SLO LIFE Magazine Oct/Nov 2020

Page 1

LIFE SLO magazine

DISCOVER SAND & SEA

SAN LUIS FAVORITE

HEALTH TRENDS MEET THE MAKERS ON

CENTRAL COAST REAL ESTATE UPCOMING HAPPENINGS BEHIND THE

SCENES VIEW FAMILY TRIP G

N

S

OCT/NOV 2020 SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

MEET JESSE DUNDON

, FAMILY, ENTREPRENEURSHIP D & F O R G IN G A H E A OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

1


Enjoy the gift of saving time and money this holiday season! Order your client and employee gift baskets now and save!

Premium Basket $60

10% off 5% off

On orders placed from Sept. 1 - Oct. 15 On orders placed from Oct. 16 - Nov. 30

Appreciation Basket $40

2226 Beebee Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 | 805.543.6844 | www.prpco.com 2

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


M O D E R N • C L A S S I C • J E W E L R Y

11 2 8

G A R D E N

S T R E E T

S A N

L U I S

O B I S P O

W W W . B A X T E R M O E R M A N . C O M

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

3


We’re here for you now and always. We know how important essential travel is to our community. SLO Transit has taken extra precautions in implementing enhanced cleaning methods and maintaining a rigorous cleaning schedule to keep buses clean and sanitized. We’re here for you now with essential travel and we’re here for you as our community is supporting one another on the road to recovery. For more information on individual routes and schedules, please visit our website at slotransit.org, download the SLO Transit app, or call Transit Dispatch at (805) 541-2877.

4

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS . LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS

8 0 5 . 7 0 4 . 75 5 9

OCT/NOV 2020 |

License 731695 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

5


LEARN BY DOING WAS BORN HERE

Cal Poly students and faculty are participating in a restoration project at the Oceano Dunes funded by a grant awarded to the Horticulture and Crop Science Department from California Department of Parks and Recreation. The habitat mitigation effort aims to reduce particulate emissions, improve air quality and provide hands-on experiences for students as they assist with the seeding, growing and transplanting of more than 200,000 native dune plants.

See more Learn by Doing stories at

GIVING.CALPOLY.EDU 6

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

PHOTOGRAPH BY CAL POLY FACULTY MEMBER MIKE BUSH

CAL POLY AND LEARN BY DOING HAVE BEEN RESIDENTS OF THE CENTRAL COAST SINCE 1901.


Picture from left to right: Damian Fernandez, MD; Rabab Hajar, MD; Neal Moller, MD; Daniel Zovich, MD

Don’t delay your colon cancer screening Don’t put off your colonoscopy. A delay in diagnosis of colorectal cancers could decrease your chances of survival. FCPP has expanded its Gastroenterology practice and offers near immediate appointment availability in Templeton and San Luis Obispo.

CONDITIONS TREATED • Abdominal pain • Barrett’s esophagus • Celiac disease • Cirrhosis • Colon cancer • Constipation • Diarrhea • Esophageal disease • Gallstones and gall bladder disease

• • • • • • • • •

Heartburn Hemorrhoids Hepatitis Inflammatory bowel disease Irritable bowel syndrome Jaundice Pancreatitis Reflux disease Ulcers

Now accepting new patients. Make an appointment at: Templeton: 805-434-4315 • San Luis Obispo: 805-541-1422

DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES Advanced endoscopic techniques Capsule endoscopy Colonoscopy Endoscopy

• • • •

LANGUAGES SPOKEN

• Arabic • French • Spanish

1220 Las Tablas Rd., Suite 1418 • Templeton, CA 35 Casa St., Suite 130 • San Luis Obispo, CA fcppcentralcoast.com OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

7


CONTENTS 24 Briefs 30 View 32 Q&A

12 PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

14 Info 16 Sneak Peek 18 In Box 22 Timeline 8

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

34

NOW HEAR THIS

Volume 11 Number 5 Oct/Nov 2020

36 MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR


Love your legs again!

Before & After actual patients

Bringing Quality Heart and Vascular Care to the Central Coast since 2008 Nationally recognized single physician practice Offering consultative cardiology, vein care, and wound care Linked with Concierge Choice, one of the nation’s leaders in patient care

w w w. p r e m i e r h e a r t a n d v e i n c a r e . c o m

|

Dr. Ken Stevens

805.540.3333 OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

9


| CONTENTS

66 Real Estate

88 Wine Notes

70 Election

92 Brew

76 Health

82 TASTE

46 ARTIST

48 Family 50 On the Rise 52 Dwelling 10

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

96 HAPPENINGS


exceptional landscape design + build contractors 805.574.0777 www.sagelandscapes.net @sagelandscapes OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

11


| PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

Recurrence For many years, I’ve had two recurring dreams. Nightmares, really. In the first, I’m late to a football game. The team is counting on me, and I’m sprinting to the locker room with a massive duffle bag draped over my shoulder. No one is there because they’re already on the field. Over the PA system, I hear the announcement: “Let’s stand for the kickoff !” I look across the plaza. It’s my high school on a crisp Friday night. The lights are beaming down. I’m panicking as I rifle through my bag when I realize my shoulder pads are missing. So is my helmet. The PA clicks on again to ask a question: “Where’s Tom Franciskovich?” The crowd boos. I wake up in my bed, gasping for air in a cold sweat. The second dream unfolds as follows: I sit down for an interview and click on my favorite, trusty voice recorder. The tiny, red light glows indicating it’s on. For an hour, I dazzle the interviewee with incisive, thought-provoking questions. Over and over again, I’m told, “I can’t believe I’m telling you this, but . . .” I get one scoop after another, going deeper and deeper into the most incredible interview of my career. Periodically, I glance at the red light to ensure the tape is still rolling. It is. I try not to smile as the interview subject gushes on. Afterward, I head back to the office, plug the voice recorder into my computer and click “upload.” Then, nothing. The tape is blank. I wake up in my bed, gasping for air in a cold sweat. More than a decade ago, my wife, Sheryl, and I were struggling to launch the very first issue of SLO LIFE Magazine. I was working from a home office. At the time, our youngest, Harrison, was only a year old. As much as I loved to have him curled up in my lap as I clanked on my keyboard, it was just not working. He was far too interested in joining every conversation and typing along with me. At the time, it was a big leap for us, but it was clear we needed a real, actual office. I moved into a windowless space at the San Luis Business Center, the broom closet suite. Just down the hall from me was a fresh-faced kid who had recently graduated from Cal Poly. Each day, when I’d go to the mailroom—praying for more checks than bills—I’d stop by to say “hello” to Jesse Dundon. He was so happy to have moved out of his garage and into a real, actual office. When I asked him what exactly his company, Hathway Tech, did, he explained it, but I didn’t really understand what he was talking about. Then, he would joke around and say the same thing he always did during those quick exchanges: “Hey, you should put me on the cover!” I would smile and dismiss him with a wave as I continued toward the mailroom, thinking to myself, “Yeah, yeah, kid, whatever.” Fast-forward ten years. Jesse has grown Hathway into a booming technology operation with more than a hundred employees. Now, the shoe was on the other foot, and I found myself trying to talk him into being on our cover. As a young CEO with a one-year-old son, it was much more difficult to track him down than it had been when we first met. But I finally did. And, after much back-and-forth, we found a window of time to talk. We sat down, and ninety minutes later, I knew I had it, a great Meet Your Neighbor story. I said “goodbye” and retreated to my office where I plugged the recorder into my computer. The screen was blank. Nothing. Zilch. I felt a surge of electricity shoot through me. But I didn’t wake up—because I wasn’t asleep. It took a week before I could bring myself to send an email admitting what had happened. I started it like this: “Hey, Jesse, you’re not going to believe this, but I have this recurring dream, and it finally came true.” Of all the people who could have made that dream a reality for me over the past ten years, he was the perfect choice as he graciously sat for a second interview. And, as we talked, I fully expected to hear a booming voice announce, “Let’s stand for the kickoff !” Thank you to everyone who has had a hand in producing this issue of SLO LIFE Magazine and, most of all, to our advertisers and subscribers—we couldn’t do it without you! Live the SLO Life!

Tom Franciskovich tom@slolifemagazine.com p.s. If you’d like to read more visit me at tomfranciskovich.com 12

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


© CAMBRIA 2020 || 439701_AD

CLOVELLY™

SEE CAMBRIA IN A NEW VEIN Bold and flowing, Cambria natural quartz designs transfuse new life into kitchens and baths. Be inspired. Be iconic. Be revolutionary with our 20 stunning new American-made designs. Discover full slabs of Clovelly and many others at San Luis Marble.

805-544-9133 SLMarble.com OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

13


LIFE SLO magazine

4251 S. HIGUERA STREET, SUITE 800, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM info@slolifemagazine.com (805) 543-8600 • (805) 456-1677 fax PUBLISHER Tom Franciskovich

Elder Placements realizes the IMPORTANCE of listening to the client, in order to find the appropriate:

Independent Living Assisted Living Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care Homes Let their experienced Certified Senior Advisors take you on a tour to find the Retirement Home or Community that fits your loved ones Medical, Financial and Social needs, at NO Cost to you.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Sheryl Franciskovich CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Charlotte Alexander Jeff Al-Mashat Lauren Harvey Paden Hughes Zara Khan Jaime Lewis Andria McGhee Brant Myers Joe Payne CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Cyrus Crossan Caroline Hernandez David Lalush Mark Nakamura Vanessa Plakias Claudio Schwarz-Purzlbaum Ergita Sela Jon Tyson CONTRIBUTIONS Have some comments or feedback about something you’ve read here? Or, do you have something on your mind that you think everyone should know about? Submit your story ideas, events, recipes, and announcements by visiting us online at slolifemagazine.com and clicking “Share Your Story” or emailing us at info@slolifemagazine.com. Be sure to include your full name and city for verification purposes. Contributions chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations. ADVERTISING If you would like to advertise, please contact Tom Franciskovich by phone at (805) 543-8600 or by email at tom@slolifemagazine.com or visit us online at slolifemagazine.com/advertise and we will send you a complete media kit along with testimonials from happy advertisers.

Nicole Pazdan, CSA,

SUBSCRIPTIONS Ready to live the SLO Life all year long? It’s quick and easy! Just log on to slolifemagazine.com/subscribe. It’s just $24.95 for the year. And don’t forget to set your friends and family up with a subscription, too. It’s the gift that keeps on giving! NOTE The opinions expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect those of SLO LIFE Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written permission of the publisher.

Contact us today for FREE placement assistance.

CIRCULATION, COVERAGE, AND ADVERTISING RATES Complete details regarding circulation, coverage, and advertising rates, space, sizes and similar information are available to prospective advertisers. Please call or email for a media kit. Closing date is 30 days before date of issue.

(805) 546-8777

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR info@slolifemagazine.com 4251 S. Higuera Street, Suite 800 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

elderplacementprofessionals.com

Letters chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations.

14

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


Moving Forward, Together.

“Instant action set American Riviera Bank apart! They were right on top of all of the SBA requirements; I wouldn’t be getting through this without them.” — Kellie Avila, Owner at Avila Traffic Safety What does True Community Banking mean? It means working together to find solutions under even the most trying of circumstances. It means we care about your employees as if they were our own. COMMERCI AL LOANS | COMMERCI AL LINES OF CR EDIT | COMMERCI AL R EAL ESTATE LENDING

Preferred SBA Lender

AmericanRivieraBank.com • 805.965.5942 Paso Robles • San Luis Obispo • Goleta • Santa Barbara • Montecito OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

15


| SNEAK PEEK

O N TH E COVE R

behind the scenes W I T H JESS E D UND O N

BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

We met in Morro Bay, it was foggy and smoky from all the fires. But the water was beautiful, as always. I took a canoe out to capture Jesse’s favorite hobby: stand-up paddle boarding. My husband was my gondolier. We had a blast.

My boys came along with me and they were calling out to me from the shore. They were ready to go. Jesse was entertaining them from the dock by holding up his board with one hand and saying, “I’m the strongest man on the planet!” It was good for a laugh. I like the colors hiding in this shot.

Jesse was great about going with the flow. I usually ask people to do silly poses or actions, and end up loving the shot. He was good with my jump and cheer request, in fact, I think he would have done it on his own. He’s got a fun personality.

d out a sea ls. Th en Jesse poi nte We saw lot s of ha rbo r s in the ng thi est , one of the cut mo mm a an d ba by ott er wh en it nd sou ble ora ad the mo st wo rld. Th e ba by ma de . me a’s be lly. It wa s aweso clim bed ont o its mo mm SLO LIFE

16

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


Emergency care is just a call away. Tele-ER Visits with Local Doctors Our emergency services team sees more than 57,000 patients a year. That experience allows us to quickly evaluate patients and determine the best treatment options. We’re here 24 hours a day to answer your call. 1. Call 805-546-7990. Talk with a nurse or emergency team member about your health concern.

2. Book your Tele-ER appointment with a local ER doctor. It’s helpful if you have a thermometer nearby.

3. Get your smartphone, tablet or computer ready. That’s it! Don’t delay your care.

For a Tele-ER visit, just call 805-546-7990 For life-threatening emergencies, go to the nearest hospital or call 911.

TenetHealthCentralCoast.com/Telehealth OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

17


| IN BOX

Take us with you! Hey, SLO LIFE readers: Send us your photos the next time you’re relaxing in town or traveling far and away with your copy of the magazine. Email us at info@slolifemagazine.com

EMERALD BAY, LAKE TAHOE

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK

HUDSON and MICHELLE NEAL

BRYCE CANYON, UTAH

CAROL and RICH GUENTHER

STAYCATION CHRIS, KAREN, ADDI, and BECKETT WOODS

HAWKINS FAMILY REUNION

SLO Life Magazine appearing at the 98th Annual Hawkins Family Reunion Zoom-style. 18

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

TERRI MONELL


B E C AU S E YO U D E S E RV E T H E V E RY B E ST C E N T R A L C OAST R E A L E S TAT E R E P R E S E N TAT I O N .

118 ALLEN ST, ARROYO GRANDE offered at: $859,000

Chris Engelskirger

Amy Daane

Owner/Broker

Owner/REALTOR®

2450 VICTORIA AVE, UNIT 104, SLO offered at: $749,000

Jed Damschroder Kellye Grayson Owner/REALTOR®

REALTOR®

1151 MILL ST, SLO offered at: $698,000

Doug Cutler

Krissy Bellisario

Sacha Steel

Mukta Naran

Yatin Naran

Stacie Kenny

Alex Wilkerson

REALTOR®

REALTOR®

REALTOR®

REALTOR®

REALTOR®

REALTOR®

REALTOR®

THE AVENUE CENTRAL COAST REALTY REAL ESTATE

|

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

1 3 3 3 J O H N S O N AV E , SA N LU I S O B I S P O, C A 9 3 4 0 1

|

|

IN-HOUSE MARKETING

(805) 548 2670

|

T H E AV E N U E S LO. C O M

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

19


| IN BOX

SLO LIFE travels! CRATER LAKE, OREGON

CALLAWAY SISTERS

HORSESHOE BEND, ARIZONA

YELLOWSTONE RIVER, MONTANA

CORY and LAURA HEIDEN, WARREN and KIM NEWHOUSE

NEWPORT, OREGON

DISHER FAMILY

CALDWELL FAMILY

LAKE TAHOE

TOM and CAMI RICHARDS, BECKY and DAN KALLAL, NATALIA and MIKE WELLMAN

VIENNE, FRANCE

ERICK and JENNIFER WAND below the Cháteau Batie ruins in the Rhône Valley wine community.

Please send your photos and comments to info@slolifemagazine.com Visit us online at slolifemagazine.com Letters may be edited for content and clarity. To be considered for publication your letter should include your name, address, phone number, or email address (for authentication purposes). 20

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


䰀漀挀愀氀 䔀琀栀椀挀愀氀 䨀攀眀攀氀爀礀 匀椀渀挀攀 ㄀㤀㜀㐀

Join the Talley Community Today GET YOUR TALLEY FARMS BOX! SIGN UP TODAY FOR $10 OFF YOUR FIRST BOX *New customers use code SLOLIFE20

Fresh, local, California-grown produce Direct from our Farm, Fresh to Your Home

匀瀀攀挀椀愀氀椀稀椀渀最 䤀渀

䌀甀猀琀漀洀 䌀爀攀愀琀椀漀渀 ☀ 䄀渀琀椀焀甀攀 刀攀猀琀漀爀愀琀椀漀渀 ㄀㄀㄀㐀 ☀ ㄀㄀㄀㠀 䜀愀爀搀攀渀 匀琀⸀ 䐀漀眀渀琀漀眀渀 匀䰀伀 㠀 㔀⸀㔀㐀㌀⸀㠀㄀㠀㘀 ⴀ 眀眀眀⸀䜀愀爀搀攀渀匀琀爀攀攀琀䜀漀氀搀猀洀椀琀栀猀⸀挀漀洀

TalleyFarmsBox.com | (805) 489-5401

We Service ALL Makes and Models

NOW OFFERING Touch Free Service Options 24/7 Quick Drop Off & Pick Up Complimentary Concierge Service

2 0 2 0 WIN N ER - Be st Oi l C h a n g e a n d Fa vo r i te Auto Mechanic

MAINTAINING EXCELLENCE FOR 40 YEARS San Luis Obispo 805.242.8336

Santa Maria 805.316.0154

RIZZOLISAUTOMOTIVE.COM OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

21


| TIMELINE

San Luis Obispo AUGUST 2020

8/18

8/18

San Luis Obispo’s City Council approves a proposal from Jamestown Properties to build a mixed-use, six-story, seventy-five-foot tall building in the heart of downtown, saying the project will create much-needed housing and stimulate the local economy. The development at 1144 Chorro Street will demolish the existing structure (home most recently to Sports Authority and Copeland’s Sports) and replace it with 30,000 square feet of commercial/retail space and fifty residential units. In comparison, the County Government Center is sixty-five feet tall and the City’s parking garage at Palm and Morro streets is eighty feet tall.

8/18

City staff will be using a new screening tool for analyzing investments after the San Luis Obispo City Council votes unanimously to proceed with a plan they say better reflects community goals about how it invests seventy-five to seventyeight million dollars of the public’s money. The more socially responsible investment approach adds weapons manufacturers to the list of industries in which the city does not invest, which currently includes tobacco products and the production of fossil fuels. City staff may take the policy a step further by expanding into Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) strategies, a far-reaching philosophy that not only looks at end products, but how products come to be and how a company treats its workforce. 22

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

A fire starts near Dolan Canyon in Big Sur. Believed to have been started by arson, the Dolan Fire keeps growing into the Ventana Wilderness area, where according to the U.S. Forest Service a California condor research facility is destroyed. One month and 128,050 acres burned later, the fire has destroyed at least nineteen structures and is only forty-six percent contained. Highway One is closed between mile post twenty-five and mile post ten. Nacimiento-Ferguson Road is closed to all traffic from Highway One to the Fort Hunter Liggett base boundary line. Smoke driven by offshore winds causes the SLO Public Health Department to issue air quality advisories for several weeks.

8/21

The SLO Arts Leadership Roundtable announces the results of its audience perception survey concerning the future of live performances in SLO County that was distributed in mid-July. More than 3,400 SLO County residents responded to the survey, the second in a series that the Roundtable intends to repeat every two to three months until performance venues can re-open in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Respondents are being asked their opinions on public safety and health regulations, motivators for attending live events, and their experience with virtual performances. Key findings: thirty-nine percent say they will wait for a vaccine before returning to live performances; seventy-eight percent say placing limits on audience size is very important; fifty-five percent have attended at least one performance streamed online in the last month.


News & Updates SEPTEMBER 2020 9/2

Community leaders submit an application officially making the case for why Vandenburg Air Force Base should be home to the US Space Command. Provisionally headquartered at Colorado Springs, the command in charge of space warfare is looking for a new home that will house 1,500 military personnel, including a four-star general and international liaisons. Vandenburg’s nomination is one of several from more than two dozen states looking to house the new headquarters. The Air Force plans to announce its preferred location in January 2021.

9/17

Tianna Arata’s attorney announces to the San Luis Obispo Superior Court his intention to file a demurrer for her case—a plea entry that does not dispute the facts of the prosecution’s claims, but argues that the facts do not justify legal action. Arata, a local activist and former Cuesta College student, was charged with five felonies and three misdemeanors for events that occurred at a Black Lives Matter protest she helped organize in San Luis Obispo in July. Eventually the charges were lowered to thirteen misdemeanors, and the court is scheduled to hear her plea on October 22.

9/3

The History Center of San Luis Obispo County announces the creation of the Dallidet Adobe Endowment Fund to support the Dallidet Adobe and Gardens. An initial $50,000 pledge has been made to maintain the adobe and its gardens in perpetuity in memory of Peter R. and Carol F. Andre by Jim Andre (their son) and Paul Kellogg. Attorney Peter Andre was instrumental in the preservation of the Dallidet Adobe, in which the Dallidet family lived from the 1850s through the 1950s, and in the creation of the History Center in 1953. Due to current restrictions, guests may only visit the gardens at 1185 Pacific Street on Sundays, and virtual tours of the adobe are conducted on Thursdays.

9/16

The San Luis Obispo County District Attorney’s Office drops all charges against Francisco Orozco, a twenty-yearold Oakland man accused of a mass shooting during a concert in May 2019 at the Oceano Dunes State Vehicular Recreation Area that sent six people to the hospital. Orozco, who could have been sentenced to prison for life if convicted on all charges and enhancements, spent four months in jail before being released on bail in August 2019. The District Attorney’s Office said the dismissal was the result of additional investigation, forensic testing, and an uncooperative witness.

9/18

Correctional Officer Ricardo Ancheta, a California Men’s Colony employee, is among ninety-eight people honored during the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s thirty-fifth annual Medal of Valor ceremony. For coming to the aid of a crash victim whose SUV was wedged under a semitrailer truck, Ancheta received a Silver Star Medal, which honors “acts of bravery under extraordinary or unusual circumstances.” In a pre-recorded ceremony, CDCR Secretary Ralph Diaz said Ancheta and the other honorees “show that the bravery and professionalism of our staff extends beyond institution walls and into the community.”

9/19

Hundreds of mourners gather in front of the SLO County Courthouse to hold a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died September 18 at the age of eighty-seven from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Local speakers from Women’s March SLO and Planned Parenthood Central Coast encouraged attendees to vote in the November election to honor Justice Ginsburg’s legacy. SLO LIFE OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

23


| BRIEFS

Aviadoros Way The name recently selected from more than 200 submissions for the street connecting ACI Jet’s new headquarters to the SLO County Regional Airport. Spanish for “aviators,” the name honors the region’s history.

74 The number of local, community-based organizations dividing up more than $1.6 million allocated by the County Board of Supervisors in August from General Fund Support and Tobacco Tax Settlement funding to benefit the community’s health and well-being.

“Best in the West” For the twenty-eighth consecutive year, Cal Poly was named the best public, master’slevel university in the west by U.S. News & World Report’s annual America’s Best Colleges guidebook. It also puts Cal Poly in the top “Best of the West” slot for most veteran-friendly university. 24

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

5 The number of brush fires reported at the Oceano Dunes State Vehicular Recreation Area in August, leading to speculation that someone could be starting the fires. They ranged in size from about three-quarters of an acre to eleven acres and occurred between August 13 and 29. The causes of the fires remain under investigation.

Card My Yard A new San Luis Obispo full-service yard sign rental company that is “spreading joy one letter at a time” by offering birthday, graduation, seasonal, and just about any other wording you might want to see on a front lawn to help families celebrate special occasions.

264 The number of Cuesta College students receiving some 454 scholarships during the institution’s annual fall scholarship reception in August to celebrate 20202021 recipients and donors alike. What the number doesn’t include is just as impressive: 978 additional students received Promise Scholarships, which offer two full years of fee-free education to SLO County high school graduates.

CCCE Monterey Bay Community Power’s new name—short for Central Coast Community Energy—and its new strategy to achieve 100% renewable energy by 2030, according to an announcement in September that says the agency wants to reflect its expanded service area, up to twenty-nine cities and four counties in California.

#ResilientSLO An initiative launched by the City of San Luis Obispo to gather information from those who live or work in the city, to identify strategies for building community resilience to the impacts of climate change. The intent is to build a roadmap for the decades ahead.

“The Precision Manufacturing Bootcamp opened up a lot of career opportunities for me.” That’s from Ariel Rasgado, a graduate of the apprenticeship program that provides students with base skills needed to go straight into the workforce and fast-tracks the on-the-job training process for local employers. It’s sponsored by SLO Partners, an initiative of the San Luis Obispo County Office of Education to address college and career readiness among the county’s population. SLO LIFE


Leadership you can trust. Civility you can count on. VOTE for the only NON-PARTISAN candidate for MAYOR.

SWEENEY

“BRIGHTER DAYS AHEAD”

I’m a downtown business owner, environmental

Bring Non-Partisan Leadership to City Hall

steward, interior designer, wife, and mom. My candidacy

Restore Community Trust in Public Health & Safety

for Mayor is inspired by the collective need to reinforce San Luis Obispo’s foundation — building upon our core

Focus on Local Economic Recovery

values of solvency, safety, civility, transparency,

Oppose Permanent 1% Local Sales Tax Increase

and accountability in our city government for the community we serve. It is time we come together and

Re-Prioritize City Spending Relevant to Today’s Public Health & Safety Needs

focus on serving our commUNITY first.

Implement Balanced Environmental & Energy Policies

@SweeneyForSLO | www.CherisseSweeney.com | (805) 310-9790 | Cherisse@CherisseSweeney.com Ad Paid for by Cherisse Sweeney for San Luis Obispo Mayor 2020 - FPPC ID #1429010 OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

25


| BRIEFS

$2,492,714 The total amount of grant funding The Community Foundation San Luis Obispo allocated in 2019, according to its recently published annual report. Of that total, $945,243 supported health and human services, $624,171 provided community enhancement activities, $549,984 was distributed for education and scholarships, and the remaining $373,316 went to the arts.

“We have seen our airport grow from a modest community asset to a true gateway to the world.” County Administrative Officer Wade Horton attributing the bright future of SLO County’s Regional Airport (SBP) to the work of Director of Airports Kevin Bumen, who is leaving after seven years to become San Francisco International Airport’s first chief commercial officer. In 2018, SBP was named the seventh fastest growing small airport in North America.

Villaggio A 404-unit “life plan community” of independent and assisted senior housing included in the Froom Ranch Specific Plan approved by the SLO City Council in September. The plan will guide development on more than forty acres of the Froom Ranch property located off Los Osos Valley Road, south of The Home Depot. 26

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

Tele-ER A new option for patients unsure about whether to go to an emergency room. Tenet Health Care Central Coast has opened a phone line that allows you to talk to a board-certified ER physician twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, from the comfort of your home. All you need is a smartphone, tablet, or computer with a functioning camera.

SEASON

57 As the outlook for the resumption of public gatherings remains poor, PCPAPacific Conservatory Theatre has delayed the opening of its fifty-seventh season from December 2020 to Summer 2021, with plans to produce four live performances, primarily at the Solvang Festival Theater. Stay tuned by visiting PCPA.org.

“Rogue” The newest K-9 to join the SLO Sheriff ’s Office is a two-year-old Malinois being trained in apprehension and bomb detection with his handler, Deputy Mora. Rogue joined the force in August.

“Chief Cantrell is an exceptional leader and an expert in policing and community engagement.” City Manager Derek Johnson announcing the departure of SLO Police Chief Deanna Cantrell to become the City of Fairfield’s police chief. He said the City will begin a national search for a new chief in the coming months, with input from the community on the recruitment and selection process.

30 FE ET

CAL FIRE and SLO City firefighters saved a rock climber who suffered severe injuries after she fell thirty feet from Bishop Peak on Labor Day morning. A CHP H-70 helicopter crew helped firefighters move the patient, who was flown to Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center for treatment. SLO LIFE


Vote for the only “SLO Grown” Nonpartisan choice for Council! ABRIANNA

TORRES for SLO CITY COUNCIL

San Luis Obispo needs a voice of reason. As a small business consultant, former Sheriff’s Correctional Deputy, former Division One scholarship and all-American athlete, and mentor to the next generation of SLO residents, I uniquely understand the current issues facing our City. My priorities are to facilitate a prosperous and sustainable future we can all participate in by empowering residents and enabling opportunities for growth. I was born and raised in San Luis Obispo and want what is best for our entire community: •

Economic Vitality

Public Safety

Minimize burdensome tax increases and regulations. Make our streets clean and safe. Prioritize addressing homelessness. •

Support public safety with adequate training, transparency, and accountability.

SLOEMPOWERED

Housing

Re-zone and adapt underutilized buildings to accommodate mixed uses including work-force housing.

Inclusion

Solutions based upon conversations with all community members.

@ABForSLO | www.AbriannaTorres.com | Ab@AbriannaTorres.com

Ad Paid for by Abrianna Torres for San Luis Obispo City Council 2020 - FPPC ID #1429012 OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

27


28

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

29


| VIEW

Coastal Scene BY MARK NAKAMURA

A

s we made our return and descended down from Buckeye Campground to the Salmon Creek Ranger Station, just north of the San Luis Obispo County and Monterey County line along Highway 1, I saw the layers of coastal mountains bathed in the golden yellow afternoon light. I pulled out my Canon 5D IV camera with the 70-200mm f2.8 lens and took a few photos before packing up and catching up with my friends, who are very understanding of my passion for landscape photography. Buckeye Trail is located in the Silver Peak Wilderness of the Los Padres National Forest, which holds iconic views along the rugged Big Sur coastline, especially at higher elevations. Just the first couple of miles into the hike will give you exceptional vistas of the coastline looking back into San Luis Obispo County. The three-and-a-quarter-mile hike ascends to the campgrounds. The higher you go, the better the view, but you don’t have to make it to Buckeye Campground to make your trip worthwhile. Beginning around 8 am we arrived in Buckeye Campground by 10 o’clock that morning, where we relaxed. There is a spring at the campsite, but we brought our own water to be safe. I brought a book to read and a hammock. By mid-afternoon, after a leisurely lunch, we headed back down the trail.

This photograph was taken in the January sun, around three o’clock as we descended to the trailhead, watching out for the poison oak that lines the trail and checking for ticks along the way. In my opinion, the Buckeye Trail has the best views of the picturesque Big Sur coastline and San Luis Obispo County’s breathtaking coastal range. Get an early start to beat the heat since much of the trail is exposed to the sunlight. SLO LIFE 30

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

MARK NAKAMURA, retired school teacher, continues to pursue his passion in landscape photography as well as capturing the joys of weddings, families, events, and sports around the Central Coast.

| OCT/NOV 2020


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

31


| Q&A

OPEN MIND Newly installed as the Executive Director of the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, LEANN STANDISH checked in recently for a wide-ranging conversation. Here is some of what she had to say…

Tell us, Leann, where are you from? Okay, sure. I’m from the Midwest. I was born in Indianapolis and grew up in that region. Most of my family still lives back there. My folks are in Michigan and I visit there several times a year. My father worked for Volkswagen of America and Audi, so we moved around that area a lot. I was a real troublemaker. My first car was a Volkswagen Beetle, stick shift. I was the first of my friends to get my license. So we’d pile into my Bug, way too many of us, much more than was appropriate. It was kind of like a clown car. We’d drive around in the winter. If I lost control and slid over the ice, we’d all pile out, pick it up, and put it back on the road. What were you like as a kid? It was a very innocent childhood. I was mostly always getting myself in trouble for talking. And I was always up for something different or a new experience. So I don’t know. I wasn’t really a troublemaker. When I reflect on it, I realize, “Oh, I wasn’t really in any kind of trouble.” But at the time I was very disruptive. I was the oldest of four kids and I required a lot of attention. I was terrible at sports. I was on a softball team for a minute, and I remember sitting on the bench and painting my teammates’ fingernails. I was active in choir and in theater, I was an exceptional shower and car singer, and occasionally I joined actual singing groups. What came next? I went to South Bend to Notre Dame. I was a terrible student, so I ran away to California before I finished. I had never traveled anywhere ever and was sure that I was going to live on the beach. I had no idea what Fresno was. Didn’t realize there was no surfing there. I got a job in a lab analyzing soil and stuff. I hated it, hated it, hated it, and was miserable. And just on a whim, I took a job as an assistant in a museum. It was the most perfect career for me. It was a tiny, little museum. Everything just clicked and I fell in love with it. I found my calling. From there, I went to the Minneapolis Institute of Art, then I moved to Portland to work at the Oregon Museum of Science & History. But I was really missing my family, so I took a job at Fredrick Meyer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan, which is a pretty extraordinary place. It’s remarkable and noteworthy because it’s a small community that has a huge arts support system. Then, it was full circle, back to the Indianapolis Museum of Art. And then you made a stop in Miami, correct? Yes, that’s right. It was a freezing cold day in February when I got a 32

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

call from Florida asking if I’d like to work at the Miami Art Museum. I was like, “Yes! Get me out of here! It’s so cold!” Anyway, as it turns out, a small group of us built a brand-new museum there. Still, to this day, it’s the thing I’m very most proud of. And, while I was there, I had this dream, a vision, of advertising on all the taxi tops—this was before Uber, gosh it sounds like I’m so old, this was not that long ago—so everyone coming out of the airport would know about the new museum. So, around this same time, I met this guy at one of our fundraising events, and I noticed he was liking everything I’d post on social media. They call that “deep liking,” by the way. So, one day, he sent me a message and said, “Are you interested in advertising on taxi tops?” And I was like, “Yes, I love you! And, by the way, who are you? And why are you on my page?” [laughter] It was cute. Turns out, he was in advertising, and he was from Fresno originally, and he made the taxicab thing actually happen. He had the goods. We’ve been together ever since. He’s my person. Okay, but why museums? I think that museums have opened my mind. And I’ve watched other people experience that same sort of thing. A work of art can change you, or speak to you deeply, or challenge you, or make you angry, but it makes you feel. And it makes your world bigger. So, when we moved here, right away I thought to myself, “One day I will run SLOMA. I really want to.” I did. I think back now to when I was a young person in the field. One of my mentors talked about how museums so often feel like a stuffy, formal existence. He compared it to when your grandmother had that living room furniture you weren’t actually allowed to sit on. And you had to take your shoes off to go into the formal living room and all of that. He said he wanted his museum to be like the rec room where you eat popcorn and crawled all over the couches and stayed there for hours and hours and were able to be yourself. I have always dreamed of each museum that I worked with as being the place where you just really relaxed into yourself and discovered a bigger world. SLO LIFE


Social Distancing

Meow, meow

Requires Better Hearing

Call us today for your consultation

805 541-1790

www.KarenScottAudiology.com

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

33


| NOW HEAR THIS

34

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


IN FULL BLOOM BY JOE PAYNE

IMAGES COURTESY OF NATALIE HASKINS

B

orn and raised in the Nipomo region of San Luis Obispo County, Natalie Haskins has performed her own music live across the Central Coast for more than a decade. But not until now, after several years of work in multiple studios with a team of instrumental contributors, has Haskins reached a serious benchmark for any singer/songwriter—her own full length album. Haskins honed her sixteen-track collection of original songs since 2016, focusing on poetic settings of real-life feelings with an Americana twang in her May-release titled Puhidua. The album showcases her songwriting like no other project, with all but two co-authored tracks featuring entirely her own lyrical and compositional efforts. “I’ve been writing poetry since I was a young girl, and I’ve always been interested in music as well. Like in middle school I played flute—I was one of those kids. In high school I was in band,” Haskins shares. “So I’ve always been interested in the arts, and when I started learning guitar at eighteen, that’s when my poetry started turning into songwriting.” Growing up in a rural SLO County, Haskins’ family was steeped in Americana and country music. Her dad, uncles, and brothers were all into that kind music while she was growing up, Haskins recalls, and even though genres like R&B held her attention, her family’s influence shone through once she started writing music. “As I got older and I started playing, I naturally just came out sounding that way,” she explains. “I think it is kind of in my blood as well because my grandfather was a musician and he was an outlaw country guy. His sound was very old school country.” Haskins’ new album exemplifies the kind of Americana that has risen in popularity during the last decade-and-a-half, which is fused with country influences but doesn’t shy away from folk, blues, and even some jazz forms. Pihidua isn’t a nitty gritty, whiskey-obsessed album often heard from the more male side of

Americana songwriting, but a polished and artful interpretation of real feelings like heartache and family dynamics. Part of the success of the album goes to Haskins’ selection of instrumentalists, who bring everything from ripping electric guitar solos to haunting pedal steel to sensual saxophone breaks to her songs. Locals may recognize some of the names on the album jacket, with contributors like Jon Clarke, Joe Koenig, and Terry Lawless. “I felt really lucky because I would kind of hand them the idea, and whatever their skill was, they would just elevate it to another level,” Haskins reveals. “That was fun for me to watch, because having a song is kind of like having a child, you’re really connected to it, you gave birth to it, but you’re sending it out to the world and hoping someone loves it. I just feel like the musicians collectively on the album made the songs so much better than I ever could have envisioned from the beginning.” The album includes tributes to her own progenitors. First, the use of an heirloom Martin guitar from her grandfather, which was used to record multiple tracks. The guitar is also featured in some of the album artwork, which Haskins said was an important part of the project. As a “90’s kid,” the physical product was important to her, and connections to her roots are seen throughout. Also, the album title, Puhidia, comes from the Native American language of the Paiute Tribe, of which her mother is a member. The word means “wildflower,” and definitely illustrates Haskins’ blossoming as a recording artist and local performer. SLO LIFE OCT/NOV 2020 |

JOE PAYNE is a journalist, as well as a lifelong musician and music teacher, who writes about the arts on the Central Coast.

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

35


| MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

36

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


HOME GROWN PHOTOGRAPHY BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

A little more than ten years ago, JESSE DUNDON was living in a garden shed on Hathway Avenue in San Luis Obispo. Each morning, he would make his commute across the backyard to the garage where a handful of recent Cal Poly graduates clanked away at computers in a mad scramble to launch a new technology company. Today, he is the Co-Founder & CEO of a sprawling enterprise that employs over a hundred people and counts some of the country’s most respected and recognizable brands as clients. Together with his wife and their fifteen-month-old son, he represents a new generation of entrepreneurs who are reshaping the Central Coast economy. Here is his story… OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

37


38

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


O

kay, Jesse, let’s start from the beginning. Where are you from? I was born in San Luis Obispo at Sierra Vista hospital in 1985 and then grew up in SLO. I’m one of nine; it’s a little bit of a Brady Bunch situation. So, there was six original Dundons. My mother passed away when I was a young kid and my dad met a woman who had two kids already and then, together, they had one more. And that makes nine, so I would be the eighth of nine. The oldest eight are basically every two years over a fifteen-year span. So, there is a large range in ages. It was competitive for scarce resources. Let’s put it that way. Attention, rides, carpools, food, those sorts of things.

get a certain percentage of this market it would work.” And we’d basically do a similar model to the house painting Kevin did, where we would line up jobs all spring and then do carpet cleaning all summer. Then we could test it out one year in San Luis Obispo and then scale it out similar to how the house painting thing worked, or how my screen printing thing worked. So we started a company called University Steam Cleaners. This was 2007, so this was my fourth year, Kevin had already graduated a little bit early and we did all the marketing all spring, and then we did the carpet cleaning all summer before we realized a couple things.

Tell us about your dad. My dad was a philosophy professor. He was a big believer in dinner with the whole family every night. There was always robust dialogue about various issues. As a result, a number of my older siblings went on to become lawyers. I would say, to a fault, we’re all very opinionated. My dad was a Cal Poly professor and then moved us up to Davis when I was a kid. He then transferred to Sac State, so I spent a lot of my childhood in Davis and Sacramento. It was around that time I started mowing lawns and walking dogs, those sorts of things. Davis is a big bike town, so I got my first job at a bike shop the day I turned fourteen, which is the earliest you can get a work permit. I worked there fixing bikes for the next three years through high school.

What did you realize? One of them was that the sales and marketing piece was not the most challenging part of it. Doing good work and making your customers happy was quite a bit different, especially when you didn’t invest in the right level of equipment. We didn’t have a $50,000 truck-mounted steam cleaning machine, which is what, as it turns out, any actual commercial operation needs to use. We got the $3,000 machine and we didn’t really have any training. I think we had a certain amount of hubris, I’d say, going into it, and we learned a lot. We came out of it with a great respect for people in the trades, and doing proper training, and investing in the right equipment to get the job done. But after one summer of mostly doing the work ourselves and employing some of our friends to help us with it, we threw in the towel on that and then wanted to get into something that was a little bit more based in technology. Something that wasn’t hard physical labor, so we moved on to start the next business.

What happened next? When I was seventeen, I came down to Cal Poly to study Industrial Technology. I was in the Santa Lucia dorms. On the first day, I met my business partner, Kevin Rice, there in the dorms. We’ve been friends ever since. While we were in school, Kevin ran the local branch of a residential house painting company. They’d set up college students to do house painting jobs in their hometown. He managed a crew here. I did a similar thing for a screen-printing company. My job was to go out and drum up business from the campus clubs, and fraternities and sororities, and sports teams, and stuff like that for T-shirt orders and apparel orders. Also, I played rugby in high school and in college and, at that time, they had a five-year eligibility window for collegiate rugby. So, you could either take five years to get your bachelors and play all five years, or you could do a four plus one program and get your bachelor’s in four and then as long as you got your master’s at the same school, they would extend your eligibility. And, so, I was one of the few on the team that decided to graduate in four and then stick around for a fifth year. And I was on the fence actually, I almost left and didn’t do the master’s program and almost took a job at Shopatron. Then, I just decided to stick around and get my masters and play another year of rugby. So, after I graduated with my bachelor’s, that summer we started a carpet cleaning business. Interesting… We looked at the map and we said, “Hey, in San Luis Obispo there’s 20,000 students or so. Let’s say four or five to a house, which means there’s four or five thousand student houses in town, or apartments, and they all need to get their carpets cleaned every summer when they move out.” We said, “If we could get that, it’s a market value of a hundred bucks or so per house, so if we could

What was the next venture? It was a company called WiHire. We had lived in various houses on Hathaway for most of college, not all of college, but most of the time after college. It was the street that taught us everything we knew at the time. It was funny, actually. We started that business a few months later. It was initially about, again, solving another college problem right in front of us, which was how to help college students get jobs and internships, and how to help companies better recruit for interns and entry-level employees. The economy was going great, so we thought it was going to be a great idea. We had some cool features in our platform for things like video resumes, and campus clubs, and interest groups using this recruiting channel, and those sorts of things. So, we did it, but we didn’t know anything about technology. So once again, we chose to start a business that we had no training in whatsoever [laughter]. But, I will say, we had learned enough >> OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

39


to know what we didn’t know. We ended up raising a little bit of money to go out and get some help. Where did you find it? As it turns out, what we were really good at was finding people using Craigslist to do freelance web development work using open source software. So, we built out our platform and started getting some traction with it and blew through the small amount of money that we had raised. It was just enough to initially make ends meet. At the time, we were all packed into a house over by Cal Poly. I think seven or eight people living in the house at the time, and we were all working out at the garage. At one point, we converted the garden shed. We put sheet rock on the walls and insulated it so we could pack more people into the house and have our rent be as low as possible. I actually lived in that garden shed as I was getting my masters and playing my last year of rugby. So, how was the business doing? We started getting some traction with WiHire, but then 2008 hit and by 2009 there wasn’t a lot of hiring or recruiting going on. It didn’t turn out to be the best timing in terms of any employment-based business. But, at the same time, we were doing more and more freelance web development work on the side. There wasn’t some hard cutoff date that I could point to, but 40

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

it was sometime in mid-2009 that we realized we were earning good money doing freelance work and just spending that money on this other idea, which was going nowhere. So, we shut down WiHire and focused all our effort on doing web development for people. At the time, our company was called Hathaway Technology Group LLC, which was never intended to be a brand name or anything, it was just that we lived on Hathway Avenue. But whenever someone would write us a check for the work we did for them, we’d say, “Oh, you can just make it out to Hathway Tech.” It just sort of stuck. Somewhere along the way, we dropped the “Tech.” Now we’re just Hathway. How did you and Kevin split up the various responsibilities? As we grew and started taking on more and more work, Kevin and I went slightly different paths. He focused more on sales and marketing and client services. I, from more of an engineering mindset, focused more on how the technology works and was doing web development work. I became a web developer and a system administrator and as we grew. Naturally, I focused on the guts of the business, actually producing the work and the financial administration, like management of the business, and Kevin focused on sales, marketing, and client services to bring in the business and to keep our clients happy. Fast forward to now, and that’s more or less still our division of labor within the >>


Explore the Extraordinary

www.GardensbyGabriel.com lic.# 887028 805-215-0511 OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

41


company. Kevin manages sales, marketing, and client services. And I manage production and financial operations.

operations for a long time has been local, but we were always using contractors throughout the US and abroad for various things.

And what exactly does Hathway do? So, initially we started out just doing web development work for small businesses at the depths of the recession using open source software so that we could help them get to market. We’d say, “Better, faster, and cheaper.” And it was really just a hodgepodge of various businesses that we worked on, but we specialize with these open source platforms for content management and marketing sites. Over time, we have evolved to where we’re at now, which is specializing in eCommerce and loyalty for a couple of retail market segments, in particular large chain restaurants, and coffee shops, and convenience stores, and other chain retail brands.

From your standpoint as a tech CEO, what’s it like to do business here on the Central Coast? Our headquarters is still in SLO, and it’s always going to be in SLO, but our clients and our teams are distributed; we’re actually in a really, fortunate place when COVID hit that we already had the equipment to go remote. We already had the software systems and collaboration tools in place to be able to work remotely, and our client relationships were almost completely remote anyway, so we were able to shift to a fully remote work culture, I would say, fairly seamlessly. There have definitely been some sticking points that we’ve had to work through and there’s certainly pros and cons to it, but we were pretty lucky for it to not be as big of a culture shock to us as I’m sure it was for other companies. As we have grown, we’ve recognized that most of our clients are not based here locally. We’ve also recognized that while the talent market is great in SLO— it’s picked up quite a bit over the years—it’s still very small. And, so, we built out an office in Dallas and we have an off-shore operation in Kiev [Ukraine]. And lately, since COVID, we’ve been really focused on just hiring remote staff throughout the country. So the nature of our employee base has shifted over the years. Most recently, over the >>

What about lately? How have things been? For us, we’ve always been a company that thrives through remote relationships. When we were first getting freelance clients, they would be from anywhere in the country. And we’ve had a number of international clients as well, and they were coming to us because of our expertise in particular software platforms. So, we always had to figure out: How do we actually work with these clients when we had never actually met most of them in person? And, on the staffing side, we hired some folks in SLO and the core of our 42

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


At In Trust Legal, we are the perfect solution between questionable online generic forms and the high cost of legal fees. SCHEDULE A COMPLIMENTARY 30 MINUTE CONSULTATION CALL (805) 439-0715

In Trust Legal

Legal Document Assistance InTrustLegal.com

AN AFFORDABLE ALTERNATIVE!

 freshpaintslo.com

 805-787-0451

 @freshpaintslo

LIC. # 1036406

• Living Trust • Healthcare Directive

• Last Will • Transfer Deed • Power of • Probate Attorney • Corp/LLC

We are not a law firm. We cannot give legal advice. We can only provide self-help services at your specific direction. San Luis Obispo County LDA, Reg. No. 250.

Local, honest expertise for home buyers and sellers 150+ transactions closed within the last seven years

“Throughout the purchase of our first home, Graham answered every question

we had. He was always prompt and professional with communication but also extremely personable and friendly. We felt like he was truly in the hunt with us as we searched for a home. We are thankful to have worked with him.

– Bobby & Kelly Boss, San Luis Obispo graham @ ccreslo.com 805.459.1865 | Lic. #01873454 www.ccreslo.com 3196 South Higuera Suite D, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

43


last few months, in particular, we now have a good portion of our staff based outside of San Luis Obispo. Let’s switch gears for a minute and talk about your family. I live with my wife, Kayla, and our son Lucas, who’s fifteen months old. I’ve got to say that my wife is a saint. She, unfortunately, hasn’t been able to pursue her career as much lately. She’s a fitness instructor, and pretty much all the gyms got shut down. So she’s been doing some remote classes out of the house on Zoom, but she’s spent most of the time watching Lucas and raising him, especially in this critical time when I’ve been working remote out of the home office, which has definitely been a challenge. But we’re very fortunate. I can only imagine how tough it would be for a family with both parents trying to work full time remotely out of the same house with dueling Zoom calls and trying to balance raising a kid at the same time. I certainly understand that not all family situations are created equal. It’s made us understand that with our employees, too, that not everybody has the same situation going on. What do you do to unplug? When I’m not working or I’m not hanging out with family most likely you can catch me out on the water. I started paddle boarding about four or five years ago at this point. At first, what 44

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

hooked me on paddle boarding was just being a part of nature and being able to see close up so many things this region has to offer. Then, I caught my first wave. After I started surfing, it progressed to higher performance paddle boards. It’s one of the few times I’m unplugged from technology. The latest journey is SUP foiling, which is when you lift up out of the water. I’m starting to really get the hang of it, but it’s definitely a humbling experience. It’s almost like starting over because you’re basically flying an airplane that’s hovering over the water and you’re still in the ocean dealing with waves and the ground and potential hostile marine life. Starting over. Sounds a lot like entrepreneurship. It’s a change up in terms of a life because much of my day is based in technology. Actually somebody asked me, “What is it about paddle boarding that is engaging?” Maybe it’s because I played rugby for ten years, but I said something like, “Oh, entertainment for me has got to include a little bit of physical jeopardy, a little bit of risk associated with it.” And, actually, I have found that I get really bored paddling on fresh water, paddling on lakes. It’s still fun, but I can paddle out in the ocean for a couple hours and it’s much more of a challenge with swell and the potential for sharks and everything because, you know they’re out there. But, on a lake, there’s none of that, so, for me, when you remove that piece of jeopardy, it’s a little bit less exciting, less engaging. SLO LIFE


EST. 1999

D r o u g h t - To l e r a n t ,

Lifestyle Landscapes

Design . Build . Maintain

805.927.0374 . ecotoneslandscapes.com . LIC # 767033

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

45


| ARTIST

PROFILE

David Limrite BY JEFF AL-MASHAT

M

ysterious, dramatic, dark, and edgy are all words that artist David Limrite uses when talking about his own drawings. “Inviting” is not likely the next natural word one would expect after hearing the artist’s description. But inviting is exactly what these gestural figures—made with the most basic drawing tools, like charcoal and graphite—are. They are invitations for us to not only recognize our internal conflicts, but spend some time and explore them a little. The figures are drawn with volatile motion and vigorous energy. At the same time, there is a constant tension, as the figures seem trapped by other marks and lines on the paper. The sense that the figures want to break free suggests that Limrite is telling the viewer that it is okay to have, and even enjoy, and maybe even show the world, a darker side of ourselves. “I am really interested in what I call the drama of vulnerability,” says Limrite. “I am fascinated by this idea that we are always at a crossroads, and one decision can alter an entire life.” Jim Dine, Edvard Munch, and Auguste Rodin are influences of Limrite’s, all of which make perfect sense. But the stark difference that Limrite brings with his work is the ability to connect on a very basic level with the viewer. He eliminates any question of distance and instead asks the viewer to come along on the journey with him. The reckoning between the ghostly figures in his drawings and Limrite’s ability to connect so easily with his viewer is evident in the man himself. Limrite is quite accomplished, with a rich body of work as well as an impressive resume. He is disciplined in his craft, but he is also an incredibly affable fellow who loves to teach and talk with anybody about art. These days, without the ability to connect with students in the classroom, he has taken to giving critiques online and is in the process JEFF AL-MASHAT is a writer and visual artist with of writing a book about what an MFA in painting from he calls “mind management,” Georgia State University. He lives in Grover Beach. which he defines as the ups and downs of being a creator. SLO LIFE 46

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


interior design . color consultation . remodels (805) 234-7302 . www.aprilmarchdesign.com

Dr. Arnie Horwitz

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Are you feeling overwhelmed and confused? I can help. Specializing in

- Relationship Conflicts - Parenting & Self-Esteem - Separation and Divorce - Personal Life Planning - Grief and Loss - Career Uncertainty Therapy/Counseling/Coaching Dr. Arnie Horwitz • 30 yrs. Experience

805-541-2752 www.doctorar nie.com

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

47


| FAMILY

Sand & Sea BY PADEN HUGHES

T

he Central Coast is one of the most beautiful and varied landscapes which includes the GuadalupeNipomo Dunes Complex, a system of dunes that covers an eighteen-mile portion of the coastline from Pismo State Beach to Point Sal, making it the largest remaining dune system south of San Francisco and the second largest in the state. Simply put, it’s huge. On top of its sheer land mass, the Central Coast sand dunes boast of having the highest sand-swept peak in the western coastline of the United States. Mussel Rock Dune stands at 500 feet tall. All that sand and space work together to create a unique ecosystem, providing home to at least eighteen endangered species of plants along with over 200 species of birds, including the ground nesting California Least Turn and Western Snowy Plover. Both species of these federally threatened birds will begin wrapping up their breeding seasons in October. The unique landscape isn’t just for the birds. The early Chumash people were the first to occupy this land, but they weren’t the only ones. From the 1920s until the mid-1970s a bohemian community of artists, writers, and poets known as the Dunites called the sandy shores home. The area has also served as the backdrop to films, music videos, and commercials alike, including the 1923 Cecil B. DeMille movie “The Ten Commandments.” The Egyptianthemed sets from the film were dismantled and buried in the dunes to prevent other filmmakers from using them— often called The Lost City of Cecil B. DeMille. If you’re interested in learning more, some of the recovered artifacts can be viewed at the Dunes Visitor Center. In addition to its history and landscape, the dunes boast an abundance of activities both in and out of the water, including surfing, boogie boarding, kite and wind surfing, paragliding, biplane flights, hiking, whale watching, and cozying up around a bonfire. In fact, according to the Whale Trail organization, Oceano is home to some of the best whale watching on the West Coast. Gray whales can be spotted between December and April and humpback whales can be seen year-round. 48

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

We decided to load up our two little ones and soak in the fun at the dunes with a family picnic. The selling point that delivered instant enthusiasm was when my husband dubbed the spot “the World’s Largest Sandbox” when describing it to our kids. With the riding area closed, the entire time we were there we didn’t see a single other person. What we loved about this was the sense of walking into a completely foreign environment and experiencing all the novelty that goes along with being somewhere so different. The sand is surprisingly fine, soft, and clean-feeling underfoot. The dunes were magical to explore. Even our fifteen-monthold son was able to tackle the heights and had so much fun sliding down the sandy hills. The highlight was watching our three-year-old daughter run happily at full speed in her Rapunzel dress shouting, “This is the best day ever!” We could all use sweet escapes like this to step out of the stresses of life and to experience something new. And if you have managed to preserve your childlike exuberance, I can promise you, it will feel like one of the “best days ever!” Getting There:

There are a few different access points. One is behind the Pacific Dunes Ranch RV Resort in Oceano. Be careful to not park on private property. A small trail can be found behind the water tower that winds its way through beautiful bluffs. After a fifteen-minute walk, you’ll find yourself surrounded by sand. You can also access the area by taking the Oso Flaco Lake Trail. The one-mile hike begins from Oso Flaco Lake Day Use Area in Arroyo Grande. The beautifully landscaped boardwalk studded with picnic tables and benches leads you on a picturesque journey to the sand. SLO LIFE

PADEN HUGHES is co-owner of Gymnazo and enjoys exploring the Central Coast.


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

49


| ON THE RISE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Ingrid Chen With several Mock Trial and Golden Tiger Awards under her belt as well as a National Latin Exam Gold Medal, this San Luis Obispo High School senior is ready to step into a bright future.

What extracurricular activities are you involved in? I am involved in Mock Trial and Harvard Model Congress. I also play on the tennis team and am the president of my school’s National Honor Society. Outside of school, I am on the United Way Youth Board. What do you like to do for fun? I love walking my dog, reading, and watching Avatar: The Last Airbender! What experience has influenced you the most? When I was in fifth grade, my parents took a sabbatical from work and we moved to Australia and then New Zealand for six months each. I met some amazing people and saw some incredible things while I was there, and living in other countries has really helped contextualize my experiences in America and solidified my beliefs and morals. What is important to you outside of high school? Being involved in my community. I think that there’s a lot of people and organizations who are underserved right in our own backyard and I think that especially in our current political climate, it’s more important than ever that we do our civic duty, and have empathy for others. What is it that you look forward to next? I’m really looking forward to graduating from college, to be honest. I think that having a solid secondary education will be the springboard to achieving my personal and work goals and making some substantial change in this world. What is your favorite memory of all time? Probably going to a tennis tournament out of town for a few days with the rest of the tennis team. We always have a really great time together and it is a lot of fun. If you could go back in history and meet anyone, who would it be? I think it would be really cool to meet Julius Caesar. I’m taking Latin in school right now and we’re reading some of his old writing. He sounds like a really interesting guy. What career do you see yourself in someday? I would love to be a lawyer someday. My interest in law started in middle school with Mock Trial, mainly because I liked the public speaking element, but I’ve since come to appreciate the political and social implications that law can have on public opinion and everyday life. What schools are you considering for college? I’m applying to Stanford, a couple Ivy League schools, and a few UCs, as well as some other great out-of-state private universities like Barnard. SLO LIFE

Know a student On the Rise? Introduce us at slolifemagazine.com/share

50

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


A new view of God AND ITS EFFECT ON WELL-BEING

Divine Love erases suffering from our lives as naturally as sunrise banishes night.

For those ready for what's next Only one real estate brand holds the keys to your most exceptional home and life. If you're thinking of selling your property or looking to buy, don't hesitate to call or text. Your best life begins with a home that inspires you.

A talk on Christian Science

Saturday, November 7 2:00pm PST

Phillip Hockley, CS Christian Science practitioner Member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship

Sponsored by

First Church of Christ, Scientist San Luis Obispo, CA

Location

Attend online! Go to www.cstalks.org/slo-hockley

Contact

805 543 5853 www.tinyurl.com/cssanluisobispo201107

3590 Broad St. #130

Linda Wilson Broker/Owner #1045160

San Luis Obispo, CA WilsonSIR.com | ID:

805.801.3232 linda@wcsir.com

© MMXX Sotheby's International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby's International Realty Affiliates LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Sotheby's International Realty and the Sotheby's International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks licensed to Sotheby's International Realty Affiliates LLC.

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

51


| DWELLING

FRESH

52

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


START BY ZARA KHAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID LALUSH

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

53


54

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


I

t was time to downsize. After a lengthy search, Monica and Stu Soren found their home—and it checked most of their boxes. It was in a welcoming location, had great bones, and was a single story. But it would require a major renovation to really feel like home. They decided to approach their project in phases. At first, they simply updated a few things, so the home felt more comfortable and reflected the couple’s design sense. The Sorens hired Anne Fortini of Fortini Designs to help them make a few strategic upgrades so the home felt updated >>

OCT/NOV 2020 |

In addition to being an interior designer, ZARA KHAN is also a shoe aficionado and horror movie enthusiast.

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

55


and was cohesive with their personal style. Fortini brings with her over forty years of design experience and is known for creating functional spaces while maintaining her clients’ individual style and personality. After discussing their project, she recommended some quick, simple fixes including a fresh coat of paint on the walls and dated oak built-ins and removal of a traditional mantel. Replacing it with large rectangle tiles immediately updated the family room. The refresh was coupled with a new kitchen island. These simple details completely transformed the space. As the Sorens continued to live in the house, they found they thoroughly enjoyed the lifestyle at the country club and gathering with their neighbors. During this period the couple began to identify how the space functioned for them and decided it was time to iron out >> the wrinkles, so they invited Fortini back and assembled

56

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

57


a game plan and a team for the second phase. Some of the home’s features left the Sorens feeling boxed in. Their kitchen counters and cooktop hood were lower than standard and needed to be adjusted. All of the interior window and door headers were at six feet eight inches and the couple hoped to open up the space and allow in even more natural light by raising them to eight feet. Their master suite was generous in size, but the layout along with poor window and door placement and height made it challenging to utilize the space the way they wanted to. And the dated light soffits needed to be removed in order to attain the updated look they were hoping to achieve. The Robertson brothers, co-owners of Green Goods, Mikel and Brian, were added to the team and served as General Contractor (Mikel) and Cabinet Maker (Brian). The Green Goods team brought an easy-to-work-with >>

58

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


CUSTOM BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS & DRAPERY

FREE Installation*

on custom blinds, shades, drapery & decorative hardware Call to Schedule Your FREE In-Home Design Consultation

1-805-436-5580 or visit www.3dayoffer530.com

*Offer valid on residential base installation of 3 Day Blinds brand products only, excluding shutters and special orders. Minimum purchase of $750 required, excluding sales tax, shipping and handling. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Offer Code CEPC. Expires 01/31/21. 3 Day Blinds LLC has the following licenses: AZ ROC 321056, CA #1005986, CT HIC.0644950, NJ #13VH09390200, OR #209181, PA #PA107656, WA #3DAYBDB842KS, Nassau County, NY Home Improvement License H01073101, Rockland County, NY #H-12401-34-00-00, VA#2705172678 (Licensed through Great Windows Services, LLC). © 2020 3 Day Blinds LLC.

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

59


demeanor along with knowledge of construction and design input, which ensured the project moved along smoothly through each phase. It was refreshing for the owners to see how their vision came together as the designer and contractor collaborated and stayed on the same page. The project was taken to another level. One of the most challenging design elements was in the master bathroom. There was a large space for separate vanities, but the couple wanted to remove a dated corner spa-tub, and really needed more closet space. Unfortunately, the best location for the closet was also where the windows were located above the removed tub. After several different iterations of the layout, Robertson thought it might work best to change out the size of the window and break up the length of lower cabinets with a full height closet and create a new focal point. With some massaging from Fortini, they agreed >>

60

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

61


to the new design which increased the functional closet space significantly, while giving the Sorens each their own vanity. Fortini always recommends identifying the overall vision, she makes a space plan and works backwards from there. This ensures that decisions aren’t made during the construction phase that will later disrupt the intention for the furniture, lighting, and spatial planning. For example, as they performed the electrical walk through with Jim Devor, owner of Green Wave Electric, the team decided it would be advantageous to place a floor outlet where the future sofa console would be placed. This would prevent lamp wires from having to be concealed and was an affordable addition since they were already performing other electrical work. And, as tempting as it was to explore widening all of the windows and doors to their maximum potential, Fortini >>

62

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

63


kept the plan on track, taking into account the future window coverings and wall space needed on both sides for drapery returns. Home improvement projects are on the rise and with several remodels under their belt the Sorens have some wisdom to share: start by doing some research and compile examples or concepts of your vision. Set clear budget parameters. And—perhaps the most important advice— assemble a collaborative team. Find people who recognize the overall goals, work creatively to solve unforeseen obstacles (because there will always DAVID LALUSH is an be a few), and choose those architectural photographer here in San Luis Obispo. you enjoy working with who understand and can communicate your vision. SLO LIFE

64

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


LIFE IN THE SLO LANE STARTS HERE

Ladera

Ladera at Righetti Models Now Open! By Appointment Only. Pricing starts from the low $1 millions. Ladera at Righetti offers five different home layouts, each designed to take full advantage of the site’s gorgeous hillside topography. Homes range from approximately 2,600 square feet to nearly 3,000 square feet and feature three and four bedrooms, and two and one-half to four and one-half baths.

Please feel free to contact us and we’d be happy to schedule a personal appointment to discuss San Luis Obispo’s most attractive new home neighborhood.

Call or go online to book a personal appointment. (805) 774-3038 www.righettiladera.com Information Center open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All prices, plans, terms and offers are effective date of publication are subject to availability and may change without notice. Housing is open to all without regard to race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin. Depictions of homes are artist conceptions. Hardscape and landscape may vary and are not included in the purchase price. Square footage shown is only an estimate and actual square footage may differ. Please consult our sales team for additional information. Sales by CADO Real Estate Group DRE # 01525182 Construction by Ambient Management Service LP Lic. #1014645

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

65


BY THE NUMBERS

REAL ESTATE

| SLO CITY

laguna lake

2019 Total Homes Sold 48 Average Asking Price $773,694 Average Selling Price $761,623 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 98.44% Average # of Days on the Market 31

2020 44 $763,261 $758,431 99.37% 38

+/-8.33% -1.35% -0.42% 0.93% 22.58%

tank farm

2019 21 Total Homes Sold $811,549 Average Asking Price $801,024 Average Selling Price Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 98.70% 20 Average # of Days on the Market

2020 32 $817,596 $811,766 99.29% 39

+/52.38% 0.75% 1.34% 99.10% 95.00%

cal poly area

2019 Total Homes Sold 18 Average Asking Price $1,065,383 Average Selling Price $1,032,549 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 96.92% Average # of Days on the Market 31

2020 19 $985,995 $977,105 99.10% 18

+/5.56% -7.45% -5.37% 2.18% -41.94%

country club

2019 Total Homes Sold 17 Average Asking Price $1,547,429 Average Selling Price $1,492,647 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 96.46% Average # of Days on the Market 104

2020 13 $1,186,461 $1,135,169 95.68% 26

+/-23.53% -23.33% -23.95% -0.78% -75.00%

down town

2019 Total Homes Sold 53 Average Asking Price $818,634 Average Selling Price $799,915 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 97.71% Average # of Days on the Market 43

2020 44 $987,080 $960,653 97.32% 40

+/-16.98% 20.58% 20.09% -0.39% -6.98%

foothill blvd

2019 Total Homes Sold 35 Average Asking Price $959,586 Average Selling Price $913,958 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 95.25% Average # of Days on the Market 33

2020 31 $885,332 $885,919 100.07% 31

+/-11.43% -7.74% -3.07% 4.82% -6.06%

johnson ave

2019 Total Homes Sold 44 Average Asking Price $834,552 Average Selling Price $817,027 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 97.90% Average # of Days on the Market 33

2020 44 $1,047,293 $1,013,472 96.77% 42

+/0.00% 25.49% 24.04% -1.13% 27.27%

*Comparing 01/01/19 - 09/23/19 to 01/01/20 - 09/23/20

®

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS

SLO LIFE

66

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


The leaves aren’t the only thing falling this time of year. Make sure you lock in a low rate before it’s too late! Work with a mortgage company that can offer low rates, great service and a fast, transparent process: • In-house underwriting and closing • Jumbo financing experts

Make sure you lock in a low rate before it’s too late! Donna Lewis

Dylan Morrow

Eileen Mackenzie

O: (805) 335-8743 C: (805) 235-0463 donna.lewis@rate.com

O: (805) 335-8738 C: (805) 550-9742 dylan.morrow@rate.com

O: (805) 212-5204 C: (831) 566-9908 eileen.mackenzie@rate.com

Joe Hutson

Ken Neate

Luana Gerardis

O: (831) 205-1582 C: (831) 212-4138 joe.hutson@rate.com

O: (805) 706-8074 C: (925) 963-1015 ken.neate@rate.com

O: (805) 329-4087 C: (707) 227-9582 luana.gerardis@rate.com

Branch Manager& VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

Maggie Koepsell VP of Mortgage Lending

O: (805) 335-8742 C: (805) 674-6653 maggie.koepsell@rate.com

Rate.com/SanLuisObispo 1065 Higuera St., Suite 100, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Applicant subject to credit and underwriting approval. Not all applicants will be approved for financing. Receipt of application does not represent an approval for financing or interest rate guarantee. Restrictions may apply, contact Guaranteed Rate for current rates and for more information. Donna Lewis NMLS #245945; CA - CA-DOC245945 | Dylan Morrow NMLS #1461481; CA - CA-DBO1461481 | Eileen Mackenzie NMLS #282909 | Joe Hutson NMLS #447536; CA - CADOC447536| Ken Neate NMLS ID #373607; CA - CA-DBO373607 | Luana Gerardis NMLS #1324563; CA - CA-DBO1324563 | Maggie Koepsell NMLS #704130; CA - CA-DBO704130 | Guaranteed Rate, Inc.; NMLS #2611; For licensing information visit nmlsconsumeraccess.org. • CA: Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

67


Now is a great time to take advantage of low rates to refinance or purchase the home of your dreams. Contact me today to learn more.

Ben Lerner

(805) 441-9486

**

Senior Loan Advisor NMLS 395723 blerner@flagstarretail.com 1212 Marsh St., Suite 1 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

The The The power power power of of the of the the ™ ™ ™ Human Human Human Interest Interest Interest Rate. Rate. Rate.

Equal Housing Lender | Member FDIC

| SLO COUNTY

REAL ESTATE BY THE NUMBERS

REGION

NUMBER OF HOMES SOLD

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET

MEDIAN SELLING PRICE

2019

2020

2019

2020

2019

2020

Arroyo Grande

237

213

52

56

$822,000

$845,313

Atascadero

216

272

40

40

$593,304 $590,490

Avila Beach

19

9

96

35

$1,453,496 $1,136,654

Cambria/San Simeon

108

96

68

86

$961,409

Cayucos

36

39

114

121

$1,170,889 $1,238,021

Creston

7

7

93

198

$935,357

$812,143

Grover Beach

92

97

56

44

$549,563

$582,999

Los Osos

118

97

39

35

$650,114

$760,542

Morro Bay

99

103

67

66

$750,272

$724,827

Nipomo

213

178

58

55

$652,600

$726,091

Oceano

45

45

64

79

$522,111

$568,648

Pismo Beach

102

95

86

57

$1,173,585 $1,032,733

Paso (Inside City Limits)

287

256

47

37

$527,636

$546,125

Paso (North 46 - East 101)

43

39

66

49

$575,216

$608,051

Paso (North 46 - West 101)

93

77

69

93

$642,085 $620,039

Paso (South 46 - East 101)

45

45

64

66

$596,731

$669,282

San Luis Obispo

283

269

43

43

$909,767

$942,521

Santa Margarita

21

14

104

102

$546,832

$538,814

Templeton

85

112

69

71

$773,656

$836,068

2105

1999

56

54

$718,247

$738,487

$841,763

** Top 200 Mortgage Originator | Mortgage Executive Magazine

Not a commitment to lend. Programs available only to qualified borrowers. Subject to credit approval and underwriting terms and conditions. Programs subject 68 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2020 to change without notice. Some restrictions may apply.

Countywide

*Comparing 01/01/19 - 09/23/19 to 01/01/20 - 09/23/20

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS

®

SLO LIFE


smart, eclectic, art to live on

TIMELESS DESIGN FOR A CHANGING WORLD

1599 Monterey Street | 805.544.5900 | sloconsignment.com (at the corner of Grove Street, across from Pepe Delgados)

Open Tuesday - Saturday 10-5pm

PUGLISIDESIGN.COM | 805.595.1962

INC

STAL WORK CONSTRUCTION + DESIGN

LIC 948012 | PO BOX 391 SAN LUIS OBISPO CA 93406 805.542.0033 WWW.STALWORK.COM MAIL@STALWORK.COM COMMERCIAL | RESIDENTIAL | ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INTERIORS | LANDSCAPE + MAINTENANCE OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

69


Election

| CANDIDATE FORUM

2020

MAYOR HEIDI HARMON

MAYOR DONALD HEDRICK

As we face the health and economic challenges of COIVD19, San Luis Obispo needs proven leadership, creativity, and collaboration to move us forward. Serving as your Mayor over the past four years, I have a proven track record of significant progress on issues, values, and priorities important to our community. I pledge to uphold this commitment in my next term.

The biggest issue the city faces today is not in the city’s daily operating activities, but the increasing changes trickling down from the levels of government above our city. We have a renegade cadre of agents of the international corporate elite that have their goal being the destruction of this country and its democracy. We as a city need to resist this erosion of our Constitution and our rights that is in process by the elite that want to replace our country’s forefathers creation with a retouched version of dictatorship. It is treason to favor these international based programs such as identified in the UN’s Agenda 21 that express the goal of the dismantling of our country’s industry and our rights. We need to have our city government cease the rubber stamping of these subversive doctrines that are coming down the line and come up with local solutions.

We have, and we will, continue to support the creation of more housing affordability, expand access to open spaces, work with small businesses and employees on challenges, build relationships with regional partners to strengthen economic recovery, reinterpret the unique culture of our downtown, prioritize fiscal responsibility, spearhead sustainability policies that attract meaningful clean jobs, and proactively refocus City staff to support our community in this unprecedented time. As Mayor, I will work to ensure San Luis Obispo is a dynamic, safe, and resilient City of belonging with a solution-oriented mission for the future, protecting the health of our residents, and providing support for local businesses to thrive. As a Cal Poly graduate, former business owner, and mother, I share your vision to evolve and adapt our City during times of change while preserving what makes SLO special. Let’s move San Luis Obispo forward together. 70

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

The first thing would be to appoint myself to the APCD and bring the issue of the international fouling of our skies with the geo-engineering that is genocide against the people of the world. Our protest of the poisoning of our land, water, crops, and lungs with the patented processes that the corporate elite are using to poison the land, water, crops, and the air we breathe. We need to resist the lure of the grants that promote the objectives of the UN’s Agenda 21 which are working their way down to the cities. We need to speak out against such seditious programs and their grants with strings attached that are designed to take away our citizen rights. We as a city need to take back control of our governments and get rid of the criminals that want to replace our democracy with the new world order.


MAYOR SANDRA MARSHALL

MAYOR CHERISSE SWEENEY

Meet Sandra Marshall, Candidate for Mayor of San Luis Obispo.

I’m proud to be a Downtown business owner, land use consultant, environmental steward, wife, and mom. Raising my family and pursuing my career locally has allowed me the opportunity to have a first-hand understanding that it is time for a new perspective in City leadership.

Sandra moved to San Luis Obispo in 1974. With almost 50 years of living in the small city she loves, she has seen the progress and change San Luis Obispo has gone through. In 1991, concern for preserving the environment inspired Sandra to found and publish Information Press, a free local paper which remained in print until 2017. Sandra’s activism also drove her to serve as the Director of Earth Day Alliance, through which she has coordinated the annual San Luis Obispo Earth Day Fair since 1999 to the present. Sandra is a homeowner, a business person, a mother and grandmother, and the Director of a non-profit organization. She understands what is important to the residents of San Luis Obispo: • Saving San Luis Obispo’s historic Downtown • Ending homelessness in our community • Affordable housing • Creating safer communities • Preserving the environment and open spaces Why Support Sandra Marshall for Mayor? In her years of activism, Sandra has grown to believe every citizen’s voice should be heard. Sandra will bring strong leadership, fairness, balance, and honesty to municipal politics. For years, Sandra has expressed her deepest personal belief with the saying “The good of the whole begins with the individual.” The urgency of today’s challenges has inspired her to amend that saying to “The good of the whole begins now.” Preserve, Protect, Plan. That is Sandra’s three-pronged approach to moving San Luis Obispo successfully through these challenging times. Preserve our heritage—our charming Downtown, our thriving businesses, our diversity of cultures and our historic architecture. Protect our natural resources—our open spaces, our fragile environments, our air and water. Plan responsibly—growth is inevitable, let’s plan together how it can best happen. To get involved with Sandra’s campaign or to offer financial support, visit her website and follow her on social media.

Partisan divisions have left our community vulnerable. My nonpartisan candidacy for Mayor is inspired by the need to reinforce San Luis Obispo’s foundation — building upon our core values of solvency, safety, civility, transparency, and accountability. In the face of unprecedented uncertainty, we are presented with an opportunity for mature, resolute leadership. I look forward to stepping into the leadership role and cultivating productive dialogue by lifting each other up and allowing all voices to be heard. One of my top priorities is to restore the City’s resilient economy by upholding and enforcing transparency and accountability of citywide financial resources. Promoting and sustaining economic stability equates to balancing and lowering assessed property, sales, and business taxes — I am not in support of the permanent 1% sales tax increase as it is currently proposed. As a business owner, it is especially important for me to mend relationships between the City and its business community. I am an advocate for keeping goods and services local. My goal is to restore community trust in public health and safety by reprioritizing city spending and resources. Meeting the growing homelessness needs with effective private/public partnerships and resource development will accelerate results-driven solutions. I will assess policy-driven issues through the lens of local relevance and economics. I will support resources and practices that will result in a City where everyone feels safe. As an environmental steward, I have and will continue to implement balanced environmental and energy policies. By supporting regulations based on facts and data, collaborating on policies that promote economically-sensible conservation and sustainability initiatives, we can collectively protect the livability of our neighborhoods and the preservation of our open green spaces. I am committed to bringing nonpartisan leadership you can trust, and civility you can count on. Working together, I see brighter days ahead. OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

71


| CANDIDATE FORUM

CITY COUNCIL KELLY EVANS

CITY COUNCIL ERIK LONG

I am an antiracist, pro-housing candidate who believes environmental justice and accessibility of government programs are inextricably linked to achieving those first two goals.

I graduated from UC Santa Barbara with a BA in political science, and CSU Chico with a MA in political science. I have taught, researched, analyzed, published and consulted extensively in the field of political science.

I will work towards building Racial Justice, affordable housing, and deeper accessibility to local government, for all residents. I will help ensure we stay on track with the newly passed Climate Action Plan. I will work on the intersection of support for unhomed residents and downtown vitality, because they are one and the same, not opposing goals. I believe in finding the cross sections of what look like opposite points and analyzing them for real, long-term solutions. I bring this energy to stalled projects, invoking efficiency and soothing pain points. I have taken action to the best of my ability as a community organizer, helping set up SLO CORE, a Collective of Organizations and Relief Efforts aimed originally around mutual aid and other support needed during COVID-19. I have a history of building coalitions, across political spectrums, to meet the challenges we face. I have interacted with Council, both in person and via emails, to support policy changes and make asks. I have volunteered at shelters and organized within nonprofits. Privately, I began work at a family business event planning company years ago and quickly realized my skills in management and the marriage of idealistic visioning with reality and budget constraints. Now I believe it’s time to take my skills to government.

72

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

Twenty-years ago when I moved to San Luis Obispo, I felt I had arrived at one of the most beautiful small cities in California. In many ways, I still feel this way. However, over the last few years, I feel there are three issues of concern which merit additional attention; homelessness, housing and downtown parking. While I realize much has been done by various political bodies to address these issues, I am proposing that we undertake a far more expansive process that would allow for greater inclusiveness and the development of diverse ideas. I am calling for three summits starting in Fall 2021 through Fall 2022. The reason for a delayed start to these summits is that we must first continue to work as a community in containing the spread of COVID-19, while a vaccine is developed. Details for these summits are on the Issues page of my website. I would be honored to have your vote.


CITY COUNCIL JAN MARX

CITY COUNCIL JAMES PAPP

I am running for City Council at the urging of many residents who say the City needs my help during this unprecedented time of COVID-19, economic meltdown, climate change, wildfires, and civil unrest. How could I say no? I love the City of San Luis Obispo and feel called to offer my services.

No sane person runs for office—unless you have a fire in your belly that the cold shower of putting yourself in front of voters can’t quench. I happily served on SLO’s Cultural Heritage Committee for five years, analyzing a two-and-a-half-foot pile of development proposals and environmental studies, but I decided to run for City Council a year ago when the Council wanted to ban memorials to people because “people are flawed.”

My first priority is serving present City residents. I am concerned that the pandemic and economic collapse have placed residents under tremendous stress. Our residents deserve City Council members who listen to their concerns and take action to protect their quality of life. Future planning is important, but serving those, who might someday live here, must not overshadow Council’s duty to protect the health, safety, and wellbeing of people who live here now. I will provide public-spirited, effective, and experienced leadership. Building on my proven track record—six years as Mayor and six on Council—I will continue to help solve difficult problems and get good things done for the community. I am committed to improving diversity, inclusivity, and public safety with the creation of a new citizen Police Accountability committee. I support all-age alternate transportation, workforce and affordable housing and our Climate Action Plan. I will continue to fight for preservation of our precious resources: natural, fiscal, historical, and environmental, including open space. I have what it takes to lead us through these challenging times, just as I did through the 2008 Great Recession: 1) the experience, social consciousness and collaborative skill to work with people from all different backgrounds; 2) the business savvy to make sound decisions based on prudent budgeting, efficiency and accountability; and 3) integrity, civility and respect for everyone, without playing favorites. The new Council’s first order of business should be curbing the virus to get the economy back on track. I will advocate required mask wearing in public and work with all sectors to update SLO’s Economic Development Strategic Plan. I encourage local hiring, so salaries are spent locally. I will advocate expansion of highspeed broadband, storage batteries and microgrids to make us a more resilient entrepreneurial center. The City must do all it can to protect residents against blackouts, given increasing dependence on air conditioning and the internet. To learn more about my take on the issues, past achievements, and vision for the City’s future, please visit my website, janmarx.com or Facebook. Working hard and working together, we can create a thriving, sustainable and secure post pandemic future for our City! I would appreciate your vote. Jan Marx for City Council 2020!

The Council didn’t ask the CHC’s advice, because we would have said it was a goofy idea. For thousands of years people have memorializing people. People inspire us to be our best, however flawed: hence SLO’s 9/11 memorial, with 403 upstanding rods for the 403 emergency workers who sacrificed their lives when their best demanded it of them. No town’s ever suggested banning monuments to people; we would have been a laughingstock. But the Council and senior staff were so intent on “Council unity” they went charging ahead—until dozens of SLO citizens charged back. This situation arises when elected representatives get out of touch with the people they represent. There’s a structural reason. SLO has a “weak mayor” system; the city manager is basically our CEO and the Council the oversight board. Only a rare individual like Ken Schwartz—who had eight years on Planning Commission, then 10 as mayor—can take the bit in their teeth and bring substantial change. Our council doesn’t have anyone with that experience, vision, and drive. The city manager calls the shots and allows symbolic accomplishments; in return, Council doesn’t ask awkward questions. Like why Monterey’s city hall overhead is 10% of that city’s operating budget and San Luis Obispo’s is 19%. Why SLO’s Police Department budget is, proportionately, a fifth more than Monterey’s but our Parks Department budget barely a third the size. SLO’s budgets have gotten way out of whack with comparable cities. So have our government values. Decades of Councils have condemned our last working-class neighborhoods to be replaced by expensive condos. That’s something our preservationists and affordable housing advocates can have common cause on. The Council recently declared a car-free, carbon-neutral future–then approved a massive new parking garage. Since then, 5,500 square miles of California have burned, and Cal Poly’s reached a Death Valley high of 120F. In these times, symbolism doesn’t cut it. OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

73


| CANDIDATE FORUM

CITY COUNCIL ANDREA (ANDY) PEASE

CITY COUNCIL JEFFERY SPECHT

It has been my honor to serve on the SLO City Council these past four years and I’m excited to be running for re-election. Despite the challenges of our time, I am confident in a bright future for our community. I have a vision for San Luis Obispo that is sustainable, inclusive and thriving. I have a balanced approach and listen to all perspectives. And, as a council member and a business owner, I have the experience to be effective. We have accomplished a lot over the past four years, and going forward, I will build on that foundation.

As a councilman, I will work to end the culture of waste, corruption and bloated government oozing out of City Hall, as well as put a halt to the division pulling apart our community at its seams. San Luis Obispo needs council members who are accountable to the people, not to buddies in big business and extremist street activism.

Economic recovery: The pandemic has been devastating to so many businesses, and we must focus on recovery. Starting in 2017, we gradually tightened our city budget by almost $9 million and planned for longterm fiscal health, putting us in a stronger position now. After COVID restrictions were put in place, we launched OpenSLO with parklets, streamlined permitting and small grants. I will continue this work to retain local businesses, while supporting head-of-household jobs, helping address child care for working families and maintaining essential services for all our residents. Housing: Our council embedded new projects with requirements for affordability and giving priority to locals, so more people who work here can afford to live here. Access to local housing supports business, reduces carbon emissions and is a keystone of social equity, and I will continue to promote housing options, walkable neighborhoods and great access for transit and biking. Homelessness: We strengthened partnerships with the county, non-profit agencies and the community to the establish and maintain the 40 Prado homeless services center, and we added social services in the field. We must do more, and I support developing transitional housing, deploying social workers to those in crisis and advocating for mental health services for all who need it. Climate action: We established the ambitious target of carbon neutral by 2035. We led our region in adopting community choice energy, so we are now receiving carbon-free electricity, supporting an equitable green economy and saving our residents money. I’ll continue the work of climate action through open space, urban forestry, sustainable transportation and energy efficiency. Diversity, equity and inclusion: Underpinning all this work is my commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion. We must ensure all of our residents have a voice and access to opportunity. I ask for your vote this November. Thank you so much! 74

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

Our City Council ignores the public while bowing to city staff and supporting large developers and a marijuana mogul. These special interests build atrocities that block our scenic views and grease the wheels to get projects approved. The council also backs a bike riding coalition determined to force people out of cars and onto bicycles. I plan to build a coalition on the council that will fire the city manager and city attorney, slash city employee salaries and place major pension reform on the ballot. We’ll also address the veterans left to rot on the streets and make police hand over body-cam footage when the public requests it. I am running for city council because I care about our community, our residents and justice. As a councilman, I promise to serve the will of the people.


| CANDIDATE FORUM

CITY COUNCIL ABRIANNA TORRES

CITY COUNCIL ROBIN WOLF

Born and raised in San Luis Obispo, I am a small business consultant, former Sheriff ’s Correctional Deputy, former Division One scholar and all-American athlete, and active mentor to the next generation of SLO residents. My strong roots in our City allow me to uniquely understand current issues at hand.

A SLO local born and raised, I grew up on the Central Coast.

In recent months, we’ve seen the “happiest city in America” devolve into a community divided. Our neighbors and friends have been branded as racist, and our police department marginalized. To my core, I stand against racism and bigotry; concurrently, I will not support any group that calls for destruction within our streets. We are in desperate need of diversity of thought; this should not be a “whose side are we on” debate but rather a “how can we work together” conversation. It is time to shine a light on what good law enforcement and first responders do for our community. I will ensure that they have the tools necessary to keep our citizens safe and to continue building a unified culture of transparency and accountability. We’ve also recently experienced how governmental mismanagement, burdensome regulations, and excessive taxes cripple our hard working community members and local businesses in the face of COVID-19. I will prioritize boosting our economic vitality by minimizing these tax increases and regulations. I will also work to ensure that our streets are clean and safe and that homelessness is properly addressed through impactful resource investment. Growing up, our house was a safe haven for foster children. As a longtime renter and newly minted, first-time homeowner in San Luis Obispo, I’m acutely aware of the housing challenges that we face. I plan on re-examining existing assumptions, regulations, and fees to make sure that the City is working in the best interest of the taxpayers. I also plan to rezone and adapt underutilized buildings to accommodate mixed uses, including work-force housing. My guiding goal is to facilitate a prosperous and sustainable future that we can all participate in by empowering residents and enabling opportunities for growth. As a nonpartisan candidate for SLO City Council, I strive to develop forward-thinking, results-driven strategies to unify our community. Our City needs voices of reason.

This year, San Luis Obispo residents have many choices in their candidates for SLO City Council. I am unique in my two-plus decades working in restaurants, hospitality, and tourism. My time spent in our public facing businesses offer a unique skill set and perspective into the largest economic force in our area. One that provides a living for many of our residents and is vital to our City. I have learned to listen and to bridge divides between people to ensure everyone has a seat at the table. Our community faces many challenges in 2020, and there is none more timely and far reaching than the recovery and success of our local economy and businesses. There is not a single member of our community unaffected by this threat. We are a bustling tourist community and the effects of Covid-19 have been nothing short of devastating, with many of our long-standing businesses fighting to survive. I have been on the ground since day one of the pandemic, adapting and pivoting entire business models to fight for ownership and employees alike. We need representation on City Council that is prepared to fight this battle with creative problem solving and the insider knowledge of someone familiar with the nuts and bolts of our service industries and the tough work ahead. I am that candidate. My priorities in office include: Economic Recovery and Vitality, Workers and Jobs, Civil Rights, Health and Safety for All, Environmental Stewardship, Affordable Housing and Renter’s Rights, and Transparency and Accountability in Elected Officials and Law Enforcement. I am dedicated to greater community engagement in local government, especially our youth and traditionally underrepresented voices. In this time, we need new and creative approaches to support local businesses and workers facing an uncertain future. I am a worker. I am a renter. I understand the struggle we undertake to make San Luis Obispo our home. City Government should be transparent and inclusive and serve the people always. I am fiercely committed to making sure each community member is heard, valued, respected, and engaged. Join me as we work together for a successful SLO for All!

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

75


| HEALTH

feast freely Does indulging in a holiday feast have a lasting impact on overall health? BY LAUREN HARVEY

H 76

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

oliday traditions vary from culture to culture, family to family, but one commonality seems to be universal among them all—a celebration centered around a feast: A meal shared with friends and relatives, consisting of a wide variety of appetizers, sides, entrees, and of course, dessert. For the health conscious, the prospect of engaging in such a gluttonous occasion may spark some concern. I wondered how indulging in a holiday

| OCT/NOV 2020

feast actually affected a person’s weight, blood sugar, and general health. It’s no secret extravagant meals are often advertised as the culprit for inevitable weight gain. Although indulging in a feast carries this undesirable connotation, this doesn’t mean it’s a scientifically backed truth. With the hope that my research findings may grant some medically justifiable permission to feast, I set out to answer this question: For the person in average health, did eating a holiday feast really incur a negative impact on general health? >>

LAUREN HARVEY is a creative writer fueled by a love of cooking, adventure, and naps in the sun.


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

77


of older adults at risk for Type 2 diabetes. The study, co-authored by Loretta DiPietro, a professor at George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health, found that “short post-meal walks were even more effective at lowering blood sugar after dinner than a single 45-minute walk taken at mid-morning or late in the afternoon.” As postdoctoral research fellow Andrew Reynolds explains, “The muscles we use to walk use glucose as energy, drawing it out of circulation and therefore reducing how much is floating around.” A short walk can combat the effects of blood sugar spikes. For those with diabetes or other medical conditions impacted by blood sugar, a walk is not sufficient replacement for doctor-approved medical treatments. In addition to balancing your blood sugar, walking after your feast provides digestive benefits. Sheri Colberg-Ochs, a researcher at Old Dominion University explains, “Exercise stimulates peristalsis, which is the process of moving digested food through the GI tract.” A short walk helps your feast move through your digestive system, which could help relieve some bloating or the overfull feeling we experience after a larger-than-life holiday meal. Hopefully, this provides peace of mind— to enjoy the meal and focus more on what you can do after you put the fork down, rather than scrutinizing everything that goes on your plate.

#1

MYTH BUSTED

Dr. Stephen Juraschek, a primary care physician at Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center in Boston, breaks down the science behind what actually happens to your body when you enjoy a big meal. One common shortterm effect includes the overstuffed feeling caused by your stomach physically expanding to accommodate large amounts of food. Other short-term effects include spikes in blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol markers—the aftermath of eating starchy foods high in carbs as they convert into glucose. However, these spikes are temporary and “should come down, usually within a couple of hours,” says Dr. Juraschek. While these processes happen after the consumption of any meal, the effects are amplified the more we eat. Dawn Jackson Blather, RD, provides some myth-busting insight on the long-term effects of holiday feasting, “What you’re [eating] for a holiday here and there is not going to have any lasting impact on health and weight if you’re getting back to your normal healthy-ish eating afterward.” And, as Dr. Juraschek adds, “It’s really more of a long-term pattern of eating that we worry about.” It seems then, one feast will not make or break your general health. Instead, it’s the rest of the year, and all those days between holiday feasts that truly impact our long-term health, despite what diet culture may want you to believe.

#2

MOVE WITH INTENT

While lounging on the couch after a Thanksgiving feast may seem like the best way to recover, prefacing your relaxation with a ten- to fifteen-minute walk can help your body recover even faster. A 2013 study published by The American Diabetes Association observed the effects of a fifteen-minute treadmill walk on the blood sugar levels 78

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

#3

STAY STEADY

Everyone has their own strategies leading up to the big feast. Some people fast all day, in an effort to save room for the big meal, while some boost their exercise in a preemptive strike against excessive calories. Still others decide to fully embrace the feast, complete with post-meal nap. So what’s the best strategy? Registered dietitian Leslie Bonci says, “Fasting [before the feast] is typically not a good idea.” Instead of starving your body in anticipation, try to stick to your everyday meal schedule, “but stop eating four to six hours before the main event.” Staying as consistent as possible with your eating and exercise habits may be the key to holiday feasting without feeling too full to move. A small study, led by University of Michigan graduate student Alison Ludzki, asked participants to consume thirty percent more calories daily for seven days while maintaining their normal exercise routine. The results of this early study aren’t enough for anything definite, however, researchers found that “a week of gluttony did not affect glucose tolerance” in participants who exercised regularly. Additionally, the research showed that consuming excess calories “had no effect on markers of inflammation in volunteers blood or tissue samples…[and] no change in lipolysis, a chemical process by which the body breaks down fats.” This study and its initial findings support the notion promoted by many dietitians—consistency, more than anything, is key. According to McKenzie Flinchum, RD, LD/N, “There is no need to add extra workouts to burn off calories or skip meals; just go back to your [daily] healthy diet and workout regimen.” It seems then, that consistent exercise promotes greater metabolism, enabling your body to better handle gastronomic anomalies like a holiday feast. If you are feeling sluggish, Flinchum suggests focusing “on consuming a lot of veggies and lean protein the next day.” This acts to balance out what is already being digested in your system. Here, steadiness, balance and being kind to your body is paramount to feasting freely. >>


Commercial | Residential LIC 772045

nkbuildersinc.com

805-544-4457

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

79


outdoor spin

LO S E W EIG HT . BU R N FAT G ET IN SHAP E BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

FOR MOR E INFOR MATIO N EM A I L U S AT INFO@R E VSLO.CO M

outdoor boot camp, tnt turn n burn

SLO L I F E SPE C I AL 5 0 % O FF MO NTHLY MEMBERSH IP T H RU NOV EMBE R 20 20 3,000 SQ FT OF NEW TURF OFFERING TRAINING FOR ATHLETES, STUDENTS, KIDS

755 Alphonso Street . SLO [off Broad Street]

8420 El Camino Real . Atascadero

805.439.1881

80

|

revslo.com

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

#4

ENJOY EVERY MOMENT

The holiday season is just beginning, so let us not forget the reason for our feast-centered gatherings. Raphael Konforti, Youfit Health Club’s national director of fitness, provides us with an important reminder to put it all in perspective, “One salad doesn’t make you healthy just like one delicious [holiday] dinner doesn’t make you unhealthy.” It’s with this in mind that we arrive at the crux of our findings—enjoying a holiday feast is not detrimental to overall health. As Flinchum states, “Indulging on [a holiday feast] will absolutely not ruin your diet.” Flinchum expresses the most important sentiment as such: “Enjoying the holiday events and festivities is all part of living a balanced and healthy lifestyle.” So next time you feel a pang of guilt for loading your plate at a holiday dinner, or someone throws a critical You’re-going-to-eat-all-that? comment your way, you can answer confidently, with a smile, “Yes, yes I am.” Stay present in the moment and enjoy the feast, however you choose to celebrate it. After all, it’s occasions like this that we cherish as some of our fondest traditions, whether your holiday feast is a buffet of secret family recipes, ordered prepared from a grocery store, or picked up curbside as takeout. No matter how your holiday looks, enjoy it and remember you have permission to feast freely!

FINAL WORD Our daily diet and exercise routines affect our overall health more greatly than one day of all-out feasting. Enjoy the moment, stay consistent in exercise, and embrace the blessing of a holiday feast. As always, attend to individual health conditions as directed by your doctor. Happy holidays! SLO LIFE


3076 Duncane Lane . San Luis Obispo 805 549 0100

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

81


| TASTE

Ribs

THE SWEETEST WAY TO GET TENDER AT THE BONE

BY JAIME LEWIS

A

s a treat to my husband last spring, I indulged in a box of high-quality locallyraised meat from Larder Meat Company. The box arrived on my doorstep, beautifully curated with a seasoning pouch, recipe card, and enough tasty cuts to keep my beloved wellfed for a long time. I called Larder’s owner and local food champion Jensen Lorenzen to ask how to cook the plate ribs in the shipment. He patiently explained how to prepare them, and I followed his instructions to the letter, filling the house with the aroma of garlic and thyme. Then I dutifully brought them out to the grill to finish with a gentle sear. My mistake was small but fatal: I walked away from the ribs. Who knows why? Maybe to start a load of laundry, check my email, or 82

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

prep some veggies; I don’t remember. What I do remember is discovering an angry column of smoke streaming from the lid of the grill. My precious ribs had caught fire and no one had been there to save them. I lifted the lid and looked to grab what remained with my tongs. The smoldering nub I found after the smoke cleared resembled a hockey puck. Since then, I’ve decided to leave ribs to the experts. I recently visited three local establishments that specialize in ribs, each in their own special way. >>

JAIME LEWIS writes about food, drink, and the good life from her home in San Luis Obispo. Find her on Instagram/Twitter @jaimeclewis.


STICK TO YOUR RIBLINE I walk into the Ribline in Grover Beach with my kids during a break in their homeschooling, and I try to turn it into an educational experience. Owner Brian Appiano makes the teachable moment extremely tasty for us. Since Appiano purchased The Ribline in 2010, the hottest menu items are ribs and tri-tip. (“Everybody wants tri-tip in this town,” he says with a grin.) He explains the differences between St. Louis Style ribs, baby back ribs, and spare ribs on a pig, and plate ribs and short ribs on a cow. Two towers of ribs arrive, rubbed with The Ribline’s universal seasoning (which goes on their fries, chicken dishes, etc.) then cooked low and slow before being sauced. The beef ribs are meatier, with more umami saltiness, while the baby back ribs are juicy, delicate, and sweet. Appiano mentions that his ribs have gone undefeated in so many Cal Poly rib cook-offs that none of the competition even bothered to show up the last three years. I grab a toothpick and tell him I’m not at all surprised.>>

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

83


HEY BIG MAMA When I meet manager Kelly Ahumada at G. Brothers Smokehouse in SLO, she tells me her last name means “smoked,” which is a happy coincidence at this wellknown BBQ joint near Cal Poly. She introduces me to the owner, Leo Garcia, who explains the different styles they prepare, including Texas BBQ, Kansas City BBQ, and others. As for ribs, he says they go through about 150 pounds of ribs each week. “Have you met Big Mama yet?” Ahumada asks me, and Garcia walks us over to a very serious looking smoker. I peak inside Big Mama and find several racks of dryrubbed ribs lounging there. Garcia tells me these ribs will be smoked four hours before being served; they won’t be sauced unless someone asks for it. I ask for it on my spare ribs, and take an order home with me. Sticky, tender, smoky, and sweet, the ribs go beautifully with two slices of Texas toast and coleslaw for lunch. >>

84

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


TEN is on aismission to amplify locallocal voices working to better our community. Ten OVER Over Studio on a mission to amplify voices in need. thisend, end,we weare aredonating donatingthe thefollowing following ad ad space space to local nonprofit ToTothis nonprofitorganizations organizationsininneed. need. Together,we wecan canleave Leave World Better Than Found Together, theThe world better than weWe found it. It.

TENO V ERSTUDIO. COM T E N O V E RS T UD IO. C O M

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

85


HIGH ON THE HOG Like G. Brothers, Oddette Augustus doesn’t sauce her ribs. “The meat should stand on its own,” she says, and adds: “That should tell you something because I’m the sauce lady and I’m saying that.” Indeed, Miss Oddette’s Creole Kitchen has been pumping out BBQ sauce for seventeen years on the Central Coast. Based out of Paso Robles, Augustus is a certified canner as well as a caterer. Lately, she’s been preparing meal deals to feed four people, and her ribs are famous, so I got in on that deal. I pulled up at Haven Properties where she does a little pop-up in the parking lot every other week to receive a hefty rack of pork back ribs plus a container of killer creamy potato salad. I also picked up a jar of her “Special Report” BBQ sauce. She tells me she learned how to make it from her “Granga,” her grandma Hazel. The ribs, she says, are seasoned very simply, then put in the smoker for four hours. Then she cures each rack in foil before selling to customers. At home, I unload the rack of ribs, the potato salad, and the sauce (which I end up using on the ribs because it’s so delicious) and then I dig in. The combination is sweet and salty, the magic formula that makes ribs taste so irresistibly good. SLO LIFE 86

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020


Custom lighting fixtures proudly made by hand right here on the Central Coast.

HANS DUUS BLACKSMITH INC

2976 INDUSTRIAL PARKWAY . SANTA MARIA . 805-570-0019 HANSDUUS@GMAIL.COM . HANSDUUSBLACKSMITH.COM OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

87


| WINE NOTES

take a chance BY ANDRIA MCGHEE

W

hen we are out wine tasting, we hear the names Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and Pinot Grigio all the time. I thought I would invite Lagrein, a red wine grape variety, to the party and introduce you to a new flavor palette. It’s similar to Petite Sirah though it stands on its own with a dark berry twist. See the potential in a new friend and find out if it’s a match.

Originally, the thick-skinned grape was grown in the northern Italian region called Alto Adige (high up). Known as the meeting point of the Alpine and the Mediterranean and one of Italy’s smallest wine growing regions, it nuzzles up to beautifully jagged peaks of the Dolomites on the Swiss and Austrian border. The region is known for their aromatic whites, such as Riesling and Pinot Grigio—Lagrein is similarly fragrant and won’t disappoint. The soil is

88

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

laced with limestone, similar to the famous soil in Paso Robles where we find Lagrein locally grown in French Camp Vineyards. Wines from Lagrein grapes tend to be strong and full-bodied with flavors of plum and wild cherry. When made well, Lagrein wines can offer an interesting, off-the-beaten-path alternative to more well-known wines like those made from Cabernet Sauvignon. Our local winemakers have made something truly lovely with these bold, dark berry flavors. >>

ANDRIA MCGHEE received her advanced degree in wines and spirits from WSET in London and enjoys travel, food, wine, and exercise as a means to enjoy those around her.


WIRELESS INTERNET FOR THE CENTRAL COAST NO CONTRACTS . NO DATA LIMITS INSTALLATION ONLY $99

8 0 5 . 5 5 6 . 4 065 | peakw i fi . com

Reserve your seat now: unlock-potential.com Our next program series begins 2021

Facilitated by Lynne Biddinger & Jennifer Porcher

Women’s Leadership Program Transform your life and leadership ....................................................................................

up

This program will develop key leadership

unlock-potential

skills, build professional connections, encourage

LEADERS • TEAMS • CULTURE

unlock-potential.com

personal growth and teach the value of reflection.

Who should attend Emerging women leaders, managers and entrepreneurs looking to grow their leadership skills, maximize their impact and build a strong community with other women leaders. OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

89


Alapay Cellars 2018 Lagrein // $39 Silver SF Wine Competition Are you still wondering about this elusive grape? Stroll down First Street in Avila Beach and you’ll find Alapay Cellars. Take a moment and taste their 2018 Legrein on the patio. Alapay, a Chumash word for heavenly, captures the meaning with their tasty wine and friendly tasting room staff—the perfect fit for the flip flop culture of this tight-knit coastal community. Winemaker Scott Remmenga was printing so many wine labels at his printing company, he decided to learn winemaking from one of the best, Clay Brock. His winemaking skills and wife Rebecca’s marketing made a fantastic blend for this winery. They started with dirt lots surrounding their tasting room, waving people in, and continue to have a loyal following.

Piedra Creek 2019 Lagrein Rosé // $26 Double Gold 95 points Rosé Experience 2020 In 1983, after successfully experimenting with winemaking at their Southern California home in Westlake, retired aerospace engineer Romeo Zuech and his wife Margaret decided to relocate to San Luis Obispo where they began making wine in the smallest bonded winery in Edna Valley—Piedra Creek. The move was largely in part due to a long-time friendship with Andy MacGregor, a fellow aerospace engineer who had planted a vineyard in the Edna Valley. While the Zuechs decided to harvest and produce Chardonnay for their first wine under the Piedra Creek label, in 1999 they purchased two acres in the Twin Creeks area of Edna Valley and planted Lagrein, Syrah, Dornfelder, Teraldego, and Pinot Noir vines. After growing up on the scene with his grandparents and graduating from the viticulture program at Cal Poly, T.J. de Jony began working alongside his family, and in 2014 suggested making a 100% varietial Lagrein wine. By 2016, de Jony’s grandmother, Margaret, successfully petitioned the FDA to approve the Lagrein grape variety in the United States. In 2017, after his gradfather’s passing, de Joney became owner of Piedra Creek Winery and in 2018 they produced their first Rosé of Lagrein. Romeo was knows for saying, “Good wine was meant to be red,” but this rosé may have changed his mind. Its basket full of strawberry flavor bowls me over. The thick Lagrein skins make a medium pink color and perfect body for the kind of wine sipped on a porch or with barbecue. Want to raise a glass? Give Margaret a call, she’ll take care of you. 90

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

The 2018 Lagrein brings me right back to Italy. Its smell wraps me up in a velvety mulberry blanket. It’s full-bodied, dark berried with a typical blueberry homage. The earthy tones pair so well with nice steaks and pasta. This is a smooth operator with a body that will hold you close and fruit to make it flirty, just like a good dance partner.

Tobin James 2015 Lagrein // $48 Speaking of good dance partners, everyone wants to cut in when dancing with Tobin James. He has been a part of the Central Coast lifestyle for years. James worked in a small wine shop where he met Gary Eberle, acting as his winery’s distributor. James secured a spot in the harvest with Eberle and moved to Paso a few years later. Eberle, well known for lovely wines, took a chance on someone passionate to learn the same trade. James won awards his first year out and started as winemaker at Peachy Canyon while dreaming up the Tobin James label. Along came Claire and Lance Silver to the team and now they have a combo for some seriously good wine. Their casual attitude along with the old saloon feel of the winery make their wine approachable. You can choose a range of wine from easy-drinking to special occasions. The 2015 Lagrein, with an impressive five years of aging, has supple tannins and blackberry flavor that glide right over the tongue and enhance food. The flavors of blueberry continue to linger, the same way we linger with good company. SLO LIFE


V O TE

REVERSE MORTGAGES Extra Income . Tax Free Cash Out . No Payments Medical Needs . Retirement Planning

S A N DR A MA R S H ALL FO R

Enhanced Lifestyle . Federally Insured All Types of Owner Occupied Properties

SAN L U I S OB I S PO MAY OR Putting the People of SLO first!

SANDRA MARSHALL

SC F

committed to protecting

SECURED CAPITAL FINANCIAL

OPEN SPACE, COMMUNITY & the ENVIRONMENT

Real Estate Loans ESTABLISHED 1997

Visit . www.sandramarshall.org Write . sandramarshall1011@gmail.com Donate . P.O. Box 3436 . SLO . CA . 93403

WE ARRANGE REVERSE MORTGAGES

531 MARSH STREET . SUITE A SAN LUIS OBISPO . CA 93401 P 805.594.1050 F 805.594.0626 NMLS# 345506, 269870

Sustainable Materials

|

PAID FOR BY SANDRA MARSHALL-EMINGER FOR SAN LUIS OBISPO CITY MAYOR

General Contracting Services

111 South Street, San Luis Obispo (805) 543-9900

|

Custom Cabinet Shop

All under one roof.

|

Interior Designers

CA Contractor License #940512

slogreengoods.com OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

91


| BREW

MARKET TRENDS BY BRANT MYERS

S

eltzers have been slowly taking over the beer aisles across our grocery and liquor stores, so when will their reign of terror end? Not likely soon from the look of things. As a matter of fact, it seems that the industry is trending more and more towards “lifestyle” beverages that represent a growing consumer base of people who enjoy the social aspect of drinking beer, but aren’t fully on board with the flavor or alcohol within them. I’m not judging, I also drink water sometimes when I don’t feel like beer. But what happens when the beer industry makes something that doesn’t look like beer, taste like beer, or have alcohol in it? Let’s take some sips of the growing trend that is not-beers. I’m a huge proponent of personal health and wellness, so there are some conflicts of interest when I’m also a huge proponent of full-

92

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

fledged craft beer. That being said, why not have a “Sober October” or a thirty-day cleanse after New Year’s Eve if it makes you feel better? Maybe you just want to wake up tomorrow morning and go for a ride or jog instead of craving a breakfast burrito and mimosa. There is a compromise available: non-alcoholic (NA) beer. And if the predictors are correct, you’re going to be seeing a lot of these in the future. Already, Heineken has their 0.0 beer with a huge marketing budget pushing it across social media and traditional platforms, taking the success of their rival’s Bud Light Ultra to the next level by making an even healthier post-workout drink. Aside from them, the big news in big brews is that Sam Adams posted record profits from selling seltzers and hard kombucha last year and will be following up those successes with a new NA Hazy IPA. Imagine that, a craft brewery making nonalcoholic IPAs. I have a feeling this will trickle down fast through the smaller breweries and we’ll be seeing them en masse soon enough. Obviously, the global brewing conglomerates have the resources and >>


TO HAVE & TO HOLD BRIDAL SALON SPECIALIZES IN AIRBRUSH MAKEUP, HAIR DESIGN, SALON SERVICES, AS WELL AS BRIDAL ROBES AND HAIR ACCESSORIES. WE INVITE YOU TO EXPERIENCE OUR UNIQUE SETTING IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SLO. TUESDAY - SATURDAY BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 1075 COURT STREET, SUITE 204, SAN LUIS OBISPO 805.459.8323 | tohaveandtoholdbridalsalon.com

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

93


infrastructure to try new things and test them in the market, so it’s always a foreshadowing of things to come when they toy with new trends and find profits in their gambles. AB InBev has said that within five years their portfolio will be twenty percent low- and non-alcohol beverages. Even Molson Coors, the fifth largest brewing concern in the world, has taken this challenge head on, as evidenced by their name change from Molson Coors Brewing Company to Molson Coors Beverage Company. I mean, that’s actually a pretty huge shift to change your business model, let alone your name. You’ll be seeing their flavored seltzer water with probiotics, and diet sodas with ingredients like yuzu and bourbon vanilla. What is going on here?! Those are fruits that go in my IPA and adjuncts for my Imperial Stouts. Has the world gone mad? Although it does look like they made a Dr. Pepper knockoff called Surgeon General, which is bold. I like to laugh; it keeps me from crying about the shelf space lost. Speaking of shelf space, there’s some skinny buggers that have been squeaking onto the shelves for the past year and knocking down everything in the way. Malt liquor. Well, technically malt-based beverages, because it’s not brown and poured out of a forty-ounce bottle but instead clear, in slim cans, and with hints of fruity essences. Hard seltzers are squeezing the competition with their perception as a low calorie, low ABV alternative to beer. And maybe, in this era of La Croix fandom and treat-yo-self wellness routines, it hit the cultural timing perfectly to carve out a niche that sent the large manufacturers scrambling for a piece of the pie. Just ask the maker of the second best-selling seltzer brand Truly—Sam Adams Beer Company. Ole Sam’s at it again. If you really want to get into the weeds with me, I think it has more to do with a tax loophole allowing brewers to maximize their profits and reduce costs associated with brewing or high-priced hops purchases, since both malt- and sugar-based hard seltzers are considered “beer,” but only malt-based hard seltzers are also considered “malt beverages.” This means that federal beer rules (27 CFR Part 25) apply to both malt94

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

and sugar-based hard seltzers, but federal malt beverage labeling and advertising rules (27 CFR Part 7) apply only to malt-based hard seltzers. Water plus malt or cane sugar plus fruit flavor equal profits! Whatever the trend may be, I guess being spoiled for choice isn’t the worst thing in the world. The craft beer industry had years of the fashion industry business model of having new trends and fads for the season, with whatever was new becoming the must-have of the time. Chasing those hype beers and hopped freshies was exhausting but also exhilarating. I guess the beverage industry wants to keep us running, and maybe they just want us to be in better shape and with good gut health, but maybe they’re also just giving the people what they want. Whatever it may be I just have one last gripe: stop making the cans skinny. It doesn’t make us skinny and they don’t fit our BRANT MYERS is a beer koozies. Rant over. Whatever industry veteran and flavor or ABV fluid you put in founder of SLO BIIIG, a your mouth, raise one up, and this hospitality consulting firm. time we can say it with sincerity— To your health! SLO LIFE


D E M U S CON A PODCAST

Join SLO Life food columnist Jaime Lewis for candid conversations about life and flavor with area eaters, drinkers, thinkers & makers.

S P OT I F Y

A PPLE P O DC A S T S

LET SGETCONSUMED.COM

OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

95


| HAPPENINGS

Culture & Events CAMBRIA SCARECROW FESTIVAL The eleventh annual community-wide array of hundreds of eclectic scarecrows offers five display areas and lots of fun for visitors and Cambrians alike. All displays are positioned and spaced in specific, well-defined areas to make them easily viewed by parking and walking. Scarecrow Walks in the East Village, Mid-Village, West Village, the Pinedorado Grounds, and San Simeon can be easily enjoyed. October 1-31 // cambriascarecrows.com

ACADEMY OF CREATIVE THEATRE As school resumed in the fall, the folks at San Luis Obispo Rep added more ACT classes so as many students as possible could learn about theatre, including daytime classes for homeschool families and students with a flexible school schedule. Spaces (and scholarships) are available for twice-per-week Session II classes beginning October 12 for between six and eight students each. All theatre games, warmups, exercises, rehearsals, and in-class activities include exposure to other elements of theatre such as scenic, costume, and prop design as well as multi-media elements. October 12 - November 5 // slorep.org

WIGGLE WAGGLE WALK A virtual fundraiser for Woods Humane Society isn’t just for walkers . . . you can run, kayak, bike, stroll, meander—whatever! And anyone, anywhere can participate. Sign up as an individual or as part of a team, then set your challenge. Enjoy weekly challenges, activity tracking, fun giveaways, and more. Now until October 31 // woodshumanesociety.org 96

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

RAPTORS, RATS, AND YOU Rodents can be a nuisance and a health hazard if they take up residence in the wrong places. And while poisoning them may seem like a simple solution, the repercussions are far different. Poisons designed to kill rats also poison wildlife, pets, and children. Join the San Luis Obispo Botanical Garden via Zoom to welcome Morro Coast Audubon Society President Judy Neuhauser and a special guest, a great horned owl, to learn how beautiful birds of prey are threatened by the widespread use of rat poison, and how you can promote natural raptor predation of pests. October 10 // slobg.org

ELECTION 2020 Every registered voter in San Luis Obispo County will receive a 2020 Presidential Election ballot in the mail, which can be returned to be counted in one of the following ways: by mailing via the United States Postal Service; by hand-delivering your ballot to one of nineteen secure Vote By Mail ballot drop box locations; or by handdelivering your ballot to one of twentythree Voter Service Centers open during the four days of voting, October 31 to November 3. Go to the County ClerkRecorder’s website to look up your voter registration status, to track your ballot, or to find Vote By Mail ballot drop box and Voter Service Center locations. Now until November 3 // slocounty.ca.gov


At t en t i on , Sm al l B u s i n e s s Ow n e r s ... Looking for a professional, convenient, affordable, and fully furnished individual office with conference room access? Individual Offices & Suite Rentals • Affordable month-to-month rent • Conference Rooms, Break Room, Copy Center • Ideal location with easy freeway access • On-site parking • High Speed Internet and Utilities included

Let us manage the details, so you can manage your business.

SAN LUIS BUSINESS CENTER

WE HELP SMALL BUSINESSES GROW!

C all to sc h e du le y o u r to u r o f available spac e s !

(8 0 5) 5 4 0-5 10 0

4251 S. H i gu e r a Str e e t | Su i te 800 | San Lu i s Ob is po

Smiling makes the world a better place and Dr. Daniel is here to help bring out your best. Give us a call to schedule your appointment today!

S p e c i a l i z i n g i n S m i l es

Dr. Daniel Family Orthodontics 1356 Marsh Street . San Luis Obispo (805) 543-3105 . drdanielortho.com OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

97


| HAPPENINGS

Culture & Events ART AT THE GARDEN SHOW & FUNDRAISER The second annual fine art show and sale to benefit the San Luis Obispo Botanical Garden opens with a wine, appetizer, and chocolate reception on Friday, November 6. The show continues through the weekend and features twenty well-known local artists. The free event, held in the Oak Glen Pavilion at the Garden, includes oneof-a-kind jewelry, glass, paintings, wood, ceramics, and wearable textiles. November 6-8 // slobg.org

Theatre Classes for All Ages! New socially-distant curriculum with approved Covid-19 safety protocols

Sign up today at slorep.org

OPEN SLO The City of San Luis Obispo is allowing businesses to expand their footprints into streets and to use other strategies to improve safety and access for residents jogging, bicycling, and strolling downtown. Temporary “parklets,” using water-filled barricades and other materials, have allowed businesses to use parking lanes on a daily basis. The block of Monterey Street between Chorro and Morro Streets is closed to eastbound car traffic, allowing for outdoor dining on half the street. Ongoing // openslo.org

SLOLIFE SWINGING

FOR THE FENCES

ON THE

live the SLO LIFE!

RISE

HEALTH

WORDS TO

LIVE BY

BEHIND THE

SCENES

magazine HEATING UP

SUMMER

OUTDOOR

LIVING

AFTER

HOURS

NOW HEAR

THIS MEET BILL

JUN/JUL 2014

OSTRANDER

ADVENTURE, PASSION & POLITICAL ACTION

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! slolifemagazine.com 98

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

WEDNESDAY WORKDAYS Every Wednesday morning EcoSlo volunteers go to work from 8:45 to 10:15 am at Irish Hills Natural Reserve, Prefumo Canyon Road & Isabella Way, in San Luis Obispo, building new trails in city-owned open space. Want to help? Meet in the south corner of The Home Depot parking lot to work on trail maintenance and brushing. Every Wednesday // ecoslo.org

PHOTO COURTESY OF SENSORIO

SENSORIO Looking for a romantic retreat, or just some family fun? Bruce Munro: Field of Light at Sensorio in Paso Robles is open for visits. The weekly schedule for the event, singled out by The New York Times as one of “Fifty Places To Go in 2020,”now includes Thursday and Sunday evenings. Visitors can watch the sunset and stroll through the fifteen-acre site as 58,000 solarpowered lights appear across the landscape. Now until January 3 // sensoriopaso.com


OCT/NOV 2020 |

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

|

99


LUXURY with STYLE

Lorem ipsum

HAVEN PROPERTIES Distinctive Collection by Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate

®

offers the service and market experience you'd expect from a brand whose legacy was built upon a passion for the home. Bringing together LOCAL knowledge and experience with the global marketing and media network of the most trusted brand in real estate, it's Lorem ipsum

100

|

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| OCT/NOV 2020

easy to see how HAVEN PROPERTIES is the clear choice for your distinctive listing.

Lorem ipsum Lorem ipsum

BHGREHAVEN.COM


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.