deeper / try to find a heart in there.’ This work is not ‘difficult’ in the sense of having to look up words or mythological characters in various dictionaries; it does not require footnotes. But it will remind you that the heart is a far more hidden organ than physicians or even lovers believe it to be. Irony, deep laughter, and a kind of dark astonishment pervade everything. AUTO BIO won’t leave you laughing; it won’t leave you at all: ‘my dead god your ghosts / go scurrying along my bloodsteam’” —Jack Foley. Luke Johnson After the Ark 978-1-935520-39-9, $14.95, paper, 84 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2011

Poetry. AFTER THE ARK, Luke Johnson’s remarkable first collection of poetry, chronicles the author’s upbringing as the son of two ministers. A seasonal triptych, the poems root themselves in the landscapes they inhabit: from the boulder fields of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the endless dusk of Clam Gulch, Alaska, to a half-frozen lake in Upstate New York. These poems ask the reader to move inward, to look hard at loss and see it stark and sure. The narrative, often deceptively formal poems, show us the affects domestic tragedies can have on a family’s faith in each other, how absence can color their collective memory. Ultimately, they are poems of hope, artifacts or rescues of some kind. Each one is a small proof that no matter the magnitude of the flood, through remembering there can always be salvage. These poems ask the reader to believe there is something left worth saving.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Paul Foster Johnson Study in Pavilions and Safe Rooms 978-0-615-43357-8, $16, paper, 76 pp.

Roberto Juarroz Vertical Poetry: Recent Poems 978-1-935210-22-1, $16, paper, 117 pp.

PORTABLE PRESS AT YO-YO LABS 2011

WHITE PINE PRESS 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. STUDY IN PAVILIONS AND SAFE ROOMS is an exploration of public and private space at their extremes. Borrowing titles from state-planned exhibition halls and panic rooms built for riding out the approaching apocalypse, these poems stage collisions of aesthetics, politics, and history in artificial environments. These poems are phenomenological investigations gone awry under the sway of unruly and contradictory forces. “Smart, elusive, like Debussy’s Nuages, crossed with Ashbery’s Three Poems—a stately Happening, where Stockhausen drops by to dish. Paul Foster Johnson uses syntax as a friend, a chaperone, a punching bag: it keeps him—and his happy reader—in a sequestered, cozy space of detente and narcosis. Reading these taut, architectural poems, I feel like I’m figure-skating on Bauhaus ice; thus Johnson gives us a sexually ambiguous, cerebral map of how to write a poem today”—Wayne Koestenbaum.

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Spanish by Mary Crow. VERTICAL POETRY: RECENT POEMS is a bilingual selection of poems by the distinguished Argentine poet Roberto Juarroz which were published between 1984 and 1988. “Mary Crow has given us a poet of miraculous lucidity and mystery at once. Her translations are marvelous in themselves and share the beauty and importance of the work. This is contemplative poetry that does not release...but compels the reader to follow the trail of the poems until the last. These poems are magnetic: engaging paradoxes and sudden bursts of light. This is a poet to compare with Octavio Paz”—David Ignatow.

Daniel Jones The Brave Never Write Poetry 978-1-55245-245-5, $15.95, paper, 96 pp. COACH HOUSE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. First published in 1985, when Daniel Jones was just twenty-six, THE BRAVE NEVER WRITE POETRY, the poet/critic/novelist’s lone collection of poems, was a cult hit, turning “poetry” on its head before its author (then known simply as “Jones”) swore off verse entirely. Written in a direct, plainspoken, autobiographical and at times confessional style in the tradition of Charles Bukowski and Al Purdy, these confrontational poems about sex and boredom, drugs and suicide, document Jones’s depressive, alcoholic years as an enfant terrible. This long overdue revised edition brings Jones’s unforgettable voice to a new generation of readers and includes the complete text of the original collection (including Jones’s own sardonic assessments of his own poetry), a new preface by poet/critic Kevin Connolly, and postscript commentary from many of Jones’s closest friends and literary colleagues. Roberto Juarroz Vertical Poetry: Last Poems 978-1-935210-21-4, $16, paper, 96 pp. WHITE PINE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Spanish by Mary Crow. Octavio Paz called Roberto Juarroz, one of Latin America’s most distinguished contemporary poets, “a poet of absolute instants.” This bilingual collection includes work from his final three books. “These are crystalline—oftentimes incandescent—translations of Juarroz’s powerful metaphysical poems where eternity and silence jut up against a world where ‘writing infects the landscape’ and there are ‘more letters than leaves’—the kind of match one hopes for where both the translator and the poet are in luck; new poems which don’t leak and yet old poems in which the original passion shines” —Jorie Graham.

Bhanu Kapil Schizophrene 978-0-9844598-6-5, $15.95, paper, 84 pp. NIGHTBOAT BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Cross-Genre. Asian American Studies. SCHIZOPHRENE traces the intersections of migration and mental illness as they unfold in post-Partition diasporic communities. Bhanu Kapil brings forward the question of a healing narrative and explores trauma and place through a somatic, poetic and cross-cultural psychiatric enquiry. Who was here? Who will never be here? Who has not yet arrived and never will? Towards an arrival without being, this notebook-book returns a body to a site, the shards re-forming in mid-air: for an instant. “Poignant, rich, delicious, a book to return to again and again”—Gail Scott. Laura Kasischke Space, In Chains 978-1-55659-333-8, $16, paper, 110 pp. COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. Laura Kasischke’s poems have the same haunting qualities and truth as our most potent memories and dreams. Through ghostly voices, fragmented narratives, overheard conversations, songs, and prayers in language reminiscent of medieval lyrics converted into contemporary idiom, the poems in SPACE, IN CHAINS create a visceral strangeness true to its own music. “Kasischke’s intelligence is most apparent in her syntactic control and pace, the way she gauges just when to make free verse speed up, or stop short, or slow down”—The New York Times Book Review. Cralan Kelder Give Some Word 978-1-84861-144-3, $15, paper, 96 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2010

Poetry. A is for Accessible. GIVE SOME WORD is a somewhat irreverent book of poems. Cralan Kelder believes that people who read poetry should be delighted, not confused. Poems are not riddles. The poetry in GIVE SOME WORD is no exception; equal parts distilled language, contrary, and pushing everyday language out of conformity. Humor lurks just below the surface in many of these shorter, condensed poems. Some apparent influences; Carver, Brautigan, Corman, Sakaki, Bukowski, Lax, the Jargon Society and a hundred others. The narrative wanders across three continents, and derives partially from publications over the past ten years by Coracle, Longhouse, Blue Press, and many generous magazine editors.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Kristin Kelly Cargo 978-1-932418-38-5, $16, paper, 80 pp.

Sally Rosen Kindred No Eden 978-0-932412-98-0, $14.95, paper, 70 pp.

ELIXIR PRESS 2010

MAYAPPLE PRESS 2011

Poetry. CARGO by Kristin Kelly is the winner of the 10th Annual Elixir Press Poetry Awards. This is Kelly’s first book of poetry and was chosen by contest judge Diann Blakely. Mark Levine had this to say about CARGO: “‘It’s just not natural,’ observes the speaker of one of Kristin Kelly’s poems, in a tone of supercharged deadpan that is one of the dozens of frequencies this work inhabits. I have rarely read a book that expresses the feeling of being unnatural with such disquieting precision. Some unnamed crisis has befallen Kelly’s speaker, leaving her broken off from herself, yet compelled to bear her salvaged remnants through these poems. In Kelly’s vision, the sun is a stripped-bare rock, the human body ‘a weight in the room,’ the soul an inchoate cargo. Her enforced detachment yields a clarity of encounter, an exactness of phrase, an extraordinary formal anxiety, and a capacity for empathetic transport that feels, to this reader, like an equivalence of grace. This is a beautiful book, brilliant and heartbreaking, that has somehow discovered within postmodern style a way to speak with utter genuineness of matters of life and death.”

Poetry. The poems in NO EDEN merge the landscapes of a rainy girlhood in the American South and the mythic world of Noah and the Flood. In these poems, a backyard stretches between a mother and daughter—the lessons of “distance tender and biblical.” The Carolina yard opens to hold the fruits of Eve and Lilith, the flight of Noah’s raven and dove, the small terrors of curbs and classrooms. These are poems of “a family awake through a storm,” an intimate theology of floods, loss, and betrayal. But NO EDEN suggests a source of possible comfort, of slow quiet mercy and forgiveness. Perhaps there once was an Eden, even if it is no longer there. Its having possibly existed offers us hope that there may still be an Eden within, one we can somehow attain through beauty, luck and hope.

Daniel Khalastchi Manoleria 978-1-932195-93-4, $16.95, paper, 72 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2011

Poetry. Winner of the Tupelo Press/Crazyhorse First Book Prize. Under the influence of broadcasts such as National Public Radio’s “Marketplace” (a daily roundup of stock reports and business news), Daniel Khalastchi composed a series of character-driven poems whose recurrent narrator is physically and mentally manipulated while the world around him takes little notice. Through their chaos and horror, these poems ask a reader to question the ways in which our careening healthcare system, crumbling financial/housing/job markets, and war on multiple fronts are actually affecting us—both inside and out. “In MANOLERIA, the body, broken apart ‘in elegant stress,’ re-congregates. Formally, the poet is taking us through the emotional work of picking up pieces. Despite the splintering, despite the hemorrhage, somehow ‘all is accounted for.’ A cardinal debut...” —D. A. Powell.

Ish Klein Moving Day 978-0-9822376-6-3, $14, paper, 112 pp. CANARIUM BOOKS 2011

Poetry. MOVING DAY is the second collection by acclaimed poet Ish Klein. In this book, the poet deepens her commitment to socially-engaged lyricism, as she directly confronts the darkest sources of conflict and shared suffering while also investigating and celebrating the relationships that help us deal with personal, societal, and environmental ills. Like Whitman and O’Hara before her, Klein is a poet of camaraderie and boundless love. “Kids need each other. / Better they never get / separated entirely.” Caroline Knox Nine Worthies 978-1-933517-48-3, $20, paper, 48 pp. WAVE BOOKS 2010

Poetry. This hand-sewn limited edition has a letterpress cover and design influenced by 18th century typesetting and binding techniques. A stunning work of prose and poetry by eminent poet Caroline Knox, NINE WORTHIES operates as a sort of historical novella, telling the story of the life and times of American portraitist Nathaniel Smibert in nine individual portraits interwoven with the perspective of the artist.

Nidaa Khoury Book of Sins 978-0-913441-99-2, $25, paper, 284 pp.

Noelle Kocot The Bigger World 978-1-933517-52-0, $16, paper, 88 pp.

HOUSE OF NEHESI PUBLISHERS 2010

WAVE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Middle Eastern Studies. Trilingual Edition. Full text in English, Arabic, and Hebrew. “These poems are burning off the pages with a rhythm embedded in fury and a beauty embedded in the ancient”—Antjie Krog. “Khoury’s poetry is fired by belief in the human and the spiritual at a time when many of us feel unreal and often spiritually hollow”—Yair Huri. “Written in water and ink, in between the shed blood. Nidaa Khoury’s poems take us to the bosom of an ancient woman, an archetype revived. The secret she whispers is ‘smaller than words’”—Karin Karakasli.

Poetry. Kocot makes a bold departure from her previous works with this collection. Written in the third-person, they are by turn funny, flippant, insane, sad, and deeply moving. Her most accessible work to date, THE BIGGER WORLD shows the range of Kocot’s talent and will likely appeal to a broad audience, while maintaining her signature linguistic style. Jose Kozer Anima 978-1-84861-146-7, $20, paper, 268 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Spanish by Peter Boyle. “A sixty-yearold man writes a poem and entitles it ‘Anima.’ Days later he writes another poem with a tone similar to the first, entitles it ‘Anima’, then realizes he has just begun a series which must all bear the same title. Furthermore, the man decides that in the future and till the day of his death he is going to continue writing poems that, since they have this tone, will bear the title ‘Anima.’ At the end of a year, having written some 150 poems, he extracts from the accumulated mass 60 poems called ‘Anima’” —José Kozer.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Joel Steven Kuszai Accidency 978-1-931824-37-8, $14.95, paper, 118 pp.

Stacie Leatherman Stranger Air 978-1-936419-03-6, $14.95, paper, 80 pp.

ROOF BOOKS 2011

MAYAPPLE PRESS 2011

Poetry. ACCIDENCY is Joel Kuszai’s first book and collects “A Miscellany,” a serial poem that emerged in limited edition chapbooks in the 1990s, and “Brooklyn Yards,” his first extended experimentation with procedural methods of composition. “Joel Kuszai’s anarchistinflected social lyrics wreak havoc on the simulated sense of our surround-sound society. Kuszai’s exuberant poems surge with voicings that pierce thought. ACCIDENCY is a pleasure of the senses, mindful of ear and eye. This long-awaited debut is scintillating” —Charles Bernstein.

Poetry. Stacie Leatherman’s dynamic poems inhabit the cusp between the domestic and the utterly strange. To read them is to travel where we haven’t been before, where things seem lost or on the verge of disappearing. To make something from nothing, out of the pure air of imagination, but to make it so sensually, emphasizing touch, creating a world of things to fill the air, a world of tumbling metaphors and images, is the essence of this superb book where every word is a metaphor for something unsayable. Leatherman is always probing, uncovering and discovering, and she understands that surrealism is a mode of restless thought, not a mere program. When you open STRANGER AIR, you open yourself, and what you find will amaze and redefine you.

Gerry Lafemina Vanishing Horizon 978-1-934695-22-7, $17, paper, 104 pp. ANHINGA PRESS 2011

Poetry. “VANISHING HORIZON is full of gritty and graceful intelligence. Consistently and sumptuously detailed, these poems amount to a kind of landscape of the soul, that aspect of self that runs the gauntlet—weathers, wearies, kneels—then grins and keeps on. It’s hard to make a way in this world, to see clearly without coming to deep despair. This book is good light” —Tim Seibles. Larissa Lai and Rita Wong Sybil Unrest 978-0-9784981-3-9, $16, paper, 112 pp. LINEBOOKS 2008

Poetry. SYBIL UNREST is a collaborative long poem begun in Hong Kong at the moment of the SARS outbreak in 2003, and the American invasions of Iraq. It was written as a punning conversation via email over the course of several years. With an ear to the noise of CNN, the BBC World Service, the US State Department, advertising and JackFM, Lai and Wong re-figure the sights, sounds and texts of contemporary culture seeking hope and connection while tripping over the barbed wire of banality. Sometimes bravely and sometimes stupidly, though always with a sense of humor, they hurl themselves through the crosshairs of war and capital, trying to recover the recoverable and reinvent the rest. Deborah Landau The Last Usable Hour 978-1-55659-334-5, $15, paper, 96 pp. COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. It is “always nighttime” in Deborah Landau’s second collection—a series of linked lyric sequences, including insomniac epistolary love poems to an elusive “someone.” Here is a haunted singing voice, clear and spare, alive with memory and desire, yet hounded by premonitions of a calamitous future. The speaker in this “ghost book” is lucid and passionate, even as everything is disappearing. “Landau registers the intensities of the flesh: pleasure, desire, limitation, and, ultimately, disappearance”—Mark Doty

Ronna Lebo Prolapse 978-0-9791495-2-8, $15, paper, 64 pp. OFF THE PARK PRESS 2011

Poetry. PROLAPSE takes us into the icy heart of America, where banality and madness go hand in hand behind closed doors. Ronna Lebo writes on the edge of a knife. Her taut sentences carve out and sing a masterful postmodern American ballad of addiction, indifference, and deceit not to be missed. Esther Lee Spit 978-1-932418-39-2, $16, paper, 88 pp. ELIXIR PRESS 2011

Poetry. Asian American Studies. Winner of the Elixir Press 10th Annual Poetry Awards. “SPIT shines. Filled with bravado and brilliance, Lee’s debut fills in the blanks it makes profound use of, hollering across the ‘rusted hollows.’ Utilizing a host of forms—from montage to prose poems, ‘Interviews with My [C]orean Father,’ to fractured sonnets—Lee echoes and evokes a multitude of identities: writer, sister, ‘good girl,’ lover. If this is the future of American poetry, as it appears to be, we are in good hands”—Kevin Young. Paul Legault The Madeleine Poems 978-1-890650-48-3, $15.95, paper, 72 pp. OMNIDAWN 2010

Poetry. LGBT Studies. Commenting on the fears and aspirations of contemporary citizens, this poetry collection speaks with an elegantly lyrical voice that is simultaneously knowing and naïve. Written in spare phrasal passages, these poems have an ephemeral musicality. The verses create images for the reader that are quick, fleeting flickers—like viewing a painting with flashbulbs. Reflecting on human relationships, these poems show them to be like an empty harbor into which ships carrying unexpected cargo sail.

Joseph Lease Testify 978-1-56689-258-2, $16, paper, 63 pp. COFFEE HOUSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “I regard Lease as the best poet of his generation. This is a poetry filled with stories that are built to last. This is a poet who will become a major voice in American poetry”—David Shapiro. Joseph Lease gracefully delves into American culture—narrating American lives, struggling with unjustified war, anxiety, and the broken promise of democracy. Lease braids humor, political bite, and lyric beauty, taking us to a place of warning, critique, and elegy.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Carol Lem Gathering the Pieces 978-0-9655239-2-9, $15, paper, 66 pp.

Francesco Levato Elegy for Dead Languages 978-1-934851-25-8, $14.95, paper, 78 pp.

GREENHOUSE REVIEW PRESS 2010

MARICK PRESS 2010

Poetry. Asian American Studies. The poems in GATHERING THE PIECES are remarkable for their quiet insight and humility, for their keen attention to and transformation of the small details of a life. Carol Lem’s is a true voice in sure command of her craft, and her clear and accessible vision gives us poems that reveal profound and essential understanding. Her themes are the transience of our lives and at the same time the beauty of nature that sustains us. Carol Lem’s poems seem to rise from love—of friends, teachers, the art of teaching, the art of learning, and music, the bamboo flute, the notes, the silence between them, the hush at the end. Philip Levine, in a lovely tribute poem, tells the poet she “knows what work is” and “how to do it.” The “work” of writing poetry is as ordinary as a day shift and, at the same time, fundamentally mysterious. Carol Lem knows how to do it.

Poetry. ELEGY FOR DEAD LANGUAGES collects in print the long documentary poems “War Rug,” “Elegy for Dead Languages,” and “Hood, Handgun, Power Drill.” “Francesco Levato’s powerful documentary, War Rug— like Eliot Weinberger’s What I Heard About Iraq before it—detains the language of the perpetrators of global military aggression and redeploys it to indict them. From J.C. Penny catalog copy to counterintelligence manuals and autopsy reports, War Rug is a fierce yet unfortunate reminder of the absolute horrors of our age” —Mark Nowak.

James P. Lenfestey, Editor Low Down and Coming On: A Feast of Delicious and Dangerous Poems About Pigs 978-1-890193-22-5, $20, cloth, 230 pp. RED DRAGONFLY PRESS 2010

Poetry. This anthology features the work of 105 poets, including work by Margaret Atwood, William Blake, Wendell Berry, Robert Bly, Billy Collins, Louise Erdrich, Martín Espada, Bill Holm, Galway Kinnell, Ted Kooser, David Lee, Denise Levertov, Pablo Neruda, Sylvia Plath, Pattiann Rogers, Gary Snyder, and Kevin Young. “This book proves that pigs DO fly”—Eric Utne, founder of Utne Reader. Takako Lento and Wayne Miller, Editors Tamura Ryuichi: On the Life & Work of a 20th Century Master 978-0-9641454-2-9, $12.99, paper, 191 pp. PLEIADES PRESS 2011

Poetry. East Asia Studies. Literary History & Criticism. After the end of World War II, Japanese poet Tamura Ryuichi began publishing Arechi (The Wasteland), a literary magazine charting a new course for Japanese poetry. Over the next fifty years, Tamura produced innovative and haunting poems inspired by an extraordinary range of poets from all over the world, including T. S. Eliot and W. H. Auden. Though Tamura is little known in the U. S., he is considered to be among the very most important Japanese poets of the 20th century. In this second volume of the Unsung Masters Series, editors Takako Lento and Wayne Miller present more than forty pages of Tamura’s poetry, as well as essays on Tamura’s work by both Japanese and American writers. David Lespiau Four Cut-Ups, or, the Case of the Restored Volume 978-1-936194-04-9, $14, paper, 72 pp. BURNING DECK 2011

Poetry. Translated from the French by Keith Waldrop. Real and fictional characters (Mrs. Lindbergh, Gertrude Stein, William Burroughs, Billy Budd or the Kid) circulate through the four parts of FOUR CUT-UPS, OR, THE CASE OF THE RESTORED VOLUME which, in the way of a mobile, uses constant movement to construct a precise form out of fragmented perceptions, ideas, stories, quotations. A form that gives a strangely uncanny sheen to the most realistic details.

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Dana Levin Sky Burial 978-1-55659-332-1, $15, paper, 96 pp. COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Death is the new and unshakeable lens through which I see,” writes Dana Levin about her third book, in which she confronts mortality and loss in subjects ranging from Tibetan Buddhist burial practices to Aztec human sacrifice. Shaped by dreams and “the worms and the gods,” these poems are a profound investigation of our inescapable fate. As Louise Glück has said: “Levin’s animating fury goes back deeper into our linguistic and philosophic history: to Blake’s tiger, to the iron judgments of the Old Testament.” “Levin’s work is phenomenological; it details how it feels to be an embodied consciousness making its way through the world”—Boston Review. “Levin has the skilled ear, magnificent tongue, and fierce mind of the truly prophetic”—Rain Taxi. Shirley Geok-Lin Lim Walking Backwards: New Poems 978-0-9826968-0-4, $14.95, paper, 84 pp. WEST END PRESS 2010

Poetry. Asian American Studies. WALKING BACKWARDS is about making a home when you are a nomad, and adding an American self to the many selves that the world’s myriad, bewildering places throw at one body. It is about how travel and restlessness wrench us and teach us about ourselves, how our losses compound our loves, and how endlessly absorbing the idea of home remains, particularly when we keep losing sight of it. Orbiting the globe, this collection narrates encounters in a transnational American’s circuit. As much about Hong Kong as the west coast of the United States, it bundles transients and family, nature and city, the still point within and characters everywhere, to produce a fresh, ethnically inflected poetics. Colleen Lookingbill a forgetting of 978-1-889098-11-1, $12, paper, 62 pp. LYRIC& PRESS 2011

Poetry. “In A FORGETTING OF, Colleen Lookingbill suggests that every soul migrates through versions of itself via myth, legend, saga, tale, fable. Within such storytelling, one can ‘imagine all our habits of experience/listening, making their own arrangements.’ Understood this way, the soul, like the poem, opens to an environment—a process—of pure possibility. Lookingbill plumbs the formal resource of poetry (lyric, narrative, fragment) to reveal the fertile void at the heart of the poem where ‘happenstance is all light.’ How rare to find a work such as this is, whose authority and generosity one can so trust. Here is a poetry that creates its own light source, opens its own portals onto a site where one follows ‘love after love’s iridescent path/back the way we came—open, unfastened”—Elizabeth Robinson. Cover art and inside artwork by the author.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Astrid Lorange Eating and Speaking 978-0-9833931-0-8, $12, paper, 44 pp. TEA PARTY REPUBLICANS PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Words can nourish and give pleasure, can be feasts replete with edgy and delightful textures and flavors. The dual sensualities named in Lorange’s title are everywhere present in her poetics. The ‘you’ and ‘I’ incarnate only by means of speech enact their conjoined philogies—lusty, omnivorous, humorously irreverent, but grave with longing as well. All this from a knowledgeable and daring mind for your reading (newly cognate with eating) pleasure”—Joan Retallack. Raymond Luczak Road Work Ahead 978-0-578-07158-9, $14.95, paper, 92 pp.

Dominic Mallary Destroyer of Man: Selected Poems by Dominic Owen Mallary 978-0-9844752-1-6, $12.95, paper, 64 pp. BLACK OCEAN 2011

Poetry. A combination of poems published during Dominic Mallary’s lifetime alongside poems posthumously selected by friends, DESTROYER OF MAN reveals a fiercely aware young poet writing from a place of anger and beauty with a lyrical virtuosity that is free from censorship. Drawing on a long and varied tradition, Mallary is equal parts Hart Crane and Rimbaud. Arresting, raw, clever, and unexpectedly moving, these poems tear away at the world in a relentless pursuit for liberation from the ugly and mundane. Ultimately, Mallary finds that freedom not at the core of humanity, but in the ashes we leave behind.

SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. In the follow-up to his critically acclaimed collection MUTE, Raymond Luczak sets out on a turbulent journey after ending a 15-year relationship. The poems of ROAD WORK AHEAD follow Luczak as he meets kindred souls on his travels and wonders what it means to love again. He opens the suitcase of his heart in far-flung cities and points beyond. His poems, pungent with musk and ache, will open yours too. Magus Magnus Heraclitean Pride 978-0-9826299-2-5, $14, paper, 100 pp. FURNITURE PRESS BOOKS 2010

Poetry. “Reading Magnus’s HERACLITEAN PRIDE, one is reminded of Fragment 115: ‘To the soul belongs a Logos that increases itself.’ Magnus’s approach increases the logos, and through that increase fashions perspectives from which to engage Heraclitus’ philosophy. His is not a traditional interpretation but a journey that is simultaneously a piercing through. In that respect, Magnus’s account truly combines two meanings of ‘traversing’ to fashion a standpoint of plenitude. I believe his success in thus traversing stems from a powerful and daring insight about Heraclitus: ‘Previous analyses and impact don’t constitute its history, it’s not over.’ For Magnus, the philosophy of Heraclitus is not over. Instead, he relates to Heraclitus in the moment when Heraclitus touches Magnus’s own Logos and thus Magnus overcomes the danger against which Heraclitus warns in Fragment 72, for Magnus’s account is never separated from that with which he is most in contact. This work is essential reading for serious inquiry into the great Sage from Ephesus”—Anne Ashbaugh, Chair, Philosophy and Religious Studies, Towson University. Marie-Elizabeth Mali Steady, My Gaze 978-1-893670-66-2, $15, paper, 80 pp. TEBOT BACH 2011

Poetry. “‘Wholehearted’ is an undervalued word; to my mind it means not blind enthusiasm or unthinking embrace but something more like the full consent of the self to experience, to be present in the glorious and wounding matrix of the here and now. I can’t think of a better word for Marie-Elizabeth Mali’s poems. She wants ‘the honeyed sizzle beyond all language,’ wants to be a vulnerable and conscious participant in the life of things as they are, awake to love and the struggle to live freely and compassionately. ‘How to hold the ocean,’ she asks, ‘when the vessel leaks? Rise your wild, / dear animal...’”—Mark Doty.

Filip Marinovich And If You Don’t Go Crazy I’ll Meet You Here Tomorrow 978-1-933254-80-7, $17, paper, 136 pp. UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. Filip Marinovich’s second book spans the Otts, the outs, and many outposts. Travel with Filip and meet the phantoms of airplane chewing gum and beat on a drum with a Molotov cocktail. “What’s happening? What is happening to me? The poems of Filip Marinovich, that’s what! This book makes me cry, then laugh, it’s awful, it’s fantastic! Joy is in the movement he says and there is an inexplicable physicality between each word! Have you been here? Ever visit such a place? In one sitting you will read it and want every book to possess such tangential magic! I’m stupid with love for the genius of Filip Marinovich!”—CAConrad. Chris Martin Becoming Weather 978-1-56689-259-9, $16, paper, 138 pp. COFFEE HOUSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Chris Martin details daily delights, sidewalks and subways, and bulldogs at the park, giving equal attention to all. In his poems, the reader witnesses the fragmentation of the speaker’s mind into particles swirling and waltzing until eventually rising into the atmosphere.

Dawn Lundy Martin Discipline 978-0-9844598-4-1, $15.95, paper, 74 pp. NIGHTBOAT BOOKS 2011

Poetry. African American Studies. This stunning second collection engages the “disciplines” associated with regimes of powers and sadomasochism. The work interrogates the social and linguistic space between regimes of power enacted on the body, and thereby the soul. “These poems are dense and deep. They are necessary, and hot on the eye. I was reminded of Leslie Scalapino, the sensitivity to the surrounding arrangements and to human suffering. There is no distance from Martin’s subject, but immersion and emotional conflict. Discipline is what it took to write such a potent set of poems”—Fanny Howe. Chris Mason Hum Who Hiccup 978-0-9793901-5-9, $15.95, paper, 136 pp. NARROW HOUSE 2011

Poetry. “Chris Mason has fabricated a set of visual charms, small and intense constellations of words that make & do, bounce & hope, zap & slap. These are dreams of poems more than poems of dreams, sweet & filled with delight”—Charles Bernstein.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE James Maughn The Arakaki Permutations 978-0-9825731-6-7, $15, paper, 120 pp.

Shane McCrae In Canaan 978-0-9844889-1-9, $10, paper, 35 pp.

BLACK RADISH BOOKS 2011

RESCUE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “In THE ARAKAKI PERMUTATIONS, James Maughn continues his uncompromising engagement with the catechisms of martial kata and their intersection with the forms of writing. Delving deeper into the heart of his own poems, he engages the particularities of technical application—of timing and distance—that comprise his own poetic waza, or practice. By disclosing the textures and subtleties of language, even to the level of the syllable, Maughn illuminates the architecture of meaning. The result is a collection of remarkable poems that discover a boundless freedom within the structure of form. Through self imitation he has subjugated selfconsciousness and achieved that most difficult of artistic feats: the revelation of a true self”—Joshua McKinney.

Poetry. African American Studies. In Shane McCrae’s IN CANAAN, he inhabits the personae of the escaped slave Margaret Garner, who, in the mid-1800s, murdered one of her daughters in order to keep her from returning to slavery. “I couldn’t stop/Hurting her because it hurt,” writes McCrae in the voice of Garner, “Before that night I never had the chance to love / Anyone/ she was the first person I loved.” McCrae composes in broken forms and shattered fragments, retelling a harrowing historical story through the imagined first-person point of view of its tortured and terrified heroine.

Bernadette Mayer Studying Hunger Journals 978-1-58177-120-6, $24.95, paper, 460 pp.

FACTORY HOLLOW PRESS 2010

STATION HILL PRESS OF BARRYTOWN 2011

Poetry. Literary Nonfiction. In 1972 Bernadette Mayer began this project as an aid to psychological counseling, writing in parallel journals so that, as she wrote in one (in bed, on subways, at parties, etc.), her psychiatrist read the other. Using colored pens to “color-code emotions,” she recorded dreams, events, memories, and reflections in a language at once free-ranging and precise—a work that creates its own poetics. She sought “a workable code, or shorthand, for the transcription of every event, every motion, every transition” of her own mind and to “perform this process of translation” on herself in the interest of evolving an innovative, inquiring language. STUDYING HUNGER JOURNALS registers this intention within a body of poetry John Ashbery has called “magnificent.” Ben Mazer January 2008 978-0-615-34305-1, $17, paper, 149 pp.

Frances McCue The Bled 978-0-9840698-7-3, $14, paper, 62 pp. Poetry. “Frances McCue’s book is the most moving account of a spouse’s death I have ever read. While living abroad in Morocco he died suddenly, and the aftermath of that event is detailed here with astonishment and heart-rung love”—James Tate. “THE BLED is a clearedeyed, ruthless, beautiful, terrible look at what it is to find love and to lose it, to be knocked around by death and grief, to wonder how you can go on living” —Rebecca Brown. Brian McGettrick Everything Else We Must Endure 978-1-934513-29-3, $13, paper, 52 pp. SUNNYOUTSIDE 2011

Poetry. EVERTHING ELSE WE MUST ENDURE allows the reader to peep through domestic doors not fully closed and see the varied interiors of the lives being led, introducing us to memorable characters who remind us that not all action takes place in the spotlight. In these poems, even the mundane sparkles and sometimes it’s the young who have wisdom to spare.

DARK SKY BOOKS 2010

Poetry. JANUARY 2008 collects one hundred thirty-five poems written shortly after the death of Landis Everson. “Like fragments of old photographs happened on in a drawer, Ben Mazer’s poems tap enigmatic bits of the past that suddenly come to life again. To read him is to follow him along a dreamlike corridor where everything is beautiful and nothing is as it seems”—John Ashbery.

Anthony McCann I Heart Your Fate 978-1-933517-51-3, $16, paper, 96 pp.

Deborah Meadows Saccade Patterns 978-1-60964-006-4, $16, paper, 100 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2011

Poetry. SACCADE PATTERNS explores vision, the erotic gaze, and social discernment. The book opens with a shuffled text that dismantles melodrama by inscribing primate capacity for abstract thought. There’s even a list of possible names for a pet cricket that follows a mathematic iteration. The poems seem to ask how an ekphrastic poem based on the story of Tristan und Isolde illumines the oldest gaze of love and eros. “Highways out to desert proving grounds” lead to technologicallyenhanced vision, failures in our “dynastic speed-up.”

WAVE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. In his third collection of poetry, Anthony McCann fuses the worlds of dream, art, love, and brute humanity, taking the redemptive power of the romantic to new and surprising extremes. “I don’t have a body to feel afraid,” writes McCann, and these poems, bald and imaginative, almost convince the reader it must be so, save for the fact that they are so vitally, essentially human.

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Pablo Medina The Man Who Wrote on Water 978-1-934909-19-5, $18, paper, 102 pp. HANGING LOOSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. “Pablo Medina’s poems belong to the real world even while they move across the borders of dreams and wild imagination. They sustain a tone that’s both sophisticated and innocent, delivering fresh news of what it feels like to be alive and human. I love these poems for their music and vivid imagery. I love their clarity, whether evoking city or bull pasture or bedroom, or an interior landscape. I love following the poet’s surprising thought, as he delves into the heart and the mind and the world” —Joan Larkin.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Tony Medina My Old Man Was Always on the Lam 978-1-935520-36-8, $14.95, paper, 112 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2011

Poetry. African American Studies. MY OLD MAN WAS ALWAYS ON THE LAM is a blues memoir in verse. With brutal honesty and lyrical prowess, Tony Medina plays the changes in an intimate collection that sticks like a stinging Ali punch and moves like a New York City subway train through the raw, unmitigated terrain of his psyche. Sparked by the sudden death of his father in Harlem, MY OLD MAN WAS ALWAYS ON THE LAM examines his relationship with a long-lost mother who abandoned him at birth, exploring his Bronx projects childhood and his relationship with the paternal grandmother who wrestled him from the clutches of the State and raised him, culminating with a reunion with his terminally ill mother, attempting to fill in the gaps of a precarious past destined to collide with its bare-bones present. In this, his fifth full-length collection, Tony Medina is at his most personal and revelatory. Erika Meitner Makeshift Instructions for Vigilant Girls 978-1-934695-23-4, $17, paper, 98 pp. ANHINGA PRESS 2011

Poetry. “These cool, hot poems about women and girls in danger and on the prowl, coming of age and being of age, are full of startling detail and vivid setting. Meitner’s range, wit, compassion and her alertness to the moments where domestic and collective experience intersect, make these poems memorable. This book is a seriously good read”—Daisy Fried.

Ben Milder From Adolescence to Senescence: A Life in Light Verse 978-1-56809-137-2, $15.95, paper, 122 pp. TIME BEING BOOKS 2011

Poetry. FROM ADOLESCENCE TO SENESCENCE is not so much Ben Milder’s autobiography in poetry as it is a sort of poetic “photo album” of the author’s life. Each of the book’s twelve sections is a page of snapshots that lets us see what’s made this master of light verse keep on ticking well into his nineties. Milder’s delightful and poignant poems on everything from work and socializing and faith to love and travel and family reflect a life both examined and lived to its fullest. So, come along, with Ben Milder, on a journey from the teenage years to the ripe old age of young-at-heart. Jennifer Militello Flinch of Song 978-1-932195-76-7, $16.95, paper, 72 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2009

Poetry. Winner of the Tupelo Press First Book Award, Jennifer Militello’s poems are lyrical, deeply thoughtful, and laced with associative leaps so surprising that a reader will be exhilarated by the imagination at work (and play) in each poem. The poems grapple with the everyday dramas of family and of love and do so with an avidity of intelligence as bracing as lines from Lorca or Rimbaud. Stan Mir The Lacustrine Suite 978-1-886350-23-6, $14, paper, 80 pp. PAVEMENT SAW PRESS 2011

David Meltzer When I Was a Poet 978-0-87286-516-7, $10.95, paper, 135 pp. CITY LIGHTS PUBLISHERS 2011

Poetry. A milestone in City Lights history, David Meltzer’s WHEN I WAS A POET is number sixty of the famous Pocket Poets Series. The title piece is an ambitious work by a master at the height of his powers, a spiritual assessment of the meaning of a lifetime spent writing poetry. Also included are portraits of key figures in the poet’s life, including Semina artist Wallace Berman, as well as “California Dreamin’,” a reminiscence of Beat-era bohemian life. Among its other highlights are the vintage, previously uncollected series, “French Broom,” a nutty homage to “Mr. Peanut,” a section of mystical “amulets,” and complete versions of “Night Reals” and “Dogma,” which appear here for the first time. With its profound meditations on love, loss, aging, and death, WHEN I WAS A POET is a substantial contribution to American poetry by one of its foremost living practitioners. “With this primal book, David Meltzer takes his place among the great poets of his generation” —Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

Poetry. “Dear Mirror, in THE LACUSTRINE SUITE, all the ships side with their shadows. This is the silhouette the stars hunt. Trace the happy apocalypse of Stan Mir’s mouth, a loophole at the end of the cul-de-sac of speech. This is the lake you have waded into. Problem songs preserved from allegory’s fortress. Asterisks then ash. Gauze fallen from your gills”—Eric Baus. Robert Mittenthal Wax World 978-0-925904-90-4, $16, paper, 116 pp. CHAX PRESS 2011

Poetry. “In Mittenthal’s work, it’s the idea of comedy in an explosion of craft that catches you. He’s quiet about it. He understands it will adhere—and it’s designed to— to linger. There’s almost a battle going on—an intellect that exists only to be destroyed by itself so that all that was is as it was—only clearer. And his sound sounds the most sounded out a boxer squaring off to take on the psychology of currency and its effects on labor. Not political OR only political. A clarity and honest posture mixed with poignant sarcasm about how the world sees itself. It’s about seeing inequality. ‘Paid to forget, I recall more’”—Nico Vassilakis.

Christina Mengert As We Are Sung 978-1-936194-05-6, $14, paper, 64 pp.

Albert Mobilio Touch Wood 978-1-934029-16-9, $14, paper, 87 pp.

BURNING DECK 2011

THE BROOKLYN RAIL/BLACK SQUARE EDITIONS 2011

Poetry. This first book by a trained vocalist explores the transformation from “I am speaking” to “I am singing,” and where exactly poetry fits between these two limits. Restlessly, in abrupt (sometimes humorous) shifts it examines the subtle, the inaccessible, what is too fine for our senses, “the song that is sung between notes.” The poems seem almost to disperse, to float off into a space as vast and as tolerant of indeterminacy as Barbara Guest’s, where seeming emptiness can turn into a fullness of motion, potential, song, being.

Poetry. “The heir to Modernism at its most terse and most oblique, Mobilio works line and sound forcefully together, managing amazingly acrobatic moves. With an eye for the monumental incidental, he winds through ekphrastic gesture and an eccentric abecedarium to give us a tour of the contemporary that’s quick, vivid, and wry almost to the point of irony—but not quite. Instead, he sticks with the tenacious questions, probing the slim abysses between a life’s well-oiled parts. It’s delightful, witty, and deeply moving all at once”—Cole Swensen.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Derek Mong Other Romes 978-0-9818591-8-7, $14, paper, 80 pp.

Vivek Narayanan Universal Beach 978-1-934639-10-8, $15, paper, 80 pp.

SATURNALIA BOOKS 2011

IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI 2011

Poetry. OTHER ROMES gathers together an eclectic range of influences—from Fellini films, to eating contests, Jesuit poetry, and jetliners—to confront the awkward but inevitable relationship between personal narratives and the larger public sphere. And like the title city that haunts much of this work, Mong refuses to settle on any one voice or form. Restrained at times as a Latin ode, or expansive as Whitman, these poems take erotic love and in-flight disaster through subtle, fissuring syllabics, strict sestinas, free verse, and more. The end result is an expansive collection, which as poet and critic David Baker remarks, demonstrates that “the privacy of the lyric world is part and parcel with the communal imagination.”

Poetry. South Asia Studies. “Vivek Narayanan’s poems remind me of a thriving port city, where diverse tongues are spoken, their registers varying from a priestly classical to a piratical demotic. Narayanan founds his poetic universe on a sophisticated understanding of bricolage: with a keen eye on the uses of friction, he counterpoints the certainties of definitions with the deceptions of synaesthesia; he sends up the vagueness of academic discourse with devastatingly precise onomatopoeia, and segues adroitly from memoir to surveillance report, from the elegiac to the carnivalesque. And then there are moments of luminosity, when the word becomes the bearer of hope and redemption. Not by offering us a spurious clarity, but challenging us into insight with a jaggedness of phrase, a treacherously ambiguous grammar, and a demanding musicality”—Ranjit Hoskote.

Daniel Morris If Not for the Courage 978-0-9841177-6-5, $15, paper, 70 pp. MARSH HAWK PRESS 2010

Poetry. “Everyday life in the household and memory of Daniel Morris’s suburban Jewish professor-poet and father of toddlers has rarely been rendered with the energy, good humor, and luminous detail we meet in Daniel Morris’s IF NOT FOR THE COURAGE. These poems are at once hilarious and heartbreaking; they take us straight to the scene of the crime, allowing us to witness the most absurd and agonizingly funny moments of daily routine against the backdrop of unrelieved media blitz. The courage of Morris’s title is evident throughout”—Marjorie Perloff. Fred Muratori The Spectra 978-0-615-41573-4, $18, paper, 79 pp. STOCKPORT FLATS 2011

Poetry. If what you relish about thought is its heft, velocity, its unpredictability, then Fred Muratori’s THE SPECTRA will transport you. Visceral particulars— Batman, buzzsaws, wax-lustered cars, beef, and, yes, even Roy Orbison—propel readers beyond finitude in blunt cascades of 15 lines. Enjambments facilitate speed, precariousness, volatility while asking: “What if everything we think, from first synaptic spark to the last, is one thought, continuously digressive?” Parsed out in 13 syllables per line, life besieges readers as Muratori charts the source of the unsayable. Locomotion and elocution bring us to life’s brim, to the subliminal spectra therein. One could cite Kant, Leibnitz and Wittgenstein to explain how Muratori twists conventional notions of meaning formation. The poet himself tips his hat to Wallace Stevens and others who fall into consciousness—Dupin, Bronk, Dahlberg, and Zukofsky. THE SPECTRA’s thoughts-about-thought clang and balk, surprising us all. Jack Myers The Memory of Water 978-1-930974-98-2, $15, paper, 103 pp. NEW ISSUES POETRY & PROSE 2011

Poetry. “What a wonderful gift to have these last poems by Jack Myers. It is a book I wouldn’t be without. Jack was a quintessentially American poet. He wrote in a distilled American idiom with a wiseguy humor that is truly wise. He honored the past, and the future, too, but knew a poet’s work was to strive for the elusive eternal present. Poetry, for Jack, is the art of the elusive, which is where mystery resides. Poetry, for Jack, was making up his prayer. He knew he might never arrive at some allexplaining religion, but, damn, he had a beautiful prayer”—Stuart Dybek.

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Gale Nelson This Is What Happens When Talk Ends 978-1-936194-06-3, $14, paper, 104 pp. BURNING DECK 2011

Poetry. There are eight sets of eight poems. All poems within a set follow the vowel pattern of a particular passage from Shakespeare. They could be called homovocalic translations of Shakespeare though they ignore his content while trying to build toward their own coherence. The sets are not presented in linear succession. Instead, the poems are arranged in a chess pattern, the earliest surviving knight’s circuit, attributed to al-Adli ar-Rumi of Baghdad and presumed to date from A.D. 840. Aimee Nezhukumatathil Lucky Fish 978-1-932195-58-3, $16.95, paper, 78 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2011

Poetry. Asian American Studies. LUCKY FISH travels along a lush current—a confluence of leaping vocabulary and startling formal variety, with upwelling gratitude at its source: for love, motherhood, “new hope,” and the fluid and rich possibilities of words themselves. With an exuberant appetite for “my morning song, my scurrystep, my dew,” anchored in complicated human situations, this astounding young poet’s third collection of poems is her strongest yet. bp Nichol The Captain Poetry Poems Complete 978-1-897388-60-0, $15, paper, 88 pp. BOOKTHUG 2011

Poetry. Art. Originally published in 1970 as a mimeo production by bill bissett’s seminal blewointment press (the same year that Michael Ondaatje issued his documentary on Nichol titled The Sons of Captain Poetry), smatterings of THE CAPTAIN POETRY POEMS COMPLETE have appeared over the years but never in their entirety. Now, in “official book form” for the first time, along with corrections to the texts and the material that wasn’t included in the original edition, and “some words on all these words” by Nichol himself THE CAPTAIN POETRY POEMS COMPLETE is available at last to scholars, poets, and other human beings alike. With an afterword by bill bissett.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Urayoán Noel Hi-Density Politics 978-1-60964-031-6, $16, paper, 106 pp.

Mary Oishi Spirit Birds They Told Me 978-0-9826968-3-5, $11.95, paper, 60 pp.

BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

WEST END PRESS 2011

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. “Urayoán Noel’s plurilingual, polyphonic, & polymorphous text works are images are performance scores are records of poetry actions are homophonic translations are poems are homages to some of Latin America and the Caribbean’s greatest innovators. Their language is a haunted one. Throughout Noel’s body of work the ghost of Spanish unsettles the English language, disrupting its expansionist ambitions. Ditto for the specter of English in the Spanish lines. The only expansionism here pertains to the field of poetry, and we’re all the luckier for it”—Mónica de la Torre.

Poetry. Asian American Studies. Drawn from her mother’s Japanese name, One Thousand Cranes, these poems bring a message of trauma and recovery, war and reconciliation, and the passage from personal shame to self-regard. They are historical, political, and personal in the same breath. “This beautiful collection of poetry is a powerful work of conscience, a telling of ‘the truest stories ever told’ about how injustice wounds—and how those who survive can learn the secrets of dreaming the world anew. Mary Oishi has given us the perfect book for this moment in history”—Demetria Martinez.

Linda Norton The Public Gardens: Poems and History 978-0-9831975-1-5, $14, paper, 134 pp. PRESSED WAFER 2011

Poetry. Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. Introduction by Fanny Howe. THE PUBLIC GARDENS: POEMS AND HISTORY is a memoir of place (Boston, New York, Oakland and San Francisco) and of the commons (gardens, streets, subways, marriage and family, libraries), a documentary (with lyrics) of a life lived in, around, and for books. “THE PUBLIC GARDENS is a brilliant, wonderful book, a sort of a wild institution, intense and readable. Linda Norton looks at the world like a dog who likes to tear apart couches—repressed but not for long. Though full of shame, this book is shameless. A life is freely divulged as are the multitude of homeopathic bits from the author’s reading list. The overall experience of moving through THE PUBLIC GARDENS’s shuttling prose and poetry is quietly breathtaking. I have felt and learned much from this book! Her ‘Gardens’ are both organized and entirely disorderly—anything and anyone from any point in history might saunter through, and that’s the meaning of public isn’t it? I find myself loving this writer’s mind, light touch, and generous heart and I, reader, didn’t want to go when it was done. My bowl is out. More!” —Eileen Myles. Kathryn Nuernberger Rag & Bone 978-1-932418-40-8, $16, paper, 80 pp.

Christina Olson Before I Came Home Naked 978-1-934828-09-0, $14, paper, 67 pp. SPIRE PRESS, INC. 2010

Poetry. “BEFORE I CAME HOME NAKED is a marvelous x-ray of Midwestern oddities and delights with the wonder and vulnerability that comes from examining the family tree—limb from crackly limb. In her debut, Olson expertly sweeps the reader into the depths of heartbreak and humor from the very first poem. These pages burst with rewards: ample evidence of a naturalist’s love of the outdoors, a sagacious blend of compassion and mirth, and the best drinking companion you’d ever imagine. This is a poetry that bears brave witness to that place in a ‘ruby heart’ where the internal and external landscape crash and clatter into the loveliest of songs”—Aimee Nezhukumatathil. Rochelle Owens Solitary Workwoman 978-1-881523-18-5, $21, paper, 152 pp. JUNCTION PRESS 2011

Poetry. A central figure in the international avant-garde for fifty years, Rochelle Owens has published sixteen previous volumes of poetry, including NEW AND SELECTED POEMS 1961-1996 and LUCA: DISCOURSE ON LIFE AND DEATH (both Junction Press, 1997 and 2001). She has been the recipient of five Village Voice Obie awards and Honors from the New York Drama Critics’ Circle for her plays. Her work has been translated into French, German, Italian, Spanish, Ukrainian, and Japanese.

ELIXIR PRESS 2011

Poetry. Winner of the 2010 Antivenom Poetry Award. Contest judge, Jane Satterfield, had this to say about RAG & BONE: “This is a poetry of pain and power... whether describing the precise coloration of fruit skin, the contours of memory, or secrets of Fatima which turn out to be ‘cryptic mumbo jumbo,’ RAG & BONE reveals complicated truths with rare eloquence and wit. Whatever the future holds, Nuernberger remembers, even as she beholds the present with blinding intensity. Lyrical and deeply felt, the poems in RAG & BONE track the movement of a sometimes skeptical but always engaged and impassioned mind.”

Judith Pacht Summer Hunger 978-1-893670-54-9, $15, paper, 76 pp. TEBOT BACH 2010

Poetry. “Judith Pacht’s SUMMER HUNGER is nothing less than a superb collection of poems. SUMMER HUNGER encompasses wry daily reflections as well as sobering and profound historical meditations. With enormous composure and poise, Judith Pacht is able to move her reader deftly between her elegant wit and calm wisdoms. This collection is an exceptional and memorable achievement”—David St. John. Ron Padgett How Long 978-1-56689-256-8, $16, paper, 91 pp. COFFEE HOUSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Ron Padgett’s title poem asks: “How long do you want to go on being the person you think you are? / How Long, a city in China.” With the arrival of his first grandchild, Padgett becomes even more inspired to confront the eternal mysteries in poems with a wry, rueful honesty that comes only with experience, in his case sixty-eight years of it.

SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION · order@spdbooks.org · edi orders via pubnet.org (san #106-6617) · 800-869-7553 · Fall 2011

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Shailja Patel Migritude 978-1-885030-05-4, $15.95, paper, 154 pp.

Justin Petropoulos Eminent Domain 978-0-9841177-9-6, $15, paper, 96 pp.

KAYA PRESS 2010

MARSH HAWK PRESS 2011

Poetry. Cross-Genre. Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. South Asian Studies. African Studies. The U.S. debut of internationally acclaimed poet and performance artist Shailja Patel, MIGRITUDE is a tour-de-force hybrid text that confounds categories and conventions. Part poetic memoir, part political history, MIGRITUDE weaves together family history, reportage and monologues to create an achingly beautiful portrait of women’s lives and migrant journeys undertaken under the boot print of Empire. “Illuminates with artistry and eloquence the shameful secrets of empire’s history”—Howard Zinn.

Poetry. Winner of the 2010 Marsh Hawk Poetry Prize selected by Anne Waldman. “The brilliant serial prose poems of EMINENT DOMAIN frame a troubled scintillating world between animate/inanimate realities, bleak and transcendent at the same time. The title references the power of the state to seize a citizen’s property, yet this book reclaims and prioritizes human imagination and vision. These are works in the lineage of Rimbaud, keen, sharp, witty, unsentimental yet curiously visceral and emotionally powerful. Justin Petropoulos mirrors back at us a reflection of the diamond-faceted juxtaposed particulars in the face of our Anthropocene Age. Animals abound, caught in civilization’s web: moths, cranes, spiders, sparrows, the isosceles comings and goings of ducks, a butterfly or is it a butterfly chair morphing into blue? Snakes disappear ‘lassoed off by wind,’ a ‘chorus of crickets’ is ‘chirping at Polaris’ and lozenges nest in the ‘mud-throats of loons.’ Petropoulos’s steady eye on the larger cosmos also holds: ‘She sees an infinite rack of stray planets in a garlic clove....’ It’s quite a ride. The crystalline surreal phrases keep humming and surprising in this postmodern apocalyptic world. A ‘bulldozer’s exhaustoria,’ a ‘mannequin’s fennel suit,’ refugee camps, strontium 90, ‘martial-like curfews,’ turret guns, border zones, fluorescent dyes, Styrofoam skies resound ‘as if history were a tea-stained sink.’ This is a new Waste Land. Welcome an original consciousness from the belly of the beast”—Anne Waldman.

Alexandria Peary Lid to the Shadow 978-0-9777698-6-5, $14.95, paper, 96 pp. SLOPE EDITIONS 2011

Poetry. In LID TO THE SHADOW, Alexandria Peary writes about spring, referencing classical Eastern imagery of blossoming cherry trees to talk about childbirth, female desire, motherhood, and absence of memory. This book thrives through its artful use of imagery and voice as well as its beautiful meta-moments and allusions. Peary draws attention to the presence of the poem itself, as though the poem were a moment of space and time. She drags words and symbols out of the flow of the text and makes them three-dimensional. In LID TO THE SHADOW, shadows represent the presence of the past, and meta language becomes the presence of the now. Craig Santos Perez From Unincorporated Territory [Saina] 978-1-890650-46-9, $15.95, paper, 136 pp. OMNIDAWN 2010

Poetry. Asian American Studies. Using a replica of the native Chamorros’ outrigger boats as his figurative vessel, these poems explore the personal, historical, cultural, and natural elements of the poet’s native Guam. Combining and contrasting the fragmentary myths of the author’s island ancestors, intimate childhood stories of growing up on Guam, and the history of his family’s immigration to the United States—with primary histories and texts of the colonial domination and abuse brought on by Spain, Japan, and the United States— these poems give voice to the anguish of the oppressed as well as their hopes for the future. Referring to both the island nation of Guam and the uncharted expanses of one’s own soul, the “unincorporated territory” title reflects the author’s attempts to express concepts that go beyond the current reaches of any language. Lucia Perillo Inseminating the Elephant 978-1-55659-295-9, $16, paper, 106 pp.

Katie Phillips Driving Montana, Alone 978-0-9820626-3-0, $12, paper, 41 pp. SLAPERING HOL PRESS 2010

Poetry. “The haunting poems in DRIVING MONTANA, ALONE are in physical and spiritual motion” —Connie Wanek. “Phillips offers her readers a series of gritty, pastoral, elegiac poems. Her radiantly distilled meditations are uncompromising, direct, and beautiful”—Denise Duhamel. Anne Pitkin Winter Arguments 978-0-9812744-8-5, $16.50, paper, 58 pp. AHADADA BOOKS 2011

Poetry. “In this strong follow-up to her earlier collection Yellow, Seattle poet Anne Pitkin effortlessly ranges from etudes based on art, music and fairy tales to deceptively domestic narrative poems of mother and daughter, wife and husband.... In their imagistic tableaux, these mature poems’ lucent language and imagery reveal in their turning facets the poet and our world”—Sean Bentley.

COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. A 2009 Pulitzer Prize finalist, INSEMINATING THE ELEPHANT delivers hard-edged yet vulnerable poems that reconcile the comic impulse with the complications and tragedies of living in the eating and breathing body—what Lucia Perillo calls the “meat cage.” Perillo dissects human failings and sexuality, as well as collisions between nature and the manufactured world, to create an unforgettable poetic vision. “Whoever told you poetry isn’t for everyone hasn’t read Lucia Perillo” —Time Out New York.

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Harry Polkinhorn Demos Oneiron 978-1-881523-20-8, $14, paper, 84 pp. JUNCTION PRESS 2011

Poetry. Child of our amorphous border and a lifetime boundary-walker, transcriber of unknown or scarcely remembered languages, in DEMOS ONEIRON Harry Polkinhorn hews fast to the bafflement of dreams and the dream of language, set forth in a pensive music. “The dead poets,” he writes, “emerge / from their graves thirsty for words / that have been denied them they / roll their eyes back in their heads / in search of former visions,” here the visions of the everyday filtered by millennia. Harry Polkinhorn, despite his nine previous collections, is one of American poetry’s unknown treasures.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Pamela Porter Cathedral 978-1-55380-106-1, $15.95, paper, 100 pp.

Marc Rahe The Smaller Half 978-0-9844889-0-2, $14, paper, 75 pp.

RONSDALE PRESS 2010

RESCUE PRESS 2010

Poetry. This collection of poems takes us on a journey— a very personal journey of Pamela Porter’s own—to Africa and South America, those corners of the world the news reports never seem to cover: to Angola’s thirtyyear-long civil war, a landscape overrun with poverty, AIDS, and infant mortality; and to the struggles of ordinary people still haunted by the past horrors of Argentina’s “dirty war.” With language deceptively simple, filled with music, color and rich detail, Porter writes with grace and compassion, making a fierce beauty from all she sees, celebrating the resilience of the poor and oppressed, who nonetheless remain determined to live their lives with dignity and with joy.

Poetry. Marc Rahe’s concern with the body—in motion, trauma, sickness, health, intoxication, joy, wonder, and waiting—fascinates and compels one to heartbreak, desire, and resignation. These poems are silly and strange, adapting, fiery, and fiercely observant—as well as bent on the notion that one might attend to even the smallest of extraordinary detail.

Gretchen Steele Pratt One Island 978-1-934695-16-6, $17, paper, 80 pp. ANHINGA PRESS 2011

Poetry. “ONE ISLAND is an earthy, delightfully vibrant collection by a fine new poet, full of sacred and profane registers. Gretchen Pratt’s poems are full of tribes and communities, stories and landscapes from our recognizably shared world. An openness of feeling is jazzily counterpointed by the thousand apprehended things of the world. What we get in the end is a cosmos in which selfhood and world are at play with each other, recombining and changing in encounter after encounter”—Tony Hoagland. Nate Pritts Big Bright Sun 978-1-60964-020-0, $16, paper, 90 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “Nate Pritts’s BIG BRIGHT SUN probably feels so thoroughly lived because reading it feels so like living in it. Robert Creeley wrote that for him in poems ‘the world came true.’ In these poems the world comes true. And how! All this sky glued to the trees and the world surface by the resin of sun-soaked American speech! You can feel this book poised listening to itself and all the light, sound, thought and feeling passing through it. Passing through on its way towards all its directly addressed others, us readers included. `Let’s be everlasting today,’ this book, at one point early on, proposes. Let’s” —Anthony McCann. George Quasha Verbal Paradise (preverbs) 978-84-87467-48-6, $16, paper, 68 pp. ZASTERLE PRESS 2011

Poetry. VERBAL PARADISE is the first book of a projected six books of preverbs. “‘Words say too much to let you know the truth.’ George Quasha’s torqued, enigmatic proverbs create unlikely balances among discrepant engagements. The vectors of these marvelous poems work at cross purposes, keeping each other aloft. These are sparkling aphoristic aporias for a new age in an old time. ‘Poetry,’ says Quasha, ‘resists immortality with difficulty.’ And also with wit and charm. Be here now, in which case immortality will take care of itself” —Charles Bernstein.

Jennifer Rahim Redemption Rain 978-1-894770-70-5, $17.95, paper, 112 pp. TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2011

Poetry. African American Studies. Caribbean Studies. Engaging with a broad range of human experience and concerns, REDEMPTION RAIN invites the reader into its profound epiphanies through patient revisitation and introspection. Rahim’s voice weaves the explosive power of her lively Trinidadian Creole with the searching intensity of one given to appreciating memory’s redemptive light. This is a book about the necessary and the unexpected; about costly arrival in the sacred spaces of realization and recognition. Always the impulse is to praise. Hers is a voice that does not shrill but invests in the finer sensibilities of justice, beauty, love, and community to bring out her poetic truth. Wendy Ranan The Quiet Room 978-0-9828100-0-2, $16.95, paper, 98 pp. DEERBROOK EDITIONS 2011

Poetry. “Wendy Ranan’s poems are strikingly original and moving in the way they deal with the difficult emotional landscapes of contemporary life. Although her subjects are sometimes dark, the luminosity of her writing makes them uplifting. Because her struggles are also ours, as we navigate the dangerous waters of our lives, through her lovely poems, we are enriched as human beings”—Ai. F. D. Reeve The Puzzle Master and Other Poems 978-1-935520-20-7, $14.95, paper, 84 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Poetry. “As if they were a crowd of pilgrims/singing in the rain.../their music rises from an earth/that will not stay in tune.” So F.D. Reeve writes in a poem entitled “Violets in a Pewter Vase.” For nearly fifty years, he has found in nature both a refuge from human imperfection and an exquisite rejoinder to it. Whether that imperfection be the war in Afghanistan, worsening economic inequality, or even the ridiculous pretense of a thoroughly professionalized poetry, Reeve makes of aesthetic perception a kind of subjunctive faith. For a moment one man’s skill offers the possibility of redemption, and the alternatives behind experience bloom like those fragile violets in a pewter vase. Steven Reigns Inheritance 978-0-9832931-2-5, $14.95, paper, 84 pp. SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. The autobiographical poems of Steven Reigns’s INHERITANCE introduce us to the gains and losses of a true American family and detail the bequests of the shadows that linger. Reigns glosses over nothing to reveal the secrets that turn suburbia into a coming-of-age battlefield. As Mark Doty says: “Steven Reigns’s graceful, plainspoken lyrics describe the shape of one gay life at the beginning of this new century, a time of uncertainty, transformation, and hope. To read his book is to meet a man alert to his times and the textures of the lives around him, a community observed with tenderness, wit and pleasure.” SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION · order@spdbooks.org · edi orders via pubnet.org (san #106-6617) · 800-869-7553 · Fall 2011

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Andrea Rexilius To Be Human Is to Be a Conversation 978-0-9844889-3-3, $14, paper, 102 pp.

Elena Rivera The Perforated Map 978-1-84861-160-3, $15, paper, 100 pp.

RESCUE PRESS 2011

SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Literary Nonfiction. Andrea Rexilius’s first book, TO BE HUMAN IS TO BE A CONVERSATION, combines memoir, essay, performance, research, poetry, and lyric meditation to entwine, twist, and twin the physical and spiritual consequences of sisterhood. Through a series of investigations and experiments, the text transforms initial factual fragments into the bodily material of the (heard and unheard) language of intimates. “Our crime is she began to grow in my skin,” writes Rexilius, “A con artist. A mammal. A flower at the back of my skull.”

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Who guides us through the unknown? Who offers the keys? In THE PERFORATED MAP, Eléna Rivera’s guide is language as she attempts to navigate the distances, the disturbances, the suggestions, the mistakes, the perforations. In these poems, language is the map, the matter that fills/affects the body, the organizing principle between the self and the world, and the forms that it gives rise to. The sentence is filled with holes. What is graspable between self and other? Is not all language in transit, moving in gradations of light, between knowing and the fuzzy conveyance shaped by words whose meaning is a matter of further adumbrations? How are we able to communicate our experience? How will understanding be sparked? What message is there for the poet/the reader? That is what is at stake in these poems, finding the word, the specific word, to illuminate the way, the experience of life, this moment, this time, this period of history.

John Calvin Rezmerski Breaking the Rules: Starting with Ghazals 978-1-890193-32-4, $15, paper, 126 pp. RED DRAGONFLY PRESS 2010

Poetry. BREAKING THE RULES is a collection of 107 ghazals and quasi-ghazals, with an introductory essay by the author on the rules of writing ghazals and his intent in breaking them. “It’s wonderful to see John Rezmerski’s many gifts come together in a magnificent multi-streamed confluence.... This book is the work of a master word-chef, highlighted with some of the most quotable lines I’ve read in some time”—Jim Heynen. “John Calvin Rezmerski explores the possibilities (and the limits) of the ghazal in every conceivable way. His poems cast their nets out over an ocean teeming with honest emotion and just as honest play”—Lola Haskins. Peter Richards Helsinki 978-0-9799755-5-4, $16, paper, 90 pp. ACTION BOOKS 2011

Poetry. HELSINKI: part erotic, part nuclear, entirely mutagenic, dangerously Sublime. HELSINKI: a fort, a hospital bed, an escape pod, the mind, and memory itself. “[A] word chain peppered with strange, colorful ciphers”—Boston Review.

Sarah Riggs and Cole Swensen, Editors READ 4 978-0-9779351-2-3, $12, paper, 142 pp. 1913 PRESS 2011

Poetry. French Studies. African Studies. Translation. READ features contemporary poetry in French and in English. Four French poets and four American poets walk into a bar.... OK so one of the French poets is Algerian and one of the American poets is half-French and another is Luxembourgeois. And it was really a cultural institute that they walked into. And spent a week translating each other’s work. Trading notes. Lounging in the garden. Improvising solutions—and walking into the bar across the street. Read the results. READ, an annual anthology of inter-translation published by 1913 Press, is the fruit of the Tamaas seminars in Paris.

Tim Roberts Drizzle Pocket 978-1-60964-039-2, $16, paper, 164 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2011

Poetry. Always inadequate, impotently contemplative, a maximalism cognizant of its own confinement, DRIZZLE POCKET points anywhere but the page, life mingled with sentence, an embodied question of “who is tearing away from whom?” As Cole Swensen writes, it is a “tour-de-force of sustained imagination...full of a freshness, an airiness, and at the same time a relentlessness that speaks to Roberts’s careful blending of compassion and determination.” An “ambient epic” and “post-human tale of the tribe” (Noah Eli Gordon), DRIZZLE POCKET is an illustrated and performed lapping against the impossibility of answer. As Tan Lin writes, “Tim Roberts has entered the nondecorative unornamental structures of social life and the rain.” Matthew Rohrer Destroyer and Preserver 978-1-933517-50-6, $16, paper, 88 pp. WAVE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Griffin Poetry Prize finalist Matthew Rohrer illuminates the modern plight: trying to figure out how to be a thoughtful citizen, parent, and person as the landscape of terror and history worms its way into our everyday existence. Unnervingly humorous, casual, and tender, Rohrer’s poems help us investigate our lives as he investigates his—openly and with a generous presence.

Todd Romanowski Every Strange Meridian 978-1-60964-029-3, $16, paper, 78 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Andrew Rihn America Plops and Fizzes 978-1-934513-30-9, $13, paper, 48 pp. SUNNYOUTSIDE 2011

Poetry. With 21 illustrations by David Munson. When Jack Kerouac deviated from the traditional haiku form, he began calling his poems “pops.” Andrew Rihn deviates even further, to the edge of formlessness, adding a new entry into the rubric of “American pops.” With short, sudden flashes, the reader is given glimpses of pop culture—the celebrity, the sloganeering, the fetishism. These poems remind us that we are all tethered to something dark, violent, and absurd that lies hidden below the surface of late capitalism.

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Poetry. “Intensely lyric, often surreal, the poems in EVERY STRANGE MERIDIAN cast a spell that is at once dangerous and beautiful. There is abundant intelligence at work here, in Romanowski’s inventive syntactical strategies (‘Touch eyelids: our room’; ‘News of aria, done/to me’), startling imagery (‘Centaurs find the night, a strewn hair’), and line breaks that swerve meaning (‘I resemble the head that wears/a statue’s crown...’). Like a fine night mist, these poems reveal and conceal simultaneously, build mystery both suspenseful and engaging, and return us to a primal state of love and longing. EVERY STRANGE MERIDIAN is that rare thing: a book of poems in a new language, one that will, I’m convinced, prove indelible”—Joan Houlihan.

SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION · order@spdbooks.org · edi orders via pubnet.org (san #106-6617) · 800-869-7553 · Fall 2011


POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Rena Rosenwasser Elevators 978-0-932716-75-0, $17, paper, 72 pp.

Nelly Sachs Collected Poems I: 1944-1949 978-1-933382-57-9, $13.95, paper, 340 pp.

KELSEY STREET PRESS 2011

GREEN INTEGER 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. Art. These experimental poems seduce us with their verbal architectures as the book transports the reader visually and graphically across the globe, through time to the present, from Perugia to Egypt to Manhattan, where historical details mesh with real time haptic experiences of cathedral architecture, Egyptian monuments, and urban corridors that ignite the “wow” effect of the poet’s New York City childhood. “This passionate psalm poem is a labyrinth inside a travelogue inside a dream”—Jane Miller.

Poetry. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the German by Michael Hamburger, Ruth and Matthew Mead, and Michael Roloff. Introduction by Hans Magnus Enzensberger. It was while living in Sweden in fear and agitation that German-born Nelly Sachs began again to write: “Writing was my mute outcry; I wrote only because I had to free myself,” she observed. In den Wohnungen des Todes, written from 1944-45 and published in 1947, and Sternverdunkelung, of 1949— books whose entire contents, with a few exceptions, appear in this volume—represent Sachs’s major writing of this painful period, works which brought her the Nobel Prize for Literature, with S. Y. Agnon, in 1966.

Jerome Rothenberg Retrievals: Uncollected & New Poems, 1955-2010 978-1-881523-19-2, $21, paper, 180 pp. JUNCTION PRESS 2011

Poetry. A central figure of both the “deep image” and ethnopoetics movements, and a pioneering experimentalist, Jerome Rothenberg is the author of over eighty collections of poems and ten volumes of translations and editor of nine groundbreaking anthologies. He here assembles, out of poems and plays unpublished or obscurely published, the first representation of the full trajectory of one of the most important careers in American poetry of the past past fifty years. Claude Royet-Journoud The Whole of Poetry Is Preposition 978-1-934200-45-2, $14, paper, 46 pp. FENCE BOOKS/LA PRESSE 2011

Poetry. Translated from the French by Keith Waldrop. An aphoristic complement to Royet-Journoud’s recent book THEORY OF PREPOSITIONS, this collection of propositions manages to be simultaneously provocative and contemplative. The evocation of the preposition is not without its homage to Louis Zukofsky, a poet central to Royet-Journoud’s work; they share a deep affinity for the particular, and beyond that, for the actual particulars that compose our days, and for the delicate tissue that blinds them: “...in the very articulation, sense becomes magnetic.” Here the poetics of one of the most important poets of the late 20th/early 21st centuries is articulated—lucidly and luminously. In short, he sheds light on the subject. Mary Ruefle Selected Poems 978-1-933517-56-8, $16, paper, 176 pp. WAVE BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Winner of the 2011 William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. Now in paperback: a career-defining retrospective by a much-beloved contemporary master. Mary Ruefle’s SELECTED POEMS gathers together the finest work from her distinguished and inimitable poetic career, showcasing the arc of her development as one of the most brilliant, expert and hilarious practitioners of the art. Anyone who wishes for poetry to be both richly challenging and thoroughly entertaining, need look no further than this capacious retrospective.

Zach Savich The Firestorm 978-1-880834-95-4, $15.95, paper, 96 pp. CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY POETRY CENTER 2011

Poetry. “Take Zach Savich’s THE FIRESTORM as one proof of Emerson’s assertion that the mind’s nature is volcanic. A firestorm is such a conflagration that it produces above it its own atmosphere. And so a reader finds in Savich’s pages a super-heated cloud in which the poet’s voice grows multiple, grows active, and the poem records the intimate collisions of lines that veer from prophecy to aphorism to ribald wit to stoic speculation. If this sounds nebulous, it is not. It is fulgurative, lightning-like, shot through sudden flashes of experience that in the sudden afterglow reveal that experience also experiences itself. Such is the complicated place where wit turns witness, and in doing so, opens up the deeper ironies—ironies that at first glance seem quite plain: ‘I have forgotten if I am pulling the curtain open or closed.’ Savich pulls the curtain open and closed, showing us again poetry’s paradoxical necessity: that the poem must show and hide at once, reveal and obscure simultaneously, and that a song that thinks makes of its melody a matter that matters” —Dan Beachy-Quick. Susan Scarlata It Might Turn Out We Are Real 978-0-9829896-1-6, $15, paper, 82 pp. HORSE LESS PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Susan Scarlata is on message, and she is not letting go. She is trying to tell us ‘no other planet meets our needs.’ She turns her screen to let us see what she sees. Not, as they say, a pretty sight. She lays it out with great precision in her beautiful vitrine of words. IT MIGHT TURN OUT WE ARE REAL is a complete set of 21st century eclogues delivered to your door with brainy clarity, with vinegary humor, with ergonomic economy and red-behind-the-ribs feeling. A positively extraordinary collection”—C. D. Wright. Maxine Scates Undone 978-1-930974-99-9, $15, paper, 71 pp. NEW ISSUES POETRY & PROSE 2011

Poetry. “By brave and honest recognition, coupled with a deft ability to glide between realms of perception tripped open by memory and emotion, Maxine Scates reconstructs a life undone by the brokenness of family, friends, and self. Nuanced, mysterious, intimate. Beautiful poems”—Dorianne Laux.

SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION · order@spdbooks.org · edi orders via pubnet.org (san #106-6617) · 800-869-7553 · Fall 2011

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Kathrin Schaeppi Sonja Sekula : Grace in a cow’s EYE : a memoir 978-0-9825731-5-0, $15, paper, 160 pp.

Jesse Seldess Left Having 978-0-9767364-8-6, $14.95, paper, 112 pp.

BLACK RADISH BOOKS 2011

KENNING EDITIONS 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. Art. “‘I love words—to me writing is drawing.’ So says artist Sonja Sekula. And so it is in her hands in Kathrin Schaeppi’s hands in this book in your hands. Schaeppi makes words into shapes into painting into ambiguated memoir—who is speaking?—of artist on artist. There is true pain here; attempts at survival. And there is art. This book can be read through the lens of gender: Sekula was a persecuted lesbian, an underacknowledged female artist among the big boys. Can be read through the lens of madness. Through ekphrasis. Perhaps even through the glass of the empathic. Ultimately, though, what we have here is, well, yes, it is the presence of grace”—Cara Benson.

Poetry. LEFT HAVING is the second full-length collection from poet Jesse Seldess. “One sees lines coming into being going out of existence. Taken that way, the words turning toward lines, seeing them become one another as they differ among themselves and dissipate into words and as spaces, this reader virtually floats and within this active resting state practices an incredible intimacy with the unknown in communication and in sharing an imminent sensate awareness with its language. Jesse Seldess’s work performs this book, honoring and taking full advantage of its occasion to replace any knowing with the certainty of a relentlessly generous nature. I will never get to the bottom of it, and this work demonstrates what a pleasure and what an honest reckoning that can be”—Steve Benson.

Andrew Schelling From the Arapaho Songbook 978-1-888809-61-9, $14, paper, 144 pp. LA ALAMEDA PRESS 2011

Poetry. “And the disjunction is simply the way / we search for new images,” writes Andrew Schelling in one of these 108 stanzas. The elements joined and disjoined on the surface are taken from natural history, linguistics, and explorations in North American poetry. Having studied for thirty years the languages and poetry of old Asia, Schelling sets out to read the landscapes, the flora and fauna, of the Southern Rocky Mountains with comparable attention to grammar and glottal stops. At the core of these poems is an encounter with Arapaho, an Algonkian language—and a whiff of the postmodern archaic. Howard Schwartz Breathing in the Dark 978-1-936419-01-2, $24.95, cloth, 92 pp. 978-1-936419-00-5, $15.95, paper, 92 pp. MAYAPPLE PRESS 2011

Poetry. Howard Schwartz is a contemporary master of the parable, the short lyric and the tale. In BREATHING IN THE DARK, he has multiplied his dreams, his myths, and his stories into poems that grow quietly and firmly from the secret root stock of his imagination. That side of Judaism and that side of poetry which is dreamlike, mythical, and memory-ridden is Schwartz’s domain. BREATHING IN THE DARK is a book of human tenderness, gentle humor, and more than a dash of mysticism. To read these poems is to enter a state of meditation in which the two worlds of ordinary life and that of spirit are combined. Susan Scutti The Commute 978-0-9831606-0-1, $15, paper, 64 pp. PAPER KITE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “Susan Scutti’s unique voice is unmistakable in this collection. Her poems feel organic, as if they’d been born whole. Poignant, intimate, and evocative, they are grounded in the everyday world while also being transcendant. Her topics are diverse: including, for example, work (‘Job’), Hiroshima (‘Death is the mother of beauty’), and love (‘Hymn’). She leads us into ourselves: showing how chaotic, contradictory and vulnerable we are while navigating through life experiences. They make us think and feel. They make us feel as if we’d experienced them ourselves”—Elizabeth Harrington.

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Theresa Senato Edwards Voices Through Skin 978-0-9832931-0-1, $14.95, paper, 90 pp. SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS 2011

Poetry. In her debut collection of poems, Theresa Senato Edwards gives voice to womanhood, from daughter and mother to warrior and lover. Through whispers and screams, her words shatter the glass of the page; and when the conversation is over, a song of strength reverberates.

Matt Shears Where a road had been 978-1-60964-048-4, $16, paper, 68 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “In WHERE A ROAD HAD BEEN Matt Shears enters American poetry already far to the fore, just perceptible at the limit of a strenuous, refined thinking about the dirt and destructions of new beginnings. At once super-sophisticated and an American original, Shears comes out of Gertrude Stein via the great late-20th century French thought about the constant coverings-up of language (‘they were always covering up. / what they were saying, and so baroque’), and about the torsions and wipings-away, the fear and the featherings, in any attempt to arrive at (to be) the new, there ‘where discovery [is] becoming. / in a fledgling sky, with a destructible wing.’ Once or twice he tantalizes the reader with the possibility that the new might actually be, despite history, a pure ‘yes / hosanna / hello’; but in the main, he’s a tough-minded realist. His caesuras (‘they could not see, what was coming’) tug backward what goes forward; his obsessive, musical repetitions and permutations of phrase do the same, at once hollowing out what he says and struggling to say more. The final line of this brilliantly intelligent collection sums it all up: ‘a heart opening /closing / breaking’” —Cal Bedient.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Brandon Shimoda The Girl Without Arms 978-0-9844752-3-0, $14.95, paper, 96 pp.

Sophie Sills Elemental Perceptions: A Panorama 978-1-60964-026-2, $16, paper, 62 pp.

BLACK OCEAN 2011

BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2011

Poetry. THE GIRL WITHOUT ARMS is a figure in Japanese folklore—a young girl whose arms are lopped off by her father, and is left to die in the mountains. The father, at the behest of his evil wife—the girl’s stepmother— lures the girl into the mountains at the promise of attending a neighboring festival. This is only the beginning of the tale. The poems of Brandon Shimoda’s THE GIRL WITHOUT ARMS are birthed of the rainy shut-in pause between steps forward and back in a season of great floods. In successive and interlocked sequences, these poems grapple with a seemingly unbridgeable confusion—related to love, the impossibility of life outside of love, and the unbearableness of life within it—as a way to give shape to the dark weather that permeates our lives, so as not to drown at its coming.

Poetry. “One thing I really like about Sophie Sills and Aristotle is their shared sense that music emerges most directly from a sense of awe in apprehending the object. Or, more precisely in the case of ELEMENTAL PERCEPTIONS, a portrait of interiority silenced by the overtakeless burden of elements in concert which in turn overthrow silence as song. Do you think atoms fuck? That’s the crass way of reading Sills’s insistence on the body’s endlessly reducible parts playing out a drama in which their connection is constantly extinguished and constantly renewed. I read this astonishing work as that very drama disclosed in the realm of human exchange, battered by ideology into diffuseness yet arranging ‘coherence’ itself as a revolutionary plateau. A plateau of necessity, and from the beginning, absorbed into the rhetoric of philosophical doubt: ‘I consent to a solvency of sorts’”—Brandon Brown.

Gleb Shulpyakov A Fireproof Box 978-0-9822376-7-0, $14, paper, 168 pp. CANARIUM BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Russian by Christopher Mattison. A FIREPROOF BOX is the first English-language translation collection of poems important young Russian poet, novelist, and translator Gleb Shulpyakov, who was awarded the prestigious Triumph Prize for his poetry in 2001. As Evgeny Rein states in his introduction to the collection, Shulpyakov’s poetry is that of one “who understands the value of existence, of the spiritual richness of existence which can descend upon any person.” Martha Silano The Little Office of the Immaculate Conception 978-0-9818591-9-4, $14, paper, 80 pp. SATURNALIA BOOKS 2011

Poetry. With humor and musicality, Martha Silano’s THE LITTLE OFFICE OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION rollicks through fourteen billion years of cosmology: galaxies, aliens, an astronaut’s dropped glove. When she’s not picking a bone with a shortsighted and sidetalking populace, she’s conceiving her own personal Big Bang. When her nouns are diaper and bibs, Silano sticks to a larger vision, seeing past gelatinous mashed peas toward the moon and stars. This cosmic-consciousness is woven right in with the mittens and the meercats, her lens taking in not only the crumbs she must wipe up, but also polio-stricken nations, the hungry Eritreans, “the old man who shuffles along / as if he might be carrying / in that steamy bowl / all our children’s futures.” We’re all “sibling citizens of this swirly world,” writes Silano, but she knows that danger lurks not only in the heavens and the atmosphere, but also on our glistening streets. As Campbell McGrath notes, THE LITTLE OFFICE OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION is “comic and wise, quotidian and celestial.”

Leonardo Sinisgalli Night of Shooting Stars 978-1-935635-06-2, $17, paper, 144 pp. TAVERN BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Italian by W. S. Di Piero. NIGHT OF SHOOTING STARS is the definitive edition of Leonardo Sinisgalli’s poetry in English. Selected, translated, and introduced by W. S. Di Piero, this bilingual collection represents work from each phase of Sinisgalli’s career, giving readers a comprehensive look into one of Italy’s essential 20th century poets. “Sinisgalli’s work follows a trajectory that passes from the modern city at one end of its major axis to the ancient countryside of Lucania at the other. W. S. Di Piero...offers the reader an exceptionally good translation that is both sensitive and faithful” —World Literature Today. Laura Solomon The Hermit 978-1-933254-78-4, $14, paper, 88 pp. UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. What is the hermit? A crab? A card drawn from a tarot deck? Sage, lunatic, scholar, mad scientist, philosopher or monk? A rebel or recluse, a wandering samurai, a stranger in an even stranger land, an immigrant, an exile, a tourist, a hero or anti-hero? Do hermits live apart from others or alone among others like them? Do they abide in the remote landscapes of legends or in our modern-day cities? Can a woman be a hermit? Who is not a hermit? In this third collection of poems by Laura Solomon, the Hermit embodies the complicated search for simplicity and shared solitude both at home and abroad. These poems explore the struggle to articulate a precision in language, people, places, and emotions by placing the poet at the heart of a monomyth. This is a gut-wrenching collection that meditates on truth, the unconscious, and the sacrifices of love.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Jonathan Stalling Yingelishi: Sinophonic English Poetry and Poetics 978-1-933996-23-3, $14.95, paper, 100 pp. COUNTERPATH PRESS 2011

Poetry. Asian & Asian American Studies. Music. The nearly supernatural nature of this groundbreaking work can be glimpsed in the book’s title: YÍNGĒLÌSHI (Chanted Songs, Beautiful Poetry): SINOPHONIC ENGLISH POETRY AND POETICS. When read aloud, YÍNGĒLÌSHI (pronounced yeen guh lee shr) sounds like an accented pronunciation of the word “English,” while the Chinese reader sees the Chinese characters for “chanted songs, beautiful poetry.” Stalling coined this term (and “Sinophonic English”) to give a positive name to an increasingly widespread variation of English created by combining the two dominant languages of globalization (Mandarin Chinese and English). With over 350 million English speakers in China (more than there are Americans alive) many of whom speak English by recombining existing Chinese sounds into English words and sentences, this new hybrid language is already overwhelmingly present, yet its aesthetic potential has not yet been explored. Stalling’s book complicates any easy dismissal of so-called Chinglish by creating a genuinely uncanny poetry written entirely in Sinophonic English. Stalling rewrites a common English phrasebook into hauntingly beautiful Chinese poetry (which is all translated into English) that when sung, becomes an uncannily accented libretto, a story of a Chinese tourist’s one-way journey into this interstitial language and its sonorous, if disastrous, consequences. Shelley Stenhouse Impunity 978-1-935520-22-1, $14.95, paper, 84 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2011

Poetry. In the title poem, the dying mother asks: “Will my daughter be able to come and go with impunity?” Stenhouse’s ironically titled collection plays against the backdrop of this mythic riddle. Privilege is tied to punishment: two sides of the same seemingly inescapable coin. In these poems, even nature is seen through a lens of power, money, sex and addiction. These themes and others unfold in images both startling and effortless. We see a poet tackling the big questions, unsatisfied with easy answers, longing for clear borders, for definition, for love and redemption—for impunity. Stenhouse writes with clarity, humor, bravery—her fresh wisdom underscores the visceral details that allow us to see the world as if we have just landed on it. Florine Stettheimer Crystal Flowers: Poems and a Libretto 978-1-897388-72-3, $18, paper, 183 pp. BOOKTHUG 2010

Poetry. Edited by Irene Gammel and Suzanne Zelazo. Florine Stettheimer (1871-1944) was an American modernist of German-Jewish heritage living in New York. She was a painter, designer, and poet. Together with her sisters Ettie and Carrie, Stettheimer hosted a legendary salon on the Upper West Side, where they entertained the likes of Marcel Duchamp, Carl Van Vechten, Henri McBride, and Georgia O’Keeffe. In 1934 Stettheimer designed the set and costumes for Gertrude Stein’s opera Four Saints in Three Acts to much acclaim. In 1949, Ettie collected Florine’s poems in CRYSTAL FLOWERS, a privately printed, elegant edition of 250. In addition to these rare poems, this new volume offers formerly unpublished material culled from archives, including three new poems and Stettheimer’s libretto for her ballet “Orphée of the Quat-z-arts.”

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Norman Stock Pickled Dreams Naked 978-1-935520-30-6, $14.95, paper, 112 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Poetry. Norman Stock’s direct expression of gut-level feelings, surreal fantasies, and riotous humor, invite the reader to experience poetry in a new, more immediate way. The boring posturing of academic poetry is stood on its head by these plain-spoken poems, from the much-anthologized “What I Said,” on 9/11, which one textbook study has described as offering “a searing insight into the nature of humanity,” to his comic send-ups of the literary world. As in his first book, the prize-winning Buying Breakfast for My Kamikaze Pilot, Stock once again lays bare the hypocrisies that surround us with his sardonic wit and commitment to the truth of what we actually feel as opposed to what we are often taught we are supposed to feel. Stephen Sturgeon Trees of the Twentieth Century 978-0-9830674-3-6, $10, paper, 62 pp. DARK SKY BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Stephen Sturgeon’s highly anticipated debut collection features over thirty poems which range in style from classically formalized stanzas on memory and vitality to allusive and lyrical free verses, chronicling— among other subjects—the stories of lost friends, a prophetic head that speaks from a tree branch, and an old black moon. “Driven by synesthesia, Stephen Sturgeon’s magnificent poems affect the senses and embed themselves in the intellect, permanently” —Philip Nikolayev. Tim Suermondt Just Beautiful 978-1-935520-28-3, $14.95, paper, 112 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Poetry. In his new collection, JUST BEAUTIFUL, Tim Suermondt writes poems about the present, the past and the future, poems dealing with the glories and follies, the tragedies and triumphs of the human heart and of the world. His poems never ask to be more than poems, but they will change your perceptions in ways you couldn’t imagine. Richard Tagett Demodulating Angel 978-0-9793390-8-0, $15, paper, 146 pp. ITHURIEL’S SPEAR 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. “Fifty years at work in the field, he has been changing with the times, alert to the tiniest of human feelings as well as to the larger currents of shared social struggle. Like Jack Spicer, with whom he worked closely and on whom he coedited a volume of lasting value, Tagett knows when and how to lure the right words to his page, and how to insure they stick close to his branches.... I know of no other American poet whose very pages are as well filled out. What an accomplishment!”—Kevin Killian. Marc Talbert Altogether Ernest 978-0-9799865-4-3, $15.95, paper, 96 pp. RED MOUNTAIN PRESS 2011

Poetry. ALTOGETHER EARNEST is most remarkable book of poetry. This the first in a series that will follow a boy as he negotiates the passages of life. In his season of self-discovery, Ernest Hopkins craves an honorable and meaningful context for his life while the physical and emotional roller coaster both inspires and torments him. He is deeply concerned with the moral and existential questions that we all must face.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Sunnylyn Thibodeaux Palm to Pine 978-0-9821600-5-3, $12, paper, 88 pp.

Daniel Tiffany Privado 978-0-9831480-0-5, $16, paper, 60 pp.

BOOTSTRAP PRESS 2011

ACTION BOOKS 2011

Poetry. These poems explore the collected senses of the day-to-day while telling the tale of another place, as if in time travel, inviting the reader to come and go with and partake in the toast. “Sunnylyn Thibodeaux is a stubborn, resilient poet who has brilliantly turned these qualities on their heads in a quicksilver serenade of the day (cold wine and treasure hunts) and its discontents (poisonous elephant ears). She seems to have made a handshake deal with things as she sees them: You be yourself and I won’t pretend you’re otherwise. And so she is herself in the eyes of the book in your hands. Rare that a poet is so always herself, to the point that we could (almost) take her place, certainly her side, as she vanishes into her lines”—Julien Poirier.

Poetry. PRIVADO is wundercritic Daniel Tiffany’s third book of poems. A sphinx made of soldier and siren, of secrecy and prophecy: a killer serial poem. “The poems in PRIVADO show how the drab style and the golden style go together”—Aaron Kunin. “A storm is now upon us”—Kevin Killian.

Tod Thilleman Egghead to Underhoof (Our Concluding the Poem) 978-0-923389-82-6, $12, paper, 78 pp. MEETING EYES BINDERY 2010

Poetry. EGGHEAD TO UNDERHOOF (OUR CONCLUDING THE POEM) is a companion poem to ROOT-CELLAR TO RIVERINE. Tod Thilleman Three Sea Monsters: Our History of Whose Image 978-1-933132-84-6, $24, paper, 322 pp. SPUYTEN DUYVIL 2011

Poetry. Thilleman shows, through the sectional and serial and a-periodic poetry of THREE SEA MONSTERS—as well as his conjuration of history in the succeeding notes— that modernist themes provide the source-ground for our present disengaged appearance. It is into this fissure all acts, real or imagined, have fallen. Daniel Thompson The Big Book of Daniel: Collected Poems of Daniel Thompson 978-1-933964-41-6, $18, paper, 340 pp. BOTTOM DOG PRESS 2011

Poetry. Here at last is the collected works of Daniel Thompson, poet laureate of Cuyahoga County, a poet of great heart who served the people of his community. “Daniel Thompson was a man who, as Whitman said of himself, was ‘not contained between his hat and his boots.’ Daniel’s last gift to us, his life’s work, what he gathered in his sixty-nine years, over three hundred pages of poems, is this book, this big jug of honey, which you have in your hands. Taste and see” —Maj Ragain, from her Foreword. Maureen Thorson Applies to Oranges 978-1-933254-85-2, $13, paper, 72 pp. UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. In APPLIES TO ORANGES, Maureen Thorson’s debut full-length collection of poems, oranges, spiders, tourists, and a Zenith television conspire to turn the conventions of narrative on its side. These poems fracture and refract narrative by crafting a story from seemingly absurd symbols whose recursive use defies coherence, but expand the imagination by gradually revealing an anachronistic, nostalgic, and cinematic world. The precision of these poems transforms a simple escapist fantasy into an internalized landscape that reveals both humor and sadness with successive repetition.

Steve Timm Un storia 978-1-60964-035-4, $16, paper, 140 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “A finery set of punctures you will not find. Steve Timm pinched these poems of poise and waggish flame right after leaving the first dawn bird factory where he’d been tinkering kerosene into arrows keening owl logic unseen and...scene. Timm’s Italian peeps are all thumbs smeared with memes—terse though language-lavish cue cards for the slalom tyre crawling salmon urgent down along you and your quote unquote erstwhile low road bones. Right now or by noon, you’ll be in the wine creek with the sound of an Italian gargling, which you will herald as all waterfall shortly or by noon. Or: There goes Steve Timm on a Vespa with orders from the thirsty to catch every raindrop on a contact lens that fell from the head of the last seer with the swerve gear, and the truth is Timm catches everyone, slakes everyone, sleightof-hands a ringer where a rung groaned. Or: Go ask the straight road begging for an oxbow from Timm. Gather these here where you’ve found them on this olive, lava earth. If ever you should will a shelter worthy of this world’s crooked sky, let these poems remind you that velvet hammers feel too. Rarest medicine man, Timm heals you with the same stuff by which he wounds your rutted purl, which brings me around to the driving sail: all aquavit wit aside, the highest totem herein stands for aphoristic-grace-potlatch-heart. Finally, I have not read a more gifting collection in years”—Abraham Smith. Mathew Timmons The New Poetics 978-1-934254-15-8, $15, paper, 112 pp. LES FIGUES PRESS 2010

Poetry. A cross-referenced encyclopedia of all things New, Mathew Timmons’s THE NEW POETICS challenges the prevailing obsession with the emergent and the reinvented by remaking The New itself in the image of the banal. Employing techniques of collage and appropriation, Timmons explores the endless repetition and recapitulation inherent in a language constructed from signs, signifiers, memes, short-hands, ready-made phrases and the vast wash of pop-culture paraphernalia. Written with poetics as both subject and approach, but in rambling prose paragraphs and breathless, run-on sentences, THE NEW POETICS simultaneously critiques and reenacts the search for the ever-desirable and everelusive New in the rubble of convention. Mike Topp Sasquatch Stories 978-0-9831706-1-7, $10, paper, 68 pp. PUBLISHING GENIUS PRESS 2010

Poetry. Fiction. SASQUATCH STORIES is a collection of poetry joke stories, each one better than the one before and after it. Cover art by Tao Lin. Illustrated by David Berman. “Mike Topp is a disablingly funny writer—a miniaturist of nervous precisions, our supreme abridger of metropolitan startlement and inner fidgetry. He dazes and graces us”—Gary Lutz.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Edwin Torres Yes Thing No Thing 978-1-931824-41-5, $14.95, paper, 128 pp.

Elizabeth Twiddy Love-Noise 978-0-9791944-5-0, $15, paper, 75 pp.

ROOF BOOKS 2010

STANDING STONE BOOKS 2010

Poetry. Edwin Torres’s poetry—full of complex graphic experiments and daring sonic explorations—opens new creative possibilities, simultaneously challenging and delighting our intelligence. Coming on strong with humor and mystery, Edwin Torres spins magical multilingual webs of words intended to change the world. “Edwin Torres is our 21st Century Mayakovsky” —Juliana Spahr.

Poetry. “The electricity here has such an incandescence, it could be resurgent voltage from Emily Dickinson in distress. What haunts the whole book, in the surge and aftermath of eros, in the empathy for family and for strangers, and in jolts of recognition, and of being recognized, is an imagination deeply and disturbingly alive, and tender to the touch”—Brooks Haxton.

Georg Trakl Song of the Departed: Selected Poems of Georg Trakl 978-1-55659-373-4, $17, paper, 184 pp.

Chris Tysh Night Scales: A Fable for Klara K 978-0-935992-40-3, $14, paper, 74 pp.

COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

UNITED ARTISTS BOOKS 2010

Poetry. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the German by Robert Firmage. SONG OF THE DEPARTED brings back into print poems written at the height of Georg Trakl’s career. Trakl boldly confronted the conflicts created by the pursuit of truth amidst the fallenness of the human condition, writing of the unspeakable that lies beyond language, creating poetry that is intensely personal and eerily beautiful. Included in this revised edition are several new translations and an introduction by the translator. “I do not understand them; but their tone pleases me. It is the tone of true genius” —Ludwig Wittgenstein.

Poetry. Drama. “In Tysh’s tough, visceral, lacerating text, we bear witness to a surreal poetry for the stage, reminiscent of Büchner, Artaud, Genet, and Heiner Müller. Klara K leads us on an unspeakable journey through the ravages of WWII, while bearing a child who will never know these immensely moving shards of stories except through her mother’s anguished memories. NIGHT SCALES is a compassionate, devastating tale of death and survival by those who ‘...ate [the] bruises and drank the hurt in a long swallow,’ and those who still ‘...hoard the pain, like a gift that flowers on a dry stalk’”—Charles Borkhuis. Cover by Christian Boltanski.

Douglas Treem Everything So Seriously 978-1-935520-14-6, $14.95, paper, 84 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Poetry. The Ancient Mariner buttonholed the Wedding Guest for the telling of his story. In Douglas Treem’s EVERYTHING SO SERIOUSLY the poems and their denizens seek to tear the world a new buttonhole. They are souls in torment. Bodies filled with pain. Hearts being spoken from. A violent psychopath in search of his own death. An actor attempting the opposite of suicide. A sex worker numb to all human connection. An icon. A myth. Those with needs mutated past the possibility of ever being met. United beyond the common threads of flesh and blood by the uniquely human demand to tell their stories and the shared position of having no one on earth to talk to. Except you. Tony Trigilio Historic Diary 978-1-60964-012-5, $16, paper, 118 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “Tony Trigilio’s HISTORIC DIARY (named after Lee Harvey Oswald’s account of his time in the Soviet Union) excavates the nightmarish record of the first Kennedy assassination, its auguries and aftermath, with a blue fury and an obsessive zeal that border on the Talmudic. What he finds there goes beyond chilling to a pureproduct-of-America craziness that makes me tremble for my country. ‘I am waiting // for someone to / ride me, the / locomotive of history,’ Trigilio writes, and his ticket beyond the grave takes us, willy-nilly, on this scarifying, brilliant, and disturbing ride”—Rachel Loden. Mark Truscott Nature 978-1-897388-67-9, $15, paper, 84 pp.

Cesar Vallejo Against Professional Secrets 978-1-931824-42-2, $14.95, paper, 100 pp. ROOF BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Spanish by Joseph Mulligan. “César Vallejo is indispensable to the Latin American experimental tradition and one of the first Peruvian poets to become a reference point for American writers. In AGAINST PROFESSIONAL SECRETS Vallejo cannibalizes the European tradition and transforms it into an American experience. Joseph Mulligan’s exceptional translation opens up that dialogue to English, to a new readership, and to the present”—Ernesto LivonGrosman. Terry Van Vliet Black Lines on Terracotta 978-1-60964-059-0, $16, paper, 100 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. “Terry Van Vliet merges the personal and the mythic with seamless grace. Conjuring Orphic lyricism, he weaves the visionary into present-day emotional truth. Van Vliet creates an intensely wideranging world. Here are Matisse, Cocteau, J. S. Bach, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins and, yes, Captain Beefheart. We come to know the memorable figures of the poet’s intimate experience as well, most vividly his loving partner of many years, Jan Keller, to whom the book is dedicated. Read BLACK LINES ON TERRACOTTA to enter writing of unblinking honesty, enthralling language and extraordinary insight. This collection is a deeply valuable contribution to contemporary poetry”—Holly Prado.

BOOKTHUG 2010

Poetry. Few ideas today are as charged or subject to as many contradictory inflections as is nature. To anchor its compositional investigations into its own material, Mark Truscott’s NATURE considers the difficulties of this overdetermined concept and asks—without recourse to nostalgia, sanctimony, or moralism—what kind of space it might meaningfully create or occupy.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Paul Vangelisti Two 978-1-58498-077-3, $14.95, paper, 91 pp.

Diane Wald Wonderbender 978-0-9779351-8-5, $11, paper, 84 pp.

TALISMAN HOUSE 2010

1913 PRESS 2011

Poetry. “In TWO, Paul Vangelisti connects the antipodes of the extraordinary literary geography he has been creating through the course of his numerous previous works. Taken separately or together, the diptych of TWO finds Paul Vangelisti at the height of his poetic, intellectual and philosophical powers. Simply put, there are precious few poets writing now who can match Vangelisti’s brilliance”—Dennis Phillips. TWO includes the complete works “Alabaster” and “A Capable Hand, or Maps for a Lost Dog.”

Poetry. “In spirited kinship with the poems of Frank O’Hara and Gertrude Stein’s notion of the continuous present, WONDERBENDER presents a vibrant, textured world of ‘mysterious kindness,’ ‘a magnificent place to visit.’ Here, one is ‘chosen by llamas...do not doubt us they say and the choosing is definite though the plot sometimes unclear.’ Like those llamas, these poems privilege associative energy and revelatory, exuberant choosing over plot as they unfold with great enchantment and authority to reveal a skewed, at times tragic, often funny, acutely observed world. One feels lucky to be in their presence”—Laurie Sheck.

Justin Vicari The Professional Weepers 978-1-886350-24-3, $14, paper, 80 pp. PAVEMENT SAW PRESS 2011

Poetry. LGBT Studies. “Justin Vicari is instantly recognizable as one of those scarce and certifiably gifted lunatics of The Real Thing—from the first line you know you are in the presence of someone who is capable of thinking in poetry. Anyone these days can hammer together a fashionably incomprehensible and workshopready piece of writing. Evidently Vicari has been selected for the lonely duty of thinking with his heart, feeling with his mind, and dreaming aloud a true poetry that communicates its deliciously subversive intent instantly to anyone with a sixth grade reading ability” —Franz Wright. Ocean Vuong Burnings 978-0-578-07059-9, $12, paper, 42 pp. SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS 2010

Poetry. Asian American Studies. LGBT Studies. The poems of BURNINGS explore refugee culture, be the speaker a literal refugee from a torn homeland, or a refugee from his own skin, burning with the heat of awakening eroticism. In this world, we’re all refugees from something. As two-time National Slam Champion Roger Bonair-Agard says: “Ocean manages to imbue the desperation of his being alive—with a savage beauty. It is not just that Ocean can render pain as a kind of loveliness, but that his poetic line will not let you forget the hurt or the garish brilliance of your triumph; will not let you look away. These poems shatter us detail by detail because Ocean leaves nothing unturned, because every lived thing in his poems demands to be fed by you; to nourish you in turn. You will not leave these poems dissatisfied. They will fill you utterly.” Jeanne Wagner In the Body of Our Lives 978-0-9819816-3-5, $16, paper, 96 pp.

Anne Waldman The Iovis Trilogy: Colors in the Mechanism of Concealment 978-1-56689-255-1, $40, cloth, 720 pp. COFFEE HOUSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. THE IOVIS TRILOGY, Anne Waldman’s monumental feminist epic, traverses epochs, cultures, and genres to create a visionary call to poetic arms. IOVIS details the misdeeds of the Patriarch, and with a fierce imagination queries and subverts his warmongering. All of Waldman’s themes come into focus—friendship, motherhood, politics, and Buddhist wisdom. This is epic poetry that goes beyond the old injunction, “to include history”—its effort is to change history. This transformative twenty-five-year labor is published here for the first time in its historic entirety, including the first two out-of-print volumes. Laura Walker bird book 978-1-84861-153-5, $15, paper, 80 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2011

Poetry. BIRD BOOK is written in collaboration with a field guide to North American birds. Each page both borrows and departs from language found in an individual bird entry. The resulting text is an investigation into dissolved and dissolving narrative, into the permeable boundaries between “human” and “natural,” and into the partial and shifting nature of narrative and memory themselves, “wet and traveling maps.” Here, as in bird song, gap and repetition create their own story. To welcome “accidental field,” “to take the songbird out of your mouth,” to examine the ever-shifting relationship between what we receive and what we project, is to move through a porous and shared space, affecting and affected, where “yellow spectacle” hovers over “a suggested house”: “exuberant ground.”

SIXTEEN RIVERS PRESS 2011

Poetry. IN THE BODY OF OUR LIVES, Jeanne Wagner’s second full-length collection of poems, looks back on a Cold War-era childhood and its effect on the construction of a self. Refusing both sentimentality and censure, the poet shines an unflinching light on a home characterized by alienation, stringent Catholicism, shadowy alcoholism, and the inescapable attitudes and historic events of the 1950s. We proceed by images—the stitching up of Frankenstein’s monster, cups wobbling on a dinner table, a child’s desire to wear her clothing inside out—until we realize that it is a life that is being crafted. With intelligence and vivid language, Wagner writes of the body as a perpetual stranger, yet, illuminated by subtly shifting qualities of light, the body remains a home, the housing of life itself.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Lillien Waller, Editor American Ghost: Poets on Life After Industry 978-0-615-44807-7, $18, paper, 74 pp.

Florence Weinberger Sacred Graffiti 978-1-893670-60-0, $15, paper, 78 pp.

STOCKPORT FLATS 2011

TEBOT BACH 2010

Poetry. Photography. African American Studies. Native American Studies. Poets and photographers reflect on the real costs of deindustrialization—community life, personal identity, cultural traditions, and the natural world—in manufacturing cities and their rural counterparts in Michigan, Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Battered by unprecedented joblessness, poverty, and depopulation, these communities are often seen as ghost towns, phantoms of a former glory, but in doing so we fail to acknowledge the people who fare the downturns and form the core of America’s urban and rural cultures. This intimate collection culls inspiration from individual and collective experience, found text, and oral history as it speaks to the humanity surviving amid so-called ruin. AMERICAN GHOST asks: How will we sustain each other? The collection includes poems and photographs by b: william bearhart, Suzette Bishop, Anne Gorrick, Randall Horton, Denise Miller, Ruby Murray, Kate Schapira, Lillien Waller, Valaurian Waller, and Deborah Woodard.

Poetry. “Like Philip Levine, Florence Weinberger’s poems evolve masterfully from the ordinary into the extraordinary. Consider marrowbones, lovingly boiled down to their essence so her husband can spread sustenance onto bread and eat, his stomach forever flattened by concentration camp hunger no matter how much he tries to fill himself up. Her persistent introspection scrutinizes everyday events such as going to the supermarket and takes them into another realm of meaning. In Weinberger’s world, what we wake up to is the first step towards insight and illumination” —Jeanette Clough.

Qingping Wang, Editor Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China 978-1-55659-330-7, $23, paper, 450 pp. COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. East Asia Studies. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Chinese by Sylvia Li-chun Lin and Howard Goldblatt. Forty-nine of China’s finest contemporary poets are represented in this luminous bilingual anthology, produced as part of the National Endowment for the Arts’ International Literary Exchanges. Profoundly influenced by the Cultural Revolution, the poets’ work reflects the turmoil of that time—from the blunt and sharply focused political work of Bai Hua and Yu Jian to the hermetic images and landscapes of the Misty poets. Craig Watson Sleepwalking with Orpheus 978-1-84861-138-2, $15, paper, 96 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2011

Poetry. Haunted by Cocteau’s version of the Orpheus myth since 1968, Craig Watson collected a palimpsest of renderings, fragments, and images from the Orphic tradition for the next 40 years. In 2008, he returned to these materials in the wake of a near fatal stroke. The result is SLEEPWALKING WITH ORPHEUS, a constellation of voices that recount the legendary singer’s continuous journey through the realms that compose a life. In “Last Man Standing,” Watson’s post-apocalyptic poem in SECRET HISTORIES, the protagonist asserts: “I’m not dead yet.” SLEEPWALKING WITH ORPHEUS takes up that proposition, cannily altering its terms of address to reflect what Watson calls “the interrogative imperative.” Jane O. Wayne The Other Place You Live 978-0-932412-97-3, $14.95, paper, 80 pp. MAYAPPLE PRESS 2010

Poetry. Jane O. Wayne’s THE OTHER PLACE YOU LIVE explores “the world’s slow unwinding” with insight and lyric grace. With characteristic intensity of language and a bounty of imagery, she reveals those other places wherever she is in the world. The poems move effortlessly from metaphor to metaphor, gradually building an atmosphere of dark disquiet, then suddenly revealing, as by moonlight, the burnished joy at the heart of things. This is a book of serious riches and profound human pleasures.

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Ellen Welcker The Botanical Garden 978-0-9822252-3-3, $12.95, paper, 68 pp. ASTROPHIL PRESS 2010

Poetry. Winner of the 2009 Astrophil Poetry Prize. Foreword by Eleni Sikelianos. “I feel so grateful to live in a world that has books such as THE BOTANICAL GARDEN. Lyric elegy, futuristic science fiction, aliens and whales, Oulipian listing. It is all here in this beautifully moving book”—Juliana Spahr. Donald Wellman A North Atlantic Wall 978-1-933675-53-4, $15, paper, 97 pp. DOS MADRES PRESS 2010

Poetry. In A NORTH ATLANTIC WALL the poetry is drawn from fieldnotes, ragged prose, some passages displaying a resonant, if fragmentary, intensity. The elements of A NORTH ATLANTIC WALL may appear to be disjointed, but the order is that of a periplum and the resonance is often transhistorical, reaching toward a conception of an immanent domain beyond the serried mountaintops. Two landscapes give particular shape to the itinerary of A NORTH ATLANTIC WALL: the Camino from Negreira near Santiago de Compostela to Fisterra (that is going away from Santiago de Compostela and toward Fisterra, the westernmost point of continental Europe) and the footpaths in the vicinity of Gósol in the Pre-Pyrenees. Other sites form segments of an imaginary chain between Fisterra and Gósol, notably the valley of the Curueño in Northern León. Trace a line from Fisterra, extending through the mountains of Northern León (the Picos de Europa), and continuing easterly along the Pyrenees to Gósol. That line, wavering as it does, separates Spain from the rest of Europe. David Wevill Casual Ties 978-1-935635-00-0, $15, paper, 112 pp. TAVERN BOOKS 2010

Poetry. By turns surreal, absurd, allegorical, and metafictional, this genre-defying cult classic of 33 linked sketches shows us a voice searching for meaning in the landscapes of intellect and ardor. This is a book of exquisite structures, of encounters with the tricksters of self, and it ultimately reveals a portrait of an artist willing to confront the mysteries and outermost limits of his own obsessions. Out of print for nearly 30 years, this new edition offers Wevill fans and new readers alike an essential work of contemporary experimental literature.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Anthony Russell White The Faith of Leaping 978-1-934828-10-6, $16, paper, 76 pp.

Peter Lamborn Wilson Ec(o)logues 978-1-58177-115-2, $15.95, paper, 156 pp.

SPIRE PRESS, INC. 2011

STATION HILL PRESS OF BARRYTOWN 2011

Poetry. “In THE FAITH OF LEAPING, White’s poetry often comes to you on a slant and keeps you off balance. Twists and turns carry you forward to, often, a surprising curl along the way. Loss, accidents, connections and conjectures break each poem open to demand your attention. Take nothing for granted here, as White explores the poem, the subject, the interior, and the external. He brings delightful discoveries and he makes you think. Enjoy the ride!”—CB Follett.

Poetry. Literary Nonfiction. EC(O)LOGUES is a Menippean Satyre (mixed poetry and prose, both serious and humorous) inspired by Virgil’s Eclogues. “What this book does has never been done even by Peter Lamborn Wilson himself before now; with all his exuberant learning and poetics, it offers the first coherent, lucid scrutiny of the intricate interweaving of traditionary sciences with the contemporary need to rescue our planet and our sanity. The Emerald Tablet speaks Green politics and ecological salvation”—Robert Kelly.

Hazel White Peril as Architectural Enrichment 978-0-932716-76-7, $16.95, paper, 96 pp. KELSEY STREET PRESS 2011

Poetry. PERIL AS ARCHITECTURAL ENRICHMENT tests landscape as the subject of experience. Propelling awareness vertically and horizontally, it questions how limbs want to move in space, when convivial with treetops, views, and pollen. The poems greet danger— lost narratives/crops, a fall, inundation—and the refuge of a familiar curvature: the turning of long lines becoming the same as building shelter in the wild where a peril can be seen and felt, and to write is to know what’s near. Like a designed landscape, Hazel White’s poetry delivers a new sense of orientation/a long-sought spatial fluency: “I want to ride in the fur of animals.” “I set this book down and wept.... This book is the most beautiful piece of writing I have read in many years” —Bhanu Kapil. Sarah White Alice Ages and Ages 978-1-60964-028-6, $16, paper, 76 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “Never in American letters, before ALICE AGES AND AGES, have we seen a thigh at once so elegant and portentous. Upon its surface a filigree of web-like veins—empurpled, cerulean, blood-red, according to certain gradations of self-regard and fear. Where will we find its meaning? Deep-rooted in Alice’s flesh? In its mirror image? Behind the looking glass in the specular world? If anyone knows, Sarah White does. Follow her words toward the heart of this spidery labyrinth. Stay always alert”—Eugene Garber. Jonathan Wilcke Dupe 978-0-9784981-9-1, $16, paper, 96 pp.

Terence Winch Falling Out of Bed in a Room with No Floor 978-1-934909-22-5, $18, paper, 80 pp. HANGING LOOSE PRESS 2011

Poetry. “The title of Terence Winch’s newest collection says it all: the wonderfully droll, self-deprecating, hardhitting and deliciously comic narrator of these poems knows only too well what life exacts from us. A trivial event like losing one’s watch and replacing it brings on the rueful recognition that ‘it ran so fast, / I had to live every day / as if it were tomorrow.’ It’s a dilemma we all face. No rest for the weary! As the narrator of ‘Low Life’ puts it, ‘You must still explain to the babysitter what has to be done.’ In a sequence of dazzling and poignant memory poems about love and death, friendship and family trauma, Winch once again displays his uncanny ability to take the most ordinary of incidents and endow them with radiance. One reads FALLING OUT OF BED IN A ROOM WITH NO FLOOR with a steady shock of recognition. Here WE are!”—Marjorie Perloff. Mary Winegarden The Translator’s Sister 978-1-936419-02-9, $14.95, paper, 86 pp. MAYAPPLE PRESS 2011

Poetry. In response to the unexpected death of her sister Katharine Washburn, Mary Winegarden has taken on the challenge of translating their lives into living language. Using phrases from Washburn’s work as her foil, Winegarden creates a beautiful portrait of the vital bonds of sisterhood. Crossing boundaries between prose and poetry, fiction and memoir, convention and experimentation, THE TRANSLATOR’S SISTER is resonant with the intimacy and humor of remembered details, alive with the urge to document, with love and its powerful complications, with loss translated into art. This shimmering conversation will sweep you in.

LINEBOOKS 2010

Poetry. DUPE goes under the hood of industrial capitalism where there is no deal, no compromise with capital, only complicity. The bearings, rods and shafts are running hot, the lubricant is breaking down, and shadetree mechanic Jonathon Wilcke is fiddling with the timing chain. “More gas!” he shouts as flames leap from the carburetor. The dwell is finally set, Ford’s time management duplicator is idling rough yet the poems flow from the manifold. DUPE takes up the formal concerns of Wilcke’s first book Pornograph and applies them to the body politic. The notion of musical notation guides the word on the page.

David Wirthlin Your Disappearance 978-1-935402-40-4, $16, paper, 100 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2009

Poetry. “The marvelous inventiveness of David Wirthlin’s YOUR DISAPPEARANCE will sweep over its lucky readers in waves. Look for it lightly disguised as canaries, pencil shavings, mysterious spirals, perpetually rotating rocks, recurring dogs and fields wherein one might just vanish. Strange, lovely, generous, disturbing, YOUR DISAPPEARANCE is the work of a writer of exceptional talent”—Laird Hunt. “Shadows play across this story of being in time where silence and subtlety are the main attractions. The shapes resulting tell us about relation, about the shifts, disappearances, and returns that define cohabitation. How we share imagined, actual, and propositional space is informed by the transformations between us. YOUR DISAPPEARANCE goes after this with precision and an eye for those understated events that fall between the cracks”—Renee Gladman.

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POETRY, PROSE POETRY, CROSS-GENRE Pui Ying Wong Yellow Plum Season 978-1-935520-29-0, $14.95, paper, 96 pp.

Yvan Yauri Fire Wind 978-1-933254-76-0, $14, paper, 80 pp.

NYQ BOOKS 2010

UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE 2011

Poetry. Asian American Studies. YELLOW PLUM SEASON, Pui Ying Wong’s first full-length collection of poetry, is visually lush and reflective; and characterized by intimate descriptions of place, memory and dream. In YELLOW PLUM SEASON, Wong speaks as a traveler from lands known and unknown yet creates a terrain all her own. She writes with delicacy and precision, small but complex narratives that cover a range of emotional landscapes. These are poems both personal and universal; poems that engage the reader in the human experiences of both loss and love, heartache but also moments of joy; and ultimately connects the reader to the desire for every aspect of life.

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. Bilingual Edition. Translated from the Spanish by Nicholas Rattner and Marta del Pozo. FIRE WIND is a translation of Peruvian poet Yván Yauri’s Viento de fuego, his second book of poems and the first of his work to appear in English. Yauri’s poetics stem from the tradition of the Latin American avant-garde, and he maintains his activism in the ranks of the contemporary Marxist-Trotskyites. “With their full pedal wawa, their panting physicality, and a reference field that incorporates just about everything, Yauri’s poems track cosmic interactions with earthly particularities. FIRE WIND takes on Empire and routine with a streetfighting swagger. The poems are roiling with lifeforce”—Forrest Gander.

Tim Wood Otherwise Known as Home 978-1-60964-030-9, $16, paper, 100 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Poetry. “The poems shimmering in this volume represent an intense and vertiginous new beginning of the sonnet, erupting from the site of ‘end words.’ Tim Wood’s reembarkations are thrilling. I hesitate to impose metaphors on a work of art that stands on its own terms, but something related to time travel might turn attention in the right direction. Yet again, knowing that the poems originate with Shakespeare’s sonnets simply doesn’t prepare one for reading them, or at least only to the degree that wearing fustian might prepare one for mardi gras on Mars. These poems are wild and beautiful. They are something new in sonnetry!” —Lyn Hejinian. C. D. Wright One with Others: [a little book of her days] 978-1-55659-388-8, $18, paper, 170 pp. COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. Winner of the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry. Investigative journalism is the poet’s realm when C.D. Wright returns to her native Arkansas and examines an explosive incident from the Civil Rights movement. Wright interweaves oral histories, hymns, lists, newspaper accounts, and personal memories— especially those of her incandescent mentor, Mrs. Vititow—with the voices of witnesses, neighbors, police, activists, and black students who were rounded up and detained in an empty public swimming pool. This history leaps howling off the page.

Dean Young Fall Higher 978-1-55659-311-6, $22, cloth, 104 pp. COPPER CANYON PRESS 2011

Poetry. Dean Young surmounts the failures of love and the body with his signature humor, verbal banter, and wild imaginative leaps. Embracing the elegiac, angry, and amorous with surrealistic wordplay and off-kilter music, Young coaxes us to “fall higher” into an intimate, vulnerable, expansive exchange. This is a major new book by one of America’s most inventive poets. “Anyone with a heartbeat knows that Dean Young has become a crucial nucleotide in the DNA of American poetry” —Tony Hoagland. Steven Zultanski Cop Kisser 978-1-897388-70-9, $22.50, paper, 197 pp. BOOKTHUG 2010

Poetry. COP KISSER is a book of 18 poems in a variety of modes. Some are quasiconceptual, some repetitively relational, and some are hyperactive lyric collage. These modes have been ordered intuitively into what appears as a totalizing structure. Thus, it’s a big book, and deceptively so. Really there are only about two ideas in here. See if you can find them all! But be careful: don’t let COP KISSER fool you. It doesn’t want to know what it’s about, and wasn’t written for the betterment of the reader. In fact, it was barely written. It’s just one of those things that showed up one day and refused to leave— like love, enemies, or authorship.

John Yau, Editor Viva la Difference: Poetry Inspired by the Painting of Peter Saul 978-0-9791495-1-1, $15, paper, 80 pp. OFF THE PARK PRESS 2010

Poetry. Art. VIVA LA DIFFERENCE is the second in a series of anthologies devoted to the work of a single artist, the first being NEW SMOKE (2009), which took the paintings of Neo Rauch as its starting point. Contributors to this new anthology of poems inspired by the painting of Peter Saul include John Yau, Ronna Lebo, Catherine Shainberg, Judson Evans, Susan Berger-Jones, Claudia LaRocco, Eileen Hennessey, and Boni Joi. As editor John Yau writes in his introduction: “Our intention was different; we wanted something that resisted being colonized by language, something that could not be encapsulated. Our intention was not to be an impressionist or to tell a story. Those are well-known solutions, and, frankly, we wanted something else.”

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SUS AN G ARDNE R

DRAWING THE LINE a passionate life

Visual artist, poet, and world traveler Susan Gardner offers a vital and compelling memoir of her extraordinary life.”A wonderful, powerful work... has tremendous weight that speaks directly from the heart.” With 23 color photographs and 14 black ink paintings.

ISBN: 978-0-9799865-5-0

STONE MUSIC GARDNER THE ART AND POETRY OF SUSAN

An overview of Susan Gardner’s photography, painting, and poetry. “Her art speaks of what is not seen yet is present, of what is common yet irredeemably precious” — J.W. Mahoney 44 color plates ISBN: 978-0-9799865-0-5

ALTOGETHER

ERNEST

Santa Fe photographer Ford Robbins presents images that speak of his love of the land. “This is the artist's eye at work ...” — The Santa Fe New Mexican 42 black and white photographs

A remarkable book of poetry featuring Ernest Hopkins as he negotiates the passages of perplexity and joy on his way to manhood.

MARC TALBERT

ISBN: 978-0-9799865-3-6 ISBN: 978-0-9799865-4-3

RED MOUNTAIN PRESS SANTA FE redmountainpress.us

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Fiction and Drama

Listed alphabetically by author. See also Poetry, Prose, and Cross-Genre Writing (p.9), Literary Nonfiction (p.63), and Magazine sections (p.73)

Chester Aaron About Them 978-0-9795285-7-6, $20, paper, 176 pp.

Jay Atkinson Tauvernier Street 978-1-60489-061-7, $17.95, paper, 215 pp.

EL LEÓN LITERARY ARTS 2011

LIVINGSTON PRESS 2010

Fiction. “Chester Aaron’s novel-in-stories, ABOUT THEM, published nearly 35 years ago, holds a unique and lasting place in the artistic annals of American boyhood. Through the account of young Benny Kahn we come to inhabit the Pennsylvania mining town of Sundown in the years leading up to World War II. Colorful and cleareyed, unsentimental but full of feeling, the book gives us a rich and textured sense of life as it was lived there and then. Now, in ABOUT THEM, an octogenarian Benny revisits what remains of that largely vanished world— to show what time and memory have done to the characters and the place, to fill in suppressed pieces of the past, and to irradiate the whole with a sense not only of what was and is, but what should be. The narrative, by turns dramatic, comic, and chilling like its predecessor, is nonetheless permeated with kindness, generosity, and love right up to the astonishing ending. How Aaron manages this without a trace of mawkishness is not the least of the truly rare delights this book offers”—Donald Fanger.

Fiction. In Jay Atkinson’s riveting new story collection, TAUVERNIER STREET, the writer that Men’s Health magazine called “the bard of New England toughness” uses a variety of narrative voices, characters and styles to express a single, central truth: you are where you came from. In these stories, some written in “Technicolor” and others in “black and white,” a young boy learns to cherish the solid, unremarkable presence of his own father when he gets to know the charismatic dad next door; an ex-Marine finds the strength to deal with his wayward young bride in the pages of an ancient book; and a young gangbanger with a keen sense of history seeks protection from a tough hombre named Jesus.

Tom Abrams Goya’s Head 978-1-60489-065-5, $18.95, paper, 340 pp. LIVINGSTON PRESS 2010

Fiction. “I divined early on that I had one great character available and that was Madrid itself. There is a constant, day and night, sideshow on the streets of that city, and on my walks I’d take in the oddities of it, the beauty and madness. I’d go down to the rose garden and then on below that to the river and Goya’s tomb in the Chapel of San Antonio de la Florida and observe the frescoes he painted on the ceiling. I learned that his body was there, but his head wasn’t. This seemed a metaphor for how I was and, by extension, for the expatriate experience. Your body is present at this particular location on the map, but your thoughts are elsewhere. Mine were often back home; they visited my childhood and relatives and the small town where I grew up. All this was fictionalized by magic, as it will do.” Lizzy Acker Monster Party 978-0-9789858-3-7, $12, paper, 84 pp. SMALL DESK PRESS 2010

Fiction. “Lizzy Acker’s MONSTER PARTY is a rager of vulnerable tomboy bravado. This is the girl who you want holding back your hair at the end of the night, totally in touch with the ridiculous sickness of life— all its sad absurdity, useless longings, flares of courage and derring-do. There’s a goofy punch of love fist-kissing at the heart of this book, bruising its tough poetry with melancholy humor. Totally awesome” —Michelle Tea.

Helen Barolini Crossing the Alps 978-1-59954-017-7, $14, paper, 158 pp. BORDIGHERA PRESS 2010

Fiction. “In this seminal work, Helen Barolini tells the story of Frances Molletone grappling with her ethnic heritage as she falls in love with a married man. The author takes us to post-WW2 Italy, a little-documented era of turmoil, and we discover the culture of the Italian diaspora, as well as Italy before it was ‘discovered.’ When it first appeared, this novel was highly acclaimed in Italy. Now, it once again speaks to us of romantic love and conflicted longing in the aftermath of war” —Christine Lehner. Jean Rae Baxter Broken Trail 978-1-55380-109-2, $11.95, paper, 246 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2011

Fiction. Young Adult Novel. Native American Studies. BROKEN TRAIL is the story a thirteen-year-old white boy, the son of United Empire Loyalists, who has been captured and adopted by the Oneida people. Striving to find his vision oki that will guide him in his quest to become a warrior, Broken Trail disavows his white heritage—he considers himself Oneida. But everything changes when Broken Trail, alone in the woods on his vision quest, is mistakenly shot by a redcoat soldier. Tobias Amadon Bengelsdorf, Editor The Fiction at Work Biannual Report 978-0-9820292-9-9, $10, paper, 46 pp. THE GREEN LANTERN PRESS 2011

Fiction. It’s a slim volume, this book, with a matte cover you can run your fingers over, pocket-width and actually pocketable, in jeans, khakis, slacks, and trousers, unlike the faux pocket editions, so popular in the 80s, which fit only into the pockets of enormous carnival pants, and on the matte cover are the names of the 24 writers locked within, their bios swollen with awards and laudations, their births in, and travels to, the countries of the world, their stories, word-counted in but the dozens or hundreds, make mince of the joys and sorrows of our lives. Published in an edition of 250, it includes writing by Bim Angst, Anne Brooke, Devin Bustin, Spencer Dew, E.K. Entrada, Kevin Fink, Jennifer Gravely, Mary Hamilton, Lindsay Hunter, Jac Jemc, Steve McPhereson, Lois McShane, Gary Moshimer, Ira S. Murfin, Jenny Ortiz, Hannis Pannis, Ryan Pendell, Michael Ramsburg, Robert Scotellaro, Tom Sheehan, Lehua Taitano, Janet Thorning, Maureen O’Leary Wanket, and Bill West.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Michael Bible Cowboy Maloney’s Electric City 978-0-9830674-4-3, $10, paper, 86 pp.

Ben Brooks An Island of Fifty 978-0-9830263-4-1, $12, paper, 156 pp.

DARK SKY BOOKS 2011

MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS 2010

Fiction. This is your new favorite book. You will read it on highways and down in the sand of a deserted island. You will learn Michael Bible’s striking and gentle language, which booms and slithers like silver percussion, and ride elevators in the forest, this horse named Forever. You will use secret cameras for spying and come to know COWBOY MALONEY’S ELECTRIC CITY and see single bolts of lightning raising up from the ground. You will know this book is not like anything. It’s a book of brightness and purpose. It’s a book that’s pure and liquid and fuel. This is your new favorite book. Get ready. “Michael Bible may have hit what a lot of us were trying, a singular new voice for CEOs to slackers. He’s so open, so easy, so fluid, you’ll smile with joy turning every page”—Barry Hannah.

Fiction. “AN ISLAND OF FIFTY is a new literary bomb, resulting in the shrapnel of gold, ships, ocean, chandeliers, dreams, blood, and flame. Old and stale literature won’t know what just hit. This is something new masking itself in the old and I’m so so so excited” —Shane Jones. “Ben Brooks is popping quarks with AN ISLAND OF FIFTY, spilling new flavors of literature on the swampy bookstacks of old. Call it new political, new ecological, new sociological, new poetic activism, or even new imaginary creationism. This book builds up to tear down and tears down to build up. Desire as melancholia, progress as slippage, and wanting for wanting’s sake. The floodgates crumble. I relish the shape of this new wordspace, the play of noise and whisper, the unfamiliar voices, and the ache of nihilism paradoxically juxtaposed with the gleam of hopeful invention”—Christopher Higgs.

George Bowering Caprice 978-1-55420-053-5, $19, paper, 280 pp. NEW STAR BOOKS 2010

Fiction. It’s the mid 1890s in Kamloops, British Columbia. Two men argue over a bottle of whisky and Frank Spencer, an American outlaw-turned-farmhand, kills Pete Foster. Enter Caprice. Almost six feet tall, with black stallion, flaming red hair, long legs, and a lethal bullwhip, she sets out to avenge her brother’s murder. Caprice leaves an indelible impression on the people she encounters: Gert, the whore with a heart of gold; Gert’s son, for whom she provides affirmation, and not the least Frank Smith, her lover, a teacher and amateur baseball player who wants her to leave the law enforcement to the professionals and marry him. Patrick Bowman Torn from Troy: Odyssey of a Slave 978-1-55380-110-8, $11.95, paper, 200 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2011

Fiction. Young Adult Novel. Two-and-a half millennia after it was created, Homer’s Odyssey remains one of humanity’s most memorable adventure stories. In this re-creation of Homer’s classic as a young adult novel, we see the aftermath of the Trojan War through the eyes of Alexi, a fifteen-year-old Trojan boy. Orphaned by the war and enslaved by Odysseus himself, Alexi has a very different view of the conquering heroes of legend. Despite a simmering anger towards his captors, Alexi gradually develops a grudging respect for them. As the Greeks fight off the angry Cicones, weather a storm that pushes them far beyond charted waters, and nearly succumb to the blandishments of the bewitching Lotuseaters, he realizes that they are not the demons they were said to be, but people like himself. Louis Daniel Brodsky Getting to Unknow the Neighbors 978-1-56809-138-9, $14.95, paper, 92 pp. TIME BEING BOOKS 2011

Fiction. GETTING TO UNKNOW THE NEIGHBORS is a collection of short fictions, by L. D. Brodsky, that presents the reader with one of the strangest casts of misfits in contemporary literature. Many of these characters dwell in an apartment building that seems to be located in a Kafkaesque twilight zone. GETTING TO UNKNOW THE NEIGHBORS is a true masterpiece of the bizarre.

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Michael Burke Music of the Spheres 978-1-929355-70-9, $16, paper, 185 pp. CARAVEL MYSTERY BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Johnny Heron is down once again, but that doesn’t stop him from attacking a seemingly impossible case, not believing the rumors and not backing down from the threats. One more time, he fumbles and fights his way to the truth behind blackmail, infidelities, and murder...and a really good martini. MUSIC OF THE SPHERES is Burke’s follow-up to his debut novel SWAN DIVE, which the Mystery Gazette referred to as “an intriguing, intelligent, contemporary American mystery.” Mary Bucci Bush Sweet Hope 978-1-55071-342-8, $27, paper, 500 pp. GUERNICA EDITIONS 2011

Fiction. Italians as indentured laborers in Southern cotton plantations at the turn of the 20th century? Entire families scrabbling to survive, dying of malaria, building relationships with their neighbors, many the first generation of freed slaves? SWEET HOPE unleashes the little known story of Italians who came looking for a better life in La Terra Nuova and found hardship, misery, and their own form of slavery instead. Russell Connor Toys from My Attic 978-1-929355-72-3, $12, paper, 65 pp. PLEASURE BOAT STUDIO 2011

Fiction. Art. Memoir. Poetry. Drama. This small book contains various pieces—memoir, short stories, poems, a one-act play, some artwork—all done as humorous commentary on life. A former TV host for studies of museum art, Connor is best known for his paintings. His earlier book, Masters in Pieces (Journey Editions, 1997), illustrated not only his skill but also his humor in putting great works of art together. Of it, Eric P. Nash wrote in The New York Times: “...Magically, Connor whisks away the artifice of art history to forge some deeper connections, and makes us smile all the while.”

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FICTION AND DRAMA Giuseppe Conte Angelina’s Lips 978-1-55071-337-4, $18, paper, 80 pp.

Kevin Fenton Merit Badges 978-1-936970-03-2, $15, paper, 233 pp.

GUERNICA EDITIONS 2011

NEW ISSUES POETRY & PROSE 2011

Fiction. Translated from the Italian by Robert Buranello. “To be Hitchcockian about it, the story deals with the relationship between [Umberto] Umber, a professor of comparative literature, and a Dr. Jamshid Kloster, an experimental physicist whom Umber meets on a Laguna Beach bench as Diane Keaton, a longtime Laguna Beach resident, strolls by. Umber’s other obsession or, perhaps, his deepest regret is that...he will never be able to know any of ‘the characters of future novels.’ In Hitchcockian terms, that’s the McGuffin and, as Kloster tells Umber, ‘If you’re interested in future novels, we must travel to the libraries of the future.’ And that’s where the story becomes both Borgesian and Contesque as Umber asks Kloster what he will need for that to happen and Kloster replies: ‘We need a library, four mirrors, and a beautiful sunset’”—Mark Axelrod.

Fiction. Winner of the AWP Prize for the Novel, judged by Jim Shepard. Follow four friends as they move from The Brady Bunch to Seinfeld, from junior high to middle management. There is Quint, whose rebellion frays into self-destruction; Slow, who struggles to become the world’s first teenage father figure; Chimes, who fears losing his friends while picking up a 7-10 split; and Barb who escapes the conformity of Minnisapa only to find herself returning by dark of night. You will feel as if you’ve always lived in Minnisapa, Minnesota. And you will never underestimate nice kids from the Midwest again. “MERIT BADGES is hilarious, painful, lovely, nostalgic, generous and true. Kevin Fenton creates an unforgettable group of characters, in whose lives and thoughts and actions readers will often recognize themselves. This is a very funny, very moving, and wonderful book”—Julie Schumacher.

Weston Cutter You’d Be a Stranger, Too 978-1-60964-047-7, $20, paper, 266 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Fiction. “In serial dioramas of ‘strange unpacking,’ Weston Cutter’s Stranger invents a singing human science. With Nabokovian care, here are homes and lots and bodies, objects, inverted for their layers, laid open both in witness and design. Here is a calculus of hidden hours and the light of those and what was made between us. Here is a huge eye”—Blake Butler. “Stories built from carved, chiseled, and finely-wrought sentences—Weston Cutter’s hand with prose is deft and intricate, and at times dazzling”—Aimee Bender. A. W. DeAnnuntis Master Siger’s Dream 978-0-9823542-7-8, $14.50, paper, 229 pp. WHAT BOOKS PRESS 2010

Fiction. Medieval philosopher Master Siger finds himself condemned as a heretic by the Catholic Church, but in a world of late 20th century technology; he makes alliances with sexy philosopher nuns and monk double agents to escape the clutches of the Papal Mafia and the Franciscan Highway Patrol in a labyrinth of drugs, sex, car chases, and back alley plots. Rikki Ducornet Netsuke 978-1-56689-253-7, $14.95, paper, 128 pp. COFFEE HOUSE PRESS 2011

Fiction. Ruled by his hunger for erotic encounters, a deeply wounded psychoanalyst seduces both patients and strangers with equal heat. Driven to compartmentalize his life, the doctor attempts to order and contain his lovers as he does his collection of rare netsuke, the precious miniature sculptures gifted to him by his wife. This riveting exploration of one psychoanalyst’s abuse of power unearths the startling introspection present within even the darkest heart. Scott Ely Dream Fishing 978-1-60489-057-0, $16.95, paper, 200 pp.

Sasha Fletcher When All Our Days Are Numbered Marching Bands Will Fill the Streets & We Will Not Hear Them Because We Will Be Upstairs in the Clouds 978-0-9830263-3-4, $12, paper, 89 pp. MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS 2010

Fiction. “My advice: those who are to read Sasha Fletcher’s delightful enjoinder WHEN ALL OUR DAYS ARE NUMBERED should go into an empty house of an afternoon, shut themselves in a backroom closet on a low shelf, and read straight through without stopping”—Jesse Ball. “Sasha Fletcher, with his dream catastrophes and immense loves, can wand us into a new world. Here is a story that glistens” —Deb Olin Unferth. Allen Frost The Mermaid Translation 978-1-933964-40-9, $15, paper, 140 pp. BIRD DOG PUBLISHING 2010

Fiction. Allen Frost’s latest book is a fantasy novel of our times. This is one of those wonder books of old like William Blake and Kenneth Patchen wrote— a magic fable, a novel in poetry.

Eugene K. Garber O Amazonas Escuro 978-0-9744288-8-8, $15, paper, 266 pp. SWANK BOOKS 2010

Fiction. Latino/Latina Studies. The acclaimed ethnographer K lives with the Roirua-peo in their compound on the Amazon. After a successful period of study, both his work and tribe’s survival are threatened by the persistent journeys upriver of evangelists, adventurers, artists, and the ideas of well-known philosophers. Eventually, the arrival of a Herzog-esque German filmmaker and his deranged and volatile star destroy the balance of tribal life and lead to a surprising—and irrevocable—climax.

LIVINGSTON PRESS 2010

Fiction. An ambush in Vietnam, a hurricane, an unexpected suicide capping a birthday. All these might seemingly provide profound insights to any participant. “Seemingly” serves as the key word, however, in these and all eleven stories in Ely’s latest collection. His latest and his most hard-nosed collection to date, we want to add.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Kathleen George, Editor Pittsburgh Noir 978-1-936070-93-0, $15.95, paper, 280 pp.

Elva Treviño Hart Simpáticas: San Miguel Stories 978-1-931010-61-0, $15, paper, 160 pp.

AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

BILINGUAL REVIEW PRESS 2010

Fiction. Pittsburgh has recently (and more than once) been called the most livable city in America, yet the old image of smoky skies and steel mills spewing forth grit has never quite disappeared. Its history as a dirty industrial center is a part of its residents, a part of their toughness. The people of the steel city fight. PITTSBURGH NOIR includes brand-new stories by Stewart O’Nan, Hilary Masters, Lila Shaara, Rebecca Drake, Kathleen George, Paul Lee, K. C. Constantine, Nancy Martin, Kathryn Miller Haines, Terrance Hayes, Carlos Delgado, Aubrey Hirsch, Tom Lipinski, and Reginald McKnight.

Fiction. Latino/Latina Studies. In this collection of short stories, Elva Treviño Hart introduces us to the people of San Miguel de Allende. Nestled in the eastern part of Guanajuato in Mexico’s mountainous bajío region, the town has a mild climate and an accommodating culture that attract wealthy Americans and Canadians seeking relaxation and escape. In this picturesque setting, we meet a variety of well-to-do Anglo retirees: some are haunted by ghosts, others by their own pasts, some find renewed meaning and purpose, and still others explore their sexuality. Witnessing it all are the maids of San Miguel, the women charged with making visitors’ stays carefree and luxurious. The maids work magic to heal or redeem their employers, but sometimes the sorcery of others trumps their own. SIMPÁTICAS: SAN MIGUEL STORIES movingly describes two extreme socioeconomic conditions and reveals the universal journey we all ultimately share.

Garth Greenwell Mitko 978-1-4507-6214-4, $15, paper, 96 pp. MIAMI UNIVERSITY PRESS 2011

Fiction. On an unseasonably warm autumn day, an American newly arrived in a foreign city pays a young man for sex. Over the next months, as what at first seems an uncomplicated transaction deepens into something more intricate and unnerving, his discovery of the geography and griefs of an unfamiliar country is accompanied by the unfolding of Mitko’s own narrative, his private history of illness, exploitation, and want. The story of a desire that grows increasingly ambivalent, poised between submission, need, and resentment, MITKO is a powerful meditation on the chances of history and privilege, on mutual predation, and on our inability to know with any certainty the natures of others or our own fugitive selves. Lucrecia Guerrero Tree of Sighs 978-1-931010-73-3, $27, cloth, 314 pp. 978-1-931010-74-0, $17, paper, 314 pp. BILINGUAL REVIEW PRESS 2011

Fiction. Latino/Latina Studies. After the sudden and tragic death of her parents, Altagracia faces an uncertain future with a bitter and secretive grandmother. When the two sink into poverty, the young girl ends up with a cruel woman who takes her to the United States, changes her name to Grace, and puts her to work as a full-time domestic servant. TREE OF SIGHS is the story of Grace’s journey to uncover her past as she straddles two cultures in the search for her own identity. After escaping servitude and imprisonment, Grace endures life on the streets and a succession of jobs, and she eventually lands in a comfortable marriage. But a phone call from a person in her past sets her on a journey to the border, where she meets a man who holds the key to her past, learns the truth about her grandmother, and ultimately finds herself. Syed Afzal Haider To Be with Her 978-0-9843776-1-9, $14.95, paper, 250 pp.

Russell Hill The Dog Sox 978-1-929355-74-7, $15.95, paper, 200 pp. CARAVEL MYSTERY BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Ray Adams buys his girlfriend, beautiful Ava Belle, a baseball team for her birthday. She loves dogs and baseball. Ray’s gift is a broken-down semi-pro team in California’s Central Valley, with a 70-year-old Jewish manager who’s been in baseball for 50 years and breaks into Yiddish homilies when the going gets tough. He assembles a rag-tag lineup of sheetrockers, farm laborers, wanna-be big leaguers, and a freak submarine pitcher—19-year-old Billy Collins. The only problem is that Billy has a drunken, abusive father who, when he shows up at the ballpark, causes Billy to fall apart. How to get rid of Bucky Collins becomes a primary goal not just for the team’s sake, but for Billy’s. Rough him up? Pay him off? See that he has an “accident”? With him around, the team and Billy are simply not functional. Jack Hodgins Spit Delaney’s Island 978-1-55380-111-5, $18.95, paper, 200 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2011

Fiction. Jack Hodgins’s first book, published originally in 1976, is once again in print—in a new edition. Winner of the Eaton’s Book Prize and nominated for the Governor General’s Award, SPIT DELANEY’S ISLAND, a collection of short stories, put Vancouver Island on the map as a Canadian literary locale and set Hodgins off on his literary career. Often compared to Faulkner’s fiction of the deep South, Hodgins’ stories develop through people who seem to live at the edge of the world, always in danger of falling off that edge. There is Spit himself, the keeper of a steam locomotive that has been exiled to Ottawa for display; there are loggers, country wives, bookstore owners, and people who “live up the mountain” in isolated communes.

WEAVERS PRESS 2010

Fiction. Asian American Studies. Jewish Studies. Told with humor and melancholy, TO BE WITH HER is a gripping tale of quest for self-evaluation by a young man from Pakistan. Of Muslim background, the narrator deals with his attachment to his culture and people, and commitment to his first love, while he gives the reader a charming love story between him and his Jewish girlfriend in Chicago in the 60s as the Vietnam War and Civil Rights Movement change everyone.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Kevin Holohan The Brothers’ Lot 978-1-936070-91-6, $15.95, paper, 320 pp.

Richard Kalich Penthouse F 978-1-55713-413-4, $15.95, paper, 227 pp.

AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

GREEN INTEGER 2011

Fiction. “Kevin Holohan’s strange yet disconcertingly recognizable world has echoes of Flann O’Brien’s and Monty Python’s, but there is rage as well as absurdist comedy. THE BROTHERS’ LOT is a memorable, skillfully wrought, and evocative satire of an Ireland that has collapsed under the weight of its contradictions” —Joseph O’Connor. “The mix of dire experiences that goes into the education dished out at the Brothers of Godly Coercion School for Young Boys of Meager Means adds up to a mordantly funny debut from Dublin native Holohan”—Publishers Weekly.

Fiction. PENTHOUSE F takes the form of an inquiry into the suicide, which may or may not be a murder, of a young boy and girl who took up residence in the protagonist/Author’s (of the same name, Richard Kalich) apartment in Manhattan. Using the interrogations of various figures in the fictional Kalich’s life, as well as the protagonist’s own philosophical musings, personal documents, and notes on a novel-in-progress, the story of the pair’s end unfolds, becoming more real and more suspect. At the center of this interrogation looms the question: is Kalich responsible? As Brian McHale has written of this fiction, “Right next door to PENTHOUSE F is the closet where the whipper whips his perpetual victim in Kafka’s The Trial. But why travel so far afield for analogues, when there are Americans closer to hand? This is the sort of novel that John Hawkes might have written if he had spent a few years obsessing about the obsolescence of literature and the tyranny of the image....Or this is the kind of novel that Ron Sukenick might have written, and in fact did write in Blown Away—a dossier-novel, an archive of documents, some real, some faked, adding up (or not adding up, finally) to a reflection on the way we live now in the society of the spectacle.” In this definitive fiction of our time, the internationally acclaimed award-winning novelist, Richard Kalich, is able to undertake a pointed critical examination of an increasingly voyeuristic generation while cautioning against the delusion that the instantaneousness of electronic media can replace the substantiality of genuine human relationship.

Ava Homa Echoes from the Other Land 978-1-894770-64-4, $19.95, paper, 112 pp. TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2010

Fiction. Middle East Studies. These haunting stories beautifully evoke the oppressive lives of modern women in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Anis, a computer programmer, is at the end of her rope, putting up with the bullying criticism of a no-good, unemployed lout of a husband; Azar is a young divorcee, and the only person she can talk to is Reza; but she can see him only late at night when “they” are not around; Sharmin has Down’s syndrome and hopelessly loves Azad; he loves Kazhal, beautiful and blessed; but Kazhal is married off and is divorced at twenty and now awaits a hopeless future.... For these and other characters the weight of traditional attitudes, the harassment of the religious establishment, and the attitudes of men make for a frustrating, confining, and sometimes unlivable existence. Ofelia Hunt Today & Tomorrow 978-0-9841406-2-6, $15.95, paper, 268 pp. MAGIC HELICOPTER PRESS 2011

Fiction. Set among the haunted parking lots and AM-PMs and home invasions of today’s America, TODAY & TOMORROW is a hypnotic and hilariously dark adventure of identity melting, ice skating, memory, and consciousness. “Ofelia Hunt is the balladeer of the doe-eyed detrivores of overstimulation. Within TODAY & TOMORROW readers find the fried and the frayed nerves in the youth of the Hyperworld (which, let’s be honest, could go up in flames or go up in hysterics any minute now and thank goodness for that), Bad(Ass) grandfathers, and the phenomenon of Bill-Murray-asPooka. All will be well, America, as long as the rims keep spinning and Hunt keeps writing”—Matthew Simmons. Alta Ifland Death-in-a-Box 978-0-9831150-0-7, $14, paper, 95 pp. SUBITO PRESS 2011

Fiction. Blending the fabulous with the macabre, the lyrical with the grotesque, the atemporal with the present, and melancholy with dark humor, these stories will take you from the ambiguous world of modern folktales where a man tries to catch Death in a box, to communist Eastern Europe where a man eats his own brains, to contemporary women who like garbage, or who prefer to keep their babies inside their bodies rather than give birth. “Fun, glam, and deliciously smart, Ifland’s language whispers half-forgotten folktales from imagined folk, remembering stories that never happened about two people who never existed. Go ahead, open this box. I dare you”—Jefferey DeShell.

Nadia Kalman The Cosmopolitans 978-1-60489-067-9, $17.95, paper, 240 pp. LIVINGSTON PRESS 2010

Fiction. Jewish Studies. Equal parts Jane Austen and Gogol, THE COSMOPOLITANS casts a sharp and sympathetic eye on the foibles and rewards of family and life in America. This warm and exuberantly comic debut tells the story of the Molochniks, Russian-Jewish immigrants in suburban Connecticut. Daughters wed, houses flood, cultures clash, and the past has a way of emerging at the most inconvenient moments (and in the strangest ways). Michael Kimball Us 978-0-615-43046-1, $14.95, paper, 203 pp. TYRANT BOOKS 2011

Fiction. A husband wakes up to find that his wife has had a seizure during the night. The husband calls an ambulance and his wife is rushed to a hospital where she lies in a coma. By day, the husband sits beside his wife and tries to think of ways to wake her up. At night, the husband sleeps in the chair next to his wife’s bedside dreaming that she will wake up. He wants to be able to take her back home.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Nathan Larson The Dewey Decimal System 978-1-61775-010-6, $15.95, paper, 251 pp.

R. Zamora Linmark Leche 978-1-56689-254-4, $15.95, paper, 280 pp.

AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

COFFEE HOUSE PRESS 2011

Fiction. After a flu pandemic, a large-scale terrorist attack, and the total collapse of Wall Street, New York City is reduced to a shadow of its former self. As the city struggles to dig itself out of the wreckage, a nameless, obsessive-compulsive veteran with a spotty memory, a love for literature, and a strong if complex moral code (that doesn’t preclude acts of extreme violence) has taken up residence at the main branch of the New York Public Library on 42nd Street. With its high body count and snarky dialogue, Larson’s debut pays respects to Chandler, Hammett, and Jim Thompson. Healthy amounts of black humor and speculative tendencies will appeal to fans of Charlie Huston, Nick Tosches, Duane Swierczynski, Victor Gischler, Robert Ferrigno, and early Jonathan Lethem.

Fiction. LGBT Studies. Asian American Studies. After thirteen years of living in the U.S., Vince returns to his birthplace, the Philippines. As he ventures into the heat and chaos of the city, he encounters a motley cast of characters, including a renegade nun, a political film director, arrogant hustlers, and the country’s spotlightdriven First Daughter. Haunted by his childhood memories and a troubled family history, Vince unravels the turmoil, beauty, and despair of a life caught between a fractured past and a precarious future. Witty and mesmerizing, this novel explores the complex colonial and cultural history of the Philippines and the paradoxes inherent in the search for both personal and national identities.

Evan Lavender-Smith Avatar 978-1-926616-16-2, $15, paper, 118 pp. SIX GALLERY PRESS 2011

Fiction. The literature of the dispossessed has found its most stirring contemporary avatar in Evan LavenderSmith’s brief tour de force of grief and solitude. Someone is floating in the depths of space with little more than his or her thoughts, tears, and strands of hair for company; nothing more than two stars—one in front, one behind—for guidance. How long has he or she been in this condition? How did it come about? For how long will it remain? Distances of a second and a century collide to reveal a present moment beholden only to the broken clock of thought. In a mesmerizing and unforgettable monologue, the speaker of AVATAR describes a mode of living and thinking sustained at the very precipice of being. John Levy A Mind’s Cargo Shifting 978-1-889960-22-7, $16, paper, 138 pp. FIRST INTENSITY PRESS 2011

Fiction. This author’s flair for unpredictability and quirkiness is abundantly clear in this first collection of fictions. Lots of humor here, much of it dark, ironic, even disturbing, but with plenty of good clean funniness to keep things in balance. Serious readers and writers of poetry will find many of these stories of singular interest; just be prepared to laugh at yourselves if the shoes fit. Tan Lin Insomnia and the Aunt 978-0-9767364-7-9, $10, paper, 44 pp. KENNING EDITIONS 2011

Fiction. Literary Nonfiction. Cross-Genre. Art. Asian American Studies. Tan Lin’s INSOMNIA AND THE AUNT is an ambient novel composed of black and white photographs, postcards, Google reverse searches, letters, appendices, an index to an imaginary novel, reruns, and footnotes. The aunt in question can’t sleep. She runs a motel in the Pacific Northwest. She likes watching Conan O’Brien late at night. She may be the narrator’s aunt or she may be an emanation of a TV set. Structured like everybody’s scrapbook, and blending fiction with nonfictional events, INSOMNIA AND THE AUNT is about identities taken and given up, and about the passions of an immigrant life, rebroadcast as furniture. Ostensibly about a young man’s disintegrating memory of his most fascinating relative, or potentially a conceptualist take on immigrant literature, it is probably just a treatment for a prime-time event that, because no one sleeps in motels, lasts into the late night and daytime slots.

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Paul Lisicky The Burning House 978-0-9819687-8-0, $14.95, paper, 160 pp. ETRUSCAN PRESS 2011

Fiction. In this captivating family saga, narrator Isidore Mirsky finds his close-knit family and community suddenly coming apart. Facing the illness of family members and the loss of homes in a recession-plagued urban town, he also contends with an overwhelming new desire—his feelings for his wife’s sister. THE BURNING HOUSE finds its narrator at his most vulnerable, and explores what it means to be a good man amidst chaos. “THE BURNING HOUSE is an achingly lovely novel about the things that bind us together in this life and the things that pull us apart. Paul Lisicky has an extraordinary gift for exploring emotional nuance and the rhythms of desire. With this book he yet again asserts himself as one of the select writers who continues to teach me about the complexities of the human heart”—Robert Olen Butler. Norman Lock Grim Tales 978-0-9830263-0-3, $12, paper, 88 pp. MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS 2011

Fiction. Norman Lock’s GRIM TALES is a mythological catalog of the peculiar, a string of strange, often murderous urban myths. It comes on fast and dirty, wasting no time in lunging at your throat.... GRIM TALES is populated end to end with the magical and the bizarre: shape-shifting, witchery, underwater cities, indoor rain, beds that contain oceans, murderous objects, all manner of disappearance. Men lose their faces to mirrors, women are smothered by their hair, clouds settle over cities and suck them up...and in the midst of all this looming, Lock has an incredible ability to render compelling imagery and demeanor in minute, super-compressed bursts. Single lines resound in the mind. In the same way that it’s hard to stop staring at the internet’s seemingly endless array of weird memes and video databases, Lock’s words are both engrossing and slightly haunted. One could spend forever worming through these magicked words, their worlds. Lonely Christopher The Mechanics of Homosexual Intercourse 978-1-936070-80-0, $15.95, paper, 200 pp. AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

Fiction. LGBT Studies. Introduction by Dennis Cooper. THE MECHANICS OF HOMOSEXUAL INTERCOURSE, a radical map of shortcomings in our daily experiences in the form of a debut story collection, presents thematically related windows into serious emotional trouble and monstrous love. Lonely Christopher combines a striking emotional grammar, reminiscent of Gertrude Stein’s THREE LIVES, with an unyielding imagination in the lovely-ugly architecture of his stories.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Adriana V. López and Carmen Ospina, Editors Barcelona Noir 978-1-936070-95-4, $15.95, paper, 245 pp.

Jack Matthews The Gambler’s Nephew 978-0-9819687-7-3, $15.95, paper, 240 pp.

AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

ETRUSCAN PRESS 2011

Fiction. Latino/Latina Studies. Translated from the Spanish by Achy Obejas. Edited by Adriana V. López and Carmen Ospina, BARCELONA NOIR includes brand-new stories by Jordi Sierra i Fabra, Imma Monsó, Santiago Roncagliolo, Francisco “Paco” González Ledesma, Valerie Miles, David Barba, Isabel Franc, Lolita Bosch, Eric TaylorAragón, Antonia Cortijos, Cristina Fallarás, Raúl Argemí, Teresa Solana, and Andreu Martín. For some, Barcelona is a European enchantress of nouveau architecture, fusion tapas, and fine cava. To others, it’s a Gothic labyrinth of tiny streets to lose oneself in; hashish-clouded afterhours bars to forget the time; dimly lit plazas with global bohemians squatting, prostitutes tempting. But come morning, its cold cobblestones and misty beachfronts have even darker stories to tell.

Fiction. With a literary style reminiscent of Mark Twain, this historical novel captures the colorful riverboat culture of 1850s Ohio. THE GAMBLER’S NEPHEW presents a world of abolitionist passion, murder, and oldfashioned cussedness, a world of steamboats plying the Ohio River, and a world with people troubled by such grand irrelevancies as love. Here is a world as richly confused as our own—and as alive as living can get.

Lorenzo Madalena Confetti for Gino 978-1-55071-224-7, $22, paper, 414 pp. GUERNICA EDITIONS 2011

Fiction. A realistic portrayal of the Sicilian fishing community in San Diego in the 1950s, CONFETTI FOR GINO centers around the DeMarino family, in particular fishing boat captain Gino DeMarino’s stubborn attempts to break away from tradition by vowing to marry a woman from outside the Italian community, and his mother’s fight to ensure he marries someone within the community. The novel shows how kinship and family proved more visceral than the notions of individuality and independence that were emerging at the time. In the end, Gino learns that he can’t break away because he has nothing to “catch him” on the other side. The family, the community, the life as a tuna boat captain are who he is and are what define him. Josie Malinowski West of Pure Evil 978-0-578-06919-7, $11.95, paper, 204 pp. OYSTER MOON PRESS 2010

Fiction. Poetry. The labyrinthine, mercurial worlds of Josie Malinowski’s WEST OF PURE EVIL represent a divorce between rhyme and reason, spinning off-key tales of love and pain. Sailors and whores unite to solve ancient, despicable mysteries; an act of aid brings a Fairy Kingdom to its knees; and the tragic Captain Cock is left cold and stiff by a scheming eight-year-old. These myriad poems and stories illuminate the crossover between waking and dreaming, and thereby cast an intimate, surrealist glance at the human condition. Paul Maliszewski Prayer and Parable: Stories 978-1-934200-44-5, $15.95, paper, 176 pp. FENCE BOOKS 2011

Fiction. At a campground, a divorced father confronts a man he believes hurt his daughter. A devoted student traces a winding path through the snow, searching for the next most beautiful thing. Two brothers watch their father tinker lovingly with his homemade robots. In this debut story collection, men and women struggle to do right. They argue. They think. They think again. They have odd dreams. Often they fail at being good, and yet, on occasion, they realize moments of true kindness. In language that is at once simple and supple, plainspoken and arresting, these twenty-eight stories describe complete lives in sharp detail, lives we may recognize as not unlike our own. “You want me to tell you what sets Maliszewski apart? The answer is probity. The answer also is decency. Here’s another answer: modesty, tact, exactitude, pertinence, reverence, wit. Maliszewski has all the graces, which is why I, in my old age, am renewed and schooled by him. Oh, and another thing: Paul Maliszewski takes no crap”—Gordon Lish.

Madeline McDonnell There Is Something Inside, It Wants to Get Out 978-0-9844889-2-6, $10, paper, 79 pp. RESCUE PRESS 2010

Fiction. THERE IS SOMETHING INSIDE, IT WANTS TO GET OUT is the brief and stunning debut by fiction writer Madeline McDonnell. In these technically surprising and lyrically astounding stories, the reader meets three haunted, singular, and unsettled protagonists— Wednesday, Mary, and Lucy—who are up to and up against all sorts of horrendous and hilarious trouble. The reader will discover in this trinity a deeply intelligent, comic, and chaotic view of consciousness, pleasure, and shame along with a panic-inducing proposal, cancerbasketball, and a series of passionate car crashes. Perhaps more importantly, the reader will fall for McDonnell’s poetic touch and her absolute attention to the magic of the sentence. Mary Miller Big World 978-0-9749541-8-9, $9.95, paper, 230 pp. SHORT FLIGHT/LONG DRIVE BOOKS 2009

Fiction. Mary Miller’s BIG WORLD is the second book and first work of fiction to come out of Short Flight/Long Drive Books, a publishing arm of the independent literary journal Hobart. The characters in Mary Miller’s debut short story collection BIG WORLD are at once autonomous and lonesome, possessing both a longing to connect with those around them and a cynicism regarding their ability to do so, whether they’re holed up in a motel room in Pigeon Forge with an air gun shooting boyfriend as in “Fast Trains” or navigating the rooms of their house with their dad after their mother’s death as in “Leak.” Mary Miller’s writing is unapologetically honest and efficient and the gutwrenching directness of her prose is reminiscent of Mary Gaitskill and Courtney Eldridge, if Gaitskill’s and Eldridge’s stories were set in the south and reeked of spilt beer and cigarette smoke. M. V. Montgomery Dream Koans 978-0-9817852-3-3, $13, paper, 157 pp. FAST FORWARD PRESS 2011

Fiction. DREAM KOANS is a collection that almost defies definition. At first glance, it is a book of short stories. At closer examination, the stories become poems, dreams, jokes, philosophy, and fables. The flash fiction pieces in this book run the gamut from tragic to hilarious. The collection illuminates Montgomery’s themes and vision into something that is, indeed, more than the sum of its parts. Montgomery’s unique approach and form breaks boundaries, inspires, and pushes the boundaries of literature. Daniel McDermott from Bananafish says about DREAM KOANS: “Creativity explodes from this...and a lesson can be learned for all writers drudging through the same stagnant form again and again.”

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FICTION AND DRAMA Maceo Montoya The Scoundrel and the Optimist 978-1-931010-65-8, $28, cloth, 272 pp. 978-1-931010-67-2, $18, paper, 272 pp. BILINGUAL REVIEW PRESS 2010

Fiction. Latino/Latina Studies. Nothing is easy when you are thirteen, and it’s especially challenging when everyone thinks you’re eight because you are tiny; your father is an abusive, tyrannical lout; your siblings are determined to strike out on their own to escape constant drunken rages; and your mother is deeply depressed. In THE SCOUNDREL AND THE OPTIMIST we meet Edmund, a hapless but irrepressible redheaded teen whose magnificent strength of spirit makes him a giant among men. Despite roadblocks and bad advice, Edmund is determined to win the heart of Ingrid Genera and to become a great guitar player. But his most notable accomplishment is teaching his father, Filastro, the value of integrity and optimism. After a prolonged episode of debauchery, Filastro discovers just how horrifying abuse is. Edmund nurses him back to health and in the process teaches him that love is mightier than fists and is worth great sacrifice. At once humorous and touching, THE SCOUNDREL AND THE OPTIMIST is a delightful read. Mariko Nagai Georgic 978-1-886157-76-7, $15.95, paper, 163 pp. BKMK PRESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY 2010

Fiction. Asian American Studies. Winner of the G.S. Sharat Chandra Prize for Short Fiction selected by Jonis Agee. “Based on dire events in Japanese history and the key of folktale Mariko Nagai has written stories of a stark and unforgettable human landscape. War, imprisonment, hunger, and betrayals are in these timeless narratives. In the last story, drowning land, a young man who has spent his life sleeping and dreaming hears a voice whispering, It is time to wake up. The past has finally counted and enough change has come from his dreaming life to get him to act. Now, there is the possibility of release and change—of body, soul and mercy uniting with what is essential in order to grace communal life. This is a deeply thoughtful and beautifully written work”—Gioia Timpanelli. Hal Niedzviecki Look Down, This Is Where It Must Have Happened 978-0-87286-539-6, $15.95, paper, 152 pp. CITY LIGHTS PUBLISHERS 2011

Fiction. The acclaimed author of THE PEEP DIARIES and HELLO, I’M SPECIAL returns to fiction and delivers a mind-altering collection of short stories that confront the hypocrisies, humiliations, and hilarities of modern life. Hal Niedzviecki has established himself as one of Canada’s most influential young writers, and in this wildly imaginative collection he romps through social conventions, confronts some of society’s most intractable arguments, and deftly captures the zeitgeist of our fractured times. Adam Novy The Avian Gospels, Book I 978-0-9825301-2-2, $12.95, paper, 278 pp. SHORT FLIGHT/LONG DRIVE BOOKS 2010

Fiction. A city without a name is cursed by a plague of birds they probably deserve. But when an angry beggar child and his father learn they have the power to lift the curse—they “control” birds—they cannot agree on how to use their gift, and end up using it on each other, taking out everyone around them, especially those they love. This is BOOK I of a two-volume novel.

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Adam Novy The Avian Gospels, Book II 978-0-9825301-3-9, $10.95, paper, 184 pp. SHORT FLIGHT/LONG DRIVE BOOKS 2010

Fiction. A city without a name is cursed by a plague of birds they probably deserve. But when an angry beggar child and his father learn they have the power to lift the curse—they “control” birds—they cannot agree on how to use their gift, and end up using it on each other, taking out everyone around them, especially those they love. This is BOOK II of a two-volume novel. Uma Parameswaran A Cycle of the Moon 978-1-894770-62-0, $20.95, paper, 224 pp. TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2010

Fiction. South Asian Studies. It is a tense autumn the year Mayura comes away from her husband, saying she will never return to the uncouth, lustful monster. Everyone in the family is affected by her arrival. A sense of collective guilt emasculates the men even as they lecture her on the moral duty of returning to her wedded husband. A sense of outrage mingled with secret sorrow overcomes the women. No one knows what to make of Mayura. Meanwhile she behaves as though nothing and nobody can touch her. Using a deceptively simple and intimate style, Parameswaran explores the subtleties of love, marriage, sex, and family life in a changing South Indian environment. Alan Michael Parker Whale Man 978-1-60226-007-8, $18, paper, 288 pp. WORDFARM 2011

Fiction. Avi Heyer’s rollicking adventure begins when he returns to Elsbeth, North Carolina, to settle his mother’s affairs. A student chef with the wrong girlfriend and a mud-loving dog, Avi soon finds himself dragged into a criminal conspiracy. His world is churned up, down and sideways by the diabolical Camel and her hired henchwomen; an unknown phone caller who somehow tracks his every move; an enticing hippie who may be trying to steal something from Avi; a plainspoken building contractor with a suspicious hearing aid; and a news reporter desperate for love. And then there’s Avi’s whale, with its graceful bulk and keening song, a whale that becomes more than an obsession. Andrew Plattner A Marriage of Convenience 978-1-886157-78-1, $15.95, paper, 180 pp. BKMK PRESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY 2011

Fiction. In Andrew Plattner’s new story collection, A MARRIAGE OF CONVENIENCE, characters try to improve their odds, on the racetrack and in life. In “Runaway,” teenager Hawley Bolton longs to run away from his wealthy home to join racetrackers like Helen, who tells him, “remember something good always happens at the racetrack.... You just gotta hang around long enough for luck to find you.” In “More Than a Hunch,” the narrator has a tip he is sure will help his former girlfriend and her grown son if they would only listen. But in every story, whether on the track or anywhere else, characters do more than hanging around waiting for luck—they do everything they can to find it. “Plattner’s stories always amaze me with delicacy, introspection, precision, observation, and profound empathy. A MARRIAGE OF CONVENIENCE is a masterful performance first to last” —Frederick Barthelme.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Dawn Promislow Jewels and Other Stories 978-1-894770-65-1, $20.95, paper, 112 pp.

Chuck Richardson So It Seams 978-1-60964-003-3, $18, paper, 280 pp.

TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2010

BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Fiction. African Studies. The landscape of 1970s South Africa lives and breathes in these highly evocative stories, populated by unforgettable characters defined in their own ways by a repressive political system: a middle-class white girl observes a servant from her hideout in the garden; a woman sees the sea for the first time and takes it home in a bottle; a sheltered, smalltown white woman drives out for the first time on her own; a young man goes away in the dark of night to become a freedom fighter; post-Apartheid, an artist finds inspiration in the earth....

Fiction. “Chuck Richardson is a master craftsman whose magnificent, long, looping sentences, in their whipping and flitting about, present a world populated by obsessive characters whose absurd deeds never seem to end. You will meet a dog named Certitude and an environmental activist named Irena-Delores Farfrankenheirmerzen-Dauphinheifer; Jesus Segundo, a member of a street gang, and Aunt Elizabeth Bullfinch who owns too much stuff for your own good; and many, many more. What’s more, it all happens within a narrative of extraordinary energy. Dear reader, you’re in for a treat”—Jefferson Hansen.

Charles Reid Ghost of Heroes Past 978-1-55380-102-3, $10.95, paper, 170 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2010

Fiction. Young Adult Novel. Thirteen-year-old Johnny Anders is something of a misfit, with no friends and a poor school record, but all this begins to change when he is awakened one night to find a soldier-ghost in his bedroom. Johnny is taken back in time to meet a series of unusual heroes in Canada’s war history. These include Joan Bamford Fletcher, who commandeered Japanese soldiers to take hundreds of wounded civilians to safety through the jungles of Indonesia, and the muchdecorated Raymond Collishaw, through whom Johnny learns that Canada played a role in the Russian Revolution. Nina Revoyr Wingshooters 978-1-936070-71-8, $15.95, paper, 250 pp. AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Asian American Studies. Michelle LeBeau, the child of a white American father and a Japanese mother, lives with her grandparents in Deerhorn, Wisconsin— a small town that had been entirely white before her arrival. Rejected and bullied, Michelle spends her time reading, avoiding fights, and roaming the countryside with her dog Brett. She idolizes her grandfather, Charlie LeBeau, an expert hunter and former minor league baseball player who is one of the town’s most respected men. Charlie strongly disapproves of his son’s marriage to Michelle’s mother but dotes on his only grandchild. This fragile peace is threatened when the expansion of the local clinic leads to the arrival of the Garretts, a young black couple from Chicago. The Garretts’ presence deeply upsets most of the residents of Deerhorn—when Mr. Garrett makes a controversial accusation against one of the town leaders, who is also Charlie LeBeau’s best friend. Chuck Richardson Smoke 978-1-935402-24-4, $16, paper, 236 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2009

Fiction. “Chuck Richardson’s SMOKE probes human existence by pursuing truth and meaning in an unknowable, inexpressible universe, much like the authorities. What makes SMOKE fascinating is the imaginary catastrophe lurking behind it, which leaves us to invent and imagine the world anew” —Raymond Federman.

Joseph Riippi The Orange Suitcase 978-0-9841025-5-6, $14.95, paper, 92 pp. AMPERSAND BOOKS 2011

Fiction. In the thirty-four stories filling THE ORANGE SUITCASE, Joseph Riippi packs an intimate and powerful portrait of a young man’s life. From a childhood spent snipering neighbours with BB guns, to adulthood grasping at love and art in New York City, THE ORANGE SUITCASE shows us not only the way life is lived but— perhaps more importantly—how it is remembered.

Ethel Rohan Cut Through the Bone 978-0-615-40093-8, $12, paper, 115 pp. DARK SKY BOOKS 2010

Fiction. In this stripped-raw debut collection, Ethel Rohan’s thirty stories swell with broken, incomplete people yearning to be whole. Through tight language and searing scenarios, Rohan brings to life a plethora of characters—exposed, vulnerable souls who are achingly human.

Philip Roy River Odyssey 978-1-55380-105-4, $10.95, paper, 240 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2010

Fiction. Young Adult Novel. In the third volume of the SUBMARINE OUTLAW Series, Alfred sets off in his submarine up the dark and wilful St. Lawrence River. With Hollie and Seaweed, his dog and seagull crew, Alfred follows the route of Jacques Cartier, nearly five hundred years before them, as they sail down the Strait of Belle Isle into the largest river mouth in the world. But the St. Lawrence is a treacherous river, concealing many dangers beneath its surface, not least of all the cursed and ghostly Empress of Ireland, a sunken ocean liner that has claimed the lives of over a thousand people and that reaches up to entangle the sub as they pass. Carol Anne Shaw Hannah and the Spindle Whorl 978-1-55380-103-0, $10.95, paper, 244 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2010

Fiction. Young Adult Novel. Native American Studies. When twelve-year-old Hannah uncovers an ancient Salish spindle whorl hidden in a cave near her home in Cowichan Bay, she is transported back to a village called Tl’ulpalus, in a time before Europeans had settled in the area. Through the agency of a trickster raven, Hannah befriends Yisella, a young Salish girl, and is welcomed into village life. Here she discovers that the spindle whorl is the prize possession of Yisella’s mother, Skeepla, a famous spinner and weaver. When Skeepla falls victim to smallpox, Hannah finally begins to open up about the death of her own mother.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Jim Shepard Master of Miniatures 978-0-9844142-3-9, $12, paper, 56 pp.

Michael Stewart The Hieroglyphics 978-0-9830263-1-0, $12, paper, 82 pp.

SOLID OBJECTS 2011

MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS 2011

Fiction. “As in Nosferatu, with its smartly imagined life of the German film director F. W. Murnau, here Shepard considers the Japanese special effects director Eiji Tsuburaya and his cinematic inventions for the sciencefiction movie we know as Godzilla. And like many of Shepard’s stories, MASTER OF MINIATURES limns the intense and alienated world of a focused expert obsessed with his field of endeavor, at a cost to his marriage and children. For Japanese survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the fifties, America itself seemed king of the monsters, to be looked at with fear and awe. This is a poignant and important story that seems to me a summation and condensation of many themes that have preoccupied Shepard before. Like a diamond held aloft, each turn of this tale in his deft hand flashes still more light”—Ron Hansen.

Fiction. “In THE HIEROGLYPHICS, a novel(la) in prose poems, Michael Stewart tackles nothing less than a radical revision of creation myths that comments darkly on the ancient stories we have received & the future we may be facing. Stewart’s language is spare & haunting, the allusions resonating, in this work that ‘reminds us how pale are the achievements of men’”—Wendy Barker.

Gregory Sherl I Have Touched You 978-0-9830674-2-9, $8, paper, 47 pp. DARK SKY BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Winner of DARK SKY MAGAZINE’s 2010 chapbook contest, Gregory Sherl’s I HAVE TOUCHED YOU is a debut collection of linked stories exploring the hurt, drive, remorse and pleasure of fleeting relationships and casual sex. Through rapt, often kinky language and quick-fire observations, Sherl’s stories linger and provoke, presenting the reader with a series of swollen hearts, unmade beds, and potent narratives. “If Tao Lin put the heart back into his writing, exchanged the bored neutrality for a sense of hope or lust or longing, we would have Gregory Sherl’s I HAVE TOUCHED YOU. As with Lin, there are the musical references, the mapping of movements, and a diary of food and drink and drug ingestion, but instead of trapping them inside a forever monotonous plain, Sherl elongates them into beauty and rifle-fires them from a language-musket, something at once wonderfully matured and yet able to open gaping holes in our chests”—J. A. Tyler. John Elvis Smelcer Alaskan: Stories from the Great Land 978-0-9791944-7-4, $16, paper, 144 pp. STANDING STONE BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Written over the course of a quarter century by one of Alaska’s best living writers, these two dozen stories embody the spirit of Alaska—its colliding cultures, magnificent beauty and dangerously unforgiving environment. “John Smelcer is Alaska’s modern-day Jack London”—W. P. Kinsella. “John Smelcer’s stories are an indispensable addition to Alaskan literature”—J. D. Salinger. Adriano Spatola The Porthole 978-0-9796177-9-9, $12.95, paper, 112 pp.

Melanie Steyn Once Around the Sun 978-89-91913-71-4, $7.95, paper, 141 pp. SEOUL SELECTION 2010

Fiction. Southeast Asia Studies. Melanie Steyn’s new novella, ONCE AROUND THE SUN, marks a rare and insightful attempt by a foreign writer to recreate characters and lives in Korea’s most intimate social unit: the family. Published at the end of September this year by English-language publisher Seoul Selection, ONCE AROUND THE SUN takes place in a seaside village in southwestern Korea’s Jeollanam-do Province. It introduces the family of Yi Chang-joon, a fisherman; his wife, Yun-hwa; their daughter and son, Ji-young and Dong-ju; and Chang-joon’s mother, Kyu-ah. In the course of the book’s four chapters, each one relating to one of the four seasons, Steyn introduces episodes in the lives of each family member with the exception of Changjoon himself. One year thus passes, and the earth revolves once around the sun. Matthew Stokoe Cows 978-1-936070-70-1, $15.95, paper, 190 pp. AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

Fiction. This is the long-awaited reissue of Stokoe’s brutal debut novel, COWS, with an introduction by Dennis Cooper, who selected it for his Little House on the Bowery series. Mother’s corpse in bits, dead dog on the roof, girlfriend in a coma, baby nailed to the wall, and a hundred tons of homicidal beef stampeding through the subway system. And Steven thought the slaughterhouse was bad.... “Stokoe’s vision of Hell is a carnivore’s nightmare. A powerful and all too possibly prophetic work”—Kathy Acker. Eileen R. Tabios Silk Egg: Collected Novels 978-1-84861-143-6, $17, paper, 132 pp. SHEARSMAN BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Asian American Studies. “The genius of Eileen R. Tabios is as generous as it is manifold. Reading SILK EGG, I suddenly feel myself becoming more perceptive, fantastical, mordant, impassioned, and artful. Just like the book itself. Read it, and the same can happen to you”—Barry Schwabsky.

OTIS BOOKS/SEISMICITY EDITIONS 2011

Fiction. Translated from the Italian by Beppe Cavatorta and Polly Geller. Recipient of the 1966 “Ferro di Cavallo” prize for a first novel, THE PORTHOLE was a highly praised and controversial debut. Pulling together diverse elements from the musical experiments of Cage, Schnebel and Kagel, the pictorial innovations of assemblage and pop art, x-rated comics, and dialogue from horror and World War II films, Spatola liberated his narrative from the stultifying edifice of Italian prose. THE PORTHOLE remains even more important today for its remarkable achievement in that fertile period of experimental literature. A co-publication of Otis Books/Seismicity Editions and Agincourt Press.

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FICTION AND DRAMA H. Nigel Thomas Lives: Whole and Otherwise 978-1-894770-61-3, $20.95, paper, 160 pp.

Katie Wainwright Cuba on My Mind 978-1-60489-063-1, $17.95, paper, 240 pp.

TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2010

LIVINGSTON PRESS 2010

Fiction. African American Studies. These stories of triumph and despair present a gallery of characters, Caribbean immigrants struggling against the odds, as they make their way through the maze of urban life. Set in Montreal, LIVES breaks the stereotypes to give us a side of Canada rarely acknowledged. Mary Fellows is a sex-worker organizing a demonstration on St Catherine Street; Margaret is on a perpetual quest for a suitable man, her latest folly a suave, much younger man she brought over from Jamaica; Greta, a domestic help, proudly holds up her son’s high school diploma; but can he read it? LIVES adds to Thomas’s already considerable reputation as a chronicler of black life in Montreal.

Fiction. Latino/Latina Studies. Catalina is remembering her teenage years in Batista’s Cuba, on the verge of Castro’s revolution. Her grandson Wayne Olaf listens to her stories while undergoing his own minor revolution against his parents, especially his mother, Catalina’s daughter. Together, Wayne and Catalina traverse fields of time to come to new insights.

Persia Walker Black Orchid Blues 978-1-936070-90-9, $15.95, paper, 270 pp. AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

Joseph Torra What’s So Funny 978-0-9831975-0-8, $12, paper, 136 pp. PRESSED WAFER 2011

Fiction. We’ve forgotten who first said, “Dying is easy; comedy is hard.” Aristophanes may have or some ancient Roman. It’s repeated every night in the performances of stand-up comics in clubs across America. The hero of Joseph Torra’s new novel WHAT’S SO FUNNY is one of those toilers who is trying to figure out what’s so funny and then get us to laugh at it. Torra, a master of the monologue, has never been better. Mary Troy Beauties 978-1-886157-74-3, $16.95, paper, 365 pp. BKMK PRESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY 2010

Fiction. “Mary Troy’s BEAUTIES is a lovely novel, a character-driven anatomy of the odds and ends of relations and friends we cobble together in the modern age as our most beloved possession, our true family. Set in the mean streets of south St. Louis in the endearing, if always failing, Alibi Café, BEAUTIES follows the cynical, one-legged Bev, and the strikingly gorgeous Shelly, as they serve up generous heapings of biscuits and gravy to a ragtag motley of troubled and endearing souls who gravitate to the haven the café offers. Love percolates like drip coffee as Shelly seeks fulfillment with a duplicitous P.I., as the beleaguered Bev struggles through red tape to adopt the neglected Toby from a world that wants to destroy him. More than anything, the ultimate lesson of BEAUTIES is one that deserves the vivid and emotional investigations Troy lavishes on it: that though the world on its surface seems a bruised and broken place, true beauty lies beneath if we only stop to look”—Tony D’Souza. David Unger The Price of Escape 978-1-936070-92-3, $15.95, paper, 218 pp. AKASHIC BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Latino/Latina Studies. In 1938, as Samuel Berkow’s tramp steamer from Germany approaches Puerto Barrios, Guatemala, he is full of hope that he will be able to remake his life in the new world. Part character study and part riveting narrative of a German Jew escaping the Nazis, this novel provides its own mix of Franz Kafka, Joseph Conrad, and Louis-Ferdinand Céline, as Samuel stumbles to get his footing in a hostile setting.

Fiction. African American Studies. Lanie Price, a 1920s Harlem society columnist, witnesses the brutal nightclub kidnapping of the “Black Orchid,” a sultry, seductive singer with a mysterious past. When hours pass without a word from the kidnapper, puzzlement grows as to his motive. After a gruesome package arrives at Price’s doorstep, the questions change. Just what does the kidnapper want—and how many people is he willing to kill to get it? “The best kind of historical mystery: great history, great mystery, all wrapped up in a voice so authentic you feel it has come out of the past to whisper in your ear”—Lee Child. William Walsh, Editor Re: Telling 978-0-9841025-6-3, $17.95, paper, 296 pp. AMPERSAND BOOKS 2011

Fiction. Poetry. How many times can Super Mario die? Did Borges visit Indiana, or did Indiana visit Borges? Does the devil drink milk and, if not, why does he like milkmaids so much? And where do our hero turtles go when there are no more foot soldiers to fight? Welcome to RE: TELLING, the anthology that answers these burning questions, and many, many more. This collection of fiction, poetry, and art features some of the independent publishing world’s favourite, most talented writers using recycled material: purloined plots, stolen settings, borrowed premises, and appropriated characters. It is subversion; it is homage. It is a ransacking of the treasure troves in our cultural basement, and nothing is off limits. The stories range from retellings of Shakespeare to Law & Order, from classical theater to video games. Each piece is something picked up and dusted off, reworked, and made new. Contributors are Matt Bell, Alicia Gifford, Michael Martone, Daniel Grandbois, Darcie Dennigan, Peter Connors, Jim Ruland, Samantha Hunt, Blake Butler, Tom La Farge, Shya Scanlon, Pedro Ponce, Crispin Best, Erin Fitzgerald, J. Bradley, Molly Gaudry, Steve Himmer, Josh Maday, Henry Jenkins, Michael Kimball, Corey Mesler, Roxane Gay, Timothy Gager, Heather Fowler, Joseph Riippi, Wendy Walker, Zachary Mason, Curtis Smith, Jeff Brewer, Kathleen Rooney and Lily Hoang, with original artwork by Teresa Buzzard.

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FICTION AND DRAMA Steve Weiner Sweet England 978-1-55420-055-9, $19, paper, 176 pp.

Paul J. Willis The Alpine Tales 978-1-60226-006-1, $28, paper, 592 pp.

NEW STAR BOOKS 2010

WORDFARM 2010

Fiction. A man of no known origin and unstable personality tries to re-enter society after a long and unexplained absence. The reader sees events through Jack’s mostly uncomprehending eyes as he negotiates the margins of a London that resembles the city of memory and story only in incidental details. Replete with episodes of manic religion and delusions, the world in SWEET ENGLAND is hard, dark, dangerous. Exploitation and violence provide a steady background glow that illuminates Jack’s relationship with Brenda, with whom he is living, drinking, brawling, and loving. Weiner’s London is equally a protagonist of his story. Dirty, somber, the city is a palimpsest, the contemporary curry houses and mosques reinscribing the landscape dotted with old churches, monuments and graveyards that invoke old England’s Christian saints and glorious past.

Fiction. The best part of any good fantasy world is the promise that you could get there yourself. In THE ALPINE TALES, that promise is kept. The Three Queens Wilderness is only the swing of an ice ax away from the mountains you may think you know. It is a world inhabited by three strange sisters at mortal odds—and by marmots and ouzels and pocket gophers ready to help you find your way. The dangers you’ll face are ever present. For this alpine world was a place of perfection until, by the bane of the Lava Beast, it crumbled into something sadder. Join the quest to repair the ruins of glistening peaks and endless forests, and discover a land you will dearly love. Here, for the first time, all four books of THE ALPINE TALES, newly revised, are collected in a single volume.

Mac Wellman Left Glove 978-0-9844142-0-8, $12, paper, 56 pp. SOLID OBJECTS 2011

Drama. Poetry. From three-time Obie Award-winner Mac Wellman comes this complex and provocative play about two simple events. Yamaha Nazimova has dropped a glove. Jewel Beckett picks it up. Between these two occurrences, a band of moths, fingers, demons, and all-too-human pronouns sing 27 choruses rich with puns, reversals, exclamations, whisperings, cries of loss, cries of victory, arguments, and resolutions. Turning dramatic convention on its head, LEFT GLOVE offers a profound view of a mishap and its ramifications in the public and private sphere. “Chorus of One Resolved, that: LEFT GLOVE will fit thee like a glove if thou relishest the sort of play in which the most aweinspiring acrobatic feats are performed by no other character than language. A left glove may have been lost, but here thou shall encounter dexterous play bountifully. And that is that. YEA”—Mónica de la Torre. Charles Dodd White and Page Seay, Editors Degrees of Elevation: Short Stories of Contemporary Appalachia 978-1-933964-39-3, $18, paper, 186 pp. BOTTOM DOG PRESS 2010

Fiction. “Hard, brilliant, and dark as coal, this brand new and necessary volume captures Appalachia today, a place where the old bedrock verities of family, community, belief, work, and the earth itself are all in painful “Upheaval”—to use the title of Chris Holbrook’s story herein. From manic to elegiac to rough, raw, beautiful, and heartbreaking, these stories will strike the reader as both absolutely true and as unforgettable, like the high pure ring of an ax on a cold winter morning, vibrating across distance, hanging in the air long afterward”—Lee Smith.

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Literary Nonfiction Ammiel Alcalay, Editor Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, Series 2 978-0-615-43350-9, $25, paper, 322 pp. THE CENTER FOR THE HUMANITIES, THE GRADUATE CENTER, CUNY 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Poetry History & Criticism. Poetics. LOST & FOUND features extra-poetic work— correspondence, journals, critical prose, and lecture transcripts—by New American Poets, with their precursors and followers. SERIES 2 features Diane di Prima’s Mysteries of Vision: Some Notes on H.D. and R.D.’S H.D. (on Robert Duncan); a lecture on Charles Olson by Robert Duncan; selections from El Corno Emplumado by Margaret Randall; selections from Muriel Rukeyser’s Spanish Civil War archive; and Jack Spicer’s Beowulf. Edited, annotated, and with accompanying essays, Bob Holman has said “These books are gems. The idea is genius.” Diane di Prima has called the series “a gold mine” and Joanne Kyger writes: “What a brilliant cast of characters. Just exactly what one (myself) would like to read.” Presented as an integrated set of chapbooks, LOST & FOUND is essential reading that proposes new and alternative versions of literary and cultural history. Kazim Ali Fasting for Ramadan: Notes from a Spiritual Practice 978-1-932195-94-1, $19.95, paper, 212 pp. TUPELO PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Middle Eastern Studies. Memoir. FASTING FOR RAMADAN is structured as a chronicle of daily meditations, during two cycles of the 30-day rite of daytime abstinence required by Ramadan for purgation and prayer. Estranged in certain ways from his family’s cultural traditions when he was younger, Ali has in recent years re-embraced the Ramadan ritual, and brings to this rediscovery an extraordinary delicacy of reflection, a powerfully inquiring mind, and the linguistic precision and ardor of a superb poet. Kazim Ali’s searching descriptions of the Ramadan sensibility and its arduous but liberating annual rite of communal fasting is sure to be a revelation to many readers—intellectually illuminating and aesthetically exhilarating. “[A]n important book.... Written ‘in that third voice, a voice between two people, neither one nor the other, neither embodied nor disembodied.’ I have wanted to know what fasting in Islam involved...to admire its intentions and effects in solitude.... I hope that multitudes will find their way to [this book]”—Fanny Howe. Stan Apps The World as Phone Bill 978-0-9728880-4-2, $19.95, paper, 248 pp. COMBO BOOKS 2011

Nonfiction. Literary Nonfiction. Poetics. THE WORLD AS PHONE BILL comprises essays in the tradition of Michel de Montaigne, Charles Olsen, and Buck Rogers. Authors covered include John Cage, Hannah Weiner, Nada Gordon, Frank O’Hara, K. Silem Mohammad, Gary Sullivan, Rodney Koeneke, Mathew Timmons, and Ara Shirinyan. Topics covered include poetic inspiration, the uses of “Flarf,” literary representation in an age of globalism, and the rough stance of urban poets.

Listed alphabetically by author. See also Poetry, Prose, and Cross-Genre Writing (p.9), Fiction and Drama (p.51), and Magazine sections (p.73)

Rae Armantrout, Steve Benson, Carla Harryman, Lyn Hejinian, Tom Mandel, Ted Pearson, Bob Perelman, Kit Robinson, Ron Silliman, and Barrett Watten The Grand Piano: Part 10 978-0-9790198-9-0, $12.95, paper, 269 pp. MODE A/THIS PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Biography and Memoir. PART 10 is the final installment of the Grand Piano “experiment.” This volume draws some of its themes from experimental music, current Amercian politics, newspaper headlines, and an array of influnces (Kathy Acker, Lorenzo Thomas, Laura (Riding) Jackson, Robert Grenier, Larry Eigner, Clark Coolidge). At the same time, almost all the pieces of the ending volume make some kind of return to the complicated impulses that initally launched the project: autobiography, resistance to autobiography, writing, language-as-such, memory, time, and especially the rich historical meeting point of these ten authors in the Bay Area literary scene(s) of the 1970s. Lawrence Aronsen City of Love and Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties 978-1-55420-048-1, $24, paper, 208 pp. NEW STAR BOOKS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Canadian History. Aronsen tells the story of the spread of the “hippie” lifestyle north from San Francisco into Vancouver, and how this rocked the buttoned-down, Protestant, white-bread frontier town that Vancouver had been up til then. A chapter on the impact of the sexual revolution tells of love-ins, free clinics, public nudism, and the Penthouse and other Vancouver fleshpots. Other chapters recount the stories of the drugs and music that were embraced by the new generation of Vancouverites; of peaceful anti-war protesters and the birth of Greenpeace, and the harder edge of the Yippies and their occupations and street theatre; and of Vancouver Free University and the new ideas that forever changed the way Canadian schools work. Aronsen’s readable account is illustrated with over 100 photos, drawings, and advertisements drawn from the newspapers—both straight and Georgia Straight— that chronicled the era. Leslie Baer-Brown and Bob Rhein Earth Keepers: A Sourcebook for Environmental lssues and Action 978-1-56279-070-7, $14.95, paper, 304 pp. MERCURY HOUSE 1995

Literary Nonfiction. Environmental Studies. EARTH KEEPERS is a uniquely user-friendly guide to environmental theory and action by the hosts of the nationally syndicated radio program EarthWatch. This sourcebook explains root causes of many of the earth’s pressing problems, along with specific suggestions for addressing them.

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LITERARY NONFICTION Michael Basinski, Editor Gerald Locklin: A Critical Introduction 978-1-935402-00-8, $25, paper, 509 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Poetry History & Criticism. “I am most happy to say that this book celebrates the poet Gerald Locklin. It is an homage to Gerald Locklin, a poet whose neck of the woods is the literary underground, which is the publishing stratum that has delivered HOWL and The Maximus Poems and Ulysses and The Making of Americans and Flower Fist and Bestial Wail. Not a bad list. Certainly, yes, this book is a tribute to Gerry Locklin and it is long and fat. It is also a tribute to iceberg lettuce and French’s Mustard. It is a tribute to Locklin’s independent voice. His is a forceful, absolutely clear and democratic voice that constantly reminds all of us in the realm of the poem that our poetry is all of us who make all of our poetry”—Michael Basinski. Bill Berkson For the Ordinary Artist: Short Reviews, Occasional Pieces and More 978-1-60964-005-7, $16, paper, 294 pp. BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Art. “‘Opinions are not literature’ Gertrude Stein famously admonished Ernest Hemingway. It’s a maxim that puts most art critics behind the Eight-Ball. Not Bill Berkson. His criticism doesn’t just deliver an opinion, it embodies an experience, matching the texture and plasticity of visual forms with a vividness and suppleness of language that gives the reader something shapely and immediate to respond to thereby opening path ways in the mind to the image or object being evoked and judged. His subject is art; his essays and critical prose poems are uncommonly graceful literary artifacts”—Robert Storr. Sandy Bothmer Creating the Peaceable Classroom: 21st-Century Wellness Guide for Teachers, Students and Parents 978-0-9845921-1-1, $29.95, paper, 224 pp. HOBBLEBUSH BOOKS 2011

Nonfiction. Education. CREATING THE PEACEABLE CLASSROOM is intended to assist the community of teachers, paraprofessionals, counselors, psychologists, school nurses, administrators, students, and parents, to create calm and useful energy within themselves and their environment. “Sandy offers concrete ideas for creating a peaceful learning environment. What a gift it would be for a child to be taught within an environment of such peaceful attention. What a gift for the world as well—creating space one child at a time”—Stephanie Rutt, Director of the Tree of Life Yoga Studio, School for Yoga and Sacred Living and the Gifts of Grace Foundation. George Bowering Horizontal Surfaces 978-1-897388-71-6, $18, paper, 93 pp. BOOKTHUG 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Every once in a while Bowering has to turn to a book such as this. HORIZONTAL SURFACES came from the same atelier as Craft Slices and Errata. You could keep the book somewhere that you visit for short periods, reading one item at a time. You should also feel free to add a sentence or two. George Bowering writes these books about literary composition as well as short stories and the odd novel. He is also a poet of sorts, and won some prizes for his poetry a long time ago. He is currently working on another book about baseball, having found another niche that will never be seen by his country’s literary types.

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William M. Brinton and Alan Rinzler, Editors Without Force or Lies: Voices from the Revolution of Central Europe in 1989-90 978-0-916515-92-8, $10.95, paper, 495 pp. MERCURY HOUSE 1990

Literary Nonfiction. Political Science. Eastern European Studies. A collection of essays, speeches, and eyewitness accounts from those directly involved in the events of 1989 in Central Europe, WITHOUT FORCE OR LIES includes essays, speeches, and eyewitness accounts from Andrei Sakharov, Václav Havel, Alfred Herrhausen, Reiner Kunze, Edith Anderson, Eric Gabriel, Günther Grass, Ewa Kuryluk, Leszek Balcerowicz, Adam Michnik, Josef Škvorecký, Tamas Aczel, George Paul Csicsery, Norman Manea, Thomas A. Oleszczuk, John Jekabson, William M. Brinton, “Z” (anonymous), and Mikhail Gorbachev. Brother Anthony, Hong Keong-Hee, and Steven D. Owyoung Korean Tea Classics 978-89-91913-66-0, $25, paper, 196 pp. SEOUL SELECTION 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Southeast Asia Studies. Poetry. Translated from the Korean by Brother Anthony of Taizé, Hong Keong-Hee, and Steven D. Owyoung. Three ancient texts expressing the essence of the Korean Way of Tea are here translated into English for the first time. The oldest, “ChaBu, Rhapsody to Tea,” by Hanjae Yi Mok (1471-1498), is a sophisticated and delicate celebration of tea. The author was a scholar of considerable attainments who died far too early. The 19th century saw a tea revival among Korean literati. Its main guide was the Venerable Cho-ui (1786-1866). The first of his tea texts, “ChaSinJeon, Chronicle of the Spirit of Tea,” he copied from a Ming Chinese work to serve as a practical guide to tea. The great poem “DongChaSong, Hymn in Praise of Korean Tea,” for which Cho-ui is chiefly celebrated, is a set of formal poetic stanzas celebrating tea with notes by the author to elucidate the references. Nash Candelaria Second Communion 978-1-931010-56-6, $18, paper, 240 pp. BILINGUAL REVIEW PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. Latino/Latina Studies. “In a way you could say that my family was one of the causes of the Los Angeles riots of 1992.” So begins Nash Candelaria’s insightful memoir that focuses on how and why he chose to become a writer. As he explores his family’s more than 300-year history in New Mexico as well as his own journeys in the Southwest, the author reveals intimate details about his life and the truths he learned about family, self, and the world around him. With sparse, clear language, Candelaria tells a tale of conquistadors, family, a Depression-era childhood, and his personal transformation into a writer. Part family history and part self-examination, SECOND COMMUNION is a must-read for aspiring writers, those interested in Southwest history, and students and teachers of Chicano literature. Paul Caponigro The Voice of the Print 978-1-882265-02-2, $30, paper, 43 pp. MUSE PRESS 1994

Limited Edition. Photography. Literary Nonfiction. Art. Text and photographs by Paul Caponigro. “The origin of this...lies in an unpublished manuscript dealing with the craft of photography.” Contains tritone images of museum quality. The exhibit grew from work at the Photographic Center at Monterey California in 1989, which was first shown at the Center in June 1989.

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LITERARY NONFICTION R. Cheran, Dalbir Singh, Chelva Kanaganayakam, and Sudharshan Durayappah, Editors World Without Walls: Being Human, Being Tamil 978-1-894770-71-2, $36, paper, 240 pp. TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Asian & Asian American Studies. Tamil Studies. In the past decade, Tamil studies has become an important and integral part of South Asian studies and diaspora studies. Tamil as one of the few classical and living languages is a testimony of secularism while celebrating various religious and political traditions. The essays included in this volume offer a nuanced view of BEING HUMAN, BEING TAMIL in the context of South Asia and the diaspora. As the title suggests, the papers in this volume explore the multiple ways of being Tamil and the cultural, religious and poetic linkages that contributed to the emergence and articulation of Tamilness in a global context. Cho In-souk and Robert Koehler Seoul’s Historic Walks 978-89-91913-31-8, $16, paper, 134 pp. SEOUL SELECTION 2008

Nonfiction. Travel. Southeast Asia Studies. In this handy guidebook based on the tours offered by the Seoul Foundation of Arts and Culture, architect and Korean traditional architecture expert Cho In-souk and magazine editor Robert Koehler share their appreciation of architecture and love for Seoul’s history as they will take you through some of Seoul’s lesser-known historic sites and give visitors a better understanding of Seoul’s development from medieval walled city to modern metropolis. Seoul is a fascinating city where old and new often coexist in jarring contrast. The best way to explore it, however, is to stretch your legs and walk, and SEOUL’S HISTORIC WALKS will show you where to go. Pilar Cuder-Domínguez, Belén Martín-Lucas, and Sonia Villegas-López, Editors Transnational Poetics: Asian Canadian Women’s Fiction of the 1990s 978-1-894770-68-2, $25.95, paper, 200 pp.

Sharon Doubiago My Father’s Love, Volume II: The Legacy 978-0-9841304-3-6, $20, paper, 510 pp. WILD OCEAN PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. “My soul looks back,” James Baldwin said, “and wonders how I got over.” Volume two of Sharon Doubiago’s memoir, MY FATHER’S LOVE, reveals the legacy of her father’s sexual and psychological abuse that continued throughout his life and the toxic effects it has had on the lives of everyone in the family. How family secrets ripple through succeeding generations with devastating results, how family myths become more powerful than truth, how they are maintained at any cost, and how denial blinds us to what we do not want to, or cannot bear to see. Most of us never realize we are in denial but Doubiago is not most of us, for she is a poet of exceptional power and insight. This is a book about all of us, how we deceive ourselves and others, believe what we want to believe, what we are conditioned to believe, how we are, as R. D. Laing put it, “destroying ourselves with violence masquerading as love.” America collectively is suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. MY FATHER’S LOVE helps us “to get over.” Hans Magnus Enzensberger Fatal Numbers: Why Count on Chance 978-1-935830-01-6, $13.95, paper, 52 pp. UPPER WEST SIDE PHILOSOPHERS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Philosophy. Economics & Statistics. Translated from the German by Karen Leeder. Acclaimed poet, essayist, and cultural critic Hans Magnus Enzensberger takes a fresh, sobering look at our faith in statistics, our desire to predict the future, and our dependence on fortuitousness. Tracing the interface between chance and probability in medical diagnostics, risk models, economics, and the fluctuations of financial markets, FATAL NUMBERS goes straight to the heart of what it means to live, plan, and make decisions in a globalized, digitized, hyperlinked, science-driven, and uncertain world. Foreword by Gerd Gigerenzer. Illustrations by David Fried.

TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Asian American Studies. Literary Criticism. TRANSNATIONAL POETICS: ASIAN CANADIAN WOMEN’S FICTION OF THE 1990s examines the writing of a generation of Asian Canadian women authors that started publishing in the 1990s: Shauna Singh Baldwin, Rachna Mara, Anita Rau Badami, Shani Mootoo, Shree Ghatage, Yasmin Ladha, Larissa Lai, Evelyn Lau, Lydia Kwa, Tamai Kobayashi, Hiromi Goto, Sally Ito, Kerri Sakamoto. The aim of the book is to determine how they re-conceptualize racial and gender identity and how they relate to the Canadian cultural climate in the new century, while providing an analysis of the innovative approach they have brought to genre and aesthetics. Thomas DePietro, Editor Frank Lentricchia: Essays on His Works 978-1-55071-312-1, $18, paper, 175 pp. GUERNICA EDITIONS 2011

Nonfiction. Literary Criticism. Italian American Studies. This collection of essays and reviews concerns Frank Lentricchia’s fiction work that explored the complexities of ethnic and artistic identity, which he did with great anguish and style. Contributing essays are Philip Tinari, Kit Wallingford, Vince Passaro, Jody McAuliffe, Fred L. Gardaphe, Thomas Hove, Jennifer Wellman, Nicholas Birns, Andrew DuBois, Daniel O’Hara, and Gina Masucci-MacKenzie. With an introduction, interview, bibliography, and biography by editor Thomas DePietro.

Thomas Farber The Face of the Deep 978-1-56279-112-4, $14.95, paper, 192 pp. MERCURY HOUSE 1998

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. Nature Writing. THE FACE OF THE DEEP is a lyrical and revealing exploration of the Pacific in all its aspects. “THE FACE OF THE DEEP is a marvelous, poetic achievement, the best book on diving that I have ever read, a remarkable meditation on the polysemous richness of the sea, and a fascinating log of a risky voyage of self-discovery”—Steven Greenblatt. Richard Froude FABRIC: Preludes to the Last American Book 978-0-9829896-0-9, $15, paper, 112 pp. HORSE LESS PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Poetry. Cross-Genre. “I love Richard Froude’s declarative, incandescently plain sentences, which at first seem like high-stakes non sequiturs, then a study in perfect, surprising aphorism, then a deftly woven web of profundity. The formal distillation and intellectual range of this book are impressive enough; even more so is Froude’s gentle but insistent touching on questions of God, mortality, war, memory, family, intimacy, and history. Froude sets up poetic shop in the fraught space between ‘terror and fertility,’ and wrests from it this exceptionally beautiful, intelligent book”—Maggie Nelson.

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LITERARY NONFICTION Warren Fulton and David Jaffin Poemed on a Beach: A Skeptic’s Guide to Modern Poetry 978-0-9812744-7-8, $16.95, paper, 213 pp. AHADADA BOOKS 2010

Nonfiction. Poetry Reference. A linguist (Warren Fulton) describes what happens when a poet from New York by way of Germany (David Jaffin) comes to a beach in Florida for a poetry reading. Confronting a curious but cautious international audience, Jaffin finds that although there are many ways to misunderstand what he’s saying, there are many more ways of uncovering meaning, even down to levels of truth he himself had not traveled. The book is not only a treatment of how modern-day people respond to a modernist voice, but also how in the process they learn the language of poetry, an unfamiliar idiom struggling for survival in the Information Age. What were first seen as obscurities gradually open onto vistas of mystery, and puzzlement is transformed to appreciation. Thus, POEMED ON A BEACH is a guide to contemporary poetics addressing new and wary readers. As such, it is eminently suited for use in poetry circles and introductory literature classes. Richard Gambino Blood of My Blood: The Dilemma of the Italian Americans 978-1-55071-101-1, $10, paper, 390 pp. GUERNICA EDITIONS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Social Science. Italian American Studies. Second Edition. Since its first publication in 1974, BLOOD OF MY BLOOD has become the most highly esteemed book on Italian Americans. It is also rare that it is both a best-seller and a college text. “Its data is presented with scholarly precision; yet the author’s style, which he peppers with autobiographical tidbits, makes it immensely readable”—The New York Times.

Susan Gardner Drawing the Line 978-0-9799865-5-0, $24.95, cloth, 288 pp. RED MOUNTAIN PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. Women’s Studies. DRAWING THE LINE is the story of personal adventure and redemption, tracing a life lived continually on the edge between chaos and harmony, tragedy and joy. Beyond her recounting of extraordinary places and events, Susan Gardner gives us a perceptive, generational voice. She recalls pivotal decades of societal change and touches on basic themes of human experience that are universal and timeless. Spanning six decades and various countries of East Asia, Europe and Mexico, it tells of a precocious child driven to excel and to escape a turbulent, combative home life. We experience the struggles and accomplishments of a uniquely gifted woman as she overcomes official strictures and domestic discord to become an accomplished artist. Ultimately, we see her break free of old patterns and constraints to live the joyous complexity of personal fulfillment and the promise of a new beginning.

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Robert Goodnough, Editor Artists’ Sessions at Studio 35 (1950) 978-0-9824090-0-8, $10, paper, 64 pp. SOBERSCOVE PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Art. In April of 1950, about two dozen of the artists who came to be known as the Abstract Expressionists met for a series of discussions about their own work as well as the contemporary scene. Nearly 60 years after the actual meetings took place, the transcript of ARTISTS’ SESSIONS AT STUDIO 35 (1950) still pulses with the heated discussions around basic artistic issues like titling, process, relationship to history, community, and professionalism. Often referenced, but rarely fleshed out, this series of closed meetings allows readers fly-on-the-wall access to the artists’ discussions. The goal of the current reprint is to refresh this document by giving it a new life in a new form. Durs Grünbein The Vocation of Poetry 978-0-9795829-9-8, $13.95, paper, 62 pp. UPPER WEST SIDE PHILOSOPHERS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Poetry History & Criticism. Translated from the German by Michael Eskin. This extraordinary book offers a dazzling personal poetics as well as a sustained engagement with the origins of poetry itself. In tracing an arc from the landfills and forests of an East German childhood to the “global air-space of poetry,” it takes in a breathtaking poetic itinerary from the Classics to the present day. Emerging from the heart of the European tradition, every page is packed with insight, wit and linguistic surprises, superbly rendered in Michael Eskin’s supple English. But more than that: this is a volume with a mission. In reckoning with the possibilities of poetry, it sets out to show us a better way of being in the world: “a guide to thinking and feeling with precision.” Written by one of the most exciting and thought-provoking writers of the moment, THE VOCATION OF POETRY is essential reading for anyone interested in modern poetry or in modern life. Andrei Guruianu Metal and Plum: A Memoir 978-0-932412-96-6, $16.95, paper, 124 pp. MAYAPPLE PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. Soccer balls putter down dusty streets, classmates forage through dumps for toys, while friends carry on inexplicably hopeful conversations in bread lines. This extraordinary memoir captures the essence of cultural dislocation and hope. Guruianu eloquently conveys the impact of immigration on his family, contrasting the hardships of Ceauşescu’s Romania with the challenges of adaptation to the United States. But in the end it is Guruianu’s lyric and earnest voice that hits home in METAL AND PLUM, titled so aptly for its juxtaposing of unlike worlds and how much it hurts the heart when you go home and find that the place you knew is no longer there.

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LITERARY NONFICTION Ken Harvey A Passionate Engagement: A Memoir 978-1-929355-68-6, $18, paper, 208 pp. AEQUITAS BOOKS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. LGBT Studies. Memoir. A PASSIONATE ENGAGEMENT is both a love story and a story of political activism. In this remarkable memoir, Ken Harvey reveals his own experience of coming out as a gay man, of meeting and falling in love with the man who would become his husband, and of growing into a social and political activist. Much of the story is filled with the kind of sensitive writing that Harvey demonstrated in his earlier work, but this book also shows a different side as he moves from the fictional to nonfictional, as he puts himself bluntly in the middle of the conflict. As the book progresses, the reader moves with Harvey from outside observer to inside participant of the political struggle for same-sex marriage. His shift is significant, and a reader can’t help but be moved along with him. This is a timely and important book, one that puts a truly human face onto this important social movement. Michael Hemery No Permanent Scars 978-0-9792410-6-2, $16, paper, 292 pp. SILENCED PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. An instant classic, NO PERMANENT SCARS reads how creative nonfiction should read: like fiction. Like nonfiction. Like memoir. Like humor. Like literature. Like life. It’s about childhood, adulthood, the neighborhood, and what it means to be a kid, a parent, a teacher, a human. Michael Hemery illuminates an honest working-class existence, offering both the sober realities of class discrimination and the humor and love of family. Intertwined with serious issues such as suicide, alcoholism, abuse, religion, and immigration, Hemery also endures a painfully slow and often naive coming of age (he once mistook an obvious prostitute for an office supply store employee). This is going to be the best book you’ll read this year. Barbara Henning Looking Up Harryette Mullen: Interviews on Sleeping with the Dictionary and Other Works 978-0-9823387-5-9, $14, paper, 120 pp. BELLADONNA* 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Poetry History & Criticism. African American Studies. Introduction by Juliana Spahr. Six years after Harryette Mullen and Barbara Henning first met at the legendary Nuyorican Poets Café, Henning proposed she do a postcard-format interview of Mullen that would allow for a “very small postcard space in which to respond...[t]he idea of cards flying through the mail & overlapping.” Thus began what is now LOOKING UP HARRYETTE MULLEN, unique collaborative conversations that offer a candid look at the influences, politics, and poetics that inform Mullen’s poetry. The conversation expands even further in the second set of spoken interviews that include concerns as far-ranging as the Heaven’s Gate cult, Oulipian constraints such as S + 7 and lipograms, syllabic rhymes, and Aimé Césaire. In stunning detail, Mullen and Henning discuss the origins of each poem in Mullen’s highly acclaimed collection Sleeping with the Dictionary. For poets and readers of poetry interested in witnessing how a brilliant, singular writer embarks on the journey of generating work to scholars researching the inception of Mullen’s poems, this book informs by way of technique and vitality.

Gary Francisco Keller, Editor Good Bandits, Warrior Women, and Revolutionaries in Hispanic Culture 978-1-931010-71-9, $17, paper, 150 pp. BILINGUAL REVIEW PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Latino/Latina Studies. GOOD BANDITS, WARRIOR WOMEN, AND REVOLUTIONARIES IN HISPANIC CULTURE is the fruit of a groundbreaking conference that was held in Phoenix in 2009. Following an introduction by Gary Francisco Keller, the first section of this book contains articles dedicated to good, goodbad, and bad characters, both fictional and historical, across Hispanic culture, among them gay caballeros, the heroes and villains of “Zapata” Westerns, and Don Quixote. The second section explores personages from popular culture and from novels set in the decades just before and during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, such as Demetrio Macías in Azuela’s Los de abajo; Angustias Farrera, the title character of the novel and film La negra Angustias; Santa Teresa de Cabora and her villainous sister Jovita; Pancho Villa’s transformation from bandit/revolutionary to popular saint and hero of the people; and Jesusa Palancares, the fictionalized soldadera of Poniatowska’s Hasta no verte Jesús mío. Crawford Kilian Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia 978-0-9784981-5-3, $24, paper, 160 pp. COMMODORE BOOKS 2008

Nonficton. African American Studies. Canadian History. The voyage north of some 600 blacks from San Francisco to Victoria during the 1858 Fraser Canyon Gold Rush was one of the most unusual mass migrations in North American history. While the British colonies of the Pacific Northwest were overrun with migrants from all lands on the quest for gold, this black community sought freedom and political enfranchisement as much as fortune. GO DO SOME GREAT THING describes a history that stands at the crossroads of multiple national narratives—the imperial contest between Britain and the United States, the emergence of Canada as a state, the fate of dozens of First Nations, and the furthest and most unlikely reaches of the global African diaspora. Originally published in 1978, this new edition adds vital information gathered by Crawford Kilian over the last thirty years. Robert Koehler Hangeul: Korea’s Unique Alphabet 978-89-91913-69-1, $15, paper, 104 pp. SEOUL SELECTION 2010

Nonfiction. Korean Language Reference. Writing Systems. Southeast Asia Studies. Hangeul, the indigenous writing system of Korea, was promulgated in 1446. It is an ingenious system that utilizes modern and scientific linguistic theories and principles of Korean traditional culture to perfectly express the sounds of the Korean language. Crafted by some of the leading scholars of the age, including the brilliant King Sejong the Great, the alphabet has been widely lauded by scholars the world over for its advanced phonetic system and ease of use. This work examines the unique characteristics of the Hangeul writing system, its history, and its impact on Korean society and culture. “Whether or not it is ultimately the best of all conceivable scripts for Korean, Hangeul must unquestionably rank as one of the great intellectual achievements of humankind” —Geoffrey Sampson.

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LITERARY NONFICTION Nancy Kuhl The Book Remembers Everything: The Work of Erica Van Horn 978-1-887123-79-2, $20, cloth, 122 pp.

Ian Macdonald and Betty O’Keefe Quiet Reformers: The Legacy of Early Victoria’s Bishop Edward and Mary Cridge 978-1-55380-107-8, $21.95, paper, 200 pp.

GRANARY BOOKS/CORACLE PRESS 2011

RONSDALE PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Art. Poetry. Artists’ Books. Erica Van Horn’s books offer miniaturist celebrations of small rituals and everyday civic and household matter, from shop signs, cook books and French lessons to napkins and envelope interiors. Many of her books have been collaborations with poets, artists and bookmakers such as Laurie Clark, Simon Cutts and Harry Gilonis. This volume surveys her books from the early 1980s to the present.

Literary Nonfiction. Biography. Canadian Studies. This lively biography of Bishop Edward Cridge and his wife Mary paints a vivid picture of early Victoria as it developed from an isolated Hudson’s Bay Company post into the bustling capital of British Columbia. Recruited from England by Governor James Douglas in 1854 to be the Church of England chaplain of Fort Victoria, Edward Cridge became an important figure in the spiritual life of the city as the rector of Christ Church. The Cridges also became two of Victoria’s foremost social reformers, leaving an indelible mark on British Columbia’s social institutions. Living through the terrible smallpox and black measles epidemics, the latter taking four of their own children, the inseparable pair worked to create the first hospital, beginning with a few beds in a rented cottage and living to see it transformed into the Royal Jubilee. As the first superintendent of education, Cridge played an essential role in B.C.’s early school system. When abandoned children were left at the parsonage door, Mary created Victoria’s first orphanage.

Stephen Lapthisophon Writing Art Cinema 1988-2010 978-1-4507-4210-8, $12, paper, 103 pp. THE GREEN LANTERN PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Film Studies. Art. Stephen Lapthisophon brings his skills as an installation artist to the page with six essays written over the last 20 years. For fans of both continental philosophy and modern poetry and prose, Lapthisophon shows how writing about writing, art, and cinema can dissolve into its subject, becoming all of those things or none of them. With an introduction by Devin King. Printed in an edition of 250. Kristin Lucas Refresh 978-0-9824090-2-2, $7, paper, 16 pp. SOBERSCOVE PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Art. On October 5, 2007, Kristin Lucas became the most current version of herself when she succeeded in legally changing her name from Kristin Sue Lucas to Kristin Sue Lucas in a Superior Court of California courtroom. REFRESH presents transcripts of courtroom discussions between Lucas and the presiding judge that enter into philosophical territory as they debate change, its perceived meaning, and its relation to law. Peng Ma Peng Ma: Abstract Ink Painting 978-1-894770-57-6, $48, paper, 100 pp. TSAR PUBLICATIONS 2011

Nonfiction. Art. Asian American Studies. Bilingual Edition. Edited with a preface by Lien Chao. This book provides a critical study of the abstract ink painting of the Chinese Canadian artist Peng Ma, who early in his career saw abstraction as an artistic advancement on tradition. Chao’s critical approach to Ma’s work juxtaposes stimulation and resistance as the ongoing impact of Western abstract painting on contemporary Chinese brush painting. She goes on to investigate how Ma’s cross-cultural experience has gradually developed his hybrid aesthetics to embrace Eastern and Western art traditions to create his own distinctive art. Includes 210 reproductions.

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Paul Kei Matsuda, Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, and Xiaoye You, Editors The Politics of Second Language Writing: In Search of the Promised Land 978-1-932559-11-8, $30, paper, 336 pp. PARLOR PRESS 2006

Literary Nonfiction. Education. ESL. Language Arts & Disciplines. THE POLITICS OF SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING: IN SEARCH OF THE PROMISED LAND is the first edited collection to present a sustained discussion of classroom practices in larger contexts of institutional politics and policies. Contributors focus on the policies on assessment, placement, credit, class size, course content, instructional practices, teacher preparation, and teacher support. They examine politics in terms of the relationships and interaction between second language writing professionals and colleagues at the program, department, school, college, and university levels and beyond. Contributors also explore—through critical reflections and situated descriptions of their teaching practices in larger institutional contexts—how these policies and politics affect pedagogical practices. Readers will learn why classroom practices are not neutral, pragmatic space but ideologically saturated sites of negotiation. Contributors are anling Fu, Marylou Matoush, Kerry Enright Villalva, Ilona Leki, Ryuko Kubota, Kimberly Abels, Angela M. Dadak, Jessica Williams, Wei Zhu, Guillaume Gentil, Kevin Eric DePew, Xiaoye You, Deborah Crusan, Sara Cushing Weigle, Jessie Moore Kapper, Christine Norris, Christine Tardy, Stephanie Vandrick, and Barbara Kroll.

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LITERARY NONFICTION Susan McNicoll The Opening Act: Canadian Theatre History 1945-1953 978-1-55380-113-9, $24.95, paper, 280 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Canadian Theater History. The conventional opinion is that professional Canadian theater began in 1953 with the founding of the Stratford Festival. But Susan McNicoll asks how this could be, when the majority of those taking the stage at Stratford were professional Canadian actors. To answer this question, McNicoll delves into the period to show how in fact the unbroken chain of Canadian professional theater began just after World War Two, when a host of theater people decided that Canada needed its own professional theater groups. Drawing on personal interviews with many of the actors and directors active in the period after the war, McNicoll explores the role of such companies as Everyman in Vancouver, New Play Society in Toronto, Canadian Repertory Theatre in Ottawa, Théâtre du Nouveau Monde in Montreal, and many more. In 1953 the Stratford Shakespeare Festival ultimately showed the world that Canada was ready for center stage, but the real birth of professional theater happened in the years leading up to that moment. The volume includes over 50 photos of scenes from plays of the time and selections from McNicoll’s interviews with such luminaries as Christopher Plummer, Joy Coghill, Amelia Hall, and Herbert Wittaker.

Victor Perera Rites: A Guatemalan Boyhood 978-1-56279-065-3, $12.95, paper, 208 pp. MERCURY HOUSE 1994

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. Latino/Latina Studies. Jewish Studies. RITES is Perera’s powerful portrait of growing up as a Jewish boy in the exotic and violent world of Guatamala in the forties. “Victor Perera is one of those rare writers who need never suffer the uncertainties of translation, for besides his fluency in both English and Spanish, he has both a Latin American and a North American sensibility. RITES is another fine example of how affectingly he can cross from one to the other, bringing all his insights with him”—Alastair Reid. Tom Pickard More Pricks Than Prizes 978-0-9824100-9-7, $12, paper, 148 pp. PRESSED WAFER 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. MORE PRICKS THAN PRIZES is a memoir that takes Pickard from Newcastle in 1968 to London’s Old Bailey in 1976, with side trips to Poland. The poet Basil Bunting makes an appearance. As does Paul McCartney. This is a true crime story with a happy ending. “I am an old admirer of Tom Pickard’s poetry and believe as does Basil Bunting that he is one of the most live and true poetic voices in Great Britain” —Allen Ginsberg.

Judy Molyneux California Gold 978-1-60052-044-0, $60, paper, 282 pp.

Harry Polkinhorn and Alfredo Velasco, Editors Caló: A Dictionary of Spanish Barrio and Border Slang 978-1-881523-21-5, $21, paper, 146 pp.

PRE PRESS 2011

JUNCTION PRESS 2011

Art. California Studies. “I am amazed by what I see: the storms, the surf, the surging power of the freeways, the multitudinous patterns of light and color that make up our reality. All of this creates a dance that is separate from my inner shadows and petty concerns, and yet to paint it, transform it, allows me entry if only for an instant. Doing homage to the outside world, I do homage to myself. To paint something is to touch something, is to give it structure and meaning and respect. But beyond all that, I feel there is a fundamental need in all of us to be in the presence of, completely open to, and able to love unconditionally, who we are and where we are. Painting our reality is a way of translating that well of ongoing life force. At best, it’s an act of worship”—Judy Molyneux.

Nonfiction. Reference. Latino/Latina Studies. “Polkinhorn and Velasco have busted the borders of linguistic analysis and Chicano talk assumptions. I hear the voices of my uncle Beto from El Paso in the 30s, the new multi-vocalities of the ‘¡Orale!’ generations of Latin America and the ever swashbuckling cross-cultural speakers and singers of the world. This is the unchained rap of the people! Tune into its poetic-love, communityrenaissance and heart-rhythm dance. A twenty-first century ring-tone. ¡De aquellas! Right on!” —Juan Felipe Herrera.

Kate Tarlow Morgan Circles and Boundaries 978-1-60001-004-0, $48, cloth, 221 pp. 978-1-60001-003-3, $18, paper, 221 pp.

CITY LIGHTS PUBLISHERS 2011

FACTORY SCHOOL 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Cultural Studies. “Although the prevailing winds of thought continually warn and admonish us about the unreliability of narratives and narrators and the need to distrust them, all of the texts collected here are stories, in one form or another. But, very importantly, they are also stories about stories that never give up this very basic and ancient rite of passage, in which any story is, at the very least, also a commentary about itself. What had been a very deep conflict (‘if the poetry comes out in a variety of forms, there is always certain punishment for the betrayal of one form by another,’ as Morgan once wrote) finds resolution in the range and variety of the writing gathered here: stories, fable-like pieces, fieldwork, anthropological investigation, literary criticism, scholarly research, reportage, and poetry”—from the afterword by Ammiel Alcalay.

Will Potter Green Is the New Red: In Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege 978-0-87286-538-9, $16.95, paper, 256 pp. Nonfiction. Political Science. Environmentalism. At a time when everyone is going green, most people are unaware that the FBI is using anti-terrorism resources to target environmentalists. Here is a guided tour into an underground world of radical activism and an introduction to the shadowy figures behind the headlines. But here also is the story of how everyday people are prevented from speaking up for what they believe in. Like the Red Scare, this “Green Scare” is about fear and intimidation, and Will Potter outlines the political, legal, and public relations strategies that threaten even acts of nonviolent civil disobedience with the label of “eco-terrorism.”

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LITERARY NONFICTION John Rich Korean War in Color: A Correspondent’s Retrospective on a Forgotten War 978-89-91913-64-6, $85, paper, 248 pp.

Marianne Roccaforte Bridges in the Mind: An Artist’s Handbook for Everyday Living 978-0-9815163-5-6, $16.95, paper, 216 pp.

SEOUL SELECTION 2010

BENU PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Photography. Southeast Asia Studies. As if it weren’t bad enough that the Korean War is, for many in the West, a “forgotten war” wedged between the larger conflicts of World War II and Vietnam, its legacy has been conveyed largely in the medium of black and white photography, putting up yet another psychological barrier between the conflict and modern day audiences. In KOREAN WAR IN COLOR, published to mark the 60th anniversary of the Korean War, the renowned war correspondent breaks down this barrier with a jaw-dropping collection of color photographs of the Korean War, perhaps the finest collection of color images of the conflict anywhere. In vivid hues of blue, green and red, Rich’s photographs take the war out of the history books, allowing readers to better connect with a conflict that, while forgotten, continues to impact the lives of Koreans to this day.

Literary Nonfiction. Art. Psychology. Finally—someone is saying what successful artists have always known. This practical book helps the creative mind to thrive, not just survive, in the everyday world. A systematic approach to the fascinating and complex topic of the artist’s imagination as revealed in ordinary situations is explored in this useful, honest, and encouraging book. Drawing on well-grounded psychological research and theory—and informed by years of direct experience counseling and teaching college-student artists—she examines the realities, delights, and challenges of having a strong sense of wonder and an imagination that’s constantly “on.” In a tone that both honors and guides the reader, the author weaves in voices of successful writers, visual artists, musicians, actors, and dancers, and offers easy-to-practice techniques for such situations as transitioning from an absorbing session of art-making, communicating effectively in social and business settings, managing intense sensory and emotional experience, and sustaining a healthy and active creative life. Insightful and applicable for any person possessing an artistic sensibility—this book enlightens, validates, and empowers, ultimately helping to build new bridges of understanding.

Michele Rider Women in the Financial District: A Photo Essay 978-0-9828284-2-7, $14, paper, 46 pp. INK. 2010

Nonfiction. Photography. WOMEN IN THE FINANCIAL DISTRICT is a study of the female form within the masculine structures of a downtown atmosphere. Michele captures her subjects in the perfect light and creates stunning photos of images we see every day, dragging the mundane into art.

Jean-Pierre Rogel Evolution: The View from the Cottage 978-1-55380-104-7, $21.95, paper, 176 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2010

Ford Robbins Connections: A Visual Journal 978-0-9799865-3-6, $34.95, paper, 96 pp. RED MOUNTAIN PRESS 2009

Literary Nonfiction. Photography. Art. Santa Fe photographer Ford Robbins presents images that speak of his journey through the land over many decades. His love of the land in its various manifestations is acutely present in each image he creates. Land, sky, water, and architecture mark the paths he has taken, the connections he has found and recorded. Such are the memories documented in this deeply engaging book of black-and-white photographs. “Texture and the abstracted nature of [Robbins’s] selective focus create surfaces many painters would envy. This is the artist’s eye at work...to use the reality of material existence as a way to break through the limits of time and place” —The Santa Fe New Mexican. “[A] love affair with light across America”—The Bloomsbury Review.

Literary Nonfiction. Natural History. Translated from the French by Nigel Spencer. With all the attention given to “creationism” in the news these days, Jean-Pierre Rogel felt it was important to show how Darwin’s concept of natural selection can be seen in action in everyday situations. Beginning with a familiar cottage scene that includes squirrels, loons, salmon and bears, Rogel expands his scope to explore the emerging field of evolutionary developmental biology, showing how genes play a role in the extraordinary diversity of the plant and animal kingdom. Readers may be surprised to discover which animal is most closely related to whales, how nature makes a fin into a paw, how salmon have adapted to gaps in fishing nets, and what really sets humans apart from chimpanzees. Bertha Rogers, Editor Book Arts 2010: Bright Hill Center 978-1-892471-63-5, $16, paper, 140 pp. BRIGHT HILL PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Art. Photography. Catalog of the Eighth Americas Curated Book Arts Exhibit at Bright HIll Literary Center, curated by Elsi Vassdal Ellis and Bertha Rogers. The catalog includes detailed photographs of the finest in contemporary book arts and book binding. Individual artists’ books contain both words and images in a book format with a clearly-stated concept, thoughtprovoking text, engaging visual and exceptional technical presentation, an imaginative approach, and an integrated overall delivery. Includes artists’ books by Alex Appella Alicia Bailey, Tara Bryan, Sarah Bryant, Deborah Phillips Chodoff, Sally Canzoneri, Elaine Downing, Elsi Vassdal Ellis, Wendy Fernstrum, Patricia Grass, Karen Hanmer, Margery S. Hellman, Sun Young Kang, Monique Lallier, Elaine Langerman, Sara Longworthy, Roberta Lavadour, Aimee Lee, Julia Leonard, Jim Machacek, Rachel Melis, Kelly Nelson, Bonnie Thompson Norman, Tara O’Brien, Jan Owen, Susan Porteous, Johanne Renbeck, Bertha Rogers, Abigail Rorer, Sibyl Rubottom, Laura Russell, Carolyn Shattuck, Ellen Sheffield, Jessica Spring, Peter & Donna Thomas, Jill Timm, Jennifer Vignone, Susan Viguers, Shu-Ju Wang, Beata Wehr, Laurie Weiss, Asa Yoshie.

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LITERARY NONFICTION Zach Savich Events Film Cannot Withstand 978-0-9844889-4-0, $14, paper, 102 pp.

Seoul Selection Editorial Team The Korea Success Story 978-89-91913-72-1, $12, paper, 52 pp.

RESCUE PRESS 2011

SEOUL SELECTION 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. Art. “I want to write you a beautiful book of prose, against not least the before-toolong loss of tongue and sense and all sun-defiant hues on the river bend, and none of us able to say or touch or see, soon enough, soon enough, aground, to give you this my voice today nevertheless, withstanding, nevertheless, given everything, for you, a clear note from a complicated bell,” begins Zach Savich in his first book of prose. He goes on to compose a powerful, precise, and playfully chaotic book-length lyric memoir on art, process, friendship, place, and imagination.

Nonfiction. Southeast Asia Studies. It is often said that Korea did in 50 years what the developed nations of the West took 200 years to do. This is not that great an exaggeration. When Korea was liberated from 35 years of colonial rule in 1945, it found itself a desperately poor and in many respects backwards nation with little experience with capitalism, democracy, and the global economy. Fast forward some 50 years, and what you behold is a nation that would be virtually unrecognizable to observers from the 1950s. Seoul, once a bombed-out city that more resembled a refugee camp than a national capital, glistens with glass and steel, its night skies flickering with the lights and energy of a city on the move. Thanks to wise policymaking, international help and a 5,000-year-old culture of hard work and education, Korea transformed into a developed nation almost overnight, with the world’s 15th largest economy. In 2009, a country that once survived on foreign aid joined the OECD Development Assistance Committee, a club of some of the world’s biggest donor nations. In November 2010, Korea became the first Asian nation and first non-G8 nation to host the G20 summit.

Leslie Scalapino How Phenomena Appear to Unfold 978-1-933959-12-2, $24, paper, 400 pp. LITMUS PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. New and Expanded Edition. “In ‘Eco-logic in Writing,’ one of many brilliant essay-talks in this volume, Leslie Scalapino asks, ‘Seeing the the moment of, or at the time of, writing, what difference does one’s living make?’What more crucial question for those concered not only with writing but with poethics: composing words into a socially conscious wager. For Scalapino the essay is a poetic act; the poetic act, essay. It’s in that combination that her textual eros—the lush beauty of it!—could reject aesthetic purity and risk the rawness of genuinely new thought, touching what she called ‘the rim of occurring.’ ‘Writing on rim’ is a celebration of the wondrous present, but requires agonistic struggle with the ugly—poverty, war, institutional brutality, racism, sexism, homophobia. Scalapino’s Steinian strategy of recomposing the vision of one’s times, ‘altering oneself and altering negative social formation,’ is her artfully problematized project of writing ourselves into a better future. With compassion and humor, Scalapino was indeed living on the rim of occurrence. That is the living in the writing that produced this work—its fundamental optimism and ebullient credo: ‘The future creates the past’” —Joan Retallack. Gershom Scholem Two Draft Essays from 1918 978-0-917453-43-4, $11, paper, 31 pp.

Nancy Shaver Henry at Home 978-0-9824090-1-5, $20, paper, 72 pp. SOBERSCOVE PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Art. Photography. Design. HENRY AT HOME presents photographs of objects from Henry— a shop in Hudson, NY, run by Nancy Shaver—as they appear in the homes of the people who purchased them. In addition to these photographs, taken by the objects’ owners, HENRY AT HOME includes artwork by Nancy Shaver, an introduction by Lucy Raven, and an interview between Shaver and Steel Stillman. “Houses and interiors have played a huge role in my life. Though they’ve taken a lot of my time, working on them has been a vital part of my art work. They’ve taught me a great deal about space and light and color. And because I’ve never had any money, but have always wanted to have art, my houses have taught me about looking. My houses have been laboratories where I’ve had visual encounters that I wouldn’t have had any other way. Henry comes out of that experience”—Nancy Shaver.

BAMBERGER BOOKS 2011

Nonfiction. Literary Criticism. Jewish Studies. Translated from the German by W. C. Bamberger. These two drafts essays capture the 21-year-old Scholem’s thoughts on two novels: Eduard Mörike’s Nolten the Painter, and Rainer Maria Rilke’s The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge. This is the first translation into English of these two excerpts from Scholem’s diaries of 1918. Included are notes by the translator W. C. Bamberger.

Roger Shepherd, Andrew Douch, and David A. Mason Baekdu-daegan Trail: Hiking Korea’s Mountain Spine 978-89-91913-67-7, $39, paper, 446 pp. SEOUL SELECTION 2010

Nonfiction. Travel. Southeast Asia Studies. This guide will get you packed up and ready to hit the road. The Baekdu-daegan chain of mountains forms the backbone of the Korean Peninsula. It has always occupied a very special place in the hearts of Koreans. More than just a series of rocky ranges, it is the source of the life and dynamic energy of the Korean people and shelters many of their cultural and historical treasures. The longdistance Baekdu-daegan hiking trail provides a great opportunity for outdoor enthusiasts living in Korea and abroad to hike their way through a 735-kilometer geographical repository of culture and history that continuously yields new discoveries and experiences in what is a still largely unexplored part of a busy peninsula.

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LITERARY NONFICTION Juliana Spahr and Stephanie Young, Editors A Megaphone: Some Enactments, Some Numbers, and Some Essays about the Continued Usefulness of Crotchless-pantsand-a-machine-gun Feminism 978-1-930068-48-3, $27.95, paper, 402 pp. CHAINLINKS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Feminist Studies. Poetics. A MEGAPHONE collects a number of enactments that Juliana Spahr and Stephanie Young did between the years of 2005-2007. In these enactments, they attempted to think with the playful dogmatism of a feminist tradition that they call “crotchless pants and a machine gun” (obviously referencing Valie Export) in order to locate what might still be useful today about the somewhat beleaguered “second wave” feminist traditions. To that end, Spahr and Young lectured in Oulipian slenderized baby talk about figures such as Carolee Schneemann and Marina Abramovic; they counted the numbers of women and men and transgendered people in various poetry anthologies; and they invited writers from outside the US to talk about being a writer where they live (over seventy-five writers from Puerto Rico to Morocco to Croatia to South Africa to Syria to Micronesia to Korea responded). Also included in A MEGAPHONE are discussions of that always contested relationship between feminism and “experimental” poetry by Julian T. Brolaski, E. Tracy Grinnell, Paul Foster Johnson, Christian Peet, Barbara Jane Reyes, Dale Smith, and A. E. Stallings. The book ends with a (soma)tic writing exercise from CAConrad, one designed to encourage readers and writers to create open, yet still meaningful, feminist alliances. Mark Spitzer After the Orange Glow 978-0-9826646-1-2, $15.50, paper, 266 pp.

Alazar Tesfamichael Trials and Tribulations 978-0-9818859-2-6, $19.95, paper, 310 pp. BEATITUDE PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. African & African American Studies. Middle Eastern Studies. Edited by Bridget Flanagan. Few countries in the world suffered more from the trials and tribulations of the 20th century than Ethiopia and its sister, Eritrea. From Italian and British colonialism through fascism to the bloody communist dictatorship of Mengistu Haile Meriam, to mass starvation and civil war, the people of those countries have endured and, despite everything, have triumphed. Alazar Tesfamichael lived through all of it. He walked on foot through Africa and the Middle East in search of a better life; and, with every fiber of his being, kept alive his passionate love of freedom. This is his story in his own words. Erin E. Tocknell Confederate Streets 978-0-9844629-0-2, $16.95, paper, 141 pp. BENU PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. “We’re born into a world already in progress, like arriving late at a movie. Erin Tocknell, born to Nashville, loved the city in a wide-eyed, child’s way, before she had a glimmer of the history that had shaped what she took to be her world. CONFEDERATE STREETS recalls how it feels to wake up to history, to understand you are living right in the midst of it. Not all the lessons are easy, but in Tocknell’s telling we come to appreciate the rewards of facing up to the hard facts, of refusing the false glamour of living innocent of history. CONFEDERATE STREETS reminds us what as a nation we seem always to be forgetting, just how far love and understanding and goodwill can take us toward the promised America”—Kevin Oderman.

MONKEY PUZZLE PRESS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. “Mark Spitzer has written a humping, yowling, spewing, browbeating memoir about his cumming crackling youth spent in Paris at George Whitman’s Shakespeare and Co., a historic and histrionic wacky crash-pad bookstore where misguided and horny youth flop and fuck and color poetry while smoking hashish and drinking wine. AFTER THE ORANGE GLOW recounts how fuck buddies, perverted patrons, jaded poets and trustafarians distracted Spitzer from translating Genet’s poetry and writing the Manifesto of his generation, and is a must must must read for anyone who gives a shit about poetry, the Beats, Paris, sex, drugs, and apparitions”—Elva Maxine Beach. Elizabeth Swados Waiting: Selected Nonfiction 978-1-934909-21-8, $19, paper, 200 pp. HANGING LOOSE PRESS 2011

Literary Nonfiction. Memoir. In WAITING, Elizabeth Swados brings her lively autobiographical pieces— many of which first ran in The New York Times and O, The Oprah Magazine—together for the first time. Among those appearing in the book are Sean Penn, Meryl Streep, Yehuda Amichai, Ellen Stewart, and Marlon Brando, as well as moving accounts of Swados’s schizophrenic brother, her work with young actors from New York to Abu Dhabi, and her explorations of the creative process—all told with grace and humor.

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Alan Twigg The Essentials: 150 Great B.C. Books & Authors 978-1-55380-108-5, $24.95, paper, 320 pp. RONSDALE PRESS 2010

Nonfiction. Literary History & Criticism. Canadian Studies. Lively, illustrated and guaranteed to be controversial, THE ESSENTIALS: 150 GREAT B.C. BOOKS & AUTHORS serves as an unprecedented guide to books from and about British Columbia—culled from Alan Twigg’s unrivaled knowledge of more than 200 years of BC literary history. It also identifies 100 essential authors, such as Alice Munro, Earle Birney and Eric Nicol, who did not have one particular book that is outstanding but have enjoyed outstanding careers. This volume is a must-have for anyone who cares about British Columbia as an original society. Barry Wallenstein, Editor For Enid with Love: a festchrift 978-1-935520-12-2, $16.95, paper, 180 pp. NYQ BOOKS 2010

Literary Nonfiction. Poetry History & Criticism. Jewish Studies. This is a gathering of essays, poems, and recollections dedicated to the memory of poet, scholar, teacher, and political activist, Enid Dame [1943-2003]. The rich array of contributions were written by friends, colleagues, and some who didn’t know Enid personally but were moved and influenced by her life’s work and ebullient spirit. For nearly a quarter of a century, she edited, with her husband Donald Lev, Home Planet News, and was a beloved member of the New York poetry community for as long. The cumulative effect of this gathering of encomiums recalls Enid as only language and art can do.

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Magazines

Listed alphabetically by title. See also Poetry, Prose, and Cross-Genre Writing (p.9), Fiction and Drama (p.51), and Literary Nonfiction (p.63)

Bryan Borland, Editor Assaracus Issue 01: A Journal of Gay Poetry 978-0-9832931-3-2, $12, paper, 128 pp.

Bin Ramke, Editor Denver Quarterly 45:2 No ISBN, $10, paper, 120 pp.

SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS 2011

DENVER QUARTERLY 2011

Magazine. Poetry. LGBT Studies. ASSARACUS is a quarterly journal of gay poetry, features a substantial collection of work by ten gay poets. ISSUE 01 features poetry by Shane Allison, Jay Burodny, Gavin Dillard, Christopher Hennessy, Matthew Hittinger, James Kangas, Raymond Luczak, Frank J Miles, Stephen Mills, and Eric Norris. Edited by poet Bryan Borland, author of the American Library Association-honored My Life as Adam.

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Essays. DENVER QUARTERLY is a journal of contemporary poetry, fiction, and thought. The new issue, Volume 45, Number 2, features work from Cynthia Arrieu-King, Michelle Auerbach, Bruce Beasley, Janet Bowdan, James Capozzi, Chelsea Dappen, Julie Doxsee, Laura Eve Angel, Elaine Equi, Rebecca Farivar, Thomas Fink, Norman Finkelstein, Craig Foltz, Bill Freind, Elisa Gabbert, Carmen Gimenez Smith, Robert Glick, Joseph Hansen, Brian Henry, Terri Kapsalis, Lily Ladewig, Patrick Leonard, Eugene Lim, Bridget Lowe, Sara Michas-Martin, David Milofsky, Bernard Noël (translated by Elena Rivera), Eric Pankey, Ray Ragosta, Jo Sarrzotti, Kate Schapira, Aaron Shunin, Arthur Sze, Tony Trigilio. Cover art by Shelton Walsmith.

Bryan Borland, Editor Assaracus Issue 02: A Journal of Gay Poetry 978-0-9832931-1-8, $12, paper, 134 pp. SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS 2011

Magazine. Poetry. LGBT Studies. ASSARACUS is a quarterly journal of gay poetry, features a substantial collection of work by ten gay poets. ISSUE 02 features poetry by Philip F. Clark, Collin Kelley, Michael Klein, Ron Mohring, Evan J. Peterson, Steven Riel, Sam Sax, Robert Siek, Christopher Soden, and Wonder Dave. Edited by poet Bryan Borland, author of the American Library Association-honored My Life as Adam. Kevin Murphy, Editor Dark Sky Magazine 978-0-9830674-1-2, $10, paper, 95 pp. DARK SKY BOOKS 2010

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Art. Literary Nonfiction. DARK SKY MAGAZINE features exciting new work from talented short story writers, poets, essayists, photographers and artists. Contributors include Elisa Gabbert, Stephen Sturgeon, Molly Gaudry, Harold Jaffe, Rusty Barnes, Jensen Beach, Sarah Sorensen, Lisa Iglesias, Jorg Meyer, Kate Lebo, Shannon Carson, and others. Bin Ramke, Editor Denver Quarterly 45:1 No ISBN, $10, paper, 120 pp. DENVER QUARTERLY 2010

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Literary Nonfiction. In its forty-fifth year of continuous publication, the DENVER QUARTERLY is a journal of contemporary poetry, fiction, and thought. The Fall issue, Volume 45, Number 2, features work from Seth Abramson, Karen Leona Anderson, J. Mae Barizo, Bridgette Bates, Travis Brown, Sten Carlson, Robin Clarke, Mary Crow, Dj Dolack, Sarah Goldstein, Noah Eli Gordon, Stephanie Harrison, Nathan Hill, Andrew Jordan, Byron A. Kanoti, Krystal Languell, Timothy Liu, Sarah Madsen, Shane McCrae, Sally Molini, Harryette Mullen, Elisabeth Murawksi, Martin Nakell, Keith Newton, Adam Peterson, Tim Roberts, Susan Scarlata, A.K. Scipioni, Sejal Shah, Jennifer Shepard, Allison Titus, Yona Wallach (trans. by Linda Zisquit), Adam Weinstein, Joshua Marie Wilkinson, Cori A. Winrock, with cover art by Jiha Moon.

Elzbieta Szoka and Joe W. Bratcher, III, Editors The Dirty Goat 23 No ISBN, $10, paper, 184 pp. HOST PUBLICATIONS 2010

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Art. THE DIRTY GOAT 23 makes its first stop in the republic of Georgia with twenty-two pages of bilingual poetry from Zviad Ratiani, Besik Kharanuali and Givi Alkhazishvili—three of Georgia’s most celebrated poets. Europe continues to shine with stunning photography by Polish artist Staszek Koba, bilingual Dutch poetry by Menno Wigman, and a short story by Brigitte Kronauer, one of Germany’s most dynamic writers. Contemporary Hebrew poetry makes its first appearance with ten pages of bilingual Hebrew and English poems by Ronny Someck. THE DIRTY GOAT continues to celebrate the rich literary tradition of Latin and South America with a variety of work from a number of nations. Mexico figures heavily in issue 23 with bilingual poetry by Alberto Blanco and Miguel Gonzalez-Gerth and a very unique trilingual selection— Mayan, Spanish and English—by Briceida Cuevas Cob. “Death and the Maiden,” a hauntingly brilliant story by Uruguay’s Juan Carlos Onetti, and the evocative poetry of Ecuador’s Santiago Vizcaíno conclude our Latin American journey. A large selection of new American poetry is peppered throughout the issue, as well as Cassandra Lewis’s “Two Women on the Shore,” a new drama inspired by the Edvard Munch woodcut prints. With a variety of literature from fifteen countries across the globe, THE DIRTY GOAT 23 is not to be missed. Rebecca Wolff, Editor Fence Vol. 13 No. 2 Winter 2011 978-1-934200-46-9, $10, paper, 170 pp. FENCE BOOKS 2011

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Nonfiction. Art. The latest issue of FENCE features work by K. Silem Mohammad, Lydia Davis, Rae Armantrout, Gina Frangello, Harmony Holiday, Matthew Henriksen, Arielle Greenberg, Brendan Lorber, Simon DeDeo, Helen Dimos, Lance Phillips, Jacqueline Waters, Cynthia Marie Hoffman, Lee Etheredge, Ona Kalima Mirkinson, Martha Schwendener, Lindsey Baggette, Marjorie Welish, Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé, Brian Young, John Kinsella, Caren Beilin, Stuart Krimko, and others.

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MAGAZINES Hollie Hardy, Editor Fourteen Hills Vol. 17 No. 1 978-1-889292-50-2, $9, paper, 175 pp.

J. D. Lloyd, Editor Spillway No. 14 978-1-893670-57-0, $9, paper, 134 pp.

FOURTEEN HILLS PRESS 2010

TEBOT BACH 2010

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Literary Nonfiction. Art. Issue 17.1 of FOURTEEN HILLS features an interview with Adam Johnson, by Fernando J. Pujals, and contains poetry by Lisa Badner, Jason Bayani, Karina Borowicz, Maxine Chernoff, Renee Emerson, Noah Gershman, Jenny Hanning, Peter Harris, Jane Hilberry, Myron Michael, Charlotte Pence, Alice Pero, Jennifer Reimer, Ann Robinson, Elizabeth Robinson, Michael Schiavo, and Dawn Tefft; fiction by Jacob M. Appel, Matthew S. Baker, Michael Reid Busk, Jackie Corley, Steve Ellerhoff, Adam Johnson, James O’Brien, and Molly Prentiss; nonfiction by KC Eib, Stephen Elliott, Kasper Hauser, and Dan Moreau; and art by Dena Schuckit, Damon Soule, and Jon Stich.

Magazine. Poetry. The latest in the ongoing poetry anthology series, SPILLWAY NO. 14 features work by Tony Barnstone, Janée J. Baugher, Gerald Locklin, Lyn Lifshin, Molly Fisk, Hari Bhajan Khalsa, Susan Terris, Judith Pacht, Florence Weinberger, Charles Harper Webb, Wendy Ortiz, Arfah Daud, Trish Dugger, Daniel Saalfeld, Bill Kemmett, and many others.

Robert Hershon, Dick Lourie, and Mark Pawlak, Editors Hanging Loose 97 No ISBN, $9, paper, 120 pp. HANGING LOOSE PRESS 2010

Magazine. Poetry. Art. HANGING LOOSE 97 features an art portfolio by Sean Grandits and exciting new work from Madhuri K. Akin, Indran Amirthanayagam, Stephen Beal, Jen Benka, Philip Dacey, Harley Elliott, Robert Gregory, Robert Hershon, Emmett Jarrett, Gary Lenhart, Joel Lewis, D. Nurkse, translations of Anna Maria Shua by Steven J. Stewart, David Wagoner, and many more. Jed Birmingham and Kyle Schlesinger, Editors Mimeo Mimeo 4 No ISBN, $10, paper, 90 pp. MIMEO MIMEO/CUNEIFORM 2011

Magazine. Poetry. Artists’ Books and the Mimeograph Revolution. MIMEO MIMEO 4 focuses on the poets, artists, printers, and publications of the British Poetry Revival, a particularly rich period of activity that ran roughly parallel to the New American Poetry of the postWWII era. On both sides of the Atlantic, the dominant modes of poetics, publishing, and media were being thought anew. Featuring: wide-ranging interviews with Tom Raworth, David Meltzer, and Trevor Winkfield; insightful essays by Richard Price, Ken Edwards, and Alan Halsey; a selection of letters from Eric Mottram to Jeff Nuttall providing a British perspective on the Lower East Side Scene; and a long out-of-print statement by Asa Benveniste, poet and publisher of London’s infamous Trigram Press. Alan Bajandas and Benjamin Solomon, Editors The Open Face Sandwich, Volume 2 978-1-880855-18-8, $15, paper, 192 pp. FIFTH PLANET PRESS 2010

Magazine. Fiction. Art. THE OPEN FACE SANDWICH, VOLUME 2 is a smörgåsbord of the ecstatic and deviant with a dollop of blood pudding on top. In it we serve up work by award-winning playwright Young Jean Lee along side the surreal dreams of a precocious nine-yearold, and step by step instructions on how to kill a mountain lion. It offers post-apocalyptic maternity woes from Blake Butler and pre-apocalyptic maternity woes from our Swedish correspondent, Agnes Gerner. It presents true visions of Neptune-blue gods in Iraq and demonstrates the tricky logistics of photographing bloated flesh. It deconstructs suicide with Gregory Sherl, spotlights children’s drawings of prostitutes and male pattern baldness, and brazenly lets Jim Meirose put his rare meat in the blender, all while giving forum to Karen Tauches’s visually stunning interrogations of permanence and solidity in a rapidly disappearing world.

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Susan Terris, Editor Spillway No. 15 978-1-893670-61-7, $9, paper, 110 pp. TEBOT BACH 2010

Magazine. Poetry. Art. SPILLWAY NO. 15 is the first with editor Susan Terris. From now on each issue will have a theme, and this first volume begins with “All in the Family”—poems on the subject of family and its many creative combinations. Contributors include Gary Soto, CB Follett, Paul Hoover, Ilya Kaminsky, Jennifer K. Sweeney, Kristin Camitta Zimet, Keith Ekiss, David St. John, Maxine Chernoff, Zack Rogow, Nicole Cooley, Ann Howells, Chad Sweeney, and many others. Ben Fama, Editor Supermachine Issue Three No ISBN, $12, paper, 120 pp. SUPERMACHINE 2011

Magazine. Poetry. ISSUE THREE features work by Joseph Calavenna, Heather Christle, Lyndsey Cohen, CAConrad, Kate Durbin, Sasha Fletcher, Rachel B. Glaser, Andrew Gorin, Kristen Kosmas, Lily Ladewig, Mark Leidner, Ben Mirov, Amanda Nadelberg, Ben Pease, Levi Rubeck, Tomaž Šalamun, Mathias Svalina, Michael Thomas Taren, and Mike Young. Edward Foster, Editor Talisman 38/39/40 No ISBN, $20, paper, 417 pp. TALISMAN HOUSE 2010

Magazine. Poetry. This is the final print issue of TALISMAN: A JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY POETRY AND POETICS. Talisman was founded in 1987. The first issue appeared in the fall of 1988. The present issue, including numbers 38/39/40, concludes the series. A new series, on the web, is planned for 2012. Contributors include Donny Smith, Joseph Donahue, John Olson, Peter Valente, John High, George Kalamaras, Thomas Fink, Basil King, Nathaniel Tarn, Joel Lewis, Evie Shockley, Burt Kimmelman, Timothy Liu, Ed Roberson, Michael Basinski, Christine Deavel, Efe Murad, Peter O’Leary, David Need, Vyt Bakaitis, Laynie Browne, Heller Levinson, Barbara Henning, Rachel Blau DuPlessis , Kimberly Lamm, Edward Foster, Andrew Klobucar, Jon Curley, Tony Iantosca, M. G. Stephens, Dean Kostos, Andrey Gritsman, Samuel Menashe, Herschel Silverman, Jeffrey Kahrs, Kimberly Lyons, Daniel Morris with Patrick Durgin, Scott Rudd, Deniz Perin, Peter Swanborn, Kristina Hocevar, Colleen McCarthy, Riva Roller, J.W. Marshall, Dianne Timblin, Asalet Erten, Ilhan Berk, Lisa Fishman, Jordan Davis, Patrick Herron, and Eric Hoffman, plus a selection of modern Tamil poetry edited and translated by Lakshmi Holmström.

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MAGAZINES Mark Spitzer, Editor Toad Suck Review: The Transitional Issue 978-0-615-42505-4, $15, paper, 150 pp. DEPARTMENT OF WRITING, UCA 2011

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Literary Nonfiction. Translations. Reviews. Art. The historic EXQUISITE CORPSE ANNUAL has gone bust and the TOAD SUCK REVIEW has stepped up to take its place! Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Xaviera Hollander, Jack Hirschman, Antler and Lyn Lifshin take it to the streets! Also included: C.D. Wright, Mike Topp, Teresa Bergen, Jack Collom, Michael Myron, Leticia Luna, Jose Beduya, David Gessner, Marck Beggs, Kevin Brockmeier, William Lychack, Willie Smith, Jacques Prévert, Daniel Grandbois, and a legion host of brand new blood! This is cutting-edge literary history disguised as an annual anthology of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, artwork, translations, and reviews! Gillian Conoley, Editor Volt No. 16 No ISBN, $13, paper, 146 pp. VOLT 2011

Magazine. Poetry. Published yearly in the spring, VOLT seeks to offer a range of adventurous writing across its characteristically large page dimensions. VOLT NO. 16 includes work by Ammiel Alcalay, Tyler Carter, Rachel Loden, Zach Savich, Dan Thomas-Glass, Matthew Cooperman, John Taggart, Giovanni Singleton, G. C. Waldrep, Donald Revell, Barbara Claire Freeman, Lyn Hejinian, Norma Cole, Tyrone Williams, Rae Armantrout, and many others. Blas Falconer and Amy Wright, Editors Zone 3 Vol. 25 No. 2 Fall 2010 No ISBN, $5, paper, 104 pp. ZONE 3 PRESS 2010

Magazine. Poetry. Fiction. Nonfiction. Interviews. The FALL 2010 issue features new poems by Patricia Lockwood, Nance van Winckel, Michael Chitwood, Okla Elliott, Shannon K. Winston, and others; fiction by Joe Hall, Philip Asaph, and Joe Woodward; and nonfiction by Irene O’Garden. VOL. 25 NO. 2 also features interviews with Coleman Barks, Joe Hall, Shane McCrae, and Eileen G’Sell. Cover photograph by Susan Bryant.

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ELEVATORS P ER IL A S A RCHITE C T UR AL E N R I C HM E N T by Hazel White The canopy of a tree, say a poplar, like a round house, removes the site of vulnerability — the obvious entrance and back with no protection. Privacy can creep about in the leaves and below them, hang here as lungs on the outside.

by Rena Rosenwasser Amorphous forms alighted like film. Shapes gave up their names. Gender lost its essential glue. I was moving in and out of my substance as if I had numerous sleeves.

I set this book down and wept. . . . It is the most beautiful piece of writing I have read in many years.

This passionate psalm poem is a labyrinth inside a travelogue inside a dream. — JANE MILLER

— BHANU KAPIL

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THE POST-APOLLO LESLIE SCALAPINO The Dihedrons Gazelle-Dihedrals Zoom

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L I TM U S PR E S S HOW PHENOMENA APPEAR TO UNFOLD LESLIE SCALAPINO New & Expanded Edition In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eco-logic in Writingâ&#x20AC;? one of many brilliant essay-talks in this volume, Leslie Scalapino asks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seeing at the moment of, or at the time of, writing, what difference does oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s living make?â&#x20AC;? What more crucial question for those concerned not only with writing but with poethics: composing words into a socially conscious wager. For Scalapino the essay is a poetic act; the poetic act, essay. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in that combination that her textual erosâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the lush beauty of it!â&#x20AC;&#x201D;could reject aesthetic purity and risk the rawness of genuinely new thought, touching what she called â&#x20AC;&#x153;the rim of occurring.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Writing on rimâ&#x20AC;? is a celebration of the wondrous present, but requires agonistic struggle with the uglyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;poverty, war, institutional brutality, racism, sexism, homophobia. Scalapinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steinian strategy of recomposing the vision of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s times, â&#x20AC;&#x153;altering oneself and altering negative social formation,â&#x20AC;? is her artfully problematized project of writing ourselves into a better future. With compassion and humor, Scalapino was indeed living on the rim of occurrence. That is the living in the writing that produced this workâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;its fundamental optimism and ebullient credo: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The future creates the past.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JOAN RETALLACK hfgg R qhj8ff R 9 omnČ&#x2021;gČ&#x2021;oiiokoČ&#x2021;ghČ&#x2021;h

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Featuring French poetry in translation guest edited by Cole Swensen with Harold Abramowitz, Etel Adnan, Amaranth Borsuk, Oscarine Bosquet, StĂŠphane Bouquet, Paul Braffort, RocĂ­o CerĂłn, MarieLouise Chapelle, Suzanne Doppelt, Johanna Drucker, Caroline Dubois, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, FrĂŠdĂŠric Forte, Isabelle Garron, Lawrence Giffin, Robert GlĂźck, Stephanie Gray, Ă&#x2030;ric Houser, Gabriela Jauregui, Reynaldo JimĂŠnez, Pierre Joris, Paul Killebrew, Brian Laidlaw, Virginie Lalucq, RenĂŠ Lapierre, David Lespiau, Lauren Levin, RomĂĄn LujĂĄn, Sabine Macher, Vannina Maestri, Jill Magi, JĂŠrĂ´me Mauche, Susan Maxwell, Catherine Meng, Erin Morrill, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jane Joritz-Nakagawa, Anne Parian, VĂŠronique Pittolo, Virginie Poitrasson, Pascal Poyet, Nathalie Quintane, Joan Retallack, Prageeta Sharma, Lauren Shufran, SĂŠbastien Smirou, Christopher Stackhouse, GwenaĂŤlle Stubbe, Ă&#x2030;ric Suchère, Mathew Timmons, G.C. Waldrep, Alli Warren, David Wolach, and BĂŠnĂŠdicte Vilgrain, with artwork by Lee Etheredge IV. hfgg R qgk8ff R 9 omnČ&#x2021;gČ&#x2021;oiiokoČ&#x2021;hgČ&#x2021;j

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Author Index Chester Aaron, About Them / p. 51 Tom Abrams, Goya’s Head / p. 51 Seth Abramson, Northerners / p. 9 Lizzy Acker, Monster Party / p. 51 Akbar Ahmed, Suspended Somewhere Between: A Book of Verse / p. 9

Jed Birmingham and Kyle Schlesinger, Editors, Mimeo Mimeo 4 / p. 74 Francesca Lia Block, Fairy Tales in Electri-City / p. 11 Dan Boehl, Kings of the F**king Sea / p. 11 Robert Bohm, Closing the Hotel Kitchen / p. 12 Roger Bonair-Agard, Gully / p. 12

Ammiel Alcalay, Editor, Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, Series 2 / p. 63

|Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 01: A Journal of Gay Poetry / p. 73

Ammiel Alcalay, neither wit nor gold / p. 9

Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 02: A Journal of Gay Poetry / p. 73

Will Alexander, Compression & Purity / p. 9 Kazim Ali, Fasting for Ramadan: Notes from a Spiritual Practice / p. 63 Paula Gunn Allen, America the Beautiful: Last Poems / p. 9 Nin Andrews, The Book of Orgasms / p. 9 Stan Apps, The World as Phone Bill / p. 63 Rae Armantrout, Steve Benson, Carla Harryman, Lyn Hejinian, Tom Mandel, Ted Pearson, Bob Perelman, Kit Robinson, Ron Silliman, and Barrett Watten, The Grand Piano: Part 10 / p. 63

Daniel Borzutzky, The Book of Interfering Bodies / p. 12

Peter Conners, The Crows Were Laughing in Their Trees / p. 15

George Bowering, Caprice / p. 52

Russell Connor, Toys from My Attic / p. 52 Gillian Conoley, Editor, Volt No. 16 / p. 75

Patrick Bowman, Torn from Troy: Odyssey of a Slave / p. 52

Giuseppe Conte, Angelina’s Lips / p. 53

John Brandi, Seeding the Cosmos: New & Selected Haiku / p. 12

Leslie Baer-Brown and Bob Rhein, Earth Keepers: A Sourcebook for Environmental lssues and Action / p. 63

Per Aage Brandt, These Hands / p. 13

Troy Burle Bailey, The Pierre Bonga Loops / p. 10

Jason Bredle, Smiles of the Unstoppable / p. 13

Alan Bajandas and Benjamin Solomon, Editors, The Open Face Sandwich, Volume 2 / p. 74

Daniel Brenner, June / p. 13

Helen Barolini, Crossing the Alps / p. 51 Dennis Barone, Parallel Lines / p. 10 Ed Barrett, Down New Utrecht Avenue / p. 10 Michael Basinski, Editor, Gerald Locklin: A Critical Introduction / p. 64

William M. Brinton and Alan Rinzler, Editors, Without Force or Lies: Voices from the Revolution of Central Europe in 1989-90 / p. 64 Louis Daniel Brodsky, At Dock’s End: Poems of Lake Nebagamon, Volume Two / p. 13

Julian T. Brolaski, gowanus atropolis / p. 13

Brother Anthony, Hong Keong-Hee, and Steven D. Owyoung, Korean Tea Classics / p. 64 Derrick Weston Brown, Wisdom Teeth / p. 13

Tobias Amadon Bengelsdorf, Editor, The Fiction at Work Biannual Report / p. 51

Laynie Browne, Roseate, Points of Gold / p. 14

Jen Benka, Pinko / p. 11

Mahogany L. Browne, #Dear Twitter: Love Letters Hashed Out Online in 140 Characters or Less / p. 14

Seth Berg, Muted Lines from Someone Else’s Memory / p. 11

Joshua Corey, Severance Songs / p. 16 Brad Crenshaw, My Gargantuan Desire / p. 16 Pilar Cuder-Domínguez, Belén Martín-Lucas, and Sonia Villegas-López, Editors, Transnational Poetics: Asian Canadian Women’s Fiction of the 1990s / p. 65 Weston Cutter, You’d Be a Stranger, Too / p. 53 Garin Cycholl, Hostile Witness / p. 16 Cyril Dabydeen, Editor, Beyond Sangre Grande: Caribbean Writing Today / p. 16 Rachel Daley, Plasmos / p. 16

A. W. DeAnnuntis, Master Siger’s Dream / p. 53

Stephanie Brooks, Love Is a Certain Kind of Flower / p. 13

Guy Bennett, Self-Evident Poems / p. 11

Steven Cordova, Long Distance / p. 16

Louis Daniel Brodsky, Seizing the Sun and Moon: Volume Three of The Seasons of Youth / p. 13 Ben Brooks, An Island of Fifty / p. 52

Martine Bellen, Ghosts! / p. 11

William Corbett, The Whalen Poem / p. 15

Glover Davis, Spring Drive / p. 16

Dan Beachy-Quick, Circle’s Apprentice / p. 10 Marvin Bell, Vertigo: The Living Dead Man Poems / p. 11

Matthew Cooperman, Still: Of the Earth as the Ark Which Does Not Move / p. 15

Louis Daniel Brodsky, Getting to Unknow the Neighbors / p. 52

Jean Rae Baxter, Broken Trail / p. 51 Robin Behn, The Yellow House / p. 10

rd coleman, beach tracks / p. 15

George Bowering, Horizontal Surfaces / p. 64

Joseph Bradshaw, In the Common Dream of George Oppen / p. 12

Aliki Barnstone, Bright Body / p. 10

Michael Cirelli, Everyone Loves the Situation / p. 15 Kate Colby, The Return of the Native / p. 15

Michael Boughn, Cosmographia: A Post-Lucrecian Faux Micro-Epic / p. 12

Jay Atkinson, Tauvernier Street / p. 51

Jessica Baran, Remains to Be Used / p. 10

Sasha Chernyi, Poems from Children’s Island / p. 15 Cho In-souk and Robert Koehler, Seoul’s Historic Walks / p. 65

Victor Coleman, The Occasional Troubadour / p. 15

Megan Boyle, selected unpublished blog posts of a mexican panda express employee / p. 12

Micah Ballard, Waifs and Strays / p. 10

Travis Cebula, Under the Sky They Lit Cities / p. 14 R. Cheran, Dalbir Singh, Chelva Kanaganayakam, and Sudharshan Durayappah, Editors, World Without Walls: Being Human, Being Tamil / p. 65

Sandy Bothmer, Creating the Peaceable Classroom: A 21st-Century Wellness Guide for Teachers, Students and Parents / p. 64

Lawrence Aronsen, City of Love and Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties / p. 63 Gennady Aygi, Into the Snow: Selected Poems of Gennady Aygi / p. 10

Mary-Marcia Casoly, Katherine Hastings, Melanie L. Moro-Huber, and Jack Foley, Ahadada Reader 3 / p. 14

Sarah Browning, Whiskey in the Garden of Eden / p. 14 Sommer Browning, Either Way I’m Celebrating / p. 14

Donna de la Perrière, Saint Erasure / p. 17 Shira Dentz, black seeds on a white dish / p. 17 Thomas DePietro, Editor, Frank Lentricchia: Essays on His Works / p. 65 Regina Derieva, Corinthian Copper / p. 17 Joanne Diaz, The Lessons / p. 17 Paul Dickey, They Say This Is How Death Came into the World / p. 17 Michael Dickman, Flies / p. 17 R. H. W. Dillard, What Is Owed the Dead / p. 17 Tim Dlugos, A Fast Life: The Collected Poems of Tim Dlugos / p. 17 Sandra Doller, Man Years / p. 17

Bill Berkson, For the Ordinary Artist: Short Reviews, Occasional Pieces and More / p. 64

Marie Buck, Life & Style / p. 14

Sharon Doubiago, My Father’s Love, Volume II: The Legacy / p. 65

Michael Burkard, lucky coat anywhere / p. 14

Rikki Ducornet, Netsuke / p. 53

Anselm Berrigan, Notes from Irrelevance / p. 11

Michael Burke, Music of the Spheres / p. 52

Stephen Bett, Track This: A Book of Relationship / p. 11

Mary Bucci Bush, Sweet Hope / p. 52

Denise Duhamel and Amy Lemmon, Enjoy Hot or Iced: Poems in Conversation and a Conversation / p. 18

Michael Bible, Cowboy Maloney’s Electric City / p. 52

Nash Candelaria, Second Communion / p. 64

Guy Birchard, Further than the Blood / p. 11

Paul Caponigro, The Voice of the Print / p. 64 Jorge Carrera Andrade, Micrograms / p. 14

Patrick James Dunagan, There Are People Who Say That Painters Shouldn’t Talk: A GUSTONBOOK / p. 18 Quinton Duval, Like Hay / p. 18

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AUTHOR INDEX Joshua Edwards and Van Edwards, Campeche / p. 18

Kathleen George, Editor, Pittsburgh Noir / p. 54

Scott Ely, Dream Fishing / p. 53

Morgan Gibson, Nonzen Poems / p. 21

Christina Hutchins, The Stranger Dissolves / p. 26

Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Fatal Numbers: Why Count on Chance / p. 65

Lawrence Giffin, Sorites / p. 22

Alta Ifland, Death-in-a-Box / p. 55

Robert Goodnough, Editor, Artists’ Sessions at Studio 35 (1950) / p. 66

Jason Irwin, Watering the Dead / p. 26

Elaine Equi, Click and Clone / p. 18 Seyhan Erözçelik, Rosestrikes and Coffee Grinds / p. 18 John Estes, Kingdom Come / p. 18 Scott Ezell, Yusef Komunyakaa, Mike O’Connor, and Thomas Merton, Songs from a Yahi Bow: A Series of Poems on Ishi / p. 18 Gil Fagiani, Chianti in Connecticut / p. 19 Blas Falconer and Amy Wright, Editors, Zone 3 Vol. 25 No. 2 Fall 2010 / p. 75 Ben Fama, Editor, Supermachine Issue Three / p. 74 Thomas Farber, The Face of the Deep / p. 65

Johannes Göransson, Entrance to a colonial pageant in which we all begin to intricate / p. 22 Nada Gordon, Scented Rushes / p. 22 Garth Greenwell, Mitko / p. 54 Renée Gregorio, Joan Logghe, and Miriam Sagan, Love & Death: Greatest Hits / p. 22 Gerry Grubbs, The Girls in Bright Dresses Dancing / p. 22 Durs Grünbein, The Vocation of Poetry / p. 66 Lucrecia Guerrero, Tree of Sighs / p. 54 Helen Guri, Match / p. 22

Patricia Fargnoli, Then, Something / p. 19

Andrei Guruianu, Metal and Plum: A Memoir / p. 66

Kevin Fenton, Merit Badges / p. 53 Alboqasem Ferdowsi, The Teller of Tales: Stories from Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh / p. 19 Josh Fernandez, Spare Parts and Dismemberment / p. 19

Arielle Guy, Three Geogaophies: A Milkmaid’s Grimoire / p. 23

Norman Finkelstein, Inside the Ghost Factory / p. 19

Amira Hanafi, Forgery / p. 23

Megan Harlan, Mapmaking / p. 23

Gerald Fleming, Night of Pure Breathing / p. 20 Sasha Fletcher, When All Our Days Are Numbered Marching Bands Will Fill the Streets & We Will Not Hear Them Because We Will Be Upstairs in the Clouds / p. 53

Carla Harryman and Lyn Hejinian, The Wide Road / p. 24 Elva Treviño Hart, Simpáticas: San Miguel Stories / p. 54

Brad Flis, Peasants / p. 20

Ken Harvey, A Passionate Engagement: A Memoir / p. 67

Josey Foo and Leah Stein, A Lily Lilies / p. 20

j/j hastain, asymptotic lover//thermodynamic vents / p. 24

Gabe Foreman, A Complete Encyclopedia of Different Types of People / p. 20 Edward Foster, Editor, Talisman 38/39/40 / p. 74 Sanford Fraser, Among Strangers I’ve Known All My Life/Parmi Les Etrangers Que J’ai Connus Toute Ma Vie / p. 20

Paul Foster Johnson, Study in Pavilions and Safe Rooms / p. 27 Daniel Jones, The Brave Never Write Poetry / p. 27 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Last Poems / p. 27 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Recent Poems / p. 27 Richard Kalich, Penthouse F / p. 55 Nadia Kalman, The Cosmopolitans / p. 55 Bhanu Kapil, Schizophrene / p. 27 Laura Kasischke, Space, In Chains / p. 27 Cralan Kelder, Give Some Word / p. 27

Edward Harkness, Beautiful Passing Lives / p. 23

Kyle Flak, The Secret Admirer / p. 20

Luke Johnson, After the Ark / p. 26

Gary Francisco Keller, Editor, Good Bandits, Warrior Women, and Revolutionaries in Hispanic Culture / p. 67

Hollie Hardy, Editor, Fourteen Hills Vol. 17 No. 1 / p. 74

Roy Fisher, Selected Poems / p. 19

Dale Jensen, Auto Bio / p. 26

Drum Hadley, The Light Before Dawn / p. 23 Syed Afzal Haider, To Be with Her / p. 54

Thomas Fink, Peace Conference / p. 19

Inge Israel, Beckett Soundings / p. 26 Sheniz Janmohamed, Bleeding Light / p. 26

Rachel Hadas, The Ache of Appetite / p. 23 Hai Zi, Over Autumn Rooftops / p. 23

Robert Fernandez, We Are Pharaoh / p. 19

Carrie Hunter, The Incompossible / p. 26

j/j hastain, Prurient Anarchic Omnibus / p. 24 Elizabeth Hatmaker, Girl in Two Pieces / p. 24 Michael Hemery, No Permanent Scars / p. 67

Kristin Kelly, Cargo / p. 28 Daniel Khalastchi, Manoleria / p. 28 Nidaa Khoury, Book of Sins / p. 28 Crawford Kilian, Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia / p. 67 Michael Kimball, Us / p. 55 Sally Rosen Kindred, No Eden / p. 28 Ish Klein, Moving Day / p. 28 Caroline Knox, Nine Worthies / p. 28 Noelle Kocot, The Bigger World / p. 28 Robert Koehler, Hangeul: Korea’s Unique Alphabet / p. 67 Jose Kozer, Anima / p. 28 Nancy Kuhl, The Book Remembers Everything: The Work of Erica Van Horn / p. 68

Andy Frazee, The Body, The Rooms / p. 20

Barbara Henning, Looking Up Harryette Mullen: Interviews on Sleeping with the Dictionary and Other Works / p. 67

Emily Kendal Frey, The Grief Performance / p. 20

Matthew Henriksen, Ordinary Sun / p. 24

Allen Frost, The Mermaid Translation / p. 53

Gerrit Henry, The Time of the Night / p. 24

Deborah Landau, The Last Usable Hour / p. 29 Stephen Lapthisophon, Writing Art Cinema 1988-2010 / p. 68

Joel Steven Kuszai, Accidency / p. 29 Gerry Lafemina, Vanishing Horizon / p. 29 Larissa Lai and Rita Wong, Sybil Unrest / p. 29

Elisabeth Frost, All of Us / p. 21

Colin Herd, too ok / p. 24

Richard Froude, FABRIC: Preludes to the Last American Book / p. 65

Robert Hershon, Dick Lourie, and Mark Pawlak, Editors, Hanging Loose 97 / p. 74

William Fuller, Hallucination / p. 21

Russell Hill, The Dog Sox / p. 54

Warren Fulton and David Jaffin, Poemed on a Beach: A Skeptic’s Guide to Modern Poetry / p. 66

Jack Hodgins, Spit Delaney’s Island / p. 54

Joseph Lease, Testify / p. 29

Jeff Hoffman, Journal of American Foreign Policy / p. 24

Stacie Leatherman, Stranger Air / p. 29

Harmony Holiday, Negro League Baseball / p. 25

Ronna Lebo, Prolapse / p. 29

Bob Holman, Picasso in Barcelona / p. 25

Esther Lee, Spit / p. 29

Richard Gambino, Blood of My Blood: The Dilemma of the Italian Americans / p. 66 Eugene K. Garber, O Amazonas Escuro / p. 53 Drew Gardner, Chomp Away / p. 21 Susan Gardner, Drawing the Line / p. 66 Susan Gardner, Stone Music: The Art and Poetry of Susan Gardner / p. 21

Kevin Holohan, The Brothers’ Lot / p. 55

Paul Legault, The Madeleine Poems / p. 29

Bruce Holsapple, Vanishing Act / p. 25

Carol Lem, Gathering the Pieces / p. 30

Ava Homa, Echoes from the Other Land / p. 55

James P. Lenfestey, Editor, Low Down and Coming On: A Feast of Delicious and Dangerous Poems About Pigs / p. 30

Joan Houlihan, The Us / p. 25

Molly Gaudry, We Take Me Apart / p. 21

Zora Howard, Clutch / p. 25

Fergal Gaynor, VIII Stepping Poems & other pieces / p. 21

Uyen Hua, a/s/l / p. 25

Jean Genet, The Genet Translations: Poetry and Posthumous Plays / p. 21

Adam Hughes, Petrichor / p. 25



Nathan Larson, The Dewey Decimal System / p. 56 Evan Lavender-Smith, Avatar / p. 56

Will Hubbard, Cursivism / p. 25

Takako Lento and Wayne Miller, Editors, Tamura Ryuichi: On the Life & Work of a 20th Century Master / p. 30 David Lespiau, Four Cut-Ups, or, the Case of the Restored Volume / p. 30

Ofelia Hunt, Today & Tomorrow / p. 55

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AUTHOR INDEX Francesco Levato, Elegy for Dead Languages / p. 30 Dana Levin, Sky Burial / p. 30 John Levy, A Mind’s Cargo Shifting / p. 56 Shirley Geok-Lin Lim, Walking Backwards: New Poems / p. 30

Ben Milder, From Adolescence to Senescence: A Life in Light Verse / p. 33 Jennifer Militello, Flinch of Song / p. 33 Mary Miller, Big World / p. 57 Stan Mir, The Lacustrine Suite / p. 33

Tan Lin, Insomnia and the Aunt / p. 56

Robert Mittenthal, Wax World / p. 33

R. Zamora Linmark, Leche / p. 56

Albert Mobilio, Touch Wood / p. 33

Paul Lisicky, The Burning House / p. 56

Judy Molyneux, California Gold / p. 69

J. D. Lloyd, Editor, Spillway No. 14 / p. 74

Derek Mong, Other Romes / p. 34

Norman Lock, Grim Tales / p. 56

M. V. Montgomery, Dream Koans / p. 57

Lonely Christopher, The Mechanics of Homosexual Intercourse / p. 56

Maceo Montoya, The Scoundrel and the Optimist / p. 58

Colleen Lookingbill, a forgetting of / p. 30 Adriana V. López and Carmen Ospina, Editors, Barcelona Noir / p. 57 Astrid Lorange, Eating and Speaking / p. 31 Kristin Lucas, Refresh / p. 68 Raymond Luczak, Road Work Ahead / p. 31 Peng Ma, Peng Ma: Abstract Ink Painting / p. 68 Ian Macdonald and Betty O’Keefe, Quiet Reformers: The Legacy of Early Victoria’s Bishop Edward and Mary Cridge / p. 68

Kate Tarlow Morgan, Circles and Boundaries / p. 69 Daniel Morris, If Not for the Courage / p. 34 Fred Muratori, The Spectra / p. 34 Kevin Murphy, Editor, Dark Sky Magazine / p. 73 Jack Myers, The Memory of Water / p. 34 Mariko Nagai, Georgic / p. 58 Vivek Narayanan, Universal Beach / p. 34

Bin Ramke, Editor, Denver Quarterly 45:1 / p. 73 Bin Ramke, Editor, Denver Quarterly 45:2 / p. 73 Wendy Ranan, The Quiet Room / p. 37 F. D. Reeve, The Puzzle Master and Other Poems / p. 37 Charles Reid, Ghost of Heroes Past / p. 59 Steven Reigns, Inheritance / p. 37 Nina Revoyr, Wingshooters / p. 59 Andrea Rexilius, To Be Human Is to Be a Conversation / p. 38 John Calvin Rezmerski, Breaking the Rules: Starting with Ghazals / p. 38 John Rich, Korean War in Color: A Correspondent’s Retrospective on a Forgotten War / p. 70 Peter Richards, Helsinki / p. 38 Chuck Richardson, Smoke / p. 59 Michele Rider, Women in the Financial District: A Photo Essay / p. 70

Hal Niedzviecki, Look Down, This Is Where It Must Have Happened / p. 58

Dominic Mallary, Destroyer of Man: Selected Poems by Dominic Owen Mallary / p. 31

Jennifer Rahim, Redemption Rain / p. 37

Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Lucky Fish / p. 34 bp Nichol, The Captain Poetry Poems Complete / p. 34

Paul Maliszewski, Prayer and Parable: Stories / p. 57

Marc Rahe, The Smaller Half / p. 37

Chuck Richardson, So It Seams / p. 59

Magus Magnus, Heraclitean Pride / p. 31 Josie Malinowski, West of Pure Evil / p. 57

George Quasha, Verbal Paradise (preverbs) / p. 37

Gale Nelson, This Is What Happens When Talk Ends / p. 34

Lorenzo Madalena, Confetti for Gino / p. 57 Marie-Elizabeth Mali, Steady, My Gaze / p. 31

Dawn Promislow, Jewels and Other Stories / p. 59

Urayoán Noel, Hi-Density Politics / p. 35

Sarah Riggs and Cole Swensen, Editors, READ 4 / p. 38 Andrew Rihn, America Plops and Fizzes / p. 38 Joseph Riippi, The Orange Suitcase / p. 59 Elena Rivera, The Perforated Map / p. 38

Linda Norton, The Public Gardens: Poems and History / p. 35

Ford Robbins, Connections: A Visual Journal / p. 70

Adam Novy, The Avian Gospels, Book I / p. 58

Tim Roberts, Drizzle Pocket / p. 38

Adam Novy, The Avian Gospels, Book II / p. 58

Marianne Roccaforte, Bridges in the Mind: An Artist’s Handbook for Everyday Living / p. 70

Filip Marinovich, And If You Don’t Go Crazy I’ll Meet You Here Tomorrow / p. 31

Kathryn Nuernberger, Rag & Bone / p. 35

Chris Martin, Becoming Weather / p. 31

Mary Oishi, Spirit Birds They Told Me / p. 35

Dawn Lundy Martin, Discipline / p. 31

Christina Olson, Before I Came Home Naked / p. 35

Chris Mason, Hum Who Hiccup / p. 31

Rochelle Owens, Solitary Workwoman / p. 35

Paul Kei Matsuda, Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, and Xiaoye You, Editors, The Politics of Second Language Writing: In Search of the Promised Land / p. 68

Judith Pacht, Summer Hunger / p. 35

Ethel Rohan, Cut Through the Bone / p. 59

Ron Padgett, How Long / p. 35

Matthew Rohrer, Destroyer and Preserver / p. 38

Uma Parameswaran, A Cycle of the Moon / p. 58

Todd Romanowski, Every Strange Meridian / p. 38

Alan Michael Parker, Whale Man / p. 58

Rena Rosenwasser, Elevators / p. 39

Shailja Patel, Migritude / p. 36 Alexandria Peary, Lid to the Shadow / p. 36

Jerome Rothenberg, Retrievals: Uncollected & New Poems, 1955-2010 / p. 39

Victor Perera, Rites: A Guatemalan Boyhood / p. 69

Philip Roy, River Odyssey / p. 59

Shane McCrae, In Canaan / p. 32

Craig Santos Perez, From Unincorporated Territory [Saina] / p. 36

Claude Royet-Journoud, The Whole of Poetry Is Preposition / p. 39

Frances McCue, The Bled / p. 32

Lucia Perillo, Inseminating the Elephant / p. 36

Mary Ruefle, Selected Poems / p. 39

Jack Matthews, The Gambler’s Nephew / p. 57 James Maughn, The Arakaki Permutations / p. 32 Bernadette Mayer, Studying Hunger Journals / p. 32 Ben Mazer, January 2008 / p. 32 Anthony McCann, I Heart Your Fate / p. 32

Madeline McDonnell, There Is Something Inside, It Wants to Get Out / p. 57

Jean-Pierre Rogel, Evolution: The View from the Cottage / p. 70 Bertha Rogers, Editor, Book Arts 2010: Bright Hill Center / p. 70

Justin Petropoulos, Eminent Domain / p. 36

Nelly Sachs, Collected Poems I: 1944-1949 / p. 39

Katie Phillips, Driving Montana, Alone / p. 36

Zach Savich, Events Film Cannot Withstand / p. 71

Tom Pickard, More Pricks Than Prizes / p. 69

Zach Savich, The Firestorm / p. 39

Susan McNicoll, The Opening Act: Canadian Theatre History 1945-1953 / p. 69

Anne Pitkin, Winter Arguments / p. 36

Leslie Scalapino, How Phenomena Appear to Unfold / p. 71

Deborah Meadows, Saccade Patterns / p. 32

Harry Polkinhorn, Demos Oneiron / p. 36

Brian McGettrick, Everything Else We Must Endure / p. 32

Pablo Medina, The Man Who Wrote on Water / p. 32 Tony Medina, My Old Man Was Always on the Lam / p. 33

Andrew Plattner, A Marriage of Convenience / p. 58 Harry Polkinhorn and Alfredo Velasco, Editors, Caló: A Dictionary of Spanish Barrio and Border Slang / p. 69 Pamela Porter, Cathedral / p. 37

Susan Scarlata, It Might Turn Out We Are Real / p. 39 Maxine Scates, Undone / p. 39 Kathrin Schaeppi, Sonja Sekula : Grace in a cow’s EYE : a memoir / p. 40 Andrew Schelling, From the Arapaho Songbook / p. 40

Erika Meitner, Makeshift Instructions for Vigilant Girls / p. 33

Will Potter, Green Is the New Red: In Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege / p. 69

David Meltzer, When I Was a Poet / p. 33

Gretchen Steele Pratt, One Island / p. 37

Howard Schwartz, Breathing in the Dark / p. 40

Nate Pritts, Big Bright Sun / p. 37

Susan Scutti, The Commute / p. 40

Christina Mengert, As We Are Sung / p. 33

Gershom Scholem, Two Draft Essays from 1918 / p. 71

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AUTHOR INDEX Jesse Seldess, Left Having / p. 40

Steve Timm, Un storia / p. 43

Theresa Senato Edwards, Voices Through Skin / p. 40

Mathew Timmons, The New Poetics / p. 43

Seoul Selection Editorial Team, The Korea Success Story / p. 71

Erin E. Tocknell, Confederate Streets / p. 72

Nancy Shaver, Henry at Home / p. 71

Mike Topp, Sasquatch Stories / p. 43 Joseph Torra, What’s So Funny / p. 61

Carol Anne Shaw, Hannah and the Spindle Whorl / p. 59 Matt Shears, Where a road had been / p. 40 Jim Shepard, Master of Miniatures / p. 60 Roger Shepherd, Andrew Douch, and David A. Mason, Baekdu-daegan Trail: Hiking Korea’s Mountain Spine / p. 71 Gregory Sherl, I Have Touched You / p. 60 Brandon Shimoda, The Girl Without Arms / p. 41

Edwin Torres, Yes Thing No Thing / p. 44

Martha Silano, The Little Office of the Immaculate Conception / p. 41 Sophie Sills, Elemental Perceptions: A Panorama / p. 41 Leonardo Sinisgalli, Night of Shooting Stars / p. 41 John Elvis Smelcer, Alaskan: Stories from the Great Land / p. 60

Craig Watson, Sleepwalking with Orpheus / p. 46 Jane O. Wayne, The Other Place You Live / p. 46 Florence Weinberger, Sacred Graffiti / p. 46 Steve Weiner, Sweet England / p. 62 Ellen Welcker, The Botanical Garden / p. 46

Georg Trakl, Song of the Departed: Selected Poems of Georg Trakl / p. 44

Donald Wellman, A North Atlantic Wall / p. 46

Douglas Treem, Everything So Seriously / p. 44

Mac Wellman, Left Glove / p. 62

Tony Trigilio, Historic Diary / p. 44

David Wevill, Casual Ties / p. 46

Mary Troy, Beauties / p. 61

Anthony Russell White, The Faith of Leaping / p. 47

Mark Truscott, Nature / p. 44

Charles Dodd White and Page Seay, Editors, Degrees of Elevation: Short Stories of Contemporary Appalachia / p. 62

Elizabeth Twiddy, Love-Noise / p. 44

Gleb Shulpyakov, A Fireproof Box / p. 41

Qingping Wang, Editor, Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China / p. 46

Alan Twigg, The Essentials: 150 Great B.C. Books & Authors / p. 72 Chris Tysh, Night Scales: A Fable for Klara K / p. 44 David Unger, The Price of Escape / p. 61 Cesar Vallejo, Against Professional Secrets / p. 44 Terry Van Vliet, Black Lines on Terracotta / p. 44

Hazel White, Peril as Architectural Enrichment / p. 47 Sarah White, Alice Ages and Ages / p. 47 Jonathan Wilcke, Dupe / p. 47 Paul J. Willis, The Alpine Tales / p. 62 Peter Lamborn Wilson, Ec(o)logues / p. 47 Terence Winch, Falling Out of Bed in a Room with No Floor / p. 47

Laura Solomon, The Hermit / p. 41

Paul Vangelisti, Two / p. 45

Juliana Spahr and Stephanie Young, Editors, A Megaphone: Some Enactments, Some Numbers, and Some Essays about the Continued Usefulness of Crotchless-pants-and-a-machine-gun Feminism / p. 72

Justin Vicari, The Professional Weepers / p. 45

Adriano Spatola, The Porthole / p. 60

Katie Wainwright, Cuba on My Mind / p. 61

Mark Spitzer, After the Orange Glow / p. 72

Diane Wald, Wonderbender / p. 45

Pui Ying Wong, Yellow Plum Season / p. 48

Mark Spitzer, Editor, Toad Suck Review: The Transitional Issue / p. 75

Anne Waldman, The Iovis Trilogy: Colors in the Mechanism of Concealment / p. 45

Tim Wood, Otherwise Known as Home / p. 48

Jonathan Stalling, Yingelishi: Sinophonic English Poetry and Poetics / p. 42

Laura Walker, bird book / p. 45

Shelley Stenhouse, Impunity / p. 42

Barry Wallenstein, Editor, For Enid with Love: a festchrift / p. 72

Florine Stettheimer, Crystal Flowers: Poems and a Libretto / p. 42

Ocean Vuong, Burnings / p. 45 Jeanne Wagner, In the Body of Our Lives / p. 45

Persia Walker, Black Orchid Blues / p. 61

Michael Stewart, The Hieroglyphics / p. 60

Lillien Waller, Editor, American Ghost: Poets on Life After Industry / p. 46

Melanie Steyn, Once Around the Sun / p. 60

William Walsh, Editor, Re: Telling / p. 61

Mary Winegarden, The Translator’s Sister / p. 47 David Wirthlin, Your Disappearance / p. 47 Rebecca Wolff, Editor, Fence Vol. 13 No. 2 Winter 2011 / p. 73

C. D. Wright, One with Others: [a little book of her days] / p. 48 John Yau, Editor, Viva la Difference: Poetry Inspired by the Painting of Peter Saul / p. 48 Yvan Yauri, Fire Wind / p. 48 Dean Young, Fall Higher / p. 48 Steven Zultanski, Cop Kisser / p. 48

Norman Stock, Pickled Dreams Naked / p. 42 Matthew Stokoe, Cows / p. 60 Stephen Sturgeon, Trees of the Twentieth Century / p. 42 Tim Suermondt, Just Beautiful / p. 42 Elizabeth Swados, Waiting: Selected Nonfiction / p. 72 Elzbieta Szoka and Joe W. Bratcher, III, Editors, The Dirty Goat 23 / p. 73 Eileen R. Tabios, Silk Egg: Collected Novels / p. 60 Richard Tagett, Demodulating Angel / p. 42 Marc Talbert, Altogether Ernest / p. 42 Susan Terris, Editor, Spillway No. 15 / p. 74 Alazar Tesfamichael, Trials and Tribulations / p. 72 Sunnylyn Thibodeaux, Palm to Pine / p. 43 Tod Thilleman, Egghead to Underhoof (Our Concluding the Poem) / p. 43

Thanks to the Friends of SPD!

Tod Thilleman, Three Sea Monsters: Our History of Whose Image / p. 43 H. Nigel Thomas, Lives: Whole and Otherwise / p. 61 Daniel Thompson, The Big Book of Daniel: Collected Poems of Daniel Thompson / p. 43 Maureen Thorson, Applies to Oranges / p. 43 Daniel Tiffany, Privado / p. 43



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Title Index About Them, Chester Aaron / p. 51

Big World, Mary Miller / p. 57

Accidency, Joel Steven Kuszai / p. 29

bird book, Laura Walker / p. 45

Cosmographia: A Post-Lucrecian Faux Micro-Epic, Michael Boughn / p. 12

The Ache of Appetite, Rachel Hadas / p. 23

Black Lines on Terracotta, Terry Van Vliet / p. 44

The Cosmopolitans, Nadia Kalman / p. 55

After the Ark, Luke Johnson / p. 26

Black Orchid Blues, Persia Walker / p. 61

Cowboy Maloney’s Electric City, Michael Bible / p. 52

After the Orange Glow, Mark Spitzer / p. 72

black seeds on a white dish, Shira Dentz / p. 17

Cows, Matthew Stokoe / p. 60

Against Professional Secrets, Cesar Vallejo / p. 44

The Bled, Frances McCue / p. 32

Ahadada Reader 3, Mary-Marcia Casoly, Katherine Hastings, Melanie L. Moro-Huber, and Jack Foley / p. 14

Bleeding Light, Sheniz Janmohamed / p. 26

Creating the Peaceable Classroom: A st-Century Wellness Guide for Teachers, Students and Parents, Sandy Bothmer / p. 64

Alaskan: Stories from the Great Land, John Elvis Smelcer / p. 60

Blood of My Blood: The Dilemma of the Italian Americans, Richard Gambino / p. 66

Crossing the Alps, Helen Barolini / p. 51

The Body, The Rooms, Andy Frazee / p. 20

The Crows Were Laughing in Their Trees, Peter Conners / p. 15

All of Us, Elisabeth Frost / p. 21

Book Arts : Bright Hill Center, Bertha Rogers, Editor / p. 70

Crystal Flowers: Poems and a Libretto, Florine Stettheimer / p. 42 Cuba on My Mind, Katie Wainwright / p. 61

Alice Ages and Ages, Sarah White / p. 47 The Alpine Tales, Paul J. Willis / p. 62

The Book of Interfering Bodies, Daniel Borzutzky / p. 12

Altogether Ernest, Marc Talbert / p. 42

The Book of Orgasms, Nin Andrews / p. 9

Cursivism, Will Hubbard / p. 25

American Ghost: Poets on Life After Industry, Lillien Waller, Editor / p. 46

Book of Sins, Nidaa Khoury / p. 28

Cut Through the Bone, Ethel Rohan / p. 59

The Book Remembers Everything: The Work of Erica Van Horn, Nancy Kuhl / p. 68

A Cycle of the Moon, Uma Parameswaran / p. 58

America Plops and Fizzes, Andrew Rihn / p. 38 America the Beautiful: Last Poems, Paula Gunn Allen / p. 9 Among Strangers I’ve Known All My Life/Parmi Les Etrangers Que J’ai Connus Toute Ma Vie, Sanford Fraser / p. 20 And If You Don’t Go Crazy I’ll Meet You Here Tomorrow, Filip Marinovich / p. 31 Angelina’s Lips, Giuseppe Conte / p. 53 Anima, Jose Kozer / p. 28 Applies to Oranges, Maureen Thorson / p. 43 The Arakaki Permutations, James Maughn / p. 32 Artists’ Sessions at Studio 35 (5), Robert Goodnough, Editor / p. 66

The Botanical Garden, Ellen Welcker / p. 46 The Brave Never Write Poetry, Daniel Jones / p. 27 Breaking the Rules: Starting with Ghazals, John Calvin Rezmerski / p. 38 Breathing in the Dark, Howard Schwartz / p. 40

Dark Sky Magazine, Kevin Murphy, Editor / p. 73 #Dear Twitter: Love Letters Hashed Out Online in 4 Characters or Less, Mahogany L. Browne / p. 14 Death-in-a-Box, Alta Ifland / p. 55 Degrees of Elevation: Short Stories of Contemporary Appalachia, Charles Dodd White and Page Seay, Editors / p. 62

Bridges in the Mind: An Artist’s Handbook for Everyday Living, Marianne Roccaforte / p. 70

Demodulating Angel, Richard Tagett / p. 42

Bright Body, Aliki Barnstone / p. 10

Demos Oneiron, Harry Polkinhorn / p. 36

Broken Trail, Jean Rae Baxter / p. 51

Denver Quarterly 45:, Bin Ramke, Editor / p. 73

The Brothers’ Lot, Kevin Holohan / p. 55

Denver Quarterly 45:, Bin Ramke, Editor / p. 73

The Burning House, Paul Lisicky / p. 56

Destroyer and Preserver, Matthew Rohrer / p. 38

Burnings, Ocean Vuong / p. 45

a/s/l, Uyen Hua / p. 25

California Gold, Judy Molyneux / p. 69

Destroyer of Man: Selected Poems by Dominic Owen Mallary, Dominic Mallary / p. 31

Assaracus Issue : A Journal of Gay Poetry, Bryan Borland, Editor / p. 73 Assaracus Issue : A Journal of Gay Poetry, Bryan Borland, Editor / p. 73

Caló: A Dictionary of Spanish Barrio and Border Slang, Harry Polkinhorn and Alfredo Velasco, Editors / p. 69

The Dirty Goat 3, Elzbieta Szoka and Joe W. Bratcher, III, Editors / p. 73

Campeche, Joshua Edwards and Van Edwards / p. 18

Discipline, Dawn Lundy Martin / p. 31

As We Are Sung, Christina Mengert / p. 33

Caprice, George Bowering / p. 52

The Dog Sox, Russell Hill / p. 54

asymptotic lover//thermodynamic vents, j/j hastain / p. 24

The Captain Poetry Poems Complete, bp Nichol / p. 34

Down New Utrecht Avenue, Ed Barrett / p. 10

Cargo, Kristin Kelly / p. 28

Drawing the Line, Susan Gardner / p. 66

At Dock’s End: Poems of Lake Nebagamon, Volume Two, Louis Daniel Brodsky / p. 13

Casual Ties, David Wevill / p. 46

Dream Fishing, Scott Ely / p. 53

Cathedral, Pamela Porter / p. 37

Auto Bio, Dale Jensen / p. 26

Dream Koans, M. V. Montgomery / p. 57

Chianti in Connecticut, Gil Fagiani / p. 19

Avatar, Evan Lavender-Smith / p. 56

Driving Montana, Alone, Katie Phillips / p. 36

Chomp Away, Drew Gardner / p. 21

The Avian Gospels, Book I, Adam Novy / p. 58

Drizzle Pocket, Tim Roberts / p. 38

Circles and Boundaries, Kate Tarlow Morgan / p. 69

The Avian Gospels, Book II, Adam Novy / p. 58

Dupe, Jonathan Wilcke / p. 47

Circle’s Apprentice, Dan Beachy-Quick / p. 10

Baekdu-daegan Trail: Hiking Korea’s Mountain Spine, Roger Shepherd, Andrew Douch, and David A. Mason / p. 71

City of Love and Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties, Lawrence Aronsen / p. 63

Earth Keepers: A Sourcebook for Environmental lssues and Action, Leslie Baer-Brown and Bob Rhein / p. 63

Barcelona Noir, Adriana V. López and Carmen Ospina, Editors / p. 57

Click and Clone, Elaine Equi / p. 18

Eating and Speaking, Astrid Lorange / p. 31

Closing the Hotel Kitchen, Robert Bohm / p. 12

Echoes from the Other Land, Ava Homa / p. 55

The Dewey Decimal System, Nathan Larson / p. 56

beach tracks, rd coleman / p. 15

Clutch, Zora Howard / p. 25

Ec(o)logues, Peter Lamborn Wilson / p. 47

Beauties, Mary Troy / p. 61

Collected Poems I: 44-4, Nelly Sachs / p. 39

Beautiful Passing Lives, Edward Harkness / p. 23

The Commute, Susan Scutti / p. 40

Egghead to Underhoof (Our Concluding the Poem), Tod Thilleman / p. 43

Beckett Soundings, Inge Israel / p. 26

A Complete Encyclopedia of Different Types of People, Gabe Foreman / p. 20

VIII Stepping Poems & other pieces, Fergal Gaynor / p. 21

Compression & Purity, Will Alexander / p. 9

Either Way I’m Celebrating, Sommer Browning / p. 14

Becoming Weather, Chris Martin / p. 31 Before I Came Home Naked, Christina Olson / p. 35 Beyond Sangre Grande: Caribbean Writing Today, Cyril Dabydeen, Editor / p. 16

Confederate Streets, Erin E. Tocknell / p. 72

Elegy for Dead Languages, Francesco Levato / p. 30

Confetti for Gino, Lorenzo Madalena / p. 57

Elemental Perceptions: A Panorama, Sophie Sills / p. 41

The Big Book of Daniel: Collected Poems of Daniel Thompson, Daniel Thompson / p. 43

Connections: A Visual Journal, Ford Robbins / p. 70

Elevators, Rena Rosenwasser / p. 39

Cop Kisser, Steven Zultanski / p. 48

Eminent Domain, Justin Petropoulos / p. 36

Big Bright Sun, Nate Pritts / p. 37

Corinthian Copper, Regina Derieva / p. 17

Enjoy Hot or Iced: Poems in Conversation and a Conversation, Denise Duhamel and Amy Lemmon / p. 18

The Bigger World, Noelle Kocot / p. 28

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3


TITLE INDEX Entrance to a colonial pageant in which we all begin to intricate, Johannes Göransson / p. 22

The Girls in Bright Dresses Dancing, Gerry Grubbs / p. 22

The Essentials: 5 Great B.C. Books & Authors, Alan Twigg / p. 72

The Girl Without Arms, Brandon Shimoda / p. 41

Kingdom Come, John Estes / p. 18

Give Some Word, Cralan Kelder / p. 27

Events Film Cannot Withstand, Zach Savich / p. 71

Kings of the F**king Sea, Dan Boehl / p. 11

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia, Crawford Kilian / p. 67

Korean Tea Classics, Brother Anthony, Hong Keong-Hee, and Steven D. Owyoung / p. 64

Everything Else We Must Endure, Brian McGettrick / p. 32

Good Bandits, Warrior Women, and Revolutionaries in Hispanic Culture, Gary Francisco Keller, Editor / p. 67

Korean War in Color: A Correspondent’s Retrospective on a Forgotten War, John Rich / p. 70

Everything So Seriously, Douglas Treem / p. 44

gowanus atropolis, Julian T. Brolaski / p. 13

Evolution: The View from the Cottage, Jean-Pierre Rogel / p. 70

Goya’s Head, Tom Abrams / p. 51

The Lacustrine Suite, Stan Mir / p. 33

The Grand Piano: Part , Rae Armantrout, Steve Benson, Carla Harryman, Lyn Hejinian, Tom Mandel, Ted Pearson, Bob Perelman, Kit Robinson, Ron Silliman, and Barrett Watten / p. 63

The Last Usable Hour, Deborah Landau / p. 29

Fairy Tales in Electri-City, Francesca Lia Block / p. 11

Green Is the New Red: In Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege, Will Potter / p. 69

Left Having, Jesse Seldess / p. 40

The Faith of Leaping, Anthony Russell White / p. 47

The Grief Performance, Emily Kendal Frey / p. 20

Fall Higher, Dean Young / p. 48

Lid to the Shadow, Alexandria Peary / p. 36

Grim Tales, Norman Lock / p. 56

Falling Out of Bed in a Room with No Floor, Terence Winch / p. 47

Life & Style, Marie Buck / p. 14

Gully, Roger Bonair-Agard / p. 12

The Light Before Dawn, Drum Hadley / p. 23

Hallucination, William Fuller / p. 21

Like Hay, Quinton Duval / p. 18

Everyone Loves the Situation, Michael Cirelli / p. 15 Every Strange Meridian, Todd Romanowski / p. 38

FABRIC: Preludes to the Last American Book, Richard Froude / p. 65 The Face of the Deep, Thomas Farber / p. 65

Fasting for Ramadan: Notes from a Spiritual Practice, Kazim Ali / p. 63 A Fast Life: The Collected Poems of Tim Dlugos, Tim Dlugos / p. 17 Fatal Numbers: Why Count on Chance, Hans Magnus Enzensberger / p. 65 Fence Vol. 3 No.  Winter , Rebecca Wolff, Editor / p. 73 The Fiction at Work Biannual Report, Tobias Amadon Bengelsdorf, Editor / p. 51

Hangeul: Korea’s Unique Alphabet, Robert Koehler / p. 67 Hanging Loose , Robert Hershon, Dick Lourie, and Mark Pawlak, Editors / p. 74 Hannah and the Spindle Whorl, Carol Anne Shaw / p. 59 Helsinki, Peter Richards / p. 38 Henry at Home, Nancy Shaver / p. 71 Heraclitean Pride, Magus Magnus / p. 31

June, Daniel Brenner / p. 13 Just Beautiful, Tim Suermondt / p. 42

The Korea Success Story, Seoul Selection Editorial Team / p. 71

Leche, R. Zamora Linmark / p. 56 Left Glove, Mac Wellman / p. 62 The Lessons, Joanne Diaz / p. 17

A Lily Lilies, Josey Foo and Leah Stein / p. 20 The Little Office of the Immaculate Conception, Martha Silano / p. 41 Lives: Whole and Otherwise, H. Nigel Thomas / p. 61 Long Distance, Steven Cordova / p. 16 Look Down, This Is Where It Must Have Happened, Hal Niedzviecki / p. 58 Looking Up Harryette Mullen: Interviews on Sleeping with the Dictionary and Other Works, Barbara Henning / p. 67

A Fireproof Box, Gleb Shulpyakov / p. 41

The Hermit, Laura Solomon / p. 41

The Firestorm, Zach Savich / p. 39

Hi-Density Politics, Urayoán Noel / p. 35

Fire Wind, Yvan Yauri / p. 48

The Hieroglyphics, Michael Stewart / p. 60

Flies, Michael Dickman / p. 17

Historic Diary, Tony Trigilio / p. 44

Flinch of Song, Jennifer Militello / p. 33

Horizontal Surfaces, George Bowering / p. 64

For Enid with Love: a festchrift, Barry Wallenstein, Editor / p. 72

Hostile Witness, Garin Cycholl / p. 16 How Long, Ron Padgett / p. 35

Forgery, Amira Hanafi / p. 23

Love-Noise, Elizabeth Twiddy / p. 44

a forgetting of, Colleen Lookingbill / p. 30

How Phenomena Appear to Unfold, Leslie Scalapino / p. 71

For the Ordinary Artist: Short Reviews, Occasional Pieces and More, Bill Berkson / p. 64

Low Down and Coming On: A Feast of Delicious and Dangerous Poems About Pigs, James P. Lenfestey, Editor / p. 30

If Not for the Courage, Daniel Morris / p. 34

lucky coat anywhere, Michael Burkard / p. 14

I Have Touched You, Gregory Sherl / p. 60

Lucky Fish, Aimee Nezhukumatathil / p. 34

Four Cut-Ups, or, the Case of the Restored Volume, David Lespiau / p. 30

Hum Who Hiccup, Chris Mason / p. 31

Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, Series , Ammiel Alcalay, Editor / p. 63 Love & Death: Greatest Hits, Renée Gregorio, Joan Logghe, and Miriam Sagan / p. 22 Love Is a Certain Kind of Flower, Stephanie Brooks / p. 13

I Heart Your Fate, Anthony McCann / p. 32

The Madeleine Poems, Paul Legault / p. 29

Impunity, Shelley Stenhouse / p. 42 In Canaan, Shane McCrae / p. 32

Makeshift Instructions for Vigilant Girls, Erika Meitner / p. 33

From Adolescence to Senescence: A Life in Light Verse, Ben Milder / p. 33

The Incompossible, Carrie Hunter / p. 26

The Man Who Wrote on Water, Pablo Medina / p. 32

Inheritance, Steven Reigns / p. 37

Man Years, Sandra Doller / p. 17

From the Arapaho Songbook, Andrew Schelling / p. 40

Inseminating the Elephant, Lucia Perillo / p. 36

Manoleria, Daniel Khalastchi / p. 28

Fourteen Hills Vol.  No. , Hollie Hardy, Editor / p. 74 Frank Lentricchia: Essays on His Works, Thomas DePietro, Editor / p. 65

From Unincorporated Territory [Saina], Craig Santos Perez / p. 36

Inside the Ghost Factory, Norman Finkelstein / p. 19

Mapmaking, Megan Harlan / p. 23

Insomnia and the Aunt, Tan Lin / p. 56

A Marriage of Convenience, Andrew Plattner / p. 58

Further than the Blood, Guy Birchard / p. 11

In the Body of Our Lives, Jeanne Wagner / p. 45

Master of Miniatures, Jim Shepard / p. 60

The Gambler’s Nephew, Jack Matthews / p. 57

In the Common Dream of George Oppen, Joseph Bradshaw / p. 12

Master Siger’s Dream, A. W. DeAnnuntis / p. 53

Gathering the Pieces, Carol Lem / p. 30 The Genet Translations: Poetry and Posthumous Plays, Jean Genet / p. 21

Into the Snow: Selected Poems of Gennady Aygi, Gennady Aygi / p. 10

The Mechanics of Homosexual Intercourse, Lonely Christopher / p. 56

Georgic, Mariko Nagai / p. 58

The Iovis Trilogy: Colors in the Mechanism of Concealment, Anne Waldman / p. 45

A Megaphone: Some Enactments, Some Numbers, and Some Essays about the Continued Usefulness of Crotchless-pants-and-a-machine-gun Feminism, Juliana Spahr and Stephanie Young, Editors / p. 72

Gerald Locklin: A Critical Introduction, Michael Basinski, Editor / p. 64

An Island of Fifty, Ben Brooks / p. 52

Getting to Unknow the Neighbors, Louis Daniel Brodsky / p. 52

It Might Turn Out We Are Real, Susan Scarlata / p. 39

Ghost of Heroes Past, Charles Reid / p. 59

Jewels and Other Stories, Dawn Promislow / p. 59

Ghosts!, Martine Bellen / p. 11 Girl in Two Pieces, Elizabeth Hatmaker / p. 24

4

January , Ben Mazer / p. 32 Journal of American Foreign Policy, Jeff Hoffman / p. 24

Match, Helen Guri / p. 22

The Memory of Water, Jack Myers / p. 34 Merit Badges, Kevin Fenton / p. 53 The Mermaid Translation, Allen Frost / p. 53 Metal and Plum: A Memoir, Andrei Guruianu / p. 66

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TITLE INDEX Micrograms, Jorge Carrera Andrade / p. 14

Pickled Dreams Naked, Norman Stock / p. 42

Migritude, Shailja Patel / p. 36

The Pierre Bonga Loops, Troy Burle Bailey / p. 10

Road Work Ahead, Raymond Luczak / p. 31

Mimeo Mimeo 4, Jed Birmingham and Kyle Schlesinger, Editors / p. 74

Pinko, Jen Benka / p. 11

Roseate, Points of Gold, Laynie Browne / p. 14

Pittsburgh Noir, Kathleen George, Editor / p. 54

Rosestrikes and Coffee Grinds, Seyhan Erözçelik / p. 18

A Mind’s Cargo Shifting, John Levy / p. 56

Plasmos, Rachel Daley / p. 16

Saccade Patterns, Deborah Meadows / p. 32

Mitko, Garth Greenwell / p. 54

Poemed on a Beach: A Skeptic’s Guide to Modern Poetry, Warren Fulton and David Jaffin / p. 66

Sacred Graffiti, Florence Weinberger / p. 46

Monster Party, Lizzy Acker / p. 51 More Pricks Than Prizes, Tom Pickard / p. 69

Poems from Children’s Island, Sasha Chernyi / p. 15

Sasquatch Stories, Mike Topp / p. 43

Moving Day, Ish Klein / p. 28

The Politics of Second Language Writing: In Search of the Promised Land, Paul Kei Matsuda, Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, and Xiaoye You, Editors / p. 68

Scented Rushes, Nada Gordon / p. 22

The Porthole, Adriano Spatola / p. 60

The Scoundrel and the Optimist, Maceo Montoya /

My Father’s Love, Volume II: The Legacy, Sharon Doubiago / p. 65

Prayer and Parable: Stories, Paul Maliszewski / p. 57

p. 58

The Price of Escape, David Unger / p. 61

Second Communion, Nash Candelaria / p. 64

My Gargantuan Desire, Brad Crenshaw / p. 16

Privado, Daniel Tiffany / p. 43

The Secret Admirer, Kyle Flak / p. 20

My Old Man Was Always on the Lam, Tony Medina / p. 33

The Professional Weepers, Justin Vicari / p. 45

Seeding the Cosmos: New & Selected Haiku, John Brandi / p. 12

Nature, Mark Truscott / p. 44

Prurient Anarchic Omnibus, j/j hastain / p. 24

Negro League Baseball, Harmony Holiday / p. 25

The Public Gardens: Poems and History, Linda Norton / p. 35

Music of the Spheres, Michael Burke / p. 52 Muted Lines from Someone Else’s Memory, Seth Berg / p. 11

neither wit nor gold, Ammiel Alcalay / p. 9 Netsuke, Rikki Ducornet / p. 53

Prolapse, Ronna Lebo / p. 29

River Odyssey, Philip Roy / p. 59

Saint Erasure, Donna de la Perrière / p. 17

Schizophrene, Bhanu Kapil / p. 27

Seizing the Sun and Moon: Volume Three of The Seasons of Youth, Louis Daniel Brodsky / p. 13 Selected Poems, Roy Fisher / p. 19 Selected Poems, Mary Ruefle / p. 39

The New Poetics, Mathew Timmons / p. 43

Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China, Qingping Wang, Editor / p. 46

Night of Pure Breathing, Gerald Fleming / p. 20

The Puzzle Master and Other Poems, F. D. Reeve / p. 37

Night of Shooting Stars, Leonardo Sinisgalli / p. 41 Night Scales: A Fable for Klara K, Chris Tysh / p. 44

Quiet Reformers: The Legacy of Early Victoria’s Bishop Edward and Mary Cridge, Ian Macdonald and Betty O’Keefe / p. 68

Seoul’s Historic Walks, Cho In-souk and Robert Koehler / p. 65

Nine Worthies, Caroline Knox / p. 28

The Quiet Room, Wendy Ranan / p. 37

Severance Songs, Joshua Corey / p. 16

No Eden, Sally Rosen Kindred / p. 28

Rag & Bone, Kathryn Nuernberger / p. 35

Silk Egg: Collected Novels, Eileen R. Tabios / p. 60

Nonzen Poems, Morgan Gibson / p. 21

READ 4, Sarah Riggs and Cole Swensen, Editors / p. 38

Simpáticas: San Miguel Stories, Elva Treviño Hart / p. 54

No Permanent Scars, Michael Hemery / p. 67

selected unpublished blog posts of a mexican panda express employee, Megan Boyle / p. 12 Self-Evident Poems, Guy Bennett / p. 11

Redemption Rain, Jennifer Rahim / p. 37

Sky Burial, Dana Levin / p. 30

A North Atlantic Wall, Donald Wellman / p. 46

Refresh, Kristin Lucas / p. 68

Sleepwalking with Orpheus, Craig Watson / p. 46

Northerners, Seth Abramson / p. 9

Remains to Be Used, Jessica Baran / p. 10

The Smaller Half, Marc Rahe / p. 37

Notes from Irrelevance, Anselm Berrigan / p. 11

Re: Telling, William Walsh, Editor / p. 61

Smiles of the Unstoppable, Jason Bredle / p. 13

O Amazonas Escuro, Eugene K. Garber / p. 53

Retrievals: Uncollected & New Poems, 55-, Jerome Rothenberg / p. 39

Smoke, Chuck Richardson / p. 59

The Occasional Troubadour, Victor Coleman / p. 15 Once Around the Sun, Melanie Steyn / p. 60

The Return of the Native, Kate Colby / p. 15

Solitary Workwoman, Rochelle Owens / p. 35

One Island, Gretchen Steele Pratt / p. 37

Rites: A Guatemalan Boyhood, Victor Perera / p. 69

So It Seams, Chuck Richardson / p. 59

One with Others: [a little book of her days], C. D. Wright / p. 48 The Open Face Sandwich, Volume , Alan Bajandas and Benjamin Solomon, Editors / p. 74 The Opening Act: Canadian Theatre History 4553, Susan McNicoll / p. 69 The Orange Suitcase, Joseph Riippi / p. 59 Ordinary Sun, Matthew Henriksen / p. 24 The Other Place You Live, Jane O. Wayne / p. 46 Other Romes, Derek Mong / p. 34 Otherwise Known as Home, Tim Wood / p. 48 Over Autumn Rooftops, Hai Zi / p. 23 Palm to Pine, Sunnylyn Thibodeaux / p. 43 Parallel Lines, Dennis Barone / p. 10 A Passionate Engagement: A Memoir, Ken Harvey / p. 67 Peace Conference, Thomas Fink / p. 19 Peasants, Brad Flis / p. 20

Thanks to the Friends of SPD!

Peng Ma: Abstract Ink Painting, Peng Ma / p. 68 Penthouse F, Richard Kalich / p. 55 The Perforated Map, Elena Rivera / p. 38 Peril as Architectural Enrichment, Hazel White / p. 47 Petrichor, Adam Hughes / p. 25 Picasso in Barcelona, Bob Holman / p. 25

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5


TITLE INDEX Suspended Somewhere Between: A Book of Verse, Akbar Ahmed / p. 9

Viva la Difference: Poetry Inspired by the Painting of Peter Saul, John Yau, Editor / p. 48

Sweet England, Steve Weiner / p. 62

The Vocation of Poetry, Durs Grünbein / p. 66

Sweet Hope, Mary Bucci Bush / p. 52

The Voice of the Print, Paul Caponigro / p. 64

Sybil Unrest, Larissa Lai and Rita Wong / p. 29

Voices Through Skin, Theresa Senato Edwards / p. 40

Talisman 3/3/4, Edward Foster, Editor / p. 74

Volt No. , Gillian Conoley, Editor / p. 75

Tamura Ryuichi: On the Life & Work of a th Century Master, Takako Lento and Wayne Miller, Editors / p. 30

Waifs and Strays, Micah Ballard / p. 10

Tauvernier Street, Jay Atkinson / p. 51

Walking Backwards: New Poems, Shirley Geok-Lin Lim / p. 30

The Teller of Tales: Stories from Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh, Alboqasem Ferdowsi / p. 19

Wax World, Robert Mittenthal / p. 33

Then, Something, Patricia Fargnoli / p. 19

We Are Pharaoh, Robert Fernandez / p. 19

There Are People Who Say That Painters Shouldn’t Talk: A GUSTONBOOK, Patrick James Dunagan / p. 18

We Take Me Apart, Molly Gaudry / p. 21

There Is Something Inside, It Wants to Get Out, Madeline McDonnell / p. 57

Whale Man, Alan Michael Parker / p. 58

Song of the Departed: Selected Poems of Georg Trakl, Georg Trakl / p. 44

West of Pure Evil, Josie Malinowski / p. 57

These Hands, Per Aage Brandt / p. 13

The Whalen Poem, William Corbett / p. 15

They Say This Is How Death Came into the World, Paul Dickey / p. 17

What’s So Funny, Joseph Torra / p. 61

Three Geogaophies: A Milkmaid’s Grimoire, Arielle Guy / p. 23

Oriana Small A Barnacle Book Details on our web site

Watering the Dead, Jason Irwin / p. 26

Testify, Joseph Lease / p. 29

This Is What Happens When Talk Ends, Gale Nelson / p. 34

Just In! Girlvert: A Porno Memoir

Waiting: Selected Nonfiction, Elizabeth Swados / p. 72

What Is Owed the Dead, R. H. W. Dillard / p. 17 When All Our Days Are Numbered Marching Bands Will Fill the Streets & We Will Not Hear Them Because We Will Be Upstairs in the Clouds, Sasha Fletcher / p. 53

Three Sea Monsters: Our History of Whose Image, Tod Thilleman / p. 43

When I Was a Poet, David Meltzer / p. 33

The Time of the Night, Gerrit Henry / p. 24

Whiskey in the Garden of Eden, Sarah Browning / p. 14

Toad Suck Review: The Transitional Issue, Mark Spitzer, Editor / p. 75

The Whole of Poetry Is Preposition, Claude RoyetJournoud / p. 39

To Be Human Is to Be a Conversation, Andrea Rexilius / p. 38

Wingshooters, Nina Revoyr / p. 59

To Be with Her, Syed Afzal Haider / p. 54

Winter Arguments, Anne Pitkin / p. 36

Today & Tomorrow, Ofelia Hunt / p. 55

Wisdom Teeth, Derrick Weston Brown / p. 13

too ok, Colin Herd / p. 24

Without Force or Lies: Voices from the Revolution of Central Europe in -, William M. Brinton and Alan Rinzler, Editors / p. 64

Where a road had been, Matt Shears / p. 40

The Wide Road, Carla Harryman and Lyn Hejinian / p. 24

Songs from a Yahi Bow: A Series of Poems on Ishi, Scott Ezell, Yusef Komunyakaa, Mike O’Connor, and Thomas Merton / p. 18

Torn from Troy: Odyssey of a Slave, Patrick Bowman / p. 52

Sonja Sekula : Grace in a cow’s EYE : a memoir, Kathrin Schaeppi / p. 40

Toys from My Attic, Russell Connor / p. 52

Women in the Financial District: A Photo Essay, Michele Rider / p. 70

Track This: A Book of Relationship, Stephen Bett / p. 11

Wonderbender, Diane Wald / p. 45

Sorites, Lawrence Giffin / p. 22

The Translator’s Sister, Mary Winegarden / p. 47

The World as Phone Bill, Stan Apps / p. 63

Space, In Chains, Laura Kasischke / p. 27 Spare Parts and Dismemberment, Josh Fernandez / p. 19

Transnational Poetics: Asian Canadian Women’s Fiction of the s, Pilar Cuder-Domínguez, Belén Martín-Lucas, and Sonia Villegas-López, Editors / p. 65

World Without Walls: Being Human, Being Tamil, R. Cheran, Dalbir Singh, Chelva Kanaganayakam, and Sudharshan Durayappah, Editors / p. 65

The Spectra, Fred Muratori / p. 34

Tree of Sighs, Lucrecia Guerrero / p. 54

Spillway No. 4, J. D. Lloyd, Editor / p. 74

Trees of the Twentieth Century, Stephen Sturgeon / p. 42

Writing Art Cinema -, Stephen Lapthisophon / p. 68

Spillway No. 5, Susan Terris, Editor / p. 74

Touch Wood, Albert Mobilio / p. 33

The Yellow House, Robin Behn / p. 10 Yellow Plum Season, Pui Ying Wong / p. 48

Spirit Birds They Told Me, Mary Oishi / p. 35

Trials and Tribulations, Alazar Tesfamichael / p. 72

Spit, Esther Lee / p. 29

Two, Paul Vangelisti / p. 45

Yes Thing No Thing, Edwin Torres / p. 44

Spit Delaney’s Island, Jack Hodgins / p. 54

Two Draft Essays from , Gershom Scholem / p. 71

Spring Drive, Glover Davis / p. 16

Under the Sky They Lit Cities, Travis Cebula / p. 14

Yingelishi: Sinophonic English Poetry and Poetics, Jonathan Stalling / p. 42

Steady, My Gaze, Marie-Elizabeth Mali / p. 31

Undone, Maxine Scates / p. 39

Still: Of the Earth as the Ark Which Does Not Move, Matthew Cooperman / p. 15

Universal Beach, Vivek Narayanan / p. 34

Stone Music: The Art and Poetry of Susan Gardner, Susan Gardner / p. 21

Us, Michael Kimball / p. 55

The Us, Joan Houlihan / p. 25

Vanishing Act, Bruce Holsapple / p. 25

The Stranger Dissolves, Christina Hutchins / p. 26

Vanishing Horizon, Gerry Lafemina / p. 29

Studying Hunger Journals, Bernadette Mayer / p. 32

Verbal Paradise (preverbs), George Quasha / p. 37

Study in Pavilions and Safe Rooms, Paul Foster Johnson / p. 27

Vertical Poetry: Last Poems, Roberto Juarroz / p. 27

Supermachine Issue Three, Ben Fama, Editor / p. 74



Your Disappearance, David Wirthlin / p. 47 Zone 3 Vol. 5 No.  Fall , Blas Falconer and Amy Wright, Editors / p. 75

Un storia, Steve Timm / p. 43

Stranger Air, Stacie Leatherman / p. 29

Summer Hunger, Judith Pacht / p. 35

You’d Be a Stranger, Too, Weston Cutter / p. 53

Vertical Poetry: Recent Poems, Roberto Juarroz / p. 27 Vertigo: The Living Dead Man Poems, Marvin Bell / p. 11

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Publisher Index ACTION BOOKS Peter Richards, Helsinki / p. 38 Daniel Tiffany, Privado / p. 43 ADASTRA PRESS Kyle Flak, The Secret Admirer / p. 20 AEQUITAS BOOKS Ken Harvey, A Passionate Engagement: A Memoir / p. 67 AHADADA BOOKS Mary-Marcia Casoly, Katherine Hastings, Melanie L. Moro-Huber, and Jack Foley, Ahadada Reader 3 / p. 14 Warren Fulton and David Jaffin, Poemed on a Beach: A Skeptic’s Guide to Modern Poetry / p. 66 Anne Pitkin, Winter Arguments / p. 36 AKASHIC BOOKS Kathleen George, Editor, Pittsburgh Noir / p. 54 Kevin Holohan, The Brothers’ Lot / p. 55 Nathan Larson, The Dewey Decimal System / p. 56 Lonely Christopher, The Mechanics of Homosexual Intercourse / p. 56 Adriana V. López and Carmen Ospina, Editors, Barcelona Noir / p. 57 Nina Revoyr, Wingshooters / p. 59 Matthew Stokoe, Cows / p. 60 David Unger, The Price of Escape / p. 61 Persia Walker, Black Orchid Blues / p. 61 AMPERSAND BOOKS Joseph Riippi, The Orange Suitcase / p. 59 William Walsh, Editor, Re: Telling / p. 61 ANHINGA PRESS Gerry Lafemina, Vanishing Horizon / p. 29 Erika Meitner, Makeshift Instructions for Vigilant Girls / p. 33 Gretchen Steele Pratt, One Island / p. 37 APOSTROPHE BOOKS Jessica Baran, Remains to Be Used / p. 10 ASTROPHIL PRESS Ellen Welcker, The Botanical Garden / p. 46 BAMBERGER BOOKS Gershom Scholem, Two Draft Essays from 1918 / p. 71 BEAR STAR PRESS Quinton Duval, Like Hay / p. 18 BEATITUDE PRESS Dale Jensen, Auto Bio / p. 26 Alazar Tesfamichael, Trials and Tribulations / p. 72 BELLADONNA* Carla Harryman and Lyn Hejinian, The Wide Road / p. 24 Barbara Henning, Looking Up Harryette Mullen: Interviews on Sleeping with the Dictionary and Other Works / p. 67 BENU PRESS Marianne Roccaforte, Bridges in the Mind: An Artist’s Handbook for Everyday Living / p. 70 Erin E. Tocknell, Confederate Streets / p. 72 BILINGUAL REVIEW PRESS Nash Candelaria, Second Communion / p. 64 Steven Cordova, Long Distance / p. 16 Lucrecia Guerrero, Tree of Sighs / p. 54 Elva Treviño Hart, Simpáticas: San Miguel Stories / p. 54 Gary Francisco Keller, Editor, Good Bandits, Warrior Women, and Revolutionaries in Hispanic Culture / p. 67 Maceo Montoya, The Scoundrel and the Optimist / p. 58 BIRD DOG PUBLISHING Allen Frost, The Mermaid Translation / p. 53 BIRDS, LLC Dan Boehl, Kings of the F**king Sea / p. 11 Sommer Browning, Either Way I’m Celebrating / p. 14

BKMK PRESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY Megan Harlan, Mapmaking / p. 23 Mariko Nagai, Georgic / p. 58 Andrew Plattner, A Marriage of Convenience / p. 58 Mary Troy, Beauties / p. 61 BLACK OCEAN Matthew Henriksen, Ordinary Sun / p. 24 Dominic Mallary, Destroyer of Man: Selected Poems by Dominic Owen Mallary / p. 31 Brandon Shimoda, The Girl Without Arms / p. 41 BLACK RADISH BOOKS Carrie Hunter, The Incompossible / p. 26 James Maughn, The Arakaki Permutations / p. 32 Kathrin Schaeppi, Sonja Sekula : Grace in a cow’s EYE : a memoir / p. 40 BLAZEVOX [BOOKS] Michael Basinski, Editor, Gerald Locklin: A Critical Introduction / p. 64 Bill Berkson, For the Ordinary Artist: Short Reviews, Occasional Pieces and More / p. 64 Stephen Bett, Track This: A Book of Relationship / p. 11 Travis Cebula, Under the Sky They Lit Cities / p. 14 Weston Cutter, You’d Be a Stranger, Too / p. 53 Garin Cycholl, Hostile Witness / p. 16 j/j hastain, asymptotic lover//thermodynamic vents / p. 24 Elizabeth Hatmaker, Girl in Two Pieces / p. 24 Colin Herd, too ok / p. 24 Deborah Meadows, Saccade Patterns / p. 32 Urayoán Noel, Hi-Density Politics / p. 35 Nate Pritts, Big Bright Sun / p. 37 Chuck Richardson, Smoke / p. 59 Chuck Richardson, So It Seams / p. 59 Tim Roberts, Drizzle Pocket / p. 38 Todd Romanowski, Every Strange Meridian / p. 38 Matt Shears, Where a road had been / p. 40 Sophie Sills, Elemental Perceptions: A Panorama / p. 41 Steve Timm, Un storia / p. 43 Tony Trigilio, Historic Diary / p. 44 Terry Van Vliet, Black Lines on Terracotta / p. 44 Sarah White, Alice Ages and Ages / p. 47 David Wirthlin, Your Disappearance / p. 47 Tim Wood, Otherwise Known as Home / p. 48 BOOKTHUG Michael Boughn, Cosmographia: A Post-Lucrecian Faux Micro-Epic / p. 12 George Bowering, Horizontal Surfaces / p. 64 Victor Coleman, The Occasional Troubadour / p. 15 bp Nichol, The Captain Poetry Poems Complete / p. 34 Florine Stettheimer, Crystal Flowers: Poems and a Libretto / p. 42 Mark Truscott, Nature / p. 44 Steven Zultanski, Cop Kisser / p. 48 BOOTSTRAP PRESS Sunnylyn Thibodeaux, Palm to Pine / p. 43 BORDIGHERA PRESS Helen Barolini, Crossing the Alps / p. 51 Gil Fagiani, Chianti in Connecticut / p. 19 BOTTOM DOG PRESS Daniel Thompson, The Big Book of Daniel: Collected Poems of Daniel Thompson / p. 43 Charles Dodd White and Page Seay, Editors, Degrees of Elevation: Short Stories of Contemporary Appalachia / p. 62 BRIGHT HILL PRESS Bertha Rogers, Editor, Book Arts 2010: Bright Hill Center / p. 70

THE BROOKLYN RAIL/BLACK SQUARE EDITIONS Albert Mobilio, Touch Wood / p. 33 BURNING DECK David Lespiau, Four Cut-Ups, or, the Case of the Restored Volume / p. 30 Christina Mengert, As We Are Sung / p. 33 Gale Nelson, This Is What Happens When Talk Ends / p. 34 C&R PRESS John Estes, Kingdom Come / p. 18 CANARIUM BOOKS Robert Fernandez, We Are Pharaoh / p. 19 Ish Klein, Moving Day / p. 28 Gleb Shulpyakov, A Fireproof Box / p. 41 CARAVEL MYSTERY BOOKS Michael Burke, Music of the Spheres / p. 52 Russell Hill, The Dog Sox / p. 54 THE CENTER FOR THE HUMANITIES, THE GRADUATE CENTER, CUNY Ammiel Alcalay, Editor, Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, Series 2 / p. 63 CHAINLINKS Juliana Spahr and Stephanie Young, Editors, A Megaphone: Some Enactments, Some Numbers, and Some Essays about the Continued Usefulness of Crotchless-pants-and-a-machine-gun Feminism / p. 72 CHAX PRESS Drum Hadley, The Light Before Dawn / p. 23 Robert Mittenthal, Wax World / p. 33 CITY LIGHTS PUBLISHERS Will Alexander, Compression & Purity / p. 9 David Meltzer, When I Was a Poet / p. 33 Will Potter, Green Is the New Red: In Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege / p. 69 Micah Ballard, Waifs and Strays / p. 10 Hal Niedzviecki, Look Down, This Is Where It Must Have Happened / p. 58 CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY POETRY CENTER Nin Andrews, The Book of Orgasms / p. 9 Emily Kendal Frey, The Grief Performance / p. 20 Zach Savich, The Firestorm / p. 39 COACH HOUSE BOOKS Gabe Foreman, A Complete Encyclopedia of Different Types of People / p. 20 Helen Guri, Match / p. 22 Daniel Jones, The Brave Never Write Poetry / p. 27 COFFEE HOUSE PRESS Rikki Ducornet, Netsuke / p. 53 Elaine Equi, Click and Clone / p. 18 Joseph Lease, Testify / p. 29 R. Zamora Linmark, Leche / p. 56 Chris Martin, Becoming Weather / p. 31 Ron Padgett, How Long / p. 35 Anne Waldman, The Iovis Trilogy: Colors in the Mechanism of Concealment / p. 45 COMBO BOOKS Stan Apps, The World as Phone Bill / p. 63 Drew Gardner, Chomp Away / p. 21 COMMODORE BOOKS Troy Burle Bailey, The Pierre Bonga Loops / p. 10 Crawford Kilian, Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia / p. 67 COPPER BEECH PRESS Rachel Hadas, The Ache of Appetite / p. 23 COPPER CANYON PRESS Marvin Bell, Vertigo: The Living Dead Man Poems / p. 11 Michael Dickman, Flies / p. 17 Laura Kasischke, Space, In Chains / p. 27

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PUBLISHER INDEX Deborah Landau, The Last Usable Hour / p. 29 Dana Levin, Sky Burial / p. 30 Lucia Perillo, Inseminating the Elephant / p. 36 Georg Trakl, Song of the Departed: Selected Poems of Georg Trakl / p. 44 Qingping Wang, Editor, Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China / p. 46 C. D. Wright, One with Others: [a little book of her days] / p. 48 Dean Young, Fall Higher / p. 48 COUNTERPATH PRESS Matthew Cooperman, Still: Of the Earth as the Ark Which Does Not Move / p. 15 Jonathan Stalling, Yingelishi: Sinophonic English Poetry and Poetics / p. 42 CYPHER BOOKS Roger Bonair-Agard, Gully / p. 12 DARK SKY BOOKS Seth Berg, Muted Lines from Someone Else’s Memory / p. 11 Michael Bible, Cowboy Maloney’s Electric City / p. 52 Kevin Murphy, Editor, Dark Sky Magazine / p. 73 Ben Mazer, January 2008 / p. 32 Ethel Rohan, Cut Through the Bone / p. 59 Gregory Sherl, I Have Touched You / p. 60 Stephen Sturgeon, Trees of the Twentieth Century / p. 42 DEERBROOK EDITIONS Wendy Ranan, The Quiet Room / p. 37

FLOOD EDITIONS Roy Fisher, Selected Poems / p. 19 William Fuller, Hallucination / p. 21 FOURTEEN HILLS PRESS Hollie Hardy, Editor, Fourteen Hills Vol. 17 No. 1 / p. 74 FURNITURE PRESS BOOKS Magus Magnus, Heraclitean Pride / p. 31 GRANARY BOOKS/CORACLE PRESS Nancy Kuhl, The Book Remembers Everything: The Work of Erica Van Horn / p. 68 GREEN INTEGER Richard Kalich, Penthouse F / p. 55 Nelly Sachs, Collected Poems I: 1944-1949 / p. 39 THE GREEN LANTERN PRESS Tobias Amadon Bengelsdorf, Editor, The Fiction at Work Biannual Report / p. 51 Stephanie Brooks, Love Is a Certain Kind of Flower / p. 13 Amira Hanafi, Forgery / p. 23 Stephen Lapthisophon, Writing Art Cinema 1988-2010 / p. 68 GREENHOUSE REVIEW PRESS Brad Crenshaw, My Gargantuan Desire / p. 16 Carol Lem, Gathering the Pieces / p. 30 THE GROUNDWATER PRESS Gerrit Henry, The Time of the Night / p. 24

DENVER QUARTERLY Bin Ramke, Editor, Denver Quarterly 45:1 / p. 73 Bin Ramke, Editor, Denver Quarterly 45:2 / p. 73 DEPARTMENT OF WRITING, UCA Mark Spitzer, Editor, Toad Suck Review: The Transitional Issue / p. 75 DOS MADRES PRESS Gerry Grubbs, The Girls in Bright Dresses Dancing / p. 22 Donald Wellman, A North Atlantic Wall / p. 46 DUSIE PRESS Laynie Browne, Roseate, Points of Gold / p. 14 Arielle Guy, Three Geogaophies: A Milkmaid’s Grimoire / p. 23 EL LEóN LITERARY ARTS Chester Aaron, About Them / p. 51 ELIXIR PRESS Kristin Kelly, Cargo / p. 28 Esther Lee, Spit / p. 29 Kathryn Nuernberger, Rag & Bone / p. 35

GUERNICA EDITIONS Mary Bucci Bush, Sweet Hope / p. 52 Giuseppe Conte, Angelina’s Lips / p. 53 Thomas DePietro, Editor, Frank Lentricchia: Essays on His Works / p. 65 Richard Gambino, Blood of My Blood: The Dilemma of the Italian Americans / p. 66 Lorenzo Madalena, Confetti for Gino / p. 57 HANGING LOOSE PRESS Jen Benka, Pinko / p. 11 William Corbett, The Whalen Poem / p. 15 Gerald Fleming, Night of Pure Breathing / p. 20 Robert Hershon, Dick Lourie, and Mark Pawlak, Editors, Hanging Loose 97 / p. 74 Pablo Medina, The Man Who Wrote on Water / p. 32 Elizabeth Swados, Waiting: Selected Nonfiction / p. 72 Terence Winch, Falling Out of Bed in a Room with No Floor / p. 47 HOBBLEBUSH BOOKS Sandy Bothmer, Creating the Peaceable Classroom: A 21st-Century Wellness Guide for Teachers, Students and Parents / p. 64

ETRUSCAN PRESS Paul Lisicky, The Burning House / p. 56 Jack Matthews, The Gambler’s Nephew / p. 57

HORSE LESS PRESS Richard Froude, FABRIC: Preludes to the Last American Book / p. 65 Susan Scarlata, It Might Turn Out We Are Real / p. 39

FACTORY HOLLOW PRESS R. H. W. Dillard, What Is Owed the Dead / p. 17 Frances McCue, The Bled / p. 32 FACTORY SCHOOL Kate Tarlow Morgan, Circles and Boundaries / p. 69 FAST FORWARD PRESS M. V. Montgomery, Dream Koans / p. 57 FENCE BOOKS Daniel Brenner, June / p. 13 Rebecca Wolff, Editor, Fence Vol. 13 No. 2 Winter 2011 / p. 73 Harmony Holiday, Negro League Baseball / p. 25 Paul Maliszewski, Prayer and Parable: Stories / p. 57 FIFTH PLANET PRESS Rachel Daley, Plasmos / p. 16 Alan Bajandas and Benjamin Solomon, Editors, The Open Face Sandwich, Volume 2 / p. 74



FIRST INTENSITY PRESS John Levy, A Mind’s Cargo Shifting / p. 56

HOST PUBLICATIONS Per Aage Brandt, These Hands / p. 13 Elzbieta Szoka and Joe W. Bratcher, III, Editors, The Dirty Goat 23 / p. 73 Hai Zi, Over Autumn Rooftops / p. 23

JUNCTION PRESS Alboqasem Ferdowsi, The Teller of Tales: Stories from Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh / p. 19 Rochelle Owens, Solitary Workwoman / p. 35 Harry Polkinhorn, Demos Oneiron / p. 36 Harry Polkinhorn and Alfredo Velasco, Editors, Caló: A Dictionary of Spanish Barrio and Border Slang / p. 69 Jerome Rothenberg, Retrievals: Uncollected & New Poems, 1955-2010 / p. 39 KAYA PRESS Shailja Patel, Migritude / p. 36 KELSEY STREET PRESS Rena Rosenwasser, Elevators / p. 39 Hazel White, Peril as Architectural Enrichment / p. 47 KENNING EDITIONS Tan Lin, Insomnia and the Aunt / p. 56 Jesse Seldess, Left Having / p. 40 LA ALAMEDA PRESS John Brandi, Seeding the Cosmos: New & Selected Haiku / p. 12 Bruce Holsapple, Vanishing Act / p. 25 Andrew Schelling, From the Arapaho Songbook / p. 40 LA PRESSE Claude Royet-Journoud, The Whole of Poetry Is Preposition / p. 39 LES FIGUES PRESS Mathew Timmons, The New Poetics / p. 43 LIGHTFUL PRESS Sasha Chernyi, Poems from Children’s Island / p. 15 LINEBOOKS Larissa Lai and Rita Wong, Sybil Unrest / p. 29 Jonathan Wilcke, Dupe / p. 47 LITMUS PRESS Leslie Scalapino, How Phenomena Appear to Unfold / p. 71 LIVINGSTON PRESS Tom Abrams, Goya’s Head / p. 51 Jay Atkinson, Tauvernier Street / p. 51 Scott Ely, Dream Fishing / p. 53 Nadia Kalman, The Cosmopolitans / p. 55 Katie Wainwright, Cuba on My Mind / p. 61 LYRIC& PRESS Colleen Lookingbill, a forgetting of / p. 30 MAGIC HELICOPTER PRESS Jason Bredle, Smiles of the Unstoppable / p. 13 Ofelia Hunt, Today & Tomorrow / p. 55 MARICK PRESS Regina Derieva, Corinthian Copper / p. 17 Francesco Levato, Elegy for Dead Languages / p. 30 MARSH HAWK PRESS Thomas Fink, Peace Conference / p. 19 Norman Finkelstein, Inside the Ghost Factory / p. 19 Daniel Morris, If Not for the Courage / p. 34 Justin Petropoulos, Eminent Domain / p. 36

IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI Uyen Hua, a/s/l / p. 25 Vivek Narayanan, Universal Beach / p. 34

MAYAPPLE PRESS Paul Dickey, They Say This Is How Death Came into the World / p. 17 Andrei Guruianu, Metal and Plum: A Memoir / p. 66 Sally Rosen Kindred, No Eden / p. 28 Stacie Leatherman, Stranger Air / p. 29 Howard Schwartz, Breathing in the Dark / p. 40 Jane O. Wayne, The Other Place You Live / p. 46 Mary Winegarden, The Translator’s Sister / p. 47

INK. Michele Rider, Women in the Financial District: A Photo Essay / p. 70

MEETING EYES BINDERY Tod Thilleman, Egghead to Underhoof (Our Concluding the Poem) / p. 43

HOUSE OF NEHESI PUBLISHERS Nidaa Khoury, Book of Sins / p. 28

ITHURIEL’S SPEAR Richard Tagett, Demodulating Angel / p. 42

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PUBLISHER INDEX MERCURY HOUSE Leslie Baer-Brown and Bob Rhein, Earth Keepers: A Sourcebook for Environmental lssues and Action / p. 63 William M. Brinton and Alan Rinzler, Editors, Without Force or Lies: Voices from the Revolution of Central Europe in 1989-90 / p. 64 Thomas Farber, The Face of the Deep / p. 65 Victor Perera, Rites: A Guatemalan Boyhood / p. 69 MIAMI UNIVERSITY PRESS Fergal Gaynor, VIII Stepping Poems & other pieces / p. 21 Garth Greenwell, Mitko / p. 54 A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S PRESS Francesca Lia Block, Fairy Tales in Electri-City / p. 11

Tony Medina, My Old Man Was Always on the Lam / p. 33 F. D. Reeve, The Puzzle Master and Other Poems / p. 37 Shelley Stenhouse, Impunity / p. 42 Norman Stock, Pickled Dreams Naked / p. 42 Tim Suermondt, Just Beautiful / p. 42 Douglas Treem, Everything So Seriously / p. 44 Barry Wallenstein, Editor, For Enid with Love: a festchrift / p. 72 Pui Ying Wong, Yellow Plum Season / p. 48

Linda Norton, The Public Gardens: Poems and History / p. 35 Tom Pickard, More Pricks Than Prizes / p. 69 Joseph Torra, What’s So Funny / p. 61

OFF THE PARK PRESS Ronna Lebo, Prolapse / p. 29 John Yau, Editor, Viva la Difference: Poetry Inspired by the Painting of Peter Saul / p. 48

R. L. CROW PUBLICATIONS Josh Fernandez, Spare Parts and Dismemberment / p. 19 James P. Lenfestey, Editor, Low Down and Coming On: A Feast of Delicious and Dangerous Poems About Pigs / p. 30 John Calvin Rezmerski, Breaking the Rules: Starting with Ghazals / p. 38

MIMEO MIMEO/CUNEIFORM Jed Birmingham and Kyle Schlesinger, Editors, Mimeo Mimeo 4 / p. 74

OMNIDAWN Paul Legault, The Madeleine Poems / p. 29 Craig Santos Perez, From Unincorporated Territory [Saina] / p. 36

MODE A/THIS PRESS Rae Armantrout, Steve Benson, Carla Harryman, Lyn Hejinian, Tom Mandel, Ted Pearson, Bob Perelman, Kit Robinson, Ron Silliman, and Barrett Watten, The Grand Piano: Part 10 / p. 63

OTIS BOOKS/SEISMICITY EDITIONS Guy Bennett, Self-Evident Poems / p. 11 Adriano Spatola, The Porthole / p. 60

MONKEY PUZZLE PRESS Mark Spitzer, After the Orange Glow / p. 72 MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS Ben Brooks, An Island of Fifty / p. 52 Sasha Fletcher, When All Our Days Are Numbered Marching Bands Will Fill the Streets & We Will Not Hear Them Because We Will Be Upstairs in the Clouds / p. 53 Molly Gaudry, We Take Me Apart / p. 21 Norman Lock, Grim Tales / p. 56 Michael Stewart, The Hieroglyphics / p. 60 MUSE PRESS Paul Caponigro, The Voice of the Print / p. 64 MUUMUU HOUSE Megan Boyle, selected unpublished blog posts of a mexican panda express employee / p. 12 NARROW HOUSE Chris Mason, Hum Who Hiccup / p. 31 NEW ISSUES POETRY & PROSE Seth Abramson, Northerners / p. 9 Kevin Fenton, Merit Badges / p. 53 Jeff Hoffman, Journal of American Foreign Policy / p. 24 Jack Myers, The Memory of Water / p. 34 Maxine Scates, Undone / p. 39 NEW STAR BOOKS Lawrence Aronsen, City of Love and Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties / p. 63 George Bowering, Caprice / p. 52 Steve Weiner, Sweet England / p. 62 NIGHTBOAT BOOKS Daniel Borzutzky, The Book of Interfering Bodies / p. 12 Michael Burkard, lucky coat anywhere / p. 14 Tim Dlugos, A Fast Life: The Collected Poems of Tim Dlugos / p. 17 Josey Foo and Leah Stein, A Lily Lilies / p. 20 Bhanu Kapil, Schizophrene / p. 27 Dawn Lundy Martin, Discipline / p. 31 3 PRESS Sarah Riggs and Cole Swensen, Editors, READ 4 / p. 38 Diane Wald, Wonderbender / p. 45 NOEMI PRESS Joshua Edwards and Van Edwards, Campeche / p. 18 NYQ BOOKS rd coleman, beach tracks / p. 15 Sanford Fraser, Among Strangers I’ve Known All My Life/Parmi Les Etrangers Que J’ai Connus Toute Ma Vie / p. 20 Adam Hughes, Petrichor / p. 25 Luke Johnson, After the Ark / p. 26

OYSTER MOON PRESS Josie Malinowski, West of Pure Evil / p. 57 PAPER KITE PRESS Bob Holman, Picasso in Barcelona / p. 25 Susan Scutti, The Commute / p. 40 PARLOR PRESS Paul Kei Matsuda, Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, and Xiaoye You, Editors, The Politics of Second Language Writing: In Search of the Promised Land / p. 68 PATRICK LOVELACE EDITIONS Marie Buck, Life & Style / p. 14 Brad Flis, Peasants / p. 20 PAVEMENT SAW PRESS Jason Irwin, Watering the Dead / p. 26 Stan Mir, The Lacustrine Suite / p. 33 Justin Vicari, The Professional Weepers / p. 45 PENMANSHIP BOOKS Mahogany L. Browne, #Dear Twitter: Love Letters Hashed Out Online in 140 Characters or Less / p. 14 Michael Cirelli, Everyone Loves the Situation / p. 15 Zora Howard, Clutch / p. 25 PLEASURE BOAT STUDIO Russell Connor, Toys from My Attic / p. 52 Scott Ezell, Yusef Komunyakaa, Mike O’Connor, and Thomas Merton, Songs from a Yahi Bow: A Series of Poems on Ishi / p. 18 Edward Harkness, Beautiful Passing Lives / p. 23 PLEIADES PRESS Takako Lento and Wayne Miller, Editors, Tamura Ryuichi: On the Life & Work of a 20th Century Master / p. 30 PM PRESS Akbar Ahmed, Suspended Somewhere Between: A Book of Verse / p. 9 Derrick Weston Brown, Wisdom Teeth / p. 13 POLEMIC PRESS Jean Genet, The Genet Translations: Poetry and Posthumous Plays / p. 21 PORTABLE PRESS AT YO-YO LABS Paul Foster Johnson, Study in Pavilions and Safe Rooms / p. 27 THE POST-APOLLO PRESS Patrick James Dunagan, There Are People Who Say That Painters Shouldn’t Talk: A GUSTONBOOK / p. 18 PRE PRESS Judy Molyneux, California Gold / p. 69 PRESSED WAFER Ed Barrett, Down New Utrecht Avenue / p. 10 Guy Birchard, Further than the Blood / p. 11

PRINTED MATTER PRESS Morgan Gibson, Nonzen Poems / p. 21 PUBLISHING GENIUS PRESS Mike Topp, Sasquatch Stories / p. 43

RED MOUNTAIN PRESS Susan Gardner, Drawing the Line / p. 66 Susan Gardner, Stone Music: The Art and Poetry of Susan Gardner / p. 21 Ford Robbins, Connections: A Visual Journal / p. 70 Marc Talbert, Altogether Ernest / p. 42 RESCUE PRESS Shane McCrae, In Canaan / p. 32 Madeline McDonnell, There Is Something Inside, It Wants to Get Out / p. 57 Marc Rahe, The Smaller Half / p. 37 Andrea Rexilius, To Be Human Is to Be a Conversation / p. 38 Zach Savich, Events Film Cannot Withstand / p. 71 RONSDALE PRESS Jean Rae Baxter, Broken Trail / p. 51 Patrick Bowman, Torn from Troy: Odyssey of a Slave / p. 52 Jack Hodgins, Spit Delaney’s Island / p. 54 Inge Israel, Beckett Soundings / p. 26 Ian Macdonald and Betty O’Keefe, Quiet Reformers: The Legacy of Early Victoria’s Bishop Edward and Mary Cridge / p. 68 Susan McNicoll, The Opening Act: Canadian Theatre History 1945-1953 / p. 69 Pamela Porter, Cathedral / p. 37 Charles Reid, Ghost of Heroes Past / p. 59 Jean-Pierre Rogel, Evolution: The View from the Cottage / p. 70 Philip Roy, River Odyssey / p. 59 Carol Anne Shaw, Hannah and the Spindle Whorl / p. 59 Alan Twigg, The Essentials: 150 Great B.C. Books & Authors / p. 72 ROOF BOOKS Nada Gordon, Scented Rushes / p. 22 Joel Steven Kuszai, Accidency / p. 29 Edwin Torres, Yes Thing No Thing / p. 44 Cesar Vallejo, Against Professional Secrets / p. 44 SATURNALIA BOOKS Derek Mong, Other Romes / p. 34 Martha Silano, The Little Office of the Immaculate Conception / p. 41 SEOUL SELECTION Brother Anthony, Hong Keong-Hee, and Steven D. Owyoung, Korean Tea Classics / p. 64 Cho In-souk and Robert Koehler, Seoul’s Historic Walks / p. 65 Robert Koehler, Hangeul: Korea’s Unique Alphabet / p. 67 John Rich, Korean War in Color: A Correspondent’s Retrospective on a Forgotten War / p. 70 Seoul Selection Editorial Team, The Korea Success Story / p. 71 Roger Shepherd, Andrew Douch, and David A. Mason, Baekdu-daegan Trail: Hiking Korea’s Mountain Spine / p. 71 Melanie Steyn, Once Around the Sun / p. 60

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PUBLISHER INDEX SHEARSMAN BOOKS Dennis Barone, Parallel Lines / p. 10 Joseph Bradshaw, In the Common Dream of George Oppen / p. 12 Shira Dentz, black seeds on a white dish / p. 17 Cralan Kelder, Give Some Word / p. 27 Jose Kozer, Anima / p. 28 Elena Rivera, The Perforated Map / p. 38 Eileen R. Tabios, Silk Egg: Collected Novels / p. 60 Craig Watson, Sleepwalking with Orpheus / p. 46 Laura Walker, bird book / p. 45 SHORT FLIGHT/LONG DRIVE BOOKS Mary Miller, Big World / p. 57 Adam Novy, The Avian Gospels, Book I / p. 58 Adam Novy, The Avian Gospels, Book II / p. 58 SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 01: A Journal of Gay Poetry / p. 73 Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 02: A Journal of Gay Poetry / p. 73 Raymond Luczak, Road Work Ahead / p. 31 Steven Reigns, Inheritance / p. 37 Theresa Senato Edwards, Voices Through Skin / p. 40 Ocean Vuong, Burnings / p. 45 SILENCED PRESS Michael Hemery, No Permanent Scars / p. 67

SUNNYOUTSIDE Brian McGettrick, Everything Else We Must Endure / p. 32 Andrew Rihn, America Plops and Fizzes / p. 38 SUPERMACHINE Ben Fama, Editor, Supermachine Issue Three / p. 74 SWANK BOOKS Eugene K. Garber, O Amazonas Escuro / p. 53 TALISMAN HOUSE Donna de la Perrière, Saint Erasure / p. 17 Seyhan Erözçelik, Rosestrikes and Coffee Grinds / p. 18 Edward Foster, Editor, Talisman 38/39/40 / p. 74 Paul Vangelisti, Two / p. 45 TARPAULIN SKY PRESS Johannes Göransson, Entrance to a colonial pageant in which we all begin to intricate / p. 22 TAVERN BOOKS Leonardo Sinisgalli, Night of Shooting Stars / p. 41 David Wevill, Casual Ties / p. 46 TEA PARTY REPUBLICANS PRESS Lawrence Giffin, Sorites / p. 22 Astrid Lorange, Eating and Speaking / p. 31

SILVERFISH REVIEW PRESS Joanne Diaz, The Lessons / p. 17

TEBOT BACH Glover Davis, Spring Drive / p. 16 Marie-Elizabeth Mali, Steady, My Gaze / p. 31 Judith Pacht, Summer Hunger / p. 35 J. D. Lloyd, Editor, Spillway No. 14 / p. 74 Susan Terris, Editor, Spillway No. 15 / p. 74 Florence Weinberger, Sacred Graffiti / p. 46

SIX GALLERY PRESS Evan Lavender-Smith, Avatar / p. 56 SIXTEEN RIVERS PRESS Christina Hutchins, The Stranger Dissolves / p. 26 Jeanne Wagner, In the Body of Our Lives / p. 45 SLAPERING HOL PRESS Denise Duhamel and Amy Lemmon, Enjoy Hot or Iced: Poems in Conversation and a Conversation / p. 18 Katie Phillips, Driving Montana, Alone / p. 36 SLOPE EDITIONS Alexandria Peary, Lid to the Shadow / p. 36 SMALL DESK PRESS Lizzy Acker, Monster Party / p. 51 SOBERSCOVE PRESS Robert Goodnough, Editor, Artists’ Sessions at Studio 35 (1950) / p. 66 Kristin Lucas, Refresh / p. 68 Nancy Shaver, Henry at Home / p. 71 SOLID OBJECTS Jim Shepard, Master of Miniatures / p. 60 Mac Wellman, Left Glove / p. 62 SPIRE PRESS, INC. Christina Olson, Before I Came Home Naked / p. 35 Anthony Russell White, The Faith of Leaping / p. 47 SPUYTEN DUYVIL Robin Behn, The Yellow House / p. 10 Martine Bellen, Ghosts! / p. 11 j/j hastain, Prurient Anarchic Omnibus / p. 24 Tod Thilleman, Three Sea Monsters: Our History of Whose Image / p. 43 STANDING STONE BOOKS John Elvis Smelcer, Alaskan: Stories from the Great Land / p. 60 Elizabeth Twiddy, Love-Noise / p. 44 STATION HILL PRESS OF BARRYTOWN Bernadette Mayer, Studying Hunger Journals / p. 32 Peter Lamborn Wilson, Ec(o)logues / p. 47 STOCKPORT FLATS Fred Muratori, The Spectra / p. 34 Lillien Waller, Editor, American Ghost: Poets on Life After Industry / p. 46



SUBITO PRESS Sandra Doller, Man Years / p. 17 Andy Frazee, The Body, The Rooms / p. 20 Alta Ifland, Death-in-a-Box / p. 55

TIME BEING BOOKS Louis Daniel Brodsky, At Dock’s End: Poems of Lake Nebagamon, Volume Two / p. 13 Louis Daniel Brodsky, Getting to Unknow the Neighbors / p. 52 Louis Daniel Brodsky, Seizing the Sun and Moon: Volume Three of The Seasons of Youth / p. 13 Ben Milder, From Adolescence to Senescence: A Life in Light Verse / p. 33 TRES CHICAS BOOKS Renée Gregorio, Joan Logghe, and Miriam Sagan, Love & Death: Greatest Hits / p. 22 TSAR PUBLICATIONS R. Cheran, Dalbir Singh, Chelva Kanaganayakam, and Sudharshan Durayappah, Editors, World Without Walls: Being Human, Being Tamil / p. 65 Pilar Cuder-Domínguez, Belén Martín-Lucas, and Sonia Villegas-López, Editors, Transnational Poetics: Asian Canadian Women’s Fiction of the 1990s / p. 65 Cyril Dabydeen, Editor, Beyond Sangre Grande: Caribbean Writing Today / p. 16 Ava Homa, Echoes from the Other Land / p. 55 Sheniz Janmohamed, Bleeding Light / p. 26 Peng Ma, Peng Ma: Abstract Ink Painting / p. 68 Uma Parameswaran, A Cycle of the Moon / p. 58 Dawn Promislow, Jewels and Other Stories / p. 59 Jennifer Rahim, Redemption Rain / p. 37 H. Nigel Thomas, Lives: Whole and Otherwise / p. 61 TUPELO PRESS Kazim Ali, Fasting for Ramadan: Notes from a Spiritual Practice / p. 63 Dan Beachy-Quick, Circle’s Apprentice / p. 10 Joshua Corey, Severance Songs / p. 16 Patricia Fargnoli, Then, Something / p. 19 Joan Houlihan, The Us / p. 25 Daniel Khalastchi, Manoleria / p. 28 Jennifer Militello, Flinch of Song / p. 33 Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Lucky Fish / p. 34

TYRANT BOOKS Michael Kimball, Us / p. 55 UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE Ammiel Alcalay, neither wit nor gold / p. 9 Julian T. Brolaski, gowanus atropolis / p. 13 Kate Colby, The Return of the Native / p. 15 Will Hubbard, Cursivism / p. 25 Filip Marinovich, And If You Don’t Go Crazy I’ll Meet You Here Tomorrow / p. 31 Laura Solomon, The Hermit / p. 41 Maureen Thorson, Applies to Oranges / p. 43 Yvan Yauri, Fire Wind / p. 48 UNITED ARTISTS BOOKS Chris Tysh, Night Scales: A Fable for Klara K / p. 44 UPPER WEST SIDE PHILOSOPHERS Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Fatal Numbers: Why Count on Chance / p. 65 Durs Grünbein, The Vocation of Poetry / p. 66 VOLT Gillian Conoley, Editor, Volt No. 16 / p. 75 WAVE BOOKS Gennady Aygi, Into the Snow: Selected Poems of Gennady Aygi / p. 10 Anselm Berrigan, Notes from Irrelevance / p. 11 Jorge Carrera Andrade, Micrograms / p. 14 Caroline Knox, Nine Worthies / p. 28 Noelle Kocot, The Bigger World / p. 28 Anthony McCann, I Heart Your Fate / p. 32 Matthew Rohrer, Destroyer and Preserver / p. 38 Mary Ruefle, Selected Poems / p. 39 WEAVERS PRESS Syed Afzal Haider, To Be with Her / p. 54 WEST END PRESS Paula Gunn Allen, America the Beautiful: Last Poems / p. 9 Robert Bohm, Closing the Hotel Kitchen / p. 12 Shirley Geok-Lin Lim, Walking Backwards: New Poems / p. 30 Mary Oishi, Spirit Birds They Told Me / p. 35 WHAT BOOKS PRESS A. W. DeAnnuntis, Master Siger’s Dream / p. 53 WHITE PINE PRESS Aliki Barnstone, Bright Body / p. 10 Peter Conners, The Crows Were Laughing in Their Trees / p. 15 Elisabeth Frost, All of Us / p. 21 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Last Poems / p. 27 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Recent Poems / p. 27 WILD OCEAN PRESS Sharon Doubiago, My Father’s Love, Volume II: The Legacy / p. 65 THE WORD WORKS Sarah Browning, Whiskey in the Garden of Eden / p. 14 WORDFARM Alan Michael Parker, Whale Man / p. 58 Paul J. Willis, The Alpine Tales / p. 62 ZASTERLE PRESS George Quasha, Verbal Paradise (preverbs) / p. 37 ZONE 3 PRESS Blas Falconer and Amy Wright, Editors, Zone 3 Vol. 25 No. 2 Fall 2010 / p. 75

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Multicultural Index AFRICAN AMERICAN TITLES Will Alexander, Compression & Purity / p. 9 Troy Burle Bailey, The Pierre Bonga Loops / p. 10 Roger Bonair-Agard, Gully / p. 12 Derrick Weston Brown, Wisdom Teeth / p. 13 Mahogany L. Browne, #Dear Twitter: Love Letters Hashed Out Online in 140 Characters or Less / p. 14 Cyril Dabydeen, Editor, Beyond Sangre Grande: Caribbean Writing Today / p. 16 Barbara Henning, Looking Up Harryette Mullen: Interviews on Sleeping with the Dictionary and Other Works / p. 67 Harmony Holiday, Negro League Baseball / p. 25 Zora Howard, Clutch / p. 25 Crawford Kilian, Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia / p. 67 Dawn Lundy Martin, Discipline / p. 31 Shane McCrae, In Canaan / p. 32 Tony Medina, My Old Man Was Always on the Lam / p. 33 Jennifer Rahim, Redemption Rain / p. 37 Alazar Tesfamichael, Trials and Tribulations / p. 72 H. Nigel Thomas, Lives: Whole and Otherwise / p. 61 Persia Walker, Black Orchid Blues / p. 61 Lillien Waller, Editor, American Ghost: Poets on Life After Industry / p. 46 ASIAN AMERICAN TITLES Brother Anthony, Hong Keong-Hee, and Steven D. Owyoung, Korean Tea Classics / p. 64 R. Cheran, Dalbir Singh, Chelva Kanaganayakam, and Sudharshan Durayappah, Editors, World Without Walls: Being Human, Being Tamil / p. 65 Cho In-souk and Robert Koehler, Seoul’s Historic Walks / p. 65 Pilar Cuder-Domínguez, Belén Martín-Lucas, and Sonia Villegas-López, Editors, Transnational Poetics: Asian Canadian Women’s Fiction of the 1990s / p. 65 Hai Zi, Over Autumn Rooftops / p. 23 Syed Afzal Haider, To Be with Her / p. 54 Uyen Hua, a/s/l / p. 25 Bhanu Kapil, Schizophrene / p. 27 Robert Koehler, Hangeul: Korea’s Unique Alphabet / p. 67 Esther Lee, Spit / p. 29 Carol Lem, Gathering the Pieces / p. 30 Takako Lento and Wayne Miller, Editors, Tamura Ryuichi: On the Life & Work of a 20th Century Master / p. 30 Shirley Geok-Lin Lim, Walking Backwards: New Poems / p. 30 Tan Lin, Insomnia and the Aunt / p. 56 R. Zamora Linmark, Leche / p. 56 Peng Ma, Peng Ma: Abstract Ink Painting / p. 68 Mariko Nagai, Georgic / p. 58 Vivek Narayanan, Universal Beach / p. 34 Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Lucky Fish / p. 34 Mary Oishi, Spirit Birds They Told Me / p. 35 Uma Parameswaran, A Cycle of the Moon / p. 58 Shailja Patel, Migritude / p. 36 Craig Santos Perez, From Unincorporated Territory [Saina] / p. 36 Nina Revoyr, Wingshooters / p. 59 John Rich, Korean War in Color: A Correspondent’s Retrospective on a Forgotten War / p. 70 Seoul Selection Editorial Team, The Korea Success Story / p. 71 Roger Shepherd, Andrew Douch, and David A. Mason, Baekdu-daegan Trail: Hiking Korea’s Mountain Spine / p. 71 Jonathan Stalling, Yingelishi: Sinophonic English Poetry and Poetics / p. 42

Melanie Steyn, Once Around the Sun / p. 60 Eileen R. Tabios, Silk Egg: Collected Novels / p. 60 Ocean Vuong, Burnings / p. 45 Qingping Wang, Editor, Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China / p. 46 Pui Ying Wong, Yellow Plum Season / p. 48 JEWISH TITLES Syed Afzal Haider, To Be with Her / p. 54 Nadia Kalman, The Cosmopolitans / p. 55 Daniel Morris, If Not for the Courage / p. 34 Victor Perera, Rites: A Guatemalan Boyhood / p. 69 Gershom Scholem, Two Draft Essays from 1918 / p. 71 Florine Stettheimer, Crystal Flowers: Poems and a Libretto / p. 42 Barry Wallenstein, Editor, For Enid with Love: a festchrift / p. 72 LATINO/LATINA TITLES Daniel Borzutzky, The Book of Interfering Bodies / p. 12 Nash Candelaria, Second Communion / p. 64 Jorge Carrera Andrade, Micrograms / p. 14 Steven Cordova, Long Distance / p. 16 Cyril Dabydeen, Editor, Beyond Sangre Grande: Caribbean Writing Today / p. 16 Josh Fernandez, Spare Parts and Dismemberment / p. 19 Eugene K. Garber, O Amazonas Escuro / p. 53 Lucrecia Guerrero, Tree of Sighs / p. 54 Elva Treviño Hart, Simpáticas: San Miguel Stories / p. 54 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Last Poems / p. 27 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Recent Poems / p. 27 Gary Francisco Keller, Editor, Good Bandits, Warrior Women, and Revolutionaries in Hispanic Culture / p. 67 Jose Kozer, Anima / p. 28 Adriana V. López and Carmen Ospina, Editors, Barcelona Noir / p. 57 Pablo Medina, The Man Who Wrote on Water / p. 32 Maceo Montoya, The Scoundrel and the Optimist / p. 58 Urayoán Noel, Hi-Density Politics / p. 35 Victor Perera, Rites: A Guatemalan Boyhood / p. 69 Harry Polkinhorn and Alfredo Velasco, Editors, Caló: A Dictionary of Spanish Barrio and Border Slang / p. 69 Elena Rivera, The Perforated Map / p. 38 David Unger, The Price of Escape / p. 61 Cesar Vallejo, Against Professional Secrets / p. 44 Katie Wainwright, Cuba on My Mind / p. 61 Yvan Yauri, Fire Wind / p. 48 LGBT TITLES Paula Gunn Allen, America the Beautiful: Last Poems / p. 9 Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 01: A Journal of Gay Poetry / p. 73 Bryan Borland, Editor, Assaracus Issue 02: A Journal of Gay Poetry / p. 73 Julian T. Brolaski, gowanus atropolis / p. 13 Steven Cordova, Long Distance / p. 16 Tim Dlugos, A Fast Life: The Collected Poems of Tim Dlugos / p. 17 Ken Harvey, A Passionate Engagement: A Memoir / p. 67 j/j hastain, asymptotic lover//thermodynamic vents / p. 24 j/j hastain, Prurient Anarchic Omnibus / p. 24 Paul Foster Johnson, Study in Pavilions and Safe Rooms / p. 27 Paul Legault, The Madeleine Poems / p. 29 R. Zamora Linmark, Leche / p. 56 Lonely Christopher, The Mechanics of Homosexual Intercourse / p. 56 Raymond Luczak, Road Work Ahead / p. 31

Steven Reigns, Inheritance / p. 37 Rena Rosenwasser, Elevators / p. 39 Kathrin Schaeppi, Sonja Sekula : Grace in a cow’s EYE : a memoir / p. 40 Richard Tagett, Demodulating Angel / p. 42 Terry Van Vliet, Black Lines on Terracotta / p. 44 Justin Vicari, The Professional Weepers / p. 45 Ocean Vuong, Burnings / p. 45 MIDDLE EASTERN TITLES Akbar Ahmed, Suspended Somewhere Between: A Book of Verse / p. 9 Kazim Ali, Fasting for Ramadan: Notes from a Spiritual Practice / p. 63 Alboqasem Ferdowsi, The Teller of Tales: Stories from Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh / p. 19 Ava Homa, Echoes from the Other Land / p. 55 Nidaa Khoury, Book of Sins / p. 28 Alazar Tesfamichael, Trials and Tribulations / p. 72 NATIVE AMERICAN TITLES Paula Gunn Allen, America the Beautiful: Last Poems / p. 9 Jean Rae Baxter, Broken Trail / p. 51 Scott Ezell, Yusef Komunyakaa, Mike O’Connor, and Thomas Merton, Songs from a Yahi Bow: A Series of Poems on Ishi / p. 18 Carol Anne Shaw, Hannah and the Spindle Whorl / p. 59 Lillien Waller, Editor, American Ghost: Poets on Life After Industry / p. 46 TRANSLATIONS Gennady Aygi, Into the Snow: Selected Poems of Gennady Aygi / p. 10 Per Aage Brandt, These Hands / p. 13 Brother Anthony, Hong Keong-Hee, and Steven D. Owyoung, Korean Tea Classics / p. 64 Jorge Carrera Andrade, Micrograms / p. 14 Sasha Chernyi, Poems from Children’s Island / p. 15 Giuseppe Conte, Angelina’s Lips / p. 53 Regina Derieva, Corinthian Copper / p. 17 Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Fatal Numbers: Why Count on Chance / p. 65 Seyhan Erözçelik, Rosestrikes and Coffee Grinds / p. 18 Alboqasem Ferdowsi, The Teller of Tales: Stories from Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh / p. 19 Jean Genet, The Genet Translations: Poetry and Posthumous Plays / p. 21 Durs Grünbein, The Vocation of Poetry / p. 66 Hai Zi, Over Autumn Rooftops / p. 23 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Last Poems / p. 27 Roberto Juarroz, Vertical Poetry: Recent Poems / p. 27 Jose Kozer, Anima / p. 28 David Lespiau, Four Cut-Ups, or, the Case of the Restored Volume / p. 30 Adriana V. López and Carmen Ospina, Editors, Barcelona Noir / p. 57 Jean-Pierre Rogel, Evolution: The View from the Cottage / p. 70 Claude Royet-Journoud, The Whole of Poetry Is Preposition / p. 39 Nelly Sachs, Collected Poems I: 1944-1949 / p. 39 Gershom Scholem, Two Draft Essays from 1918 / p. 71 Gleb Shulpyakov, A Fireproof Box / p. 41 Leonardo Sinisgalli, Night of Shooting Stars / p. 41 Adriano Spatola, The Porthole / p. 60 Georg Trakl, Song of the Departed: Selected Poems of Georg Trakl / p. 44 Cesar Vallejo, Against Professional Secrets / p. 44 Qingping Wang, Editor, Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China / p. 46 Yvan Yauri, Fire Wind / p. 48

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LES FIGUES PRESS LETTER MACHINE EDITIONS LIBELLUM BOOKS LIGHTFUL PRESS LINEBOOKS LITMUS PRESS LIVINGSTON PRESS LOST ROADS PUBLISHERS LOVELETTER EDITIONS LOW FIDELITY PRESS LUNAR CHANDELIER PRESS LUQUER STREET PROJECTS LYRIC& PRESS MAGIC HELICOPTER PRESS MAKE NOW PRESS MAMMOTH BOOKS MANGO PUBLISHING MANIFEST PRESS MANY MOUNTAINS MOVING MARCH/ABRAZO PRESS MARICK PRESS MARSH HAWK PRESS MAYAPPLE PRESS MEMBRANE PRESS MENARD PRESS MERCURY HOUSE MERITAGE PRESS MIAMI UNIVERSITY PRESS A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S PRESS MONKEY PUZZLE PRESS MOVING PARTS PRESS MUD LUSCIOUS PRESS MUUMUU HOUSE THE NAROPA PRESS NARROW HOUSE NATIONAL POETRY FOUNDATION NEO LITERATI PRESS NEW AMERICAN WRITING NEW CLARION PRESS NEW ISSUES POETRY & PROSE NEW NATIVE PRESS NEW STAR BOOKS NIGHTBOAT BOOKS 1913 PRESS 96 TEARS PRESS NOCTURNES EDITIONS NOEMI PRESS NYHIL NYQ BOOKS O BOOKS OCTOPUS BOOKS OFF BEAT PULP PRESS OFF THE PARK PRESS OMNI ARTS, LLC OMNIDAWN PUBLISHING OPEN CITY OTIS BOOKS | SEISMICITY EDITIONS OTOLITHS OWL PRESS OYSTER MOON PRESS OYSTER RIVER PRESS PALM PRESS PANTOGRAPH PRESS PAPER KITE PRESS PARADIGM PRESS PARLOR PRESS PASSAGER BOOKS PAST TENTS PRESS PATMOS PRESS PATRICK LOVELACE EDITIONS PAVEMENT SAW PRESS PENMANSHIP BOOKS PENNYWHISTLE PRESS PERIPLUM EDITIONS/FIELD BOOKS PLEASURE BOAT STUDIO PLEIADES PRESS

PLINTH BOOKS PM PRESS POCKET OPERA PRESS POETIC MATRIX PRESS POETS & WRITERS INC. POLTROON PRESS PORTABLE PRESS AT YO-YO LABS PORTAL PRESS THE POST-APOLLO PRESS PRE PRESS PRESSED WAFER PRINTED MATTER PRESS PUBLISHING GENIUS PRESS QUALE PRESS QUERCUS REVIEW PRESS R.L. CROW PUBLICATIONS RAGER MEDIA RAW ART PRESS RE/SEARCH PUBLICATIONS REDBONE PRESS RED DRAGONFLY PRESS RED DUST RED LETTER PRESS RED MOUNTAIN PRESS REDWOOD COAST PRESS RESCUE PRESS RESONANT BOOKS RIBBONWEED PRESS RIVERRUN PRESS ROCKY LEDGE ROGUE ART RONSDALE PRESS ROOF BOOKS ROSE METAL PRESS RUMOR BOOKS/LISTENING CHAMBER RUST BUCKLE BOOKS SALT PUBLISHING SAND PAPER PRESS SAN FRANCISCO BAY PRESS SATURNALIA BOOKS SCARLET TANAGER BOOKS SECOND STORY BOOKS SEMAR PUBLISHERS SEOUL SELECTION SHARK BOOKS SHEARSMAN BOOKS SHORT FLIGHT/LONG DRIVE BOOKS SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS SIDEBROW BOOKS SILENCED PRESS SILVERFISH REVIEW PRESS SINGING HORSE PRESS SIX GALLERY PRESS SIXTEEN RIVERS PRESS SKANKY POSSUM SKIPPING STONES EDITIONS SLAPERING HOL PRESS SLOPE EDITIONS SMALL DESK PRESS SOBERSCOVE PRESS SOLID OBJECTS SOULTHEFT RECORDS, INC. SPIRE PRESS, INC. SPLIT SHIFT SPOUT PRESS SPUYTEN DUYVIL STANDING STONE BOOKS STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES STARCHERONE BOOKS STATION HILL PRESS OF BARRYTOWN STOCKPORT FLATS STOP PRESS STRAW GATE BOOKS SUBITO PRESS

SUBPRESS SUN DOG PRESS SUNNYOUTSIDE SUPERMACHINE SUSPECT THOUGHTS PRESS SWAN SCYTHE PRESS SWANK BOOKS SWITCHBACK BOOKS TALISMAN HOUSE TALKING LEAVES PRESS TAM TAM BOOKS THE TANGENT PRESS TARGUM PRESS TARPAULIN SKY PRESS TAUREAN HORN PRESS TAVERN BOOKS TEA PARTY REPUBLICANS PRESS TEBOT BACH TENDER BUTTONS THEENK BOOKS THIRD WOMAN PRESS THIS PRESS THREE CANDLES PRESS TIBOR DE NAGY EDITIONS TIME BEING BOOKS TINFISH PRESS TOMBOUCTOU BOOKS TOP PEN PRESS TOUGHER DISGUISES TRASK HOUSE BOOKS TRES CHICAS BOOKS TRIP STREET PRESS TSAR PUBLICATIONS TUPELO PRESS TURTLE POINT PRESS TWISTED SPOON PRESS TYRANT BOOKS UCLA AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES CENTER UCLA ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES CENTER UCLA CHICANO STUDIES RESEARCH CENTER UGLY DUCKLING PRESSE UNITED ARTISTS BOOKS UPPER WEST SIDE PHILOSOPHERS VAGABOND PRESS VALA BOOK PRESS VANITAS VEHICLE EDITIONS VINTAGE ENTITY PRESS VIZ. INTER-ARTS VOLT WASHINGTON WRITERS' PUBLISHING HOUSE WAVE BOOKS WE PRESS WEAVERS PRESS WEST END PRESS WEST HOUSE BOOKS WHAT BOOKS PRESS WHIT PRESS WHITE DEER BOOKS WHITE PINE PRESS WILD OCEAN PRESS WOLF RIDGE PRESS WORDFARM THE WORD WORKS WRITEGIRL PUBLICATIONS WRITING OUR WORLD PRESS WRIT LARGE PRESS XENOS BOOKS XOXOX PRESS ZASTERLE PRESS ZEPHYR PRESS ZONE 3 PRESS

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Assorted 10 or more . . . . 40% 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20% 2-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10% 1 copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . net

FOREIGN ACCOUNTS: Payment should be made

in U.S. funds via International Money Order, check drawn in U.S. dollars, Visa, Mastercard or American Express. Please allow six to eight weeks for shipment via U.S. Postal Service. Rush orders and new accounts, please inquire. For questions about trade and library sales, please contact SPD’s Operations Manager, at (510) 524-1668, x308.

Individual Orders Orders are accepted by mail, or by the following methods: SECURE ONLINE ORDERING at www.spdbooks.org EMAIL ORDERS: orders@spdbooks.org FAX ORDERS: (510) 524-0852 TOLL-FREE ORDERS (OUTSIDE BAY AREA):

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+ $3.00 shipping; 5-10 copies 40% discount + $4.00 shipping (media mail). For UPS Shipping add $2. BACKORDERS: Unavailable titles are backordered

at bookseller’s request and shipped immediately on receipt. Please indicate on purchase orders whether backorders are desired, and if they are, please include cancelation dates. SHIPPING: Orders are shipped UPS ground,

at bookseller’s expense. For rush orders: Please specify date needed and method of shipment. UPS 3-Day Select, 2nd Day Air, and Overnight are available, as are FedEx Ground Collect, UPS Consignee, USPS Media Mail, and USPS Priority Mail. Call or email for rates. TERMS: Terms are net 30 days; please pay from invoice which will follow the shipment by separate mail. Libraries are offered an automatic extension to net 60 days. NEW ACCOUNTS: New trade customers should prepay the first order or request a credit application. Net-30 day terms are extended thereafter.

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and purchase dates will be credited at the purchase price. All other returns will be credited at 45% of the retail price. NO CREDIT WILL BE ISSUED FOR TITLES NOT PURCHASED FROM SPD, NOR FOR RETURNS IN UNSALEABLE CONDITION (shopworn, stickered

or sticker-marked, books damaged in transit to SPD, etc.). No credit will be issued for books sold at a designated non-returnable discount. Returns cannot be accepted for items from unpaid invoices. Items ineligible for credit will be returned at customer’s expense. Credit is applied to future purchases. NO REFUNDS ISSUED. CREDITS MUST BE USED WITHIN ONE YEAR. CLAIMS: In case of damage or order fulfillment error, we accept immediate returns. Claims for shorts or misshipments must be made within 45 days of the invoice date. Credit will be issued or damaged items replaced immediately upon notification.

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minimum 8.25% sales tax; Santa Barbara, San Diego, San Bernadino, and Sacramento counties add 8.75%; Marin county add 9.0%.; San Mateo and Contra Costa counties add 9.25%; San Francisco residents add 9.50%; Alameda and Los Angeles counties add 9.75%. Shipments to Canada will be sent UPS Canada. Please calculate $15 for first book, $2 for each additional. For all other international shipments, please add $19 for the first book, $6 for each additional. Please contact orders@spdbooks.org for an accurate shipping quote. International shipments, except for Canada, will be sent via FedEx International. Payment: International Money Order, check in U.S. dollars, or credit card (Visa, Mastercard, or American Express). ADDITIONAL POSTAGE MAY BE CHARGED FOR HEAVIER ITEMS.

Returns Policy FOR WHOLESALE ORDERS OVERSTOCK RETURNS: Returns can be made

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This catalog represents new titles to SPD’s complete standing inventory, and we make every effort to keep all titles in stock. However, prices may change without notice and occasionally a book may go out of stock or out of print by the time the catalog comes out. See SPD’s website at spdbooks.org for a full backlist of titles and presses. If a title you order is out of stock, you will receive a credit on your account at SPD. Please pass this catalog on to a friend who might be interested in ordering (think of it as recycling). Also, please keep us updated with any change of address (SPD pays for return of all catalogs sent to old addresses). Thanks.

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SHIPPING RATES: For 1 item include $4.50: add $1.00 for each additional item. Generally allow 10-15 days for delivery. Contact us for rates for accelerated shipping (UPS Next Day Air, 2nd-Day Air).* Due to heightened security, international shipping may take longer. FOR CANADIAN AND OTHER FOREIGN SHIPMENTS: For all other international shipments, please add $17.50 for the first 2 items. For more than 2 books, please contact orders@spdbooks.org for an accurate shipping quote. These shipments will be sent via FedEx International. Please pay by Visa/MasterCard, American Express or by International Money Order or check in US dollars.*

*Additional postage will be charged for heavier items. TO MAIL IN YOUR ORDER:

our address for all correspondence is SPD/Small Press Distribution, Inc. 1341 Seventh Street Berkeley, CA 94710-1409

SECURE ONLINE ORDERING: E-MAIL: FOR FAX ORDERS: TO ORDER BY PHONE: EDI ORDERS:

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Change Service Requested

Hot New Titles at SPD! US Michael Kimball Page 55

GULLY Roger Bonair-Agard Page 12

THE VOCATION OF POETRY Durs Gr眉nbein Page 66

THE WIDE ROAD Carla Harryman and Lyn Hejinian Page 24

GOWANUS ATROPOLIS PINKO Jen Benka Page 11

Julian T. Brolaski Page 13

SPD Fall 2011 Catalog  

493 New Titles

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