I Value Sport - Values based education for children

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RESPECT COMPASSION HONESTY RESPONSIBILITY FAIRNESS 6-8 9-11 12-14

I VALUE SPORT – Values based education for children

Authors: Nina Makuc, Marija Andjelković, Gabriela Andrieasu, Nenad Dikić, Elisa Engels, Alex Gheondea, Andrei Valeriu Micle, David Senft, Charles Thomas, Janko Dvoršak

Published by: Slovenian Anti-Doping Organisation

Design by: Neža Tomori Kontrec Illustrated by: Marko Kočevar Proofread by: AMIDAS d.o.o.

Reviewed by: Tanja Kajtna Printed by: Tiskarna ŽNIDARIČ

Year of publication: 2022 No. of copies: 25 Co-funded by the Erasmus+ programme of the European Union

CIP - Kataložni zapis o publikaciji Narodna in univerzitetna knjižnica, Ljubljana

37.013:17 796-053.2

I value sport : values based education for children / [authors Nina Makuc ... [et al.] ; illustrated by Marko Kočevar]. - Ljubljana : Slovenian Anti-Doping Organisation, 2022

ISBN 978-961-95153-6-5 COBISS.SI-ID 121327363

Lesson plans 1-41 I-XII CONTENT OF THE TOOLKIT CONTENT OF THE TOOLKIT Instructions for teachers Lesson plans Age group 6-8 I-XII 1-41 42-84 Age group 9-11 Age group 12-14 42-84 85-114 85-114 115 115 Details about the I Value project

I VALUE SPORTI VALUE SPORT

INSTRUCTIONS FOR TEACHERSINSTRUCTIONS FOR TEACHERS

The ”I VALUE SPORT” toolkit helps teachers provide values-based education in schools. Recognising the multiple demands placed on teachers, resources have been prepared in a ‘ready to go’ format, so they can be easily implemented. Sport has been used as a context for the resources that will develop values. However, the resources still align with a whole-school approach, which means they are suitable for all pupils, not only student-athletes.

The toolkit includes detailed lesson plans for teachers and various activities and tasks for pupils. Suggestions on how to carry out the activities and online tasks are provided. The lesson plans can be used during various subjects.

I

1. VALUES IN SPORT

I. VALUES IN SPORT

At a broad level, values are the guiding principles in the life of a person or group (Schwartz, 1992). So, when we think of our values, we think of what is important to us in life (Schwartz, 2012). Features of all values (from Schwartz 2012):

(1) Values are beliefs linked inextricably to affect (how we feel). When values are activated, they become infused with feeling (e.g., people for whom fairness is an important value feel bad when they see unfairness).

(2) Values refer to desirable goals that motivate action. People for whom social order, justice, and helpfulness are important values are motivated to pursue these goals.

(4) Values serve as standards or criteria. Values guide the selection or evaluation of actions, policies, people, and events. People decide what is good or bad, justified or illegitimate, worth doing or avoiding, based on the possible consequences for their values. But the impact of values in everyday decisions is rarely conscious. They enter awareness when the actions or judgments one is considering have conflicting implications for the different values one holds.

(3) Values transcend specific actions and situations. Valuing honesty, for example, may be relevant in school, at home, on the sports field, with friends or strangers. This feature distinguishes values from norms and attitudes that usually refer to specific actions, objects, or situations.

(5) Values are ordered by importance relative to one another. People's values form an ordered system of priorities that characterise them as individuals. Do they attribute more importance to fairness or inclusivity? This hierarchical feature also distinguishes values from norms and attitudes.

(6) The relative importance of multiple values guides action. For example, attending church might express and promote tradition and conformity values at the expense of hedonism and stimulation values. The trade-off among relevant, competing values guides attitudes and behaviours (Schwartz, 1992, 1996). Values influence action when they are relevant in the context (hence likely to be activated) and important to the actor.

II

Values are therefore integral in shaping children's behaviour, both now and in future. Based on the scoping review of the literature, which formed an initial stage of the development of this program, five personal values that are recognised across cultures were identified as most important for the Toolkit.

Values are therefore integral in shaping children's behaviour, both now and in future. Based on the scoping review of the literature, which formed an initial stage of the development of this program, five personal values that are recognised across cultures were identified as most important for the Toolkit.

FAIRNESS

Fairness reflects the importance of everyone having an equal opportunity to engage and succeed in activities, without getting an unfair advantage. Fairness also represents a lack of favouritism for one side or another.

RESPECT

Respect means treating others how you would want to be treated. This reflects the quality of being polite, kind, courteous, and tolerant of others’ views, cultures, and beliefs.

III

COMPASSION

Compassion is the quality of protecting and caring about other’s feelings, well-being, and welfare. It reflects supporting, helping and understanding others, particularly in times of need.

HONESTY

Honesty reflects the quality of being truthful toward others and oneself, and being able to be trusted. In life and sport this means that you don't deceive, steal, cheat or lie, and that you communicate your own thoughts and views truthfully, fairly, and respectfully the best you can.

RESPONSIBILITY

Responsibility means taking care of others, our surroundings and ourselves. Being responsible means that you do the things you are expected to do, and that you accept the consequences of your actions.

IV

2. HOW TO USE THE TOOLKIT

2. HOW TO USE THE TOOLKIT

Values pathway poster

The values pathway poster is a map of the entire program, and shows you how lesson plans should be carried out. The poster also allows pupils in your class to name the two main characters. You can place the poster on the wall in your classroom and ask pupils to name the characters, then write the names they choose on the poster.

Lesson plans

The Toolkit is designed as lesson plans with additional activity cards and/or other materials for children (see Chapter 3. Lesson plan design). In general, the toolkit is divided into three age groups: 6 to 8, 9 to 11 and 12 to 14. If you find it appropriate and suitable, you can also use the activities for different age groups than originally planned. Within each age group there are lesson plans for all five values, and basic and advanced options are available. The lesson plan for each value is prepared for one school hour (45 minutes): activities for around 40 minutes + 5 minutes for assessment of learning (see Chapter 6. Assessment of learning). For each activity within the lesson plan the time needed is suggested. However, since the time can vary based on the number of the pupils involved, we encourage you to choose another activity from the same value if you have any time left in the class. The order of lesson plans is given, but you can decide whether to do the advanced option or not. Once pupils have completed all the basic lesson plans in their age group you can reward them with a certificate for the basic level. If you decide to use the advanced lesson plans, pupils can then receive a certificate for the advanced level.

V

Example: You teach a 2nd grade class, which means the pupils fit into the age group category 6 to 8. You ask their 1st grade teacher whether they did the programme in the first year or not.

If the answer is NO, you choose the lesson plans for the age group 6 to 8, basic level. You start with basic lesson plan for fairness, followed by those for respect, compassion, honesty and responsibility. Once you go over all the values you can reward pupils with a certificate for the basic level. Then you can choose to do advanced level of the programme in the same school year, or plan it for the next year.

If the answer is YES, you choose the lesson plans for the age group 6 to 8, advanced level. You start with the advanced lesson plan for fairness, followed by those for respect, compassion, honesty and responsibility. Once you go over all the values you can reward the pupils with a certificate for the advanced level.

If the pupils have already completed the basic and advanced levels you can re-do some of the activities so the values are well anchored.

VI

3. LESSON PLAN DESIGN

3. LESSON PLAN DESIGN

Name of the core value

Definition of the value

Age group and level - there are three age groups (6-8, 9-11 and 12-14) and two levels (basic and advanced)

Title of the lesson plan

Aim of the lesson plan and its activities

Objectives for the lesson plan

Equipment/materials needed - everything you need to implement the activities, and the appendix, can be found at the end of the lesson plan

Values pathway - at which stage of the programme this lesson plan is used

VII
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Title of the activity 10. Detailed instructions for the activity 11. Time needed to implement the activity - the approximate time that you will need to carry out the activity 12. Variation - how you can tailor instructions to change the activity 13. Modification for online use - how can you adapt the activity if the class is taking place online

VIII
9 10 11 12 13
9.

14. APPENDIX VISUAL GUIDES:

Print or copy the Appendix sheet. The number of copies depends on the number of pupils and groups

Cut (or let the pupils cut) the activity cards from the Appendix sheet

Show the Appendix sheet to the pupils

Take the cards from the envelope

Hand out the material to the pupils

If you think you won’t need the Appendix sheet, because the pupils can write the words on a piece of paper themselves or because the example seems too easy and you have an idea for another activity, you can decide not to use the templates in the Appendix.

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14

4. ROLE OF THE TEACHER:

4. ROLE OF THE TEACHER:

The role of the teacher is to:

• Select and adapt the materials and resources in a manner that meets the needs of their class.

• Explain the definition of each value in such a way that pupils will understand and remember it.

• Prepare all the materials needed for a specific task or activity and distribute them to the pupils.

• Explain the tasks or activities to the pupils in such a way that they will understand them. Guide and supervise the class during tasks or activities.

• Start the discussion based on the suggested questions and moderate the answers. You can always add additional examples from situations that happen in your class.

• Observe pupils during the tasks or activities, encourage them to do their best and help them if needed.

• Motivate pupils to participate in the activities and share their own opinions in discussions.

• If you are limited by time or the suggested activities are taking too long, choose between the activities (where there are multiple activities) or extend the lesson plan to an additional school hour.

• Assess pupil's learning (see page XI of the Toolkit).

5. ROLE OF THE PUPILS:

5. ROLE OF THE PUPILS:

The role of the pupils is to:

• Follow instructions for the tasks or activities and participate in discussions.

• Think about their own feelings and express them.

• Recognise different situations related to the task or activity.

• Seek to understand and remember the definition of each value.

• Apply what they learn in everyday life.

X

6. ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING

6. ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING

To wrap up each lesson the last five minutes should be dedicated to the assessment of learning.

For the 6 to 8 age group you can:

• Ask pupils what a specific value means.

• Instruct pupils to draw a picture associated with a specific value.

• Encourage pupils to be more aware of other people's feelings.

• Reflect with pupils on what they have learned by pointing out different situations from the lesson.

For the 9 to 11 age group you can:

• Ask pupils what they think/believe a specific value is.

• Motivate pupils to think about behaviour in line with these values in everyday life and sport, and demonstrate such behaviour.

• Encourage pupils to help people in distress and be kind to each other.

• Discuss with pupils if it is OK to cheat or misbehave even if no one sees them or no one is hurt by such action.

For the 12 to 14 age group you can:

• Ask pupils to identify situations when someone is or is not acting in line with a specific value.

• Ask pupils what they have learned from the lesson that will be important to know three years from now.

• Working together with pupils, recap why rules are important and what are the consequences of breaking them.

5 min

XI

NOTES

7.
XII 7.
NOTES

AGE GROUP 6-8

FAIRNESS

Fairness reflects the importance of everyone having an equal opportunity to engage and succeed in activities, without getting an unfair advantage. Fairness also represents a lack of favouritism for one side or another.

6-8

BASIC

WHAT IS FAIRNESS?

• To introduce the idea of fairness, or fair play, to pupils.

Pupils will:

• Remember the definition of fairness (age-related terminology) and fair play.

• Recognise the importance of fairness through sport and life.

• Be able to recognise and remember positive and negative behaviours that represent fairness.

The lesson plan needs:

• Typical school or craft supplies

• Activity cards (Appendix)

FAIRNESS 6-8 BASIC • 1
˙

Is it fair?

Description of the activity

1. Give pupils a set of activity cards (Appendix) that have an image of an action on one side and a description of the action in words on the other side.

2. After the pupils go through the cards, ask them if those actions seemed fair or unfair.

3. Give them the brief definition of fairness that is written under the title on the previous page. Based on the pupils' level of understanding, you can break the definition down, word by word, until they gain a minimal understanding of the value.

Modification for online use:

Share activity cards (Appendix) on the screen and continue the activity online with the same questions.

Fair hands

Description of the activity

1. Tell the pupils that you will read different statements aloud and that they should show whether they think it is fair or unfair: if fair they raise one hand, and if unfair they cross their arms and form an X.

2. Read the following statements aloud and after each one give the pupils some time to think and then react to the statement with their chosen response. Give positive reinforcement after each correct reaction.

• Giving a smaller pupil a head start in a race.

• A player never having the ball passed to him.

• One pupil gets a bigger piece of cake than the others.

• Helping someone up from the ground after you have accidentally tripped them.

• Not allowing someone to play a game because they are not from your class or group.

• Telling your teammates or friends it's OK to cheat a little to win.

• Playing by the rules.

3. Give the pupils a few more examples from everyday life or from something that happened in your class.

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

20 min

FAIRNESS 6-8 BASIC • 2 20 min
APP.: FAIRNESS 6-8 BASIC ˙ Is it fair? FAIRNESS 6-8 BASIC • 3 A PUPIL TAKES TWO PENCILS INSTEAD OF ONE A PUPIL IS CUTTING IN LINE DURING SCHOOL LUNCH THE SAME PUPIL ALWAYS GOING FIRST
APP.: FAIRNESS 6-8 BASIC ˙ Is it fair? FAIRNESS 6-8 BASIC • 4
GIRL IS CHOOSING ONLY GIRLS FOR HER FOOTBALL TEAM
PUPIL HELPING ANOTHER PUPIL GET UP AFTER A FALL A PUPIL CONGRATULATING ANOTHER PUPIL FROM THE OPPOSITE TEAM AFTER THE GAME
A
A

RESPECT

Respect means treating others how you would want to be treated. This reflects the quality of being polite, kind, courteous, and tolerant of others’ views, cultures, and beliefs.

BASIC

TREAT THE DOG WELL!

• To promote respect as a necessary value when playing.

Pupils will:

• Know the definition of respect (age-related terminology).

• Be aware of the importance of respect (in sport and life).

• Be able to recognise and remember behaviours that demonstrate respect (e.g., being kind).

The lesson plan needs:

• Typical school or craft supplies

6-8 ˙
RESPECT 6-8 BASIC • 5

Treat the dog well! 40 min

Description of the activity

1. The pupils sit in a circle on the floor. The standard classroom setting is also possible. Make sure everyone is comfortable and has enough room to move around. Tell them they will learn what respect is, and write "RESPECT" in capital letters on the board.

2. Have the pupils imagine that they have a dog, and they want to play with it. They should name the dog. Point out that the pupils are now responsible for the well-being of this animal.

3. Ask the pupils, "What will make the dog want to play with you?" (Most likely they will respond with words like love, happiness, toys, food, etc.). Let the pupils draw something that represents their answers on a piece of

4. Write "DOG" on the left side of a board (or another place where everyone can see) and stick the drawings to the board or write down the words from the pupils.

5. Write "FRIEND" on the right side of a board (or another place where everyone can see) and ask the pupils, "What do friends need from you?" (Most likely they will respond with words like trust, interest, toys, playing, friendship, etc.). Again, let the pupils draw something that represents their answers on a piece of paper.

6. As before, stick the drawings to the board or write down the words from the pupils.

7. Ask the pupils about any similar drawings or words on the board. Highlight those drawings which show a positive attitude towards another person or accepting differences, such as love, friendship, and trust. Disregard the other drawings or words. Tell the pupils that those drawings describe what respect is all about.

Variation:

Tell the pupils the day before the activity to bring to class things that their pets and/or friends need.

Modification for online use:

As teacher you need a board or flip chart, where you can write or draw something. Otherwise, it is the same procedure as for the in-person class.

RESPECT 6-8 BASIC • 6

COMPASSION

Compassion is the quality of protecting and caring about others' feelings, well-being, and welfare. It reflects supporting, helping and understanding others, particularly in times of need.

6-8

BASIC

AN INTRODUCTION TO COMPASSION

• To introduce pupils to the value of compassion in general and in sport, so they will be able to recognise the related emotions.

Pupils will:

• Define compassion and understand why it is an important value.

• Recognise ways people show how they feel.

• Recognise situations when we can show compassion (e.g., when someone needs support or help), and how we can show it.

• Typical school or craft supplies

• Acts of compassion pictures (Appendix)

• Range of emotions sketches (Appendix)

• Video player & screen

COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 7
˙

10 minIntroduction to compassion

Description of the activity

1. Show pupils pictures of acts of compassion (Appendix) and ask them what they see in the pictures and what is happening, and then explain to them that these are acts of compassion.

2. Ask pupils if they know what compassion means or what it makes them think of, and how they would describe it with their own words.

You can write words or short sentences from the pupils' answers on the board. Once you have taken all the answers into account, give the brief definition of compassion, as seen on the previous page under the title. Based on the pupils' level of understanding, you can break the definition down into smaller units until the class gains a basic understanding of the value.

3. Compare this definition with the different ideas given by the pupils and note those which express the same or a similar value, or highlight those that mean something different and explain why.

Variation:

You or the pupils act out the scenes shown in the pictures and then carry on with the questions and conversation.

Modification for online use:

The pictures are shared on screen.

Introduction to emotions

Description of the activity

1. Ask pupils to give examples of things that make them angry, sad, or disappointed, and how they would react if they saw someone showing these emotions.

2. Print or copy the set of emoji-like pictures (Appendix) for each pupil, give them examples of situations and ask them to raise a card showing how it makes them feel.

Examples:

• Someone pushes you on the ground.

15 min

Modification for online use:

The pictures are shared on screen.

• Someone compliments you or says that you are nice.

• You trip, fall, and hurt yourself.

• You eat your favourite food.

• Include some examples that have happened in your class.

Variation:

Show pictures of real faces or of familiar cartoon characters (Mickey Mouse smiling, Peppa Pig crying, etc.) instead of emojis.

COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 8

Examples of compassion in sport

Description of the activity

1. Play pupils one or both of the suggested videos in which compassion is shown in different sports situations.

2. Pause the video as suggested - after you have seen the first person struggle and before anyone else has come to comfort them - and ask the pupils the following questions:

• How do you think the person is feeling?

• What is the person doing that lets you know how they feel?

• If you saw a person in this situation, what could you do to help them?

3. Play the rest of the video and at the end pupils can say if they would have done the same or something different, or how they feel about it.

Video 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8zG jLBrWi4&ab_channel=euronews%28enfr an%C3%A7ais%29

A supporter of the defeated team is being comforted by a pupil supporting the winning team who tries to cheer him up. Pause after 5 seconds.

Video 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liCR rheKIOI&ab_channel=JohnChambers

A short distance from the finish line the first runner is losing strength, then his brother reaches out and helps him go all the way to the end, so he gets second place in the race. Pause after 43 seconds.

Modification for online use:

The videos are shared on screen.

15 min
COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 9

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 10 APP.: COMPASSION 6-8
˙
BASIC

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 11 APP.: COMPASSION
˙
6-8 BASIC

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 12 APP.: COMPASSION
˙
6-8 BASIC

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 13 APP.: COMPASSION
˙
6-8 BASIC

Introduction to emotions

COMPASSION 6-8 BASIC • 14 APP.: COMPASSION 6-8
˙
BASIC

HONESTY

Honesty reflects the quality of being truthful toward others and oneself, and being able to be trusted. In life and sport this means that you don't deceive, steal, cheat or lie, and that you communicate your own thoughts and views truthfully, fairly, and respectfully the best you can.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING HONEST

• To teach pupils how to act and communicate truthfully, fairly and respectfully.

Pupils will:

• Get to know values in sport and will be able to recognise the positive ones.

• Be aware of the meaning of honesty in sport and life.

• Remember that being dishonest has consequences (or why being honest is important).

The lesson plan needs:

• Typical school or craft supplies

• "True or false" statements (Appendix)

• Booklet "Mike the little chamois and his first competition" (Appendix)

HONESTY 6-8 BASIC • 15
6-8 ˙ BASIC

Truth or lie

Description of the activity

1. Draw a line in the middle of the classroom (or use the ones in the gym), place the letter T on one side, and L on the other.

2. Play the game "truth or lie": make a statement that the pupils know is true or false (for example: my hair is purple, pupils in our class are taller than pupils in 9th grade, ...). Pupils should walk to the side of the line that represents "truth" or "lie" depending on what they think about the statement.

3. After a few examples from you, encourage pupils to come up with their own statements.

4. After the activity, ask the pupils:

• Why do you think we played this game?

• Did anyone tell a lie?

• Why did they tell a lie?

5. Explain that being truthful is important and that telling a lie can have bad consequences and hurt someone's feelings.

Variation:

The activity can also be used online.

Modification for online use:

Print or copy the "true or false" statements (Appendix) and hand them to the pupils. The pupils should take a look at the pictures and circle true or false for each statement based on what they see. When they have finished explain to them why being truthful is important, and that telling a lie can have bad consequences and hurt someone's

15 min
HONESTY 6-8 BASIC • 16

Mike the little chamois and his first competition

Description of the activity

1. Read the book to the pupils (or pupils can do it on their own) (Appendix).

2. Discuss the book with pupils, and point out any parts of the story that are related to kindness, cheating, fairness, love for sport, etc.

3. Ask them questions such as:

• Which sport was the little chamois doing?

• Which was the most important competition?

• What did Thomas do during the competition?

• Was what Thomas did OK?

• Who was fastest to the finish line?

• Who was the real winner of the competition?

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

25 min
HONESTY 6-8 BASIC • 17

Mike the little chamois and his first competition

APP.: HONESTY
˙
6-8 BASIC
HONESTY 6-8 BASIC • 18

THERE ARE FOUR CHILDREN PLAYING VOLLEYBALL.

TRUE FALSE

A GIRL IS PLAYING ON THE SLIDE. TRUE FALSE THERE IS A DOG IN THE PICTURE.

TRUE FALSE A GIRL IN A WHEELCHAIR IS PLAYING VOLLEYBALL. TRUE FALSE

A BOY IS EATING A SANDWICH.

TRUE FALSE

APP.: HONESTY 6-8 BASIC ˙ Truth or lie? HONESTY 6-8 BASIC • 19

RESPONSIBILITY

Responsibility means taking care of others, our surroundings and ourselves. Being responsible means that you do the things you are expected to, and accept the consequences of your actions.

6-8

BASIC UNDERSTANDING OF RESPONSIBILITY

• Promoting responsibility as a necessary value when playing.

Pupils will:

• Be aware, remember and recognise responsibility through examples.

• Know the definition of responsibility.

• Have an awareness of the importance of responsibility in life and sport.

• Be able to recognise and remember positive and negative ways to behave responsibly.

The lesson plan needs:

• Playing cards (Appendix)

RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 BASIC • 20
˙ BASIC

Self-responsibility

Description of the activity

1. Write "RESPONSIBILITY" in capital letters on the board and define the term.

2. Show the playing cards (Appendix) to the pupils and explain that each card shows a picture that describes responsibility.

3. Divide the pupils into six groups and tell them that they will have a group discussion.

4. Ask one pupil from each group to pick one card, turn it over and show the other pupils. Give the groups some time to discuss what the card shows.

5. Ask one pupil from each group to explain to the whole class what they believe the picture represents. After they are finished, explain the picture on each card and link it to the idea of responsibility by using the text on the other side as a reference.

6. Start a discussion with the following questions:

• What does responsibility mean in this case?

• What is the role of children?

• What is the role of parents?

• What is the role of coaches?

7. Repeat the procedure with each group.

Modification for online use:

For an online class use a PowerPoint presentation where pupils choose the number of a slide and then do everything as if they were in a classroom.

40 min
RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 BASIC • 21

I

I II

Good nutrition can influence your sports performance. You should eat at least two hours before a sports activity to have enough energy. It is also very important to eat and drink after the activity, so your muscles can replenish lost energy and fluid. But be careful not to overeat, because it is bad for your health and sports performance.

II II APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 BASIC ˙

II III

RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 BASIC • 22

III

III III

Fruit provides you with vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre, and many other things that help you stay healthy. Eating fruit on a daily basis can give you lots of energy and help you stay fit. There’s no athlete in the world who doesn't eat fruit. You should be responsible and always bring some fruit from home as a healthy snack in school.

I I
Self-responsibility
You should eat lots of vegetables to be healthy and strong. A few cups a day is recommended, and you should choose veggies of all colours, like a rainbow. All the essential vitamins and minerals for your heart, brain, and muscles are found in vegetables.

Self-responsibility

VIIV IV

V V VI

IV IV

You need to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration means that your body is losing more water than it’s taking in. When it is hot or in the summer, drinking water, juice or sports drinks is vital. You are responsible if you remember to bring something to drink with you when training.

V V

Every child should be tidy, especially those who are training for a sport. A clean home helps you have a clear mind. It is your responsibility to clean up your room and take care of your sports equipment. Athletes are also responsible for making sure that their dressing room is clean after training.

VI VI

RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 BASIC • 23
A friendly smile is a great start to any activity, even sports. If you want a pleasant and healthy smile then brush your teeth in the morning and before going to bed. You must also wash your body every day, especially after training. Maintaining good hygiene means that you are responsible for your health. APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 BASIC ˙

CERTIFICATE

HAS
THE
OF
Place and date: Teacher’s signature:
SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED
BASIC LEVEL
THE “I VALUE SPORT” PROGRAMME FOR THOSE AGED 6 TO 8

FAIRNESS

Fairness reflects the importance of everyone having an equal opportunity to engage and succeed in activities, without getting an unfair advantage. Fairness also represents a lack of favouritism for one side or another.

6-8

RAISING AWARENESS AND UNDERSTANDING RULES

• To teach pupils how a fair environment helps build character and help support people.

Pupils will:

• Learn about rules.

• Recognise what a fair competition looks like.

• Be aware what good behaviour means.

The lesson plan needs:

• Typical school or craft supplies

• A clear drinking glass filled with 250ml of water, a fresh egg, some salt, a permanent marker, and a tablespoon

• Battleship game (Appendix)

FAIRNESS 6-8 ADVANCED • 24
˙ ADVANCED

The fair egg-speriment

Description of the activity

1. Show pupils the egg - you can name it "Eddie" and draw a face on it with the marker, if you want - and the glass of water.

2. With the tablespoon gently place the egg into the glass of water. Tell pupils that the egg represents someone who is not being treated fairly and that the sinking of the egg to the bottom of the glass represents how someone who is left out or mistreated would feelsad, defeated, unappreciated, and unloved.

3. Remove the egg from the water and set it aside.

4. One tablespoon at a time, add salt to the water (you will need a lot of salt - at least five tablespoons). As you stir in each spoonful, explain that the salt represents different ways to show fairness towards others. For example: following the rules when playing a game, taking turns and sharing, treating others with honesty and respect, and taking action to stop someone being treated unfairly.

5. After you have added all of the salt, put the egg back in the water, and it will now float. Explain that "Eddie" is now being supported with kindness, and held up by the fairness and acceptance of others.

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class, but adult supervision is recommended if pupils will do their own egg-speriment.

15 min
FAIRNESS 6-8 ADVANCED • 25

Battleships

Description of the activity

1. Give the pupils a short introduction as to what fair play is, reminding them of the definitions from the first activity, and about the importance of learning and using the rules of any game and putting them into practice. Tell them that fair play is also about learning social rules, such as cooperation, taking turns, being polite, being flexible, and showing courtesy. Explain to them that playing is not only about winning or losing, it's also about having fun, learning how to play the game, how to be a good sport, and so play by the rules.

2. Tell the pupils to open their mathematics notebooks and make two 9-by-9 tables, or print the Battleships tables in the Appendix.

3. Explain the game to pupils: Each player's fleet consists of the following ships:

1 x Aircraft carrier - 5 squares

1 x Battleship - 4 squares

1 x Cruiser - 3 squares

2 x Destroyers - 2 squares each

2 x Submarines - 1 square each

Each ship occupies a number of adjacent squares on the grid, horizontally or vertically.

During play, the players take turns in making a shot at the opponent by calling out the coordinates of a square (e.g. D5). The opponent responds with "hit" if the shot hits a ship or "miss" if it misses. If the player has hit the last remaining square of a ship the opponent must announce the name of the ship; e.g. "You sank my battleship".

During play each player should record their opponent's shots on the left-hand grid, and their own shots on the right-hand grid, using "X" for a hit and "O" for a miss: The first player to lose all their ships loses the game. You can encourage pupils to cheat, and when their opponent calls a coordinate that would be a hit, to lie and say miss.

4. After the game of Battleships talk with pupils about how they perceived the rules of the game. Were the rules easy to follow and understandable, do they feel like the rules could be changed to make the game more fun? What could be unfair about the game? Did everyone follow the rules, or did someone cheat?

You can also ask what the correct action would be if one pupil didn't have a mathematics notebook. Should we give them a piece of paper? What if they are also don’t have a pen or pencil?

This game is very useful in the development of critical and strategic thinking, attention, focus, social skills and logic.

Modification for online use:

Pupils create or print the Battleships tables at home. They play it in pairs in breakout rooms.

25 min FAIRNESS 6-8 ADVANCED • 26
A B C D E F G H A B C D E F G H 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 81 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 A B C D E F G H A B C D E F G H 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 81 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 FAIRNESS 6-8 ADVANCED • 27 APP.: FAIRNESS 6-8 ADVANCED ˙ Battleships

Respect means treating others how you would want to be treated. This reflects the quality of being polite, kind, courteous, and tolerant of others’ views, cultures, and beliefs.

ADVANCED SPORTSMANSHIP

6-8

• To promote respect as a necessary value when playing.

Pupils will:

• Identify respectful behaviour when playing.

• Be able to recognise and remember behaviours that demonstrate respect (e.g., being kind).

The lesson plan needs:

• This depends on the games that you choose

RESPECT
˙
RESPECT 6-8 ADVANCED • 28

Sportsmanship

Description of the activity

1. Prepare multiple games (e.g., target throwing, memory, card games, etc.) Make sure there are at least two pupils to play each game.

2. Set up stations or desks where the games are played for 5-10 min.

3. Before the games start, tell only one pupil per game that when they play they must act very politely. For example, they must give the opponent a high five if they play well or score. Alternatively, they can applaud or say

4. After a few minutes get the pupils to switch roles.

5. Bring the pupils back to a circle and ask them how they felt when the other player was nice to them when they played well or scored. Ask if this changed the way the games were played.

Variation:

Play the activity with a sport (handball, football, etc.).

Modification for online use:

This lesson plan cannot be carried out during an online class.

40 min RESPECT 6-8 ADVANCED • 29

COMPASSION COMPASSION

Compassion is the quality of protecting and caring about others' feelings, well-being, and welfare. It reflects supporting, helping and understanding others, particularly in times of need.

CONTINUE YOUR JOURNEY ON COMPASSION

• Pupils will recognise emotions.

Pupils will:

• Define compassion and understand why it is an important value.

• Recognise ways people show how they feel.

• Recognise situations when you can show compassion (e.g., when someone needs support or help) and how.

The lesson plan needs:

• Typical school or craft supplies

• Paper cut into the shape of leaves (Appendix)

• A tree drawn on the board

• Child-friendly movie scenes showing acts of compassion and non-compassion (Appendix)

• Video player & screen

COMPASSION 6-8 ADVANCED • 30
6-8 ˙ ADVANCED

Introduction to compassion

Description of the activity

1. Instruct the pupils to sit in a circle (you sit with them) and close their eyes except for the pupil sitting on your left. Whisper the name of an emotion to this pupil. The pupil then mimes the emotion to the pupil sitting on their left, who has now their eyes open while the rest of the class are still not looking.

2. The game goes on until the last pupil in the circle has had the emotion shown to them, which they then say to the rest of the class.

3. Ask the pupils how they knew it was that emotion and why they mimed it the way they did.

4. If there is still some time remaining you can do the activity again with another emotion.

Variation:

Show a picture of the emotion instead of whispering it to the first pupil.

Modification for online use:

Depending on the online system you are using, you can create a separate room which you monitor and where you invite the first pupil, mime the emotion, have a second pupil enter the room to whom the first one mimes, and so on until the last pupil sees the emotion and names it.

10 min
COMPASSION 6-8 ADVANCED • 31

The tree of self-compassion

Description of the activity

1. Give each pupil a piece of paper in the shape of a leaf (Appendix). On one side, each pupil writes down a quality, something they like about themselves, and on the other side something they like less about themselves or something they feel like they could have done better (you can choose to give some examples on the board before this).

2. Collect all the leaves and stick them in the shape of a tree on the board, positive side up.

3. Ask the pupils what they see and explain that the tree represents the class as a whole, and that each pupil has things they like less about themselves but - just as the tree shows - the important is to focus on the positive in everyone.

4. If there is time and if you find it appropriate, pupils can pick up a leaf, or many, and - without identifying the owner - read what is written on the negative side and ask the class what they think about this weakness, and what positive aspect they can find in it.

Variation:

min

Write down the qualities and weaknesses on pieces on paper, mix them in a jar, bowl, hat or similar container, ask pupils to pick one out, and then lead a conversation based on the characteristics they find.

Modification for online use:

Open a shared work document online to which all the pupils can contribute.

Can you see it?

Description of the activity

1. Show the class pictures from popular child-friendly movies or TV series (Appendix) that show either acts of compassion or actions where a character lacks empathy or kindness.

2. Pupils have to identify whether the character in each picture is showing compassion or not, and explain how they know this.

Modification for online use:

The pictures are shared on screen.

Variation:

10 min

20
Ask the pupils to describe a scene from a movie or TV series they know in which compassion is shown or where a character is being really unkind. COMPASSION 6-8 ADVANCED • 32

The tree of self-compassion

COMPASSION 6-8 ADVANCED • 33 APP.:
˙
COMPASSION 6-8 ADVANCED

Big Hero 6

The main character hurts himself by stubbing his toe, and this triggers Tadashi's giant marshmallow robot to activate.

See this scene on YouTube with this link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8ZPHsvzdfs

Inside Out

The scene shows that when all other efforts to stop Riley (the little girl) from running away from her parents have failed, Joy (Amy Poehler) allows Sadness (Phyllis Smith) to have a go, and she succeeds. Riley returns home and Sadness interacts with her memories of her old home in Minnesota, tuning them from happy memories into sad ones, in a touching montage. Riley tearfully tells her parents that she misses her old home, and as they comfort her the family island part of her brain starts working again.

See this scene on YouTube with this link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2CJ46XkwxA

The Lion King

Scar, Simba’s uncle, sets a trap for his brother Mufasa, luring Simba into a gorge and having the hyenas drive a large herd of wildebeest into a stampede that will trample him. Scar doesn't care about his family and the consequences of his actions. He is only interested in himself and his goal to become the king.

See this scene on YouTube with this link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2-Fci_SZTc

COMPASSION 6-8 ADVANCED • 34 APP.: COMPASSION 6-8 ADVANCED ˙
Can you see it?

HONESTY

6-8

• To teach pupils how to be honest in their daily activities.

Pupils will:

• Get to know values in sport and will be able to recognise the positive ones.

• Be aware of the meaning of honesty in sport and life.

• Remember that being dishonest has consequences (or why being honest is important).

The lesson plan needs: • Typical school or craft supplies • Cardboard • Scissors • String • Hole puncher • Marker • Honesty statements (Appendix)

˙
HONESTY IN EVERYDAY LIFE HONESTY 6-8 ADVANCED • 35
ADVANCED
Honesty reflects the quality of being truthful toward others and oneself, and being able to be trusted. In life and sport this means that you don't deceive, steal, cheat or lie, and that you communicate your own thoughts and views truthfully, fairly, and respectfully the best you can.

Think before you speak

Description of the activity

1. Write "say it out loud" and "think and rephrase" on the board.

2. Give pupils examples and ask them whether they should say something like that out loud, or they should think and rephrase it. Discuss what they could say instead to not hurt someone's feelings.

• Your shoes are really ugly.

• I see you have problems with your sports equipment. Can I help you with it?

• He is playing so badly. Why did the coach even put him in the team?

• This lunch is disgusting!

• Our team won by 10 points. The other team is full of

• Use some examples that happened in your class.

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

Classroom honesty board

Description of the activity

1. Give each pupil two small pieces of cardboard and tell them to write down in what ways they are honest, such as I don't cheat, I always tell the truth, I admit my mistakes, etc. For younger pupils you can use printed cards and they choose the ones that are the most important to them - Appendix.

2. With the hole puncher make a hole in the cardboard and use the string to tie the smaller pieces of cardboard to a bigger piece (see Appendix.). The pupils should help with the creation of the board.

3. When the board is finished you can place it on the wall in the classroom so the pupils will see it every day.

4. Read the statements on the board or have the pupils read them out loud. Discuss the statements and point out why they are important.

Modification for online use:

Pupils create their own or their family's honesty board at home.

10
HONESTY 6-8 ADVANCED • 36
min 30 min
I DON’T CHEAT I DON’T STEAL I RESPECT THE RULES I DON’T SPREAD RUMOURS I DON’T LIE I CAN BE TRUSTED I ALWAYS SAY HOW SOMETHING REALLY HAPPENED I ADMIT MY MISTAKES HONESTY 6-8 ADVANCED • 37 APP.: HONESTY 6-8 ADVANCED ˙ Classroom honesty board
HONESTY 6-8 ADVANCED • 38 I AM HONEST I DON’T CHEAT I DON’T STEAL I ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH APP.: HONESTY 6-8 ADVANCED ˙ Classroom honesty board

RESPONSIBILITY

Responsibility means taking care of others, our surroundings and ourselves. Being responsible means that you do the things you are expected to, and accept the consequences of your actions.

6-8

ADVANCED

RESPONSIBILITY IN EVERYDAY LIFE

• Motivate pupils to give their own additional examples of responsibility.

Pupils will:

• Define responsibility and why it is important.

• Recognise examples of self-responsibility in everyday life.

• Identify situations where pupils show responsibility.

The lesson plan needs:

• Typical school or craft supplies

• Playing cards (Appendix)

˙
RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 ADVANCED • 39

Responsibility around us

Description of the activity

1. Write "RESPONSIBILITY" in capital letters on the board and define the term.

2. Show the playing cards (Appendix) to the pupils and explain that some cards have a picture and they will need to describe the situation, while some cards are blank on which they will draw something that describes

3. Show the pupils a blank card and tell them to draw their own picture related to the idea of responsibility. Allow pupils to express themselves, and help them if

4. Show the pupils a card with a picture and ask them how it represents responsibility. Ask the pupils to come up with a related example from their everyday lives.

Hints for the cards: II Responsibilities at school

To keep your school desk clean

To do your homework

To listen to the teacher

To bring all the school supplies needed to your class

To come to school on time III Responsibilities at sport

To prepare your sports equipment

To train

To do the best you can

To respect the judges and referees

To listen to your coach

IV Responsibilities at home

To keep your room tidy

To clean up after yourself

To help with the housework

To care about your family V Responsibilities to yourself

To take care of yourself

To eat healthy food

To read books

To dress appropriately

To own your actions and their consequences VI Responsibilities to others

To show love and respect to others

To listen to other people when they speak

To help others when needed

To not spread rumours about others

To treat others well

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

40 min
RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 ADVANCED • 40

Responsibility around us

III III

APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 ADVANCED ˙
RESPONSIBILITY 6-8 ADVANCED • 41 I
IV
VI
I II II IV
V V VI
Place and date: Teacher’s
HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE ADVANCED LEVEL OF THE “I VALUE SPORT” PROGRAMME FOR THOSE AGED 6 TO 8 CERTIFICATE
signature:

AGE GROUP 9-11

FAIRNESS

Fairness reflects the importance of everyone having an equal opportunity to engage and succeed in activities, without getting an unfair advantage. Fairness also represents a lack of favouritism for one side or another.

FAIRNESS 9-11 BASIC • 42
9-11 ˙ BASIC

Reaching up, new possibilities

Description of the activity

1. Explain to the pupils that fairness means that everyone gets what they need to succeed, then ask them if they know about fairness or fair play.

2. Ask for two volunteers, one taller and one shorter.

3. Place two items somewhere in the classroom on the same level, for example books on a shelf. The taller one should be able to get the item with ease, whilst the shorter pupil will have difficulty reaching it.

4. Ask the pupils for ideas on what can we do to help the smaller pupil reach the item.

• If it's a boy and a girl in this situation. Can the girl ask the boy for help? Should she only ask other girls for help? How could we help?

Modification for online use:

5. After their answers, transition to the topic of fair vs equal, because the two volunteers cannot have equal treatment. After all, it isn't fair because the taller pupil has an advantage for this particular exercise. The other pupil, however, requires some help to have an equal opportunity.

6. Show the image (Appendix) - what story does it tell?

7. Explain that equality implies conditions are the same, just like in mathematics when we use the equal sign, which means that both sides of the equation are the same. Being fair means everyone gets what they need to succeed.

When online, a parent, guardian or older sibling is needed to complete the this activity.

Sportsmanship

Description of the activity

1. Watch a video where fair play can be seen. Sports clips have lots of beautiful moments full of sportsmanship, so analyse these with the pupils.

2. Pause after each demonstration of fair play and ask the pupils to identify the action.

Video: Top 10 Fair Play Moments of The Decade 2010-2019 - Great Sportsmanship by Alaba, Hummels & Co. https://www.youtube.com/watch ?v=8ohw7lOm9Sw

25 min

Modification for online use:

Share the screen with the video, book, or cartoon you would like pupils to analyse and proceed with the questions.

FAIRNESS 9-11 BASIC • 43 15
min
FAIRNESS 9-11 BASIC • 44 APP.: FAIRNESS 9-11 BASIC ˙ Reaching
possibilities
up, new
FAIRNESS 9-11 BASIC • 45 APP.: FAIRNESS 9-11 BASIC ˙ Reaching
up, new possibilities

Respect means treating others how you would want to be treated. This reflects the quality of being polite, kind, courteous, and tolerant of others’ views, cultures, and beliefs.

RESPECT
9-11
RESPECT 9-11 BASIC • 46
˙ BASIC

R-E-S-P-E-C-T 40 min

Description of the activity

1. Give the pupils the worksheet with the letters R E S P E C T (Appendix) or they can write the word into their notebooks.

2. Ask them to add letters to form words associated with respect. The letters in R E S P E C T do not have to be at the beginning of the words.

3. Give the pupils the worksheet with the letters S P O R T (Appendix) or they can write the word into their notebooks.

4. Again, ask them to add letters to form words associated with respect. The letters S P O R T do not have to be at the beginning of the words.

5. Ask the pupils, letter by letter, what words they have written that are related to respect. If this will take too long, just focus on 3 to 5 words, then do the same with sport.

6. Form groups where the same or similar associations have been written. Divide the groups so you have 2 or 3 pupils per group with 2 or 3 words the same or similar. R

7. Each group should now pick a sport and come up with a short roleplay featuring this in which they will act out these 2 or 3 words.

8. In the meantime, collect the papers with the words and count how often they appear. Write RESPECT and SPORT on the board and add the 15 or so most common words from the pupils’ work. The more common a word is, the larger it should be written. This can also be done using one of the many online tools that are available to make a wordcloud - just Google "wordcloud online".

9. Ask the pupils to act out their roleplays. Before they start, they should tell you which words they will act out. After they have seen a roleplay, the other pupils should guess which words were acted out.

Variation:

Use a different, longer word than sport.

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class, although it is recommended that you use a video conference tool where you can make breakout sessions.

RESPECT 9-11 BASIC • 47
E S P E C T
S P O R T

R E S P E C T

RESPECT 9-11 BASIC • 48 APP.: RESPECT 9-11 BASIC ˙ R-E-S-P-E-C-T

R T

RESPECT 9-11 BASIC • 49 APP.: RESPECT 9-11 BASIC ˙ R-E-S-P-E-C-T
S P O

COMPASSION

Compassion is the quality of protecting and caring about others' feelings, well-being, and welfare. It reflects supporting, helping and understanding others, particularly in times of need.

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 50
9-11 ˙ BASIC

Introduction to compassion

Description of the activity

1. Ask pupils if they remember what compassion is, and what they can remember from the previous lesson (6-8). If there are new pupils in the class, those who were there for the lesson 6-8 can explain what they remember.

2. Based on what is said, give a summary of the first lesson (Lesson 6-8: Introduction to compassion). In order to help the pupils remember the previous lesson - if they have had it - you can use the range of emotions and acts of compassion pictures (Appendix).

3. Ask the pupils to identify what is happening in the pictures, in what way it shows a demonstration of compassion, and which feeling the emojis are expressing.

Modification for online use: The pictures are shared on screen.

The four musketeers

Description of the activity

1. Divide the pupils into groups (ideally groups of four, but other numbers work as well).

2. Explain the rules of the game: In each group, three pupils will have to stay in their given positions or movements (arms straight above their heads, doing a repetitive move with one of their hands, balancing a small object on the back of their hand, etc) while the fourth runs around in a defined route. The runner keeps going until one of the other members of the group asks to be replaced, and then the two switch roles. The new runner then starts running around, but this time the pupils holding their positions or movements can't ask to be replaced - instead, the runner has to look for any non-verbal signs and then offer to change places.

3. The activity stops after at least two rounds for each group (one verbal and one non-verbal).

4. Ask pupils how they knew the others were struggling to hold their given positions or movements, or how they expressed their struggle, and start a conversation on the non-verbal communication of emotions.

Modification for online use:

Variation:

The teacher can act out the scenes shown in the pictures - or ask the pupils to - and then carry on with the questions and conversation.

10 min

Variation:

These are examples. You can choose any other position or movement as long as there’s no chance that it could cause any kind of injury. You can also tell a struggling pupil that they can stop holding their position, or give clues to the runner so they see what is happening.

Use positions or movements that can easily be seen on screen, such as keeping arms and hands straight in front of them, keeping an object balanced on their head or back of the hand, etc.

10
min
COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 51

The compassion letter

Description of the activity

1. Ask the class to identify all the people without whom the athletes wouldn't be able to practice or perform their sport (coaches, referees and judges, doctors, nutritionists, and parents, but also ticketing officers, gardeners, cleaning personnel, volunteers, and so on) and how it would affect the sport if these people weren't there. You can also choose people from another context who support the main players, such as school.

2. Continue with the following questions:

• How would you feel if no one thanked you for the work you are doing?

• How would you feel if nobody noticed what you did for them?

• How do you think you’d feel if somebody thanked you for your work?

3. With these questions try to make the pupils reflect on the importance of the people you don't really notice but who are crucial for the smooth running of sport. Furthermore, based on the pupils answers you can highlight the fact that if you promote and have a compassionate view of someone’s work - if that person knows someone is paying attention to what they’re doing and appreciates it - then they will give their best.

4. Instruct pupils to write a short letter to one of the people that you identified before who help keep sport running smoothly. Each letter should include the following: who the person is, what they do, and what the consequences would be if they stopped doing their job. If pupils are struggling with writing their own letters, they can do it in groups or use the template in the Appendix.

5. After everyone has written a letter, choose some of the pupils to read their work out loud and see if everyone agrees with them.

Suggestion: After the activity, the class can reach out to a local sports club and have the letters delivered to the people discussed in the letters (if a pupil in the class is in such a club, the teacher can make then responsible for delivering the letters). If these people react (send a letter to the class, make a phone call, etc.), the class will be able to witness the positive effects of giving others recognition and credit for what they do. This brings the experience closer to the pupils’ daily lives.

Variation:

Ask the pupils to imagine a story that happens during a training session or competition, identify all the characters, and create a dialogue between an athlete and a person without whom the sport would not run smoothly.

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

20 min
COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 52

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 53 APP.:
˙
COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC

9-11 BASIC

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 54 APP.:
˙
COMPASSION

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 55 APP.:
˙

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 56 APP.: COMPASSION
˙
9-11 BASIC

Introduction to compassion

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 57 APP.:
˙
COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC

The compassion letter

I have compassion for

(Key actor in sport).

Without this person, who it would be

(The actions this person does to helpthe smooth running of sport),

(The consequences of the absence of this person for sport).

COMPASSION 9-11 BASIC • 58 APP.: COMPASSION 9-11
˙
BASIC

Honesty reflects the quality of being truthful toward others and oneself, and being able to be trusted. In life and sport this means that you don't deceive, steal, cheat or lie, and that you communicate your own thoughts and views truthfully, fairly, and respectfully the best you can.

HONESTY
˙
HONESTY 9-11 BASIC • 59
9-11
BASIC

Bingo

Description of the activity

1. Print or copy bingo cards (Appendix) and give each pupil one.

2. Print the statements (Appendix), cut them, fold the pieces of paper and put them into a bowl, bag or other container.

3. Explain the rules to the pupils: you, as the bingo caller, will read a statement. Pupils need to find the same idea on their bingo card, if they have it, and cross it out or use a small piece of paper to cover the square on their card. When a pupil covers all the squares in one row, vertically or horizontally, they raise a hand and say "BINGO". The pupil should then explain what the items in that row mean.

4. The game is played until you have read out all the statements.

Modification for online use:

Pupils print bingo card(s) at home. Other modifications are not needed for an online class.

Speed dating

Description of the activity

1. Together with the pupils prepare the classroom so that two sets of chairs are facing each other in a circle.

2. If there are more than 20 pupils in the class, divide them into two groups and prepare two circles with chairs.

3. Tell the pupils to sit on the chairs and face each other.

4. Explain the activity: each pupil has one minute to say something honest and kind about the person sitting in front of them. Then they change the roles. When both pupils have played both roles, everyone moves to the seat on their right and plays with a new partner. The game is played until each pupil is back in their original seat.

5. After the game, ask the pupils:

20 min

• Was it hard to say something kind and honest to your classmates?

• How did you feel when other pupils were saying kind words to you?

Modification for online use:

Divide the pupils into smaller breakout rooms where they exchange kind and honest words about each other. Change the members of the groups after 10 minutes (or 15, depending on the size of the groups).

20 min
HONESTY 9-11 BASIC • 60
HONESTY 9-11 BASIC • 61 APP.: HONESTY 9-11 BASIC ˙ Bingo CHEATING DECIEVING ADMITTING YOUR MISTAKES ACTING TRUTHFULLY BEING RESPECTFUL BEING HONEST WITH OTHERS THINKING BEFORE SPEAKING TELLING THE TRUTH LYING GOSSIPING STEALING FOLLOWING THE RULES
HONESTY 9-11 BASIC • 62 APP.: HONESTY 9-11 BASIC ˙
Bingo
HONESTY 9-11 BASIC • 63 APP.: HONESTY 9-11 BASIC ˙
Bingo

RESPONSIBILITY

Responsibility means taking care of others, our surroundings and ourselves. Being responsible means that you do the things you are expected to, and accept the consequences of your actions.

9-11 ˙
RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 BASIC • 64
• Typical school or craft supplies
Playing cards (Appendix)
BASIC

Responsibility is part of success

Description of the activity

1. Tell pupils to draw and describe an athlete and responsibility in sport.

2. Show the cards (printed before class) and explain to the pupils that each card shows a picture that describes responsibility.

3. Divide the pupils into six groups and tell them to have a group discussion.

4. Ask one pupil from each group to pick one card, turn it over and show the other pupils. Give the groups some time to discuss what the card shows.

5. Ask one pupil from each group to explain to the whole class what they believe the picture represents. After they are finished, explain the picture on each card and link it to the idea of responsibility by using the text on the other side as a reference.

6. Start a discussion with the following questions for each card:

Card IV:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the mother?

• What was the role of the father?

• What was the role of the football player?

Card V:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the cleaning ladies?

• What was the role of the basketball player?

Card VI:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What is your role as a player?

• What is the role of the coach?

• What is the role of your teammates?

Card I:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the grandmother?

• What was the role of the doctor?

• What was the role of the father?

• What was the role of the big club?

Card II:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the brothers?

• What was the role of the parents?

Card III:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the mother?

• What was the role of the coach?

Modification for online use:

For an online class use a PowerPoint presentation where pupils choose the number of a slide and then do everything as if they were in a classroom.

40
min
RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 BASIC • 65

I

I

There was once a little boy in Argentina who loved to play football. Knowing this, his grandmother took him to training since nobody else had the time. The coach told him that he was too short. A doctor diagnosed growth hormone deficiency and prescribed medical therapy. Since the drug was expensive, it seemed that the boy would have to stop training. However, his dad found a way and brought him to a big club, Barcelona, which decided to pay for the boy’s for medicine if he played for them. Today, that boy is one of the best football players in the world.

II II APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 BASIC ˙

II III

RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 BASIC • 66

III

A small girl was destined to be an athlete, just like her mother, who supported her from the beginning. She even inherited her mother's coach. She grew up in a small town where she played with the other children. She was fast, very fast, and could jump far. This also made her happy, so it wasn't hard for her to listen to the coach, who was highly dedicated to her. She loved athletics above all, and soon started winning championship after championship. She has medals from European and world competitions, and even the Olympic Games.

III III

I I
Responsibility is part of success
When he was little, he watched his brothers play basketball. He has a little bit from both brothers: one is talented, and the other is strong. He was a bit of both, and his brothers taught him the basics of basketball. The family apartment was tiny. They had two bedrooms, a kitchen, and a bathroom. His mother, father, two brothers, and grandmother lived there. It was a full house. They even had a small basketball hoop in the apartment, so the three boys played all the time. His parents supported him, and didn't complain about the noise. But neighbours who lived below constantly complained to his parents about it. Today that boy is one of the top ten NBA basketball players, and his neighbours are proud of him.
II

APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 BASIC ˙

Responsibility is part of success IV

IV V

A boy was born on a small island in the Atlantic Ocean. Instead of swimming, thanks to his father, who worked at a football club, he got to a ball and was never seen without it again. Her mother said he ate, studied, and slept with the ball. And indeed, at 16 he played for Manchester United, one of the best clubs in the world. He also became a national team member and, thanks to his skills, led them to the European Championship. Because he lost his parents early on, he learned what it means to be alone and decided to help children in trouble around the world. After the earthquake in Nepal, the tsunami in Thailand, and the nuclear disaster in Japan, he personally helped more than some wealthy countries, not only in money but in supporting the education of children who had lost their parents.

V VI

V V RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 BASIC • 67

VI

Being part of a team is not easy, but it is crucial, especially if you want to achieve top results. It is not essential to always be first, but it is important to always do your best and listen to the coach. That is why team spirit is the most important thing. Belonging to a team is both an honour and responsibility. It is important that if you’re part of a team you work to fit in, listen to the coach, always support your teammates, and treat them as part of a sports family. The question of personal responsibility is how you will live with your teammates and coach.

VI VI

IV IV
A young boy would get up at five or six before school and go to the gym. The cleaning ladies helped and allowed him to train before anyone else arrived. They tidied the hall and he practised basketball, making hundreds of shots every day before school. He would put out chairs and dribble around them. He was enjoying basketball, and was the most responsible player in his club. There was a time when he would get hundreds of baskets a day. He was responsible because he trained eight or nine hours daily, without exception. In fact, he hardly missed any planned training sessions throughout his entire career.
Place and date:
HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE BASIC LEVEL OF THE “I VALUE SPORT” PROGRAMME FOR THOSE AGED 9 TO 11 CERTIFICATE
Teacher’s signature:

FAIRNESS

Fairness reflects the importance of everyone having an equal opportunity to engage and succeed in activities, without getting an unfair advantage. Fairness also represents a lack of favouritism for one side or another.

˙
FAIRNESS 9-11 ADVANCED • 68
9-11
ADVANCED

Does fairness mean equal?

Description of the activity

1. Ask the pupils if fairness always means equal treatment.

2. After they respond give examples from different subjects or sports where pupils or athletes receive equal treatment, but this isn't necessarily fair.

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

3. Assess the pupils' understanding of fairness:

• Ask the pupils to write what they believe fairness is.

• Ask the pupils to write what fairness isn't.

• Ask the pupils to write what equality is.

• Ask the pupils to write what equality isn't.

Tall has the ball?

Description of the activity

1. Tell the pupils the following example:

"Bob and Mark are classmates, and they both share a love for basketball. Bob is 1.2 metres tall while Mark, the tallest in their class, is 1.6 metres. During their sports class, where they choose to play basketball, the coach asks them to play 1-on-1, where the first to reach 4 points wins, with 1 point per basket."

2. Ask the pupils:

• Do you believe it's fair for Bob to compete against Mark?

• How can this game be adapted to make it fair for Bob?

• Imagine Bob lost to Mark 4-0, how would he feel?

3. Explain to the pupils that equal treatment doesn't always mean fair treatment. You can give everyone the same tools, status and opportunities, but for some children other adaptations are necessary to make it fair.

4. Based on the example above, discuss with the pupils:

• What could the coach do for the game to be fair?

• Could he choose more suitable opponents for Bob and Mark, based on height and skill?

• Could he make a game of three vs three, or five vs five where the teams were more balanced, and everyone played their own role?

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

10 min

• What other situations or examples can you think of, where fair isn't always equal?

Definitions of fairness often include equality in some way, shape or form, but definitions of equality seldom refer to fairness. Equal means the same, while fair means impartial and just treatment or behaviour, without favouritism or discrimination.

10
min
FAIRNESS 9-11 ADVANCED • 69

Following the rules

Description of the activity

1. Explain to the pupils that they will play a game that takes after the rules of H.O.R.S.E, where when you miss a shot, you get one letter of the word. When you get all the letters, you lose the game and must leave the playing area.

2. This ball game requires a set boundary for the pupils to play within. The rules are simple:

• One pupil has the ball at first, and becomes the Tagger.

• The Tagger has to count to 10, while the other pupils who play the game run around inside the boundary.

• When the count reaches 10, everyone has to stop.

• The Tagger can take five steps from their position in any direction, towards a chosen player.

• After those five steps, the Tagger has to throw the ball at the player. If they miss, they gets the first letter - H. If the Tagger manages to hit the other player then that player now becomes the Tagger and gets the letter H.

• The winner is the last player standing.

3. Before playing the game, ask the pupils if following rules is important. If they say yes, then ask why? In a game like Tagger, what could we change to make the game more inclusive or fairer for all pupils?

4. After the pupils get a chance to play the game, ask them:

• What other rules can we add to the game to make it more fun?

• Could we eliminate the five steps and replace them with two? Or would that create an unfair advantage for the players who are running around?

• Can we eliminate the boundary while leaving the Tagger with the option to only take five steps?

• How can we add more players while keeping the game short? (HINT: reduce the number of letters in the game to 3, or maybe just 2).

• Ask the pupils why rules are important in any game, then write down their answers.

Modification for online use:

This activity cannot be carried out during an online class.

20 min FAIRNESS 9-11 ADVANCED • 70

Respect means treating others how you would want to be treated. This reflects the quality of being polite, kind, courteous, and tolerant of others’ views, cultures, and beliefs.

RESPECT
RESPECT 9-11 ADVANCED • 71
9-11 ˙ ADVANCED

Catch me if you can

Description of the activity

1. Tell the pupils that they will be playing tag in a slightly different way. They are only allowed to step on the lines in the gym or the playing field. There should also be some "safe zones", areas where pupils can stand without being tagged and having to leave the game.

2. Choose two or more pupils as "catchers". If one of the other pupils is tagged and caught, they leave the playing area. Tell the pupils you will keep track of the time, and note how long it takes to catch everybody.

3. Play the game for the first time.

4. Now add 2 or 3 pupils with artificial impairments (e.g. tie their shoelaces together, have them wear a weight vest or blindfolded, etc.).

5. The pupils play the game again, but in this round they must now shake hands with the catchers after being caught and say: "good job". All the non-catchers should help the impaired pupils to not get tagged by carrying them or sacrificing themselves. All the pupils who have been caught should cheer the remaining players from the side. The goal for the non-catchers is to make the catchers need more time to tag everybody than in the first round of the game.

6. Bring the pupils back in a circle and start a discussion with following questions:

• How did you feel when you played in the second round, with players saying "good job" and taking care of those with impairments?

• Was there a difference between the games? If so, why?

Variation:

Play this type of game with the rules of dodgeball, not tag.

Modification for online use:

This activity cannot be carried out during an online class.

40 min RESPECT 9-11 ADVANCED • 72

Compassion is the quality of protecting and caring about others' feelings, well-being, and welfare. It reflects supporting, helping and understanding others, particularly in times of need.

COMPASSION
9-11 ˙
COMPASSION 9-11 ADVANCED • 73
ADVANCED

Adopt the appropriate behaviour

Description of the activity

1. Present sports situations starring the two main characters of the programme (Name 1 and Name 2). The game is played either individually or in small groups.

2. Give four cards to the pupils: A, B, C and D (if played individually, each pupil gets a set of four cards, if by group, a set is given to each group) (Appendix). Each letter will have a different colour (A=green, B=red, C= blue, D=yellow). For each situation, there will be four possible answers from which the pupils will have to choose. For each situation, every pupil or group will hold a card up representing the answer they think is right. Ask pupils with different answers to explain their choice.

3. Situation 1: Name 1 and Name 2 are in physical education class. The teacher has prepared a race where the pupils will have to run as fast as possible. Name 1 finishes the race first and sees that Name 2 is last and has some trouble finishing the course (due to a side stitch). What would you do if you were Name 1?

A: I'm not looking after the end of the race. I finished first, and that's all that matters.

B: I go to the other pupils who also finished the race to talk.

C: I grab my water bottle and sit down on my own and wait until everyone has finished.

D: I stay and watch the race to cheer on Name 2, and wait for them at the finish line.

Situation 2: Name 1 and Name 2 are playing catch with their friends during the lunch break at school. Name 1 accidentally touches Name 2, who stumbles and falls on the ground. It appears that Name 2 is injured and that their ankle is twisted. How would you react to this situation?

A: A twisted ankle is not so bad, I’d encourage the others to keep playing.

B: I’m angry because of Name 2’s injury - the game is ruined and I can't play anymore because of them.

C: I try to comfort Name 2 and contact a teacher or someone else who can help.

D: I’m laughing. because the way Name 2 fell down was very funny.

Situation 3: Name 1 just won a game against Name 2. The game was very intense and both players wanted to win. Unfortunately, Name 2 lost and is so disappointed that they start crying. How would you react if you were Name 1?

A: It's not my fault that Name 2 is crying. I did what I had to do to win the game.

B: I don't feel sorry for Name 2 crying. I mind my own business, it's not my problem.

C: It's just a game, I don't understand why Name 2 is crying.

D: I try to comfort Name 2 about the loss and tell them how well they played, and that next time they could win.

Situation 4: There is a new pupil in the class of Name 1 and Name 2. The new pupil is shy and struggles to make friends. Name 1 and Name 2 play grandmother’s footsteps every break. One break Name 1 sees the new pupil is alone - how would you react?

A: I just want to play the game with my friend.

B: The break is too short to make new friends.

C: I ask the new pupil if they want to play with us.

D: It's not my problem if they can't make new friends.

Variation:

You can choose situations from books or events the class is familiar with.

30
min
COMPASSION 9-11 ADVANCED • 74

Modification for online use:

1. Create polls on the internet to collect the pupils' answers anonymously. Below there are two free websites where you can create a poll with free account.

https://freeonlinesurveys.com/pricing https://xoyondo.com/plans

Catch us!

2. To create a poll please follow the steps on the website.

3. If you already have an account on somewhere else or you are familiar with another website you can use that one.

OW!

COMPASSION 9-11 ADVANCED • 75

Tell me a story

Description of the activity

1. Tell pupils a story about a situation featuring compassion without giving too much detail.

2. Every pupil adds a sentence to the story, one at a time, (e.g.: the day it happened, how many people were there, what the weather was like, etc.).

3. Every time something is added to the story the next speaker needs to repeat every detail, repeating the whole story with everything the other pupils have added. If this is too complicated, the next pupil can start with just the last new detail of the story.

4. Once you feel like there are enough details start another story about compassion. Every story should have a "bad start" and "happy ending". Examples of a "bad start": Yesterday I was riding my bike when I fell..., I was walking down the street when I saw a cat crying..., etc. Modification

Variation:

15 min

Do this as a written activity. Each pupil writes the first sentence on a sheet of paper, then passes it to the pupil on their left - or any other pre-defined order, but it must be the same order for each round - who has to add another sentence, and so on. So the activity does not to last too long, maybe stop after round 5 or 6, as this will keep the pupils focused on the "happy ending" that will come soon.

Write the sentences in a shared document.
for online use:
COMPASSION 9-11 ADVANCED • 76
COMPASSION 9-11 ADVANCED • 77 APP.: COMPASSION 9-11 ADVANCED ˙ Adopt the appropriate behaviour

Honesty reflects the quality of being truthful toward others and oneself, and being able to be trusted. In life and sport this means that you don't deceive, steal, cheat or lie, and that you communicate your own thoughts and views truthfully, fairly, and respectfully the best you can.

ADVANCED

HONESTY
˙
HONESTY 9-11 ADVANCED • 78
9-11

Word search

Description of the activity

1. Distribute the sheets with the wordsearch (Appendix) game and tell the pupils to find the words that are written in the clues. Words can go in any direction, but two words cannot share any letters.

2. When a pupil finds the first word, they should circle it and raise their hand.

3. Ask the pupil to explain to the class what this word means and help them with the explanation if necessary.

Variation:

• To make the activity harder don't give pupils the list of clues, just tell them the number of the words that they need to find.

• To make the activity easier, pupils could do it in pairs or small groups.

Modification for online use:

M J X Z E O E O B T R W U A C

R U A C H A W M Q F H U N D Y

E V I E C E D I F G E T L W Q

K O R I L I I S L F Q M U E T

F C D A N D G E W R U G J R S

S V E Z D W E L E R A D J T T

I T K T S S I S R O L Q E N F

S L S S T E P F P N J V T E N

S J W U B E Z T S E N O H L X

E V K R C S U P P O R T K O U

D Q F T I B W C B M L P X S Z

No modifications are needed for an online class, as pupils can print the wordsearch sheets at home.

Mike the chamois and the magic berries

Description of the activity

1. Tell the pupils to take turns in reading the book.

2. Discuss the book with pupils, and point out any parts of the story that are related to kindness, cheating, fairness, love for sport, etc.

3. Ask them questions such as:

• Was it OK that Thomas used the magic berries?

• Why did Thomas use the magic berries?

• Was this fair to the other competitors?

• What would you do if you were Thomas?

• Would you still be able to celebrate if you won a competition because you cheated?

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

Variation:

S H A R E A B L O P M G M N U

B L E L A L F J S V N T F I T

25 min D Q H M A J Q R A G X B I J X

• Ask the pupils to write down a summary of the story and point out any positive or negative actions.

15
HONESTY 9-11 ADVANCED • 79
min
• Divide the pupils into small groups, tell them to read the book and discuss the content. Ask them to share their ideas afterwards. P J R S T I R P W R E R I P X
APP.: HONESTY 9-11 ADVANCED ˙ Word search HONESTY 9-11 ADVANCED • 80 P J R S T I R P W R E R I P X Clues: cheat fair honest lie promise rules share steal trust truth deceive respect equal support insolent D Q H M A J Q R A G X B I J X M J X Z E O E O B T R W U A C R U A C H A W M Q F H U N D Y E V I E C E D I F G E T L W Q K O R I L I I S L F Q M U E T F C D A N D G E W R U G J R S S V E Z D W E L E R A D J T T I T K T S S I S R O L Q E N F S L S S T E P F P N J V T E N S J W U B E Z T S E N O H L X E V K R C S U P P O R T K O U D Q F T I B W C B M L P X S Z S H A R E A B L O P M G M N U B L E L A L F J S V N T F I T

Mike the chamois and the magic berries

APP.: HONESTY
˙
9-11 ADVANCED
HONESTY 9-11 ADVANCED • 81

RESPONSIBILITY

Responsibility means taking care of others, our surroundings and ourselves. Being responsible means that you do the things you are expected to, and accept the consequences of your actions.

9-11 ˙
RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 ADVANCED • 82
ADVANCED

Responsibility during sports activities

Description of the activity

1. Show the playing cards (Appendix) to the pupils and explain that some cards have a picture and they will need to describe the situation, while some cards are blank on which they will draw something that describes responsibility.

2. Show the pupils a blank card and tell them to draw their own picture related to the idea of responsibility. Allow pupils to express themselves, and help them if they have questions.

3. Show the pupils a card with a picture and ask them how it represents responsibility. Ask the pupils to come up with a related example from their everyday lives.

Hints for the cards:

II Responsibility for your opponents • To treat your opponents with respect • To be kind to your opponents • To never say bad things to your opponents • To not underestimate your opponents • To protect your opponents • To play fairly against your opponents

III Responsibility to be protected • To wear protective gear, if needed • To keep safe • To follow the referees' decisions • To protect the weaker • To be clean • To protect yourself

IV Responsibility for maintaining the spirit of sport • To follow the rules

• To be a good winner and loser • To congratulate your opponents • To follow your dreams • To never give up • To not try and win by any means, fair or not

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

40 min
RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 ADVANCED • 83

Responsibility during sports activities I

RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 ADVANCED • 84
˙
APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 9-11 ADVANCED
I III III IV IV II II
Place and date: Teacher’s signature: HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE ADVANCED LEVEL OF THE “I VALUE SPORT” PROGRAMME FOR THOSE AGED 9 TO 11 CERTIFICATE

AGE GROUP 12-14

FAIRNESS

Fairness reflects the importance of everyone having an equal opportunity to engage and succeed in activities, without getting an unfair advantage. Fairness also represents a lack of favouritism for one side or another.

FAIRNESS 12-14 BASIC • 85
12-14 ˙ BASIC

Faircon

Description of the activity

CHARADES

1. Select a pupil to stand in front of the class and give them a word from the list to act out for the others to guess. No talking is allowed.

2. Tell the rest of the class to guess what word the pupil is acting out, by either raising a hand or calling out the answer.

3. The pupil who guesses correctly will come forward, explain what the word means and then act out a new word.

4. Repeat the game until all the suggested words are used. You can add some more words if you have any time left.

Modification for online use:

Send a private message to the pupil who has to act out a word, and set up a chat message for the others.

FAIRNESS 12-14 BASIC • 86 40 min WORDLIST: • STEAL • HONEST • RESPONSIBLE • RESPECTFUL • COMPASSIONATE • GENEROUS • CLEAN • EQUALITY • FAIR • CHEAT

Respect means treating others how you would want to be treated. This reflects the quality of being polite, kind, courteous, and tolerant of others’ views, cultures, and beliefs.

RESPECT
RESPECT 12-14 BASIC • 87
12-14 ˙ BASIC

Mirror/parents/press conference test 40 min

Description of the activity

1. Explain to the pupils that they will develop a short story. The main character is a fictional elite athlete, and it is important that he or she has a clear background. The story should include the fictional character’s name, age, and sport. The pupils should also think of an occasion where the athlete cheated by doping, and explain why they did this and with what substance or method (here you can learn more about the items on the prohibited list at the following website: https:// www.wada-ama.org/en/content/what-is-prohibited).

3. In this new setting the pupils play the role of the athlete in their stories and explain their actions to whoever they are facing - themselves, the press or a parent. The person they are facing reads the following questions:

• Why did you take this banned substance?

• How do you think other athletes feel about this?

• How did you feel when you took the substance?

• Would you have taken it if your best friend needed this same medication because they were sick?

• Can you imagine something or a situation that would have stopped you taking the substance?

A simple example could be "A 20-year-old sprinter took stimulants before the final at the Olympic Games", and you can ask the pupils to add more details to this before they start their own work. Give the pupils about 10 to 15 minutes to prepare their stories.

2. Ask pupils to read out their stories in front of the class. When they have all finished put the pupils in groups and place them:

a) in front of a mirror (MIRROR TEST)

b) on a chair in front of the classroom (PRESS CONFERENCE TEST)

c) opposite yourself (you will act as a parent) (PARENTS TEST)

4. Ask the pupils to write a letter or email from their future selves to their present selves, still playing the role of the athlete. They should develop the story, explain what happened and how they could have avoided choosing the wrong path.

Variation:

Do this activity in a different setting (e.g. politics, business, school, etc.).

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class, although breakout sessions for each test are recommended.

RESPECT 12-14 BASIC • 88

Compassion is the quality of protecting and caring about others' feelings, well-being, and welfare. It reflects supporting, helping and understanding others, particularly in times of need.

COMPASSION
COMPASSION 12-14 BASIC • 89 12-14
˙ BASIC

Introduction to compassion

Description of the activity

It is assumed that the majority of the pupils, who attended the 6-8 and 9-11 lessons, know the definition and principles of compassion and what it represents.

1. Ask the pupils to give a definition of compassion with their own words and to give examples.

2. Start a conversation on how compassion can be applied in sports situations.

Variation:

The pupils can act out situations related to compassion, and give examples of situations they witnessed or participated in that involved compassion.

Modification

10
min
COMPASSION 12-14 BASIC • 90
for online use: No modifications are needed for an online class.

Draw and explain it

Description of the activity

1. Divide pupils into groups of five (this can vary depending on the number of pupils).

2. Before starting the game ask each pupil to create a booklet with blank pieces of paper, which can be stapled together for easier use, in which the number of pages is equal to the number of pupils per group.

3. Each pupil starts by writing a short situation related to compassion (a man helps other person get up, a child hugs another child who is crying, etc.) on the first page of the booklet.

4. Once everyone is finished with the first page, they each pass their booklet to the pupil on their right. Having received the new booklet, each pupil reads the situation written on the first page, turns to the second page and draws a picture showing that situation.

5. Once everyone is finished drawing they pass the booklet to the next pupil, open to the page with their drawing on (the previous page should be hidden). Having received the booklet, the third pupil looks at the picture drawn by the second pupil, turns the page and writes a phrase representing the picture.

6. The game continues following the pattern - phrase, picture, phrase, picture, phrase - with only the most recent page shown to the next pupil. It ends after a full round is completed, once every pupil gets their original booklet back.

7. You can set a time for every stage, 3 minutes for example (so with groups of 5, a full round would last 15 minutes).

8. Once a full round has been completed select a booklet and ask the group who made it:

• Is the original situation really about compassion?

• How was the situation interpreted by the group members?

• Where did any changes from the first to last pages come from?

• How would the pupils themselves have tried to help the person in this situation?

9. If you notice that the situation is not really related to compassion, ask the pupils what changes could be made to improve this.

Modification for online use:

The game follows the same principles, but this time everything is done online via the website https://garticphone.com/en. You will have to create separate chatrooms and designate group leaders who will have to carry out this game in each room to avoid having too many players play at the same time, and thus much longer rounds.

30 min
COMPASSION 12-14 BASIC • 91

Honesty reflects the quality of being truthful toward others and oneself, and being able to be trusted. In life and sport this means that you don't deceive, steal, cheat or lie, and that you communicate your own thoughts and views truthfully, fairly, and respectfully the best you can.

HONESTY
˙
HONESTY 12-14 BASIC • 92
12-14
BASIC

Level the playing field

Description of the activity

1. Show the video "Level the playing field" to pupils.

2. After the video, ask the pupils the following questions and start a discussion:

• What is the main point of the video?

• What would sport look like if there were no rules?

• Can you give some examples of unfair advantage in your sport?

• How would you feel if you were competing against someone with an unfair advantage?

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

Link to video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZY-syOm qNQ.

10 min
HONESTY 12-14 BASIC • 93

30 minRules in sport

Description of the activity

1. Divide the pupils into small groups (5 to 7 pupils in one group).

2. Each group selects the sport of their choice, lists the key rules under which it is played and answers the questions on the “Rules in sport” sheet (Appendix).

3. The pupils present their answers to the other groups, and the class also discusses:

• Which organisation sets the rules?

• What is the purpose of the rules?

• How are the rules enforced?

• How successful are these rules in achieving their aims?

• How do doping and match-fixing affect sport?

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class, as groups can be put in breakout rooms.

HONESTY 12-14 BASIC • 94

Rules in sport

Your sport: Rules in this sport: • • • • • •

Who determines whether those rules have been broken?

What are the consequences for breaking the rules?

Are there any rules that you would change, and what would the effect be?

Are you familiar with any rule-breaking in this sport, like match-fixing, doping (use of prohibited substances to improve performance), discrimination, or abuse?

APP.: HONESTY 12-14 BASIC ˙
HONESTY 12-14 BASIC • 95

RESPONSIBILITY

Responsibility means taking care of others, our surroundings and ourselves. Being responsible means that you do the things you are expected to, and accept the consequences of your actions.

RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 BASIC • 96
12-14 ˙ BASIC

Team responsibility

Description of the activity

1. Tell the pupils that they will learn what responsible behaviour means in sport.

2. Show the cards (printed before class) and explain to that each card shows a picture that describes responsibility.

3. Divide the pupils into a few groups and tell them to have a group discussion.

4. Ask one pupil from each group to pick one card, turn it over and show the other pupils. Give the groups some time to discuss what the card shows.

5. Ask one pupil from each group to explain to the whole class what they believe a picture represents. After they are finished, explain the picture on each card and link it to the idea of responsibility by using the text on the other side as a reference.

6. Start a discussion with the following questions for each card:

Card IV:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the athletes?

• What was the role of the team’s coaches?

• What was the role of the team’s fans?

Card V:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the society?

• What was the role of everybody who likes sport?

• What was the role of the teams?

• What was the role of the person with a disability?

Card VI:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the coach?

• What was the role of the athlete?

Card I:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the swimmer?

• What was the role of the swimming federation?

Card II:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the players?

• What was the role of the referees?

Card III:

• Who acted responsibly in this case?

• What was the role of the parents?

• What was the role of the team staff?

• What was the role of the athletic support personnel?

Modification for online use:

For an online class use a PowerPoint presentation where pupils choose the number of a slide and then do everything as if they were in a classroom.

40 min
RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 BASIC • 97

Team responsibility

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Responsibility in sports is more visible than in any other area of life. Sports rules are generally known, and it is difficult to break them because athletes are always in front of the public. However, one swimmer recklessly smoked marijuana in front of an audience, which does not go with the character of an athlete who is a role model for young people. And thus the swimming federation punished him not for a doping violation, but for a disciplinary offense with a three-month ban from competing. Not only that, but that swimmer also lost some sponsorship contracts. Sport is all about responsibility.

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Sports judges and referees are empowered to make judgments, and their decisions must be respected. There is a way for athletes to appeal their decisions, but this is never done on the field. The question of responsibility towards yourself, the team, and the game means that you always obey such decisions. Frustration with a bad decision does not contribute to anything, no more points, no better result, no easier victory. Arguing with a referee only leads to a loss of focus, and makes defeat more likely. Therefore, the referee's decisions are never commented on during a game, but only when everything is over.

Parents often have ambitions that their children do not have, and because of this there are a lot of misunderstandings. The parents' role is not to achieve their dreams through their children, but to help them become good athletes. It is the responsibility of all the team staff to recognise parents' unrealistic ambitions and prevent them from negatively affecting their children. It is best when parents are just strong supporters of their children, and everything else should be left to coaches and experts in the field.

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APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 BASIC ˙
RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 BASIC • 98
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Team responsibility

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Sports greetings are an integral part of sports culture, and represent the essence of fair play. It is the responsibility of all participants, athletes, and coaches, as well as fans, to respect their opponents and greet each other warmly, even after a loss. Such an attitude is rare in life, although it is still true that there can be unpleasant scenes, arguments, and even fights over sports results. However, if there were no sports greetings, then the idea of sport would not be the same.

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Many people have a disability and so cannot be fully active. Society's role here is to work to integrate those with a disability so they can do everything others can, and all of us can help with this. People with a disability who compete at the highest level are called Paralympic athletes. With their results, they achieve what seems impossible and inspire everyone to test their own limits.

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Sport prepares a person to win and lose. Sport teaches a person to be part of a team and to be part of a community. Sport motivates a person to listen and prepare to achieve a common goal. And most importantly, sport teaches a person to be dignified and modest in victory, and never to humiliate their opponents. To put it simply - responsible behaviour is just as important in any sport as the game itself.

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APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 BASIC ˙
RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 BASIC • 99
Place and date: Teacher’s
HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE BASIC LEVEL OF THE “I VALUE SPORT” PROGRAMME FOR THOSE AGED 12 TO 14 CERTIFICATE
signature:

FAIRNESS

Fairness reflects the importance of everyone having an equal opportunity to engage and succeed in activities, without getting an unfair advantage. Fairness also represents a lack of favouritism for one side or another.

12-14 ˙ ADVANCED FAIRNESS 12-14 ADVANCED • 100

Have you ever...?

Description of the activity

1. Tell the pupils to form a straight line, standing side by side.

2. For every action that they’ve done from the list you will read, they must take a step forward towards a finish line.

3. Ask the students the following questions:

• Have you ever shaken another player's hand after a game?

• Have you ever congratulated another player after a game?

• Have you ever helped a teammate during a game?

• Have you ever helped a classmate during an activity?

• Have you ever cheated during a game?

• Have you ever lied to win?

• Have you ever broken the rules?

• Have you ever yelled at a teacher or coach?

• Have you ever thanked your teacher for their work?

• Have you ever lied to your parents about something you did?

4. Start the discussion by asking pupils to remember when they did the things listed above, and how they felt afterwards.

Modification for online use:

This game can only be played on-line in a questions and answers version, followed by a discussion.

40 min
FAIRNESS 12-14 ADVANCED • 101

Respect means treating others how you would want to be treated. This reflects the quality of being polite, kind, courteous, and tolerant of others’ views, cultures, and beliefs.

RESPECT
12-14
RESPECT 12-14 ADVANCED • 102
˙ ADVANCED

Easy or hard?

Description of the activity

1. Print scales from 1 to 10 (Appendix) or let the pupils draw them. Each pupil needs 8 scales.

2. Read them the following scenarios and let them decide if it is an easy (scale 1) or hard (scale 10) decision to make. (Note: They should not decide whether to answer yes or no, but reflect on the difficulty of the process of decision making):

a) Your favourite sports brand makes its products overseas using child labour. Do you continue to use the brand?

b) You’re playing a football video game with a friend. In the final minute of the game the score is a draw and your friend’s controller stops working. Would you take advantage of this situation and score the winning goal?

c) During a bicycle race drawing pins were placed on the road, and many of the other riders got flat tyres and had to repair them. Would you take advantage of this situation and cycle even faster?

d) The list of banned substances comes into force every year on January the 1st. Now it is September the 1st. A new medication promises better recovery for athletes, but was originally developed as a response to a new disease which can be life-threatening for young children. At the moment the active substances in this medication are allowed, but the World Anti-Doping Agency has already stated that they will be prohibited by January the 1st next year. Would you take the medication while it is still allowed?

3. Get the pupils to compare their answers and talk about them.

4. Ask some of the pupils to stand in front of the class and read the texts (a to d) as if they were affected by these situations. E.g.:

• "My name is NAME, I am 7 years old and I work in DEVELOPING COUNTRY in a sewing room. I earn only 0.1% of the average income in your country."

• "I’m NAME, and I’m super angry because my friend scored a goal while my controller was broken. This made me feel...."

• "I’m a rider in a professional cycling team. This was a very important race for me, but I feel cheated because I got a flat tyre after someone placed drawing pins on the road. If I’d finished this stage in a good position then I’d have had a good shot at the podium."

• "I am the parent of a 3-year-old child. Our child suffers from this new disease, and it is hard for us to get this medication. This is especially a difficult for use to accept, because we’ve heard that some healthy athletes use this medication to improve their performance."

5. Ask the pupils to then reassess the situations, and see if their opinions have changed.

6. Put the pupils in groups of 3 or 4. Ask the pupils to come up with some difficult decisions related to politics, food, animals or the environment. Smartphones or computers can be used to find ideas if you think they are needed.

Variation:

Ask the pupils what they would do in each situation, and discuss this.

Modification for online use:

class.

No
modifications are needed for an online
40
RESPECT 12-14 ADVANCED • 103
min
RESPECT 12-14 ADVANCED • 104 APP.: RESPECT 12-14 ADVANCED ˙ Easy or hard? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Compassion is the quality of protecting and caring about others' feelings, well-being, and welfare. It reflects supporting, helping and understanding others, particularly in times of need.

COMPASSION
• Blindfolds 12-14 ˙ ADVANCED COMPASSION 12-14 ADVANCED • 105

Help each other

Description of the activity

1. In the gym create an obstacle course with different objects that you can find (benches, balls, frames, cones, etc.). It must be challenging but still easy enough to overcome with a disability. (If you don't have access to the gym you can create an obstacle course in the classroom, using the furniture as obstacles.) Make sure that there is enough space around the obstacle course, so that safety will not be an issue.

2. Divide pupils into pairs. In each pair, one of the pupils is blindfolded and the other is not.

3. The first round consists of having the blindfolded pupil in each pair try and finish the course without any help. The second round will have the blindfolded pupil try and finish the course again, but this time with the second pupil guiding them through the whole course.

4. Repeat the game with the roles reversed, so each pupil can understand the importance of each role.

5. Once everyone has played both parts start the conversation by asking questions such as:

• How did it feel doing the circuit without help? And with help?

• How did the other pupil help you?

• Why was this useful, or not?

Variation:

Ask pupils to draw a sort of maze, or any kind of path with a beginning and an end, on a piece of paper. After having a look at it once, the blindfolded pupil will first have to try and draw their way out of the maze (or along the path) with no help, then try again for the second round, except that the second pupil will now help them.

Modification for online use:

Use the “variation” idea. After sharing their screen and opening the drawing in Microsoft Paint or another program, one pupil will use the pencil function and try and draw their way out of the maze (or along the path) with their eyes closed (or blindfolded), then do it again but with the help of another pupil.

30 min
COMPASSION 12-14 ADVANCED • 106

The forbidden word

Description of the activity

1. Pupils will talk about compassion and talk about what they remembered and learned from this lesson. The objective is for the pupils to talk about and describe compassion without pausing or using fillers such as "um" or “er”, the sounds you make when thinking, as these are all forbidden. Everybody needs to say something, a minimum of one sentence, about compassion, it can be an example (from real life, a movie, sport ...), a definition, a synonym, an action, and so on.

2. Give the pupils 5 minutes to think about compassion before starting the game. To prevent pupils from over-preparing, they will be asked to take part in no specific order. Once a pupil has finished their sentence, they point to another pupil while looking at them, and in this way the next speaker is chosen.

3. When someone uses a forbidden word they are out of the game, and the game continues until only one person is remaining, the winner.

4. You can intervene when you feel that a pupil's speech is not related to compassion, and explain why.

Variation:

THE EXTRA WORD - This game takes the opposite approach, and instead of losing when using a filler word, each pupil is given a word related to compassion and must use it in their speech.

Some words you can use: help, understanding, emotion, kindness, sympathy, empathy, and feeling.

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

10 min
COMPASSION 12-14 ADVANCED • 107

Honesty reflects the quality of being truthful toward others and oneself, and being able to be trusted. In life and sport this means that you don't deceive, steal, cheat or lie, and that you communicate your own thoughts and views truthfully, fairly, and respectfully the best you can.

HONESTY
12-14 ˙ ADVANCED HONESTY 12-14 ADVANCED • 108

What do you do when no one is watching?

Description of the activity

1. Tell the pupils to form groups of 4 or 5.

2. Ask the pupils to discuss the following scenario: A child buys a drink and notices that the shopkeeper accidentally gave them too much change. One of their parents is present, but is distracted.

3. Each group decides what they would do. Do they tell the shopkeeper and give the money back? Do they take the money and not tell anyone? Do they tell their parent?

4. Each group reports back to the class on what they decided and on the reasons for their choices.

5. Lead the discussion with these questions:

• What are the main values that are being tested here?

• Would it make a difference if they took the money to buy something they needed?

• What if they take the money to give to someone who needs it?

• What does it mean to the shopkeeper if the money is taken?

• What would they do if they got caught by the shopkeeper or their parent?

• What are the consequences of each different action, and how might they make each person in the story feel?

• Does it make a difference to your behaviour if someone is watching?

for online use: No modifications are needed for an online class, as groups can be put in breakout rooms.

Modification

10 min HONESTY 12-14 ADVANCED • 109

The lying experiment

Description of the activity

1. Phase 1: Ask the pupils what are the most common things that they lie about. Together with the pupils, write 5 simple questions about these things.

2. Phase 2: Ask for 5 volunteers to participate in the experiment. Explain to them that they will be asked 5 simple questions and that they should lie when answering two of them, but that the lies should be believable. Give the score sheets to the other pupils (Appendix) and tell them to write down the names of the 5 volunteers.

3. Ask the volunteers to stand in front of the class and answer the questions. The other pupils should observe them carefully and try to guess whether they are lying or not. If a pupil gets the answer right, they put 1 point on the score scoring sheet next to the volunteer’s name.

4. Write the names of the volunteers on the board (or on your own score sheet), and ask the pupils to tell you their scores. The volunteer with the highest score is the worst at lying, and the one with the lowest score is the best.

5. Discuss the experiment with the pupils:

• How did you tell when someone was lying? Was it just because you knew them well, and knew what they were saying was false, or because they acted differently?

• Why do people lie?

• What are the benefits and disadvantages of lying?

Modification for online use:

• Phase 1 - no modifications needed.

• Phase 2 - volunteers film themselves when giving answers so that the videos can be played during the online class, and the other pupils will be able to clearly see them.

30 min HONESTY 12-14 ADVANCED • 110

The lying experiment

APP.: HONESTY 12-14 ADVANCED ˙
HONESTY 12-14 ADVANCED • 111
Name Score 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Name Score 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Name Score 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

RESPONSIBILITY

Responsibility means taking care of others, our surroundings and ourselves. Being responsible means that you do the things you are expected to, and accept the consequences of your actions.

• Playing cards (Appendix) 12-14 ˙ ADVANCED RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 ADVANCED • 112

Who has to be responsible in sport?

Description of the activity

1. Show the playing cards (Appendix) to the pupils and explain that some cards have a picture and they will need to describe the situation, while some cards are blank on which they will draw something that describes responsibility.

2. Show the pupils a blank card and tell them to draw their own picture related to the idea of responsibility. Allow pupils to express themselves, and help them if they have questions.

3. Show the pupils a card with a picture and ask them how it represents responsibility. Ask the pupils to come up with a related example from their everyday lives.

Hints for the cards:

II Responsibility to keep sport clean • To know the anti-doping rules • To act in line with anti-doping rules • To make a report when you suspect someone is doping • To not allow any banned substance to enter your body • To say no to doping • To motivate team mates to play clean

III Responsibility to athletic support personnel (ASP) • To treat ASP with respect • To listen to your coach • To do the best you can • To be part of the team

• To understand that your power is your ASP • To not forget your ASP • To thank your ASP

IV Responsibility to not use drugs • To know the consequences of using drugs • To not hang out with people who use drugs • To not stay in a place where people are smoking marijuana • To encourage your team mates not to take drugs • To publicly speak against drugs in sport • To support social campaigns against drugs

Modification for online use:

No modifications are needed for an online class.

V

Responsibility for proper nutrition •

To eat healthy food •

To not use food supplements •

To be aware of the dangers of food supplements • To be always well hydrated • To respect the advice of a sport nutritionist • To prepare your own food • To choose and buy your own food

40 min
RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 ADVANCED • 113

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APP.: RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 ADVANCED ˙
RESPONSIBILITY 12-14 ADVANCED • 114
Who has to be responsible in sport?
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date:
HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE ADVANCED LEVEL OF THE
VALUE SPORT” PROGRAMME FOR THOSE AGED 12 TO 14
Place and
Teacher’s signature:
“I
CERTIFICATE

ABOUT THE I VALUE PROJECT AND THIS TOOLKIT ABOUT THE I VALUE PROJECT AND THIS TOOLKIT

The I Value Sport toolkit was prepared as part of the Erasmus+ project I Value. This started in 2019 and aims to develop, implement, and scientifically evaluate an early doping prevention programme, targeting school children aged 6 to 14 years old, their teachers, and parents. The programmewhich is co-developed by experienced educators from five national anti-doping organisations, experienced academics from two leading universities in the field of doping prevention and schoolteachers - is values-based, evidence-informed and meets the diverse socio-political and environmental needs of the member countries.

Most existing doping prevention programmes are not evidence-based. When doping prevention programmes and long-term plans are prepared, practitioners in the field working against doping rarely consult researchers, and the other way around. Furthermore, researchers rarely consider the needs of practitioners, and thus how to implement the results of their work effectively in practice. Effective prevention programmes (and research) require collaboration between practitioners and academics, and thus the I Value project sets an example of bridging the gap between both groups.

Doping has become a societal problem and a public health concern. Many societal and sporting pressures are pushing young people towards taking performance and/or image enhancing substances to improve their looks, work harder, study longer, and be more concentrated. That is why it is essential that we start early with prevention efforts, through developing a range of positive values so the younger generation will see doping as a form of cheating, and thus reject both doping and related behaviours. In this way we can have a significant influence on children’s actions and attitudes.

During the development of the programme the I Value project team gathered and reviewed existing doping prevention materials from around the world, and the existing international literature. The findings from those reviews served as a basis for the development of this prevention program and its resources.

More about the I Value project is available on www.i-value.eu.

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