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slanted 25 visites et auteurs ABM Studio, Akatre, Quentin Aldhui, Amelange, Philippe Apeloig, Atelier de Création Graphique, Atelier Formes Vives, Atelier Michel Bouvet, Benoît Bodhuin, Caroline Bouige, Lea Brousse, c-album, Charlotte Cheetham, Coco, Jocelyn Cottencin, Sophie Della Corte, Des Signes, Pierre-Olivier Deschamps, deValence, Jonathan Fabreguettes, Fontyou, Morgan Fortems, Fabienne Francisco, Frédéric Teschner Studio, Amélie Gastaut, Stéphane Goddard, GUsto, Hannah & Joel, Ilka Helmig, Helmo, Mehdi Hercberg, Étienne Hervy, Laurent Fétis & Sarah Martinon, Olivier Lebrun, Les Graphiquants, Véfa Lucas, Ian Lynam, Guillaume Mary, Thibault Maupetit, Fanette Mellier, Isabelle Moisy, Charlotte Molas, My Name is Wendy, Vincent Perrottet, Pinar&Viola, Jean François Porchez, Émilie Rigaud, Étienne Robial, Raban Ruddigkeit, Alice Sfintesco, Julie Sittler, Spassky Fischer, Superscript², Syndicat, Frédéric Tacer, Pierre Vanni, Vier5, Yorgo&Co

video interviews slanted.de/paris


2

Pinar&Viola Como High Tech, 2014 Digital paint, T-shirt line presented during Paris Fashion Week, the patterns are rejuvenated P&V classics. Photography: Chantapitch Wiwatchaikamol

P 252


3

Les Graphiquants Floating, 2010 Poster, offset print, 120 Ă— 176 cm

P 251


4

Les Graphiquants Half Decade Beast – Moustache, 2014 Poster, offset print, 65 × 85 cm

P 251


5

Yorgo&Co Le Baloon – football club and bar, 2014 Visual identity

P 253


6

Les Graphiquants Comité Colbert, 2014 Press book, offset edition, 16 × 23 cm

P 251


7

Helmo Palais de Tokyo Magazine, 2012–2014 Art direction and design (issues #15–#20)

P 250


12

Yorgo&Co Lacoste Lab, 2012 Product design

P 253


13

c-album Grand Palais, 2012 Visual identity and branding, Paris. Agathe HondrĂŠ, Laurent Ungerer

P 248


14

Frédéric Teschner Studio P 249 Nanterre-Amandiers, 2014–2015 Global identity for the theatre, 112 p., 21 × 29,7 cm


15

Helmo Studio view, Feb. 11th, 2015

P 250


20

Syndicat Studio view, Feb. 9th, 2015

P 253


21

Les Graphiquants Studio view, Feb. 12th, 2015

P 251


24

deValence Et balancez mes cendres sur mickey, 2014 Poster for the play directed by Rodriguo Garcia at La Commune centre dramatique national d’Aubervilliers, 100 × 150 cm

P 249


25

Pierre Vanni Les Siestes Électroniques, 2014 Visual identity for the adventurous music festival

P 253


30

Akatre At Least For Now, 2014 Visual identity (photo, design object and typeface) for the singer Benjamin Clementine

P 247


31

Yorgo&Co Black Crows, 2006–today Launch design and art direction

P 253


32

ABM Studio Philippe LĂŠvy, Rock etc., 2013 Enhanced e-book, concept, production, graphic design and programming. Published by Art Book Magazine Publishing

P 247


33

Les Graphiquants Molitor photo box, 2015 Poster, limited edition, Gil Rigoulet

P 251


34

Charlotte Cheetham Slide Shows, 2014 Project by Charlotte Cheetham, designed by Pierre Vanni

P 248


35

Atelier de CrĂŠation Graphique Studio view, Feb. 9th, 2015

P 247


40

Spassky Fischer Razzle Dazzle, 2014 Website showing the visual identity designed for the architecture office Razzle Dazzle

P 253


43

Spassky Fischer MAC / VAL newspaper, 2015 Concert’s newspaper for the MAC / VAL, museum of contemporary Art in Vitry, France, 30 × 40 cm

P 253


50

Syndicat Studio view, Feb. 9th, 2015

P 253


51

Syndicat Studio view, Feb. 9th, 2015

P 253


58

Syndicat VDP, since 2014 New identity for Villa du parc art centre, posters, 120 Ă— 176 cm

P 253


59

ABM Studio Our House In The Middle Of Our Street, 2012 Enhanced e-book, concept, graphic design and programming. Published by Art Book Magazine Publishing

P 247


62

deValence Hypérion, 2014 Poster for the play directed by Marie José Malis at La Commune centre dramatique national d’Aubervilliers, 100 × 150 cm

P 249


63

Spassky Fischer P 253 MAC / VAL, 2013–2015 Series of posters for the exhibitions at MAC / VAL, museum of contemporary Art in Vitry, France part of the visual identity, 200 × 150 cm each


66

Des Signes CNSMD, 2014–2015 Visual identity for the National Superior Conservatory of Dramatic Art of Paris, various sizes

P 249


Helmo

Jazzdor, 2014

67

Poster for Strasbourg Jazz Festival, 120 Ă— 176 cm and in a set of 40 Ă— 60 cm. Portraits by Christophe Urbain

P 250


70

Frédéric Teschner Studio Studio view, Feb. 9th, 2015

P 249


71

Frédéric Teschner Studio Studio view, Feb. 9th, 2015

P 249


72

Akatre Studio view, Feb. 13th, 2015

P 247


73

Frédéric Teschner Studio H A V R E, 2012 5 posters designed for the exhibition Une Saison Graphique at Le Havre, first price of the international festival of posters and graphic design of Chaumont, silk screen print in five colors, 120 × 176 cm

P 249


92

Hannah & Joel P 250 Mario, Mario’s rental room, Paris Little did we know that on this day, hidden underneath this tattooed skin and ever-surrounding clouds of smoke, we had just encountered a brilliant mind and a new friend.


93


96

Fontyou Fonts Catalogue, 2014 14,8 Ă— 21 cm

P 249


97

Hannah & Joel P 250 Tear it down, build it up, Ch창telet Les Halles, Paris Shot of a lonely worker at the early phases of the reconstruction of Ch창telet Les Halles.


98

c-album Studio view, Feb. 14th, 2015

P 248


99

c-album Institut du monde arabe, 2013 Branding and opening event. Marc Maione, Zane Najjar, Laurent Ungerer

P 248


106

Laurent FĂŠtis & Sarah Martinon Studio view, Feb. 10th, 2015

P 250


107

Laurent FĂŠtis & Sarah Martinon Studio view, Feb. 10th, 2015

P 250


110

Étienne Hervy Karel Martens, 2013 A4 wallpaper for Chaumont festival Monozukuri, façons et surfaces d’impression, 2013 Travelling exhibition about creative considerations of the materiality of a book. Curators: Sacha Léopold, François Havegeer and Thierry Chancogne Display: Sacha Léopold and Lionel Dinis Salazar

P 250


111

Laurent FĂŠtis & Sarah Martinon Studio view, Feb. 10th, 2015

P 250


114

Akatre Studio view, Feb. 13th, 2015

P 247


115

Laurent Fétis Hell Featuring P. Diddy – The DJ, 2009 International Deejay Gigolo Records, GIGOLO 255T2

P 250


130

Pierre-Olivier Deschamps / Agence VU’ RÊsidence Passage des Marais, 75010 Paris

P 249


131

Atelier de CrÊation Graphique Secours populaire français re-edition, 2013 Visual identity for the French organization that helps people in financial and social difficulties

P 247


136

Atelier de CrÊation Graphique Secours populaire français re-edition, 2013 Visual identity for the French organization that helps people in financial and social difficulties

P 247


137

Pierre-Olivier Deschamps / Agence VU’ Résidence Avenue des Champs Elysées, 75008 Paris

P 249


140

Atelier Michel Bouvet Studio view, Feb. 12th, 2015

P 248


141

Atelier Michel Bouvet Studio view, Feb. 12th, 2015

P 248


Fontnames Illustrated

Liberté, Égalité, Solidarité FONTNAMES ILLUSTRATED

curated by Lea Brousse & Raban Ruddigkeit

146

Die Ereignisse in Paris im Januar 2015 haben wenige Menschen unberührt gelassen. Doch es sind besonders die Zeichner, Illustratoren und vor allem Karikaturisten, die ihre alltägliche Arbeit nun hinterfragen und zum Nachdenken gezwungen worden sind. Und dabei fällt Tokyo designer Ian Lynam on randomness as both an inheritance and auf, dass wir längst nicht so frei sind, wie wir glauben, längst nicht so a methodology. kritisch, wie wir könnten und längst nicht so ehrlich, wie wir eigentlich müssten. Das Vermächtnis der unbeugsamen Charlies ist deshalb von einer besonderen Schwere; wer kämpft kann verlieren. Wer nicht kämpft, hat schon verloren.

Lea Brousse & Raban Ruddigkeit P 248 / P 252


147

Sophie Della Corte Sans Merci

P 249


154

Charlotte Molas Parisine

P 251


155

StĂŠphane Goddard ENfer

P 250


10 × 10 — Vive la campagne! — 10 questions and 100 answers from 10 designers and studios (not from Paris!)

156

Atelier Formes Vives Benoît Bodhuin Jocelyn Cottencin Jonathan Fabreguettes Morgan Fortems GUsto Véfa Lucas My Name is Wendy Vincent Perrottet Superscript² 10 × 10 – Vive la campagne!

Slanted 25 – Paris


1 What do you love about not living in Paris? Are there things that you miss? Atelier Formes Vives Maybe, we should reverse the question. What do we like in Marseilles, Brest and Nantes? Our friends, our favorite and peaceful places, landscapes, beautiful natural sites which are easily reachable, associative life and links between art and activist movement we are involved in. It does exist the same in Paris, but everything seems so divided, distant, and the life is so fast. You need much money to live cosily, and, in this way, too many things turn into “working machines.” Perhaps, meetings, swaps and exchanges are not so easy in province. At first sight, you think that all cultural events are centralized in Paris, but all things considered, many things, shows, touring bands also occur in our cities. (Adrien) The only thing I miss are my 30 minute rides across Paris by bike twice a day, at full speed. (Nicolas) I do miss, bars’ terraces, open during the whole night, atmospheres, this feeling to cross over the world in just a few metro stations and, naturally, friends and the south-east suburb. Benoît Bodhuin Nantes is a beautiful city, a lot of stuff happens here, it has a nice climate, clean air, the sea isn’t far, neither is the Campagne, there are many parks, good libraries, good public trans­portation and bike paths … and the price of housing isn’t too high. Paris is a beautiful city too, it’s only two hours by train. In France, most of the graphic events are happening in the provinces Chaumont, Le Havre and Échirolle.

157

Jocelyn Cottencin I was born in Paris and spent my childhood in the suburbs. I studied in Paris and finished my training at The Ecole National Supérieure des Arts décoratifs. After that I started my studio and moved to Montreuil for some years, a sort of Parisian Brooklyn. Then I moved to Rennes for family reasons and to be closer to the ocean. I evidently have an affection for Paris. I got attached to it during this very intense and creative period when I left the ENSAD and started my

10 × 10 – Vive la campagne!

professional activity. My relationship to Paris today: it’s mostly about friends I miss. Obvious­ ly, cultural programs are quite strong. Music groups, choreographic or theatrical projects that interest me are strongly visible in Paris. The city is sublime and beautiful but I find it quite closed and not very dynamic. There is a state of mind that is not really cheerful or rapturous, compared to cities like Amsterdam, Brussels or New York where I just went few days ago to work. Rennes is a pleasant town, dynamic enough, but especially not far from the sea and ocean ...

Jocelyn Cottencin, Litanies, conseils et autres idioties, 2013 Series of five posters for le Voyage à Nantes

Jonathan Fabreguettes I live in Angoulême. Quite obviously, what I love is living closer to nature, in a quieter, less polluted place. I need only a few minutes walk to see huge trees, walk along a river. I do not really miss anything. Moreover, like Paris, Angoulême is a city with an important cultural and graphic activity, there are museums, international comic festivals, or film festivals. Morgan Fortems Living in a smaller city is like living a little out from the buzz, off the noise. This probably helps to put yourself a little away from the streams of fashion or the star system and you avoid losing too much time and energy chasing mermaids. Here, we care less to be cool, hip, or being the next big thing ... We’re on a slower but more human life and scale, we ride bikes

Slanted 25 – Paris


Vincent Perrottet The great advantage of working in “normal” cities is that one knows better the environment and the political and administrative function­ ing. In small towns or in medium-sized cities, we can measure the effect produced by our work on people and groups formed (associa­ tions, institutions, private sector ...). In Paris, as in most large cities, everything is dissolved in the amount of information, especially in a society that is always on the run. Only what is BIG is visible. Ordinary things, whether beauti­ful or ugly become invisible with so many other things around. You have a high impact with your activity when you know all the players of municipal or regional dynamics.

Vincent Perrottet, Sadia in front of her portrait, 2013 Series of 35 posters showing graphic portraits of inhabitants of Marseille

162

Superscript² It’s not easy to say precisely if it’s more easy to work in a smaller city. Paris is always a powerful place in France to find business in design, even if a lot of designers are based there. In our case, it was a great choice. Not work­ing in Paris gave us quickly a kind of national visibility, there is few graphic design studio in Lyon, we were like a curiosity out of the capital. We think working in a small town is the same as working in Paris, clients are always in a hurry and you’ve to fight everyday to make them understand that you need time to produce good work.

4 How much of Contemporary French Design is influenced by its history? Atelier Formes Vives It’s difficult for us to determinate what would be the “Contemporary French Design.” For sure there are design practices that stand in a more modern way or in a trendy spirit comparing to others … in the same time, there’s a lot of different practice on which you cannot put this label on. In our case, we feel in filiation with Grapus (to talk about a French collective), but we also feel alone! Grapus was very important in French graphic-design history to the point that a generation of designers, which began with computers’ shift and after the fall of USSR, in 90’ and 2000’, had clearly denied this heritage. This generation was looking for a model rather in Dutch, Swiss or German design. Maybe, a specify aspect of French graphicdesign is the figure, not so easy to define, of “author-designer.” Following cinema’ s system that made a separation between “commercial movies” and “author movies,” French designers aimed to do the same in graphic-design land­scape, starting 70’. This distinction is based on artistic and ethical claim, about their practice: graphic-design is not just forms and function values, it reveals also of a political position and aesthetic ambition. Thus, we can see, the heritage of poster’s painters (19 and beginning go 20 century), painters were in France the first graphic-­ designers (the “affichistes”). If today posters have not the same impact and importance, some of designers continue to develop singular visual approach in their work, underlining an artistic process, looking for alterity inside commissions. Finally, this type of work is often more highlighted than others in books and exhibitions. Benoît Bodhuin I’m not a historian. But it seems that for a long time in France, the practice of communication was divided in advertising and art / illustration (advertising people are often more interested in money than in image). There have been, of course, great designers, but they didn’t suffi­ciently reach the general public and clients which still prefer advertising agencies. But I think that it’s changing (slowly), France has

10 × 10 – Vive la campagne!

Slanted 25 – Paris


a lot of great young graphic designers who are trying to make things happen. This context gives France its particularity (perhaps less attached to the rigor of the grid and more to drawing). Jocelyn Cottencin I do not know how to answer this question in gen­eral. For me, I have the impression that the history of French design is rather related to a form of expression of the letter. Roger Excoffon can be a kind of model for this relationship to history. Today, it seems to me that it is more fluid, there is more mode of expression or current, the sources of inspiration are quite different. Jonathan Fabreguettes Generally speaking, typography is a discipline much influenced by its history, the history of writing and printing. French type design is not an exception to this rule. I always believed that being aware of what has been done before helps you making interesting (and new) things. Morgan Fortems I am not an expert in either art or graphic design history and I would not be able to answer with proper arguments. I just feel like France has been stuck too long in an image based approach while systems, grids and typog­raphy were the signs of modernity elsewhere. After a first step during the “French touch” decade in the 90s, French graphic design has been slowly coming back on stage. Nowadays it is stronger, mainly in two fields where it used to excel: typography and illus­tration. I would not be able to point specificities and say which part of it is a legacy but it seems like the brand new scene is both exploring new paths and referencing the past. Illustrator Jean Jullien is a good example, his drawings are in direct relations with our tradition of press drawing, Cassandre, or mai 68.

163

GUsto How much? We don’t know. But today, there is a real trend and a great appetite for the history of French graphic design in our country. The French modern history has always been a bit shameful compared to the one of our European neighbors, like Switzerland, the Netherlands etc. But recently, many erudite books of talented French researchers have helped the French designers to have a kind of group therapy. We’re a little better now.

10 × 10 – Vive la campagne!

Véfa Lucas Many of my designer, artist and architect friends have chosen to settle down outside of Paris because in reality, Paris is not that modern. As soon as you go walking through Berlin or Amsterdam, you understand that in many ways Paris is old-fashioned and very slow with ecological innovations. I believe more in the cultural and artistic leadership of other metropolis. My Name is Wendy We have no idea. Lots of people say that Paris is the ideal destination. We are not sure about this. However, when we first started out, several people in Paris treated us completely wrong. Partly because we were young and on the other because we were “provincials.” Fortunately, it didn’t happen again for years. It would be good if things were less centralized.

My Name is Wendy, Kiblind issue N°50, 2014 Kiblind magazine invited 50 artists to design one white cover at Gaîté Lyrique

Vincent Perrottet The French graphic design is built on multiple national and international influences. The poster comes from painting and its ramifica­ tions in the decorative arts. In France, the Polish school of poster scored many creators. Those working on graphic identities, signage and architecture taught in German schools, Dutch and Swiss, who are publishing too, with some influence of the French editorial culture. It is important to recognize

Slanted 25 – Paris


10 × 10 — Love Paris — 10 questions and 100 answers from 10 designers and studios (from Paris!)

174

Philippe Apeloig Caroline Bouige & Isabelle Moisy (Étapes) Mehdi Hercberg Olivier Lebrun Guillaume Mary Jean François Porchez Émilie Rigaud Étienne Robial Frédéric Tacer Vier5 10 × 10 – Love Paris

Slanted 25 – Paris


1 How would you describe your work? What processes are you interested in? Philippe Apeloig Typography is the main feature of my work, as you know. I enjoy transcending its limits, going beyond functionality. Most of all, I try to bring liveliness and joy to my typographic systems and letters. I am most interested in the research aspect of design. Over the years I have compiled a sort of mental dictionary containing references from painting, architecture, dance, and litera­ture. These provide my inspiration. But I also investigate each project before beginning the initial sketches – exploring the relevant history, cultural context, and so forth. Then the cre­ative process goes through many steps during which I am never quite sure I am going in the right direction. I do many sketches before the work is finalized. You have to be fearless about uncovering fresh ideas and trust that the process itself will lead you to new discoveries.

175

Étapes (Isabelle Moisy) We’ve been sharing with Caroline Bouige the position of editor in chief at Étapes Magazine since three years now. For the last three years, I’ve shared the role of co-editor in chief of Étapes with Caroline Bouige. We make the main editorial decisions together and we work alternatively on the general and graphic coordination of its issues, which means that one ensures the good reception of the articles and takes care of the teams and the layout, while the other books the contents of the next issue. We handle the publication of six issues every year, each one consisting of 224 pages dedicated to graphic design, design itself, art direction, typography and, more generally, to visual culture. Our work consists of guaranteeing the up­holding of the editorial policy for all the proj­ects that are developed within the media, and to ensure the general coordination with the rest of the team. It is composed of an editorial head for the digital contents, two people in marketing and advertising, one webmaster and a team of designers, and a free-lance proof­ reader. We are a small team but it allows us to understand everybody’s challenges. We also deal with a part of the magazine promotion through various partnerships, event organizations or conferences, most of the time

10 × 10 – Love Paris

at Gaité Lyrique arts center. Generally speaking, we make sure there is a good balance of every component of the media, on its human side just as well as its editorial contents, promotion, distribution, etc. ... It’s a matter of gumption and curiosity who must be renewed every day according to the readers’ interests evolution , the news and the other press media. Mehdi Hercberg My work is mainly graphic but also deals with space and sound. I would say that it’s rather impulsive, driven by simple ideas, motivations. It’s dealing with failure, oxymora and popular images. I also do very different kind of things from illustrations for kids to harsh noise instal­lations so it’s hard to talk more generally about one single process.

Mehdi Hercberg, Untitled, 2015 Ink on paper, DIN A6

Olivier Lebrun I’m working as a graphic designer in a field that I’m trying to expand. Until 2010, I was a collab­orator of Frédéric Teschner, and we mostly worked for institutions like Centre Pompidou, MAC / VAL and Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, also for artists, curators and cultural events. Since then, I’ve set up my own practice and am working with friends, clients or whoever is up to. I’m not looking at a partic­ular context. There are qualities and investigations to do in a ton of things – it’s just a matter of «plaisir»,

Slanted 25 – Paris


outside the capital. This slowly seems to change though. For the better if you ask me. The fact is that the majority of Parisian desig­ners (like myself) come from other cities (sometimes other countries). So, if there was something unique about this design scene, I guess it would be its plurality. That being said, talking about the more general “French design scene” would seem more accurate. Vier5 Paris is a city in which everything is possible. Paris in some way is unique. 6 There seems to be a divide among French designers: you either work in the cultural field / non-profit field or in advertising with little or no overlap. Where do you think this separation / differentiation come from? Philippe Apeloig Things have been changing over the last ten years, with fewer and fewer opportunities to realize good design for the nonprofit sector. The bureaucracy has become unwieldy and the economic support is no longer there, so it is something I am moving slowly away from in my practice. It is unfortunate, because the great cultural initiatives offered creative freedom, respect and prestige, and marvelous opportu­ nities for collaboration. In advertising there is rarely an opportunity for collaborations. I don’t know if the gap really exists, that hard split you refer to – between designers who work in the cultural arena and those who work for profit – but I think more and more desig­ners will be working in both arenas as they find opportunities for work. New technologies and communication strategies, new business mod­els, and the next generation’s changing desires and goals are all very much affecting how, and for whom, designers work. I don’t think it’s an either / or situation.

184

Ètapes (Caroline Bouige) In France, on a strictly graph­ical point of view, the massive influence of the Grapus Collective, whose work incorporated political, social and cultural approaches, signifi­cantly changed things. The idea that has been shared for a long time, and is still carried on, is that a good graphic designer was someone who didn’t try to sell you shampoo or any other

10 × 10 – Love Paris

consumer good, but someone responsible for the production of public interest images. There is also an education issue, with for example the marketing schools willing to create “creative marketers” without raising awareness about the value of graphical quality, and the relevance of calling on professional designers. We could also speak about a lack of image-related education. If we have the culture of the word, there is still a lot to achieve about the visual one. The Fine Art schools rarely produce publicists ... A very few advertising agencies bring forward graphic visuals of quality also because there are not so many clients ready to take risks, or who don’t have the adequate cul­ture to judge the production. The cultural partners are necessarily more educated to those matters. We could still discuss about the other fea­tures that contributed to lead to this situation, but trying to explain all the causes of this trend would take a lot of time if you don’t want to generalize. The main conse­quence is that we ended up generating a vicious circle: the rejection of publicity by the good design­ ers, the often poor quality of the production on the advertising agencies side, and a big part of the public who is not always demanding about the images they see every day. Those three tendencies maintain themselves together. (Isabelle Moisy) This is indeed a constant consideration when you talk about French graphic design. Beside other countries, France developed a singular graphic design culture and History. Regarding the European situation, the commercial approach relating to graphic design, and design itself, is very different here than in other countries like the UK, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands or Italy. Ever since the Romantic era, artists have had a specific status in the French society. Untouchable, out of the economical and commercial circuit, painters or illustrators are specific characters, even political ones, who create images considered as full pieces of art, which provide them the status of author, far behind the one of designers. The artists and illustrators such as Mucha or the guests of Salon de l’Araigné in the beginning of the 20th century showed very high interest in making of visuals and packages of French luxury goods (soap, mineral waters, beers, powders), but this was out of the production line of the product itself. In France, there is no product culture like other countries developed during their industrialization.

Slanted 25 – Paris


185

While isolating the making of the product or the brand image, France didn’t integrate in its own industrial history the ones of graphic design and visual communication, which were considered as secondary or optional over decades. This is not the case in Switzerland: when you look for example at brands such as Geigy, they early acquired a specific sensibility / attention to graphic design, which they entire­ly integrated in the communication reflexion and strategy of the company. In this way, you have on one side the makers of image seen as real artists and on the other side the ones who think and make the products (the marketing department). This approach spread over time until the 70-80s when a lot of publicity and communication agencies were born without embedding the profession of graphic designer in their crew, in favor of freelance C.A.M. designers only hired for being executive and not creative hands. Image and its political, social and cultural values was not at the center of the marketing preoccupations of agencies who often pre­ ferred to import from the States visual systems that had direct impact on the customers mass. In opposition, some designers or collectives (particularly Grapus) developed independent initiatives, a political and / or artistic work who later slipped into productions for cultural institutions, political parties or social move­ ments. This movement experienced a renewed interest at the beginning of the 80s, thanks to the rise of the Ministry of Culture’s budget who was funding the communication cam­ paigns of the French cultural institutions. In times of crisis, the communication budgets are always in the first ones to be reduced in France. Graphic design has always been consid­ered as an art, a luxury, even dispensable; as a matter of fact it is taught in arts schools and it relies on the Ministry of Culture and Communi­cation, not the Ministry of Industry and Economics and Digital Technologies. Graphic design or design itself don’t have a lot of entries in the world of trade because of their history in France, and designers still feel society lacks recognition of their work. I therefore have faith in the fact that graphic designers are writing their own history, and actions led by structures such as CNAP (National Centre of Visual Arts) or some other media promote their recognition and exis­ tence. In 2015 you can still think that there is a problem between commercial and cultural orders in some professional areas, but it tends

10 × 10 – Love Paris

to disappear thanks to the support of other work organizations in which designers are totally integrated and considered. I think you have to keep being optimistic as long as it’s still possible, and the students graduating every year from several schools are proving it. Mehdi Hercberg I’m not sure I get your point but as far as I’m concerned, I work with both maybe because my work is easy to decline either for advertis­ ing or art / illustration. Also I’m teaching besides my artistic activities and this allows me to choose more carefully the kind of works I want to get involved in.

Mehdi Hercberg, Monu, 2014 Airbrush on paper, 50 × 30 cm

Olivier Lebrun Something has happened at the end of the «Trente Glorieuses» (The Glorious Thirty). Clearly, many good designers were working in the commercial field before this period (Savignac, even Excoffon, Jossot earlier) or designing books for large audience collections (Massin, Daniel, Faucheux). I think what happened is a split in ’68, with the students protest and the production of political poster with a kind of DIY style – hand painted signs silkscreened at the workshops of art schools. At some points, these forms appeared to be the cultural / political visual identity. In the meantime, advertising agencies became bigger and more organized – duplicating an AngloSaxon model and make it evolve into a French

Slanted 25 – Paris


2

A Few (Hi)stories about French Illustration

210

Ilka Helmig

Ilka Helmig P 250

Slanted 25 – Paris


Ilka Helmig works at the interface of art and design and lives in Cologne and Paris. For Slanted she takes a look at the rich history and stories behind French illustration. In the aftermath of the massacre of editorial staff at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in rue Nicolas-Appert in Paris and while a society in shock is looking for explanations of the January 7 massacre, the City of Paris is covered in personal commentary and statements. Recent events remain visible in the form of drawings, texts and other visual markings – often expressed in wordplay or visual wit, demonstrating the much-quoted will for freedom of speech and press and quite in the vein of the late cartoonists. The culture of cartoon commentary, of illustration and cartoon history in France is a multifaceted one that looks back upon a long history full of tradition. Any attempt to tell it in full would be doomed to fail, but it is surely worth trying to look at a choice of representatives of this craft. Let’s start at the very beginning: The first painted depictions were created 30,000 BC in the Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc caves, and recently brought to a wide audience by director Werner Herzog in his 2010 3D documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams. These pictorial creations, no doubt, partly mark the beginnings of a visual language which subsequently continued to develop across many cultures. The Egyptian hieroglyphs and the visual aesthetics of Egyptian cult objects at the time of Napoléon Bonaparte (1769–1821) in France gave rise to what became to be known as “mummy mania” and were among the prime motifs of the more than 300 draughtsmen in Bonaparte’s legion of culture despatched by the emperor to follow in the wake of his invading army for a detailed record of anything they might find. It is, however, just as much the pottery of Ancient Greece, or Trajan’s Column of 112 / 113 AD, or, indeed, the 13–15th century livres d’heures, the French books of hours which bear witness of a visual narrative that has, in various ways, continued to develop throughout a variety of cultures.

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The development in China at a very early point in time (around 800 BC) of paper and, later on, the technique of woodcut or woodblock printing had repercussions on the how Asiatic graphic reproductions made their way

Ilka Helmig P 250

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across Asia and, subsequently, to Europe where, much later, Johannes Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press in the mid-15th century laid the foundation for the mass reproduction of printed matter. In 1796, German playwright Alois Senefelder invented lithography which, alongside the French woodcut printing, became part of the narrative technique and was used as much by Eugène Delacroix for his illustrations of Goethe’s Faust as by Paul Garvani for his series of genre pictures, the Récréations diabolico-fantasmagoriques. That time was the first heyday of French book illustration, with oeuvres like the six-volume edition of Molière’s works illustrated by François Boucher or Diderot’s and D’Alembert’s famous and widely acclaimed Encyclopédie (1751–1772). In 1817, Englishman Charles Thomson introduced wood engraving to France, a technique subsequently used by Gustave Doré, e. g. for his illustrations of French novelist Eugène Sue’s Le Juif errant (The Wandering Jew, 1845). Later influenced by Japanese print, 19th century European artists redis­ covered the woodcut printing technique. A crucial role in the emergence of what came to be known as Le Japonisme was played by the woodblock prints and book illustrations of Katsushika Hokusai (about 1760–1849) whose works were shown at a major exhibition at the Grand Palais, Paris, in 2014, once more creating a wave of enthusiasm. Modern printing techniques fuelled the production and distribution of news­paper illustrations on social and political issues. Artists like French caricaturist Honoré Daumier (1808–1879) have no doubt provided a role model for later generations of cartoonists. As early as in 1813, Daumier experienced the potential consequences of lampooning the ruling class through satirical cartooning when colleague and editor of satirical journals La Caricature and Le Charivari Charles Philipon (1800–1861) was brought to trial by Citizen King Louis Philippe I – for lèse-majesté. Daumier, his employee, at the end of a series of satirical lithographs had portrayed the King as a human pear. That, clearly, was too much.

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During the era of Art Nouveau, satirical illustration, alongside with literary subjects, increasingly covered quotidian as well as extreme situations. The Paris journal L’Illustration (1843 until 1944) commented on and described, among other topics, the horrors of the War in Europe. Spanning almost one-hundred years and over 5,000 issues, a large number of illus­ trators worked for the journal until it was closed after World War II – due to collaboration with Nazi occupation.

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The Monument à la République until today shows traces of the huge solidarity march on January 11, 2015

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5

Histoire de l’affiche en France

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Amélie Gastaut

Amélie Gastaut P 250

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Amélie Gastaut a publié dans La revue TDC (NO 1091, pages 8–15) un article consacré à l’histoire de l’affiche en France. Slanted en publie un extrait à partir de l’après guerre. La revue TDC propose tous les quinze jours un dossier complet consacré à un thème à dominante arts, littérature, histoire, géographie, sciences ou éducation à la citoyenneté. reseau-canope.fr/tdc Les Trente Glorieuses : affichistes contre publicitaires Après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la France, grâce au plan Marshall, peut se reconstruire. En seulement cinq ans, le pays retrouve un niveau de vie équivalent à celui de l’avant-guerre, et les Trente Glorieuses font entrer le pays dans l’ère de la consommation de masse. Dans ce contexte économique favorable, un nouveau genre d’affiche s’impose : l’affiche-gag dont l’inventeur et le chef de file est Raymond Savignac (1907–2002). Il explique son parti pris par ces mots : « Si je m’exprime par gags, boutades, pirouettes, si mes affiches sont des clowneries graphiques, c’est d’abord parce que le public s’ennuie tellement dans son train-train quotidien que je considère que la publicité a besoin de divertir. » Ses affiches sont le plus souvent le résultat de deux idées réunies en une : du lait sortant des pis de la vache pour les savons Monsavon (1949) ou encore la tête d’un homme traversée par un tunnel embouteillé de voitures pour les aspirines Aspro. Ces deux affiches, sont que deux exemples de ces « scandales visuels », comme il aimait à les appeler, qui parcourent son monde illustré. D’autres affichistes comme Hervé Morvan, Siné ou Fix-Masseau adopteront le gag visuel dans leurs affiches.

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A côté de cette tendance qui séduit annonceurs et public, d’autres affichistes comme Bernard Villemot ou Guy Georget, marquent également l’histoire de l’affiche de ces années là. Si l’humour est régulièrement présent, ils se font davantage remarquer par leur style esthétique directement influencé par un des courants artistiques dominant, que l’on appelle l’Ecole de Paris. Bernard Villemot (1911–1989) revendique Henri Matisse et Nicolas de Staël comme ses principales influences. En effet,

Amélie Gastaut P 250

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Index

↘ P 28 / 29, 32, 59–61, 85

ABM Studio, Paris (FR) abm-studio.com artbookmagazine.com ABM Studio specializes in application consultancy, design and production for both printed and digital publications and is a partnership of Pascal Béjean, Olivier Körner, Nicolas Ledoux, Jean-Luc Lemaire, David Longuein and Vincent Piccolo. Alongside commis­sioned assignments, ABM Studio develops its own creative concepts, such as the iPad bookshop Art Book Magazine and interactive e-books. Photo by Philippe Savoir.

↘ P 30, 72, 102 / 103, 114

Akatre, Paris (FR) akatre.com Akatre was founded in 2007, in Paris, by Valentin Abad, Julien Dhivert and Sébastien Riveron. They work mainly around the visual identity, in art, cultural, music, fashion and luxury fields.

↘ P 151

↘ P 152

Quentin Aldhui, Paris (FR) facebook.com/qntnttts pulpplayground.tumblr.com Quentin is a French tattoo artist who loves to create fresh designs, far from the traditional patterns. Dot­work, woodcut style, and black­work are his weapons of choice. Most of all, he prefers graphic universes inspired from mother nature, musical iconography and ancient scientific imagery and art history. He also loves to develop his creative persona through other medias like photography and illustration. Photo by Mejika Setsunai.

Amelange, Paris (FR) / Salzburg (AT) amelange.com Amelange is an artistic collaboration project of Anke Braatz and Christina Andraschko. Anke is an illustrator based in Paris (FR). Christina is a graphic designer based in Salzburg (AT). They met in 2000 during their studies in Paris and have been working together occasionally ever since. Their focus lies on drawing, illustration, graphic design and typography.

↘ P 35, 36, 123, 131, 135, 136

↘ P 174–192

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Philippe Apeloig, Paris (FR) apeloig.com Philippe Apeloig, born in 1962 in Paris, is a graphic designer and art director who works for numerous renowned brands and institutions like Musée du Louvre or Yves Saint Laurent. His work is known for its typographic systems and letters and has been awarded internationally. Apeloig is currently working on the visual identity of the Louvre in Abu Dhabi. Photo by Carlos Freire.

Index

Atelier de Création Graphique Pierre Bernard, Paris (FR) acgparis.com Pierre Bernard (*1942) co-founded and managed Grapus from 1970 until 1990. Then, he founded the Atelier de Création Graphique and designed, among other projects, the visual identities of the Louvre and the French National Parks. An AGI member since 1987, Pierre Bernard was awarded the Erasmus Prize in 2006 for his work as graphic designer in the area of “design for the public domain.”

Slanted 25 – Paris


↘ P 156–173

Atelier Formes Vives, Marseille / Brest / Nantes (FR) formes-vives.org Formes Vives is a collective that consists of three graphic designers and illustrators: Nicolas Filloque, Geoffroy Pithon and Adrien Zammit. Their work centres on the search for a political way of practicing visual communication: how to create and deploy quality forms for topics and organizations that foster the common good?

↘ P 140–145

Atelier Michel Bouvet, Paris (FR) michelbouvet.com Graduated from the ENSBA Paris, Michel Bouvet is a poster artist and a graphic designer for theaters, festivals and public institutions. Professor at the ESAG / Penninghen, Paris. He is a member of Alliance Graphique Internationale (AGI) since 1997. Has held 80 one-person exhibitions in 30 countries around the world.

↘ P 146–155

↘ P 174–192

Caroline Bouige, Paris (FR) etapes.com Co-editor in chief of the graphic design magazine Étapes since 2012, where she redefines the editorial direction of the magazine. Caroline is particularly interested in the evo­lution of design as well as its hy­brid­­ization. She also participates in juries, forums, and contributes to publications about these matters.

Lea Brousse, Berlin (DE) brousseruddigkeit.com leabrousse.com 2004 Lea completed her Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology GCEA level and gradu­ated with a BTEC Higher National Diploma in 2006. 2009 she moved to Venice and obtained a Master’s degree in Product Industrial Design (IUAV). 2012–2014 she was Lead Designer at Zafin (North America). Together with Raban Ruddigkeit she started the studio Brousse & Ruddigkeit in Spring 2015. Photo by Peter Adamik.

↘ P 34, 120

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Charlotte Cheetham, Paris (FR) charlotte-cheetham.tumblr.com Charlotte Cheetham is a curator. Her exhibitions and printed projects explore common issues to emerging curatorial and publishing practices. She created the blog manystuff.org in 2006, published various books and organized several events, exhibitions and book fairs.

↘ P 148

Coco, Paris (FR) cocopit.biz forget-me-not.me As a French designer and graphic artist, Coco has worked on a series of collaborations for the fashion, beauty and design industries. Her work has been published in numerous publications including Taschen, Gestalten, Victionary as well as shown in exhibitions in Paris, London, Los Angeles and Barcelona.

Index

↘ 156–173

Benoît Bodhuin, Nantes (FR) bb-bureau.fr Mathematical then graphics studies and a short stint in agency persuades him to work as independent. For ten years he splits his timetable between orders for customers tolerating his practice and personal projects often focus on typography. Since 2010 he also teaches type design and regularly leads workshops.

↘ P 13, 18, 65, 98–101, 124–126

c-album, Paris (FR) c-album.fr Born in 1962 in Karlsruhe, Laurent Ungerer joined in 1985 the Jean Widmer agency in Paris and worked there for ten years as project manager. He founded the c-album graphic design studio in 1996 and works regularly with the French institutions as the Institut du monde arabe, the Pompidou Centre and the Parisian transport network, RATP. He is currently professor at ENSAD Paris.

↘ P 156–173

Jocelyn Cottencin, Rennes (FR) jocelyncottencin.com lieuxcommuns.com As an artist and graphic designer, he is particularly interested in the question of emission and reception of images, codes and languages, and to the ability of a project, not to circumscribe a territory but to move between different points. His work develops on one part with his studio Lieux Communs, and secondly on projects in the field of visual arts and collaboration with other artists including choreographers. Photo by Pascal Béjean.

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↘ P 147

Sophie Della Corte, Paris (FR) sophidellacorte.com Sophie Della Corte is a Parisbased graphic artist working in book design and illustration. Graduated from ENSAAMA Olivier de Serres, explores and connects signs, patterns and shapes to create ambivalent landscapes and stories. She is fascinated by the strength of words and symbols, their ability to arouse one’s imagination and their power of evocation.

↘ P 24, 46, 48 / 49, 62, 78, 86, 88, 108 / 109

deValence, Paris (FR) devalence.net editions-b42.net deValence is a graphic design studio specialized in both editing and designing projects. In 2008, they established the publishing house, B42, and Back Cover magazine, thus allowing it to extend its breadth of expertise in design to the production of books. Their clients include Centre Pompidou, La Commune theater, L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui etc. They also have long lasting collaboration with artists Raphaël Zarka, Saâdane Afif and Mathieu Abonnenc. ↘ P 156–173

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Morgan Fortems, Nancy (FR) morganfortems.com mymonkey.fr Morgan Fortems is an artist, art director and graphic designer since 2001. His studio is based in Nancy (FR) at My monkey gallery which he is been heading since 2003. It is a nice place to see the wonderful work of contemporary artists and graphic designers.

Index

↘ P 11, 54 / 55, 66, 76 / 77, 79, 80

Des Signes, Paris (FR) des-signes.fr Elise Muchir and Franklin Muchir Desclouds, are graphic designers and the founding partners of Des Signes, a French studio born in 2003. They are specialized in the cultural field with a customer base such as museums, exhibitions, events, monuments, institutions, editors and publishers, theatre, cinema … Their work goes from complete visual identities, to signage, posters, and edition. Photo by Ulysse Fievé.

↘ P 130, 132–134, 137–139

Pierre-Olivier Deschamps, Paris (FR) pierreolivierdeschamps.com agencevu.com Lives and works in Paris since 1981. Member of Agence VU’. He started working as a photographer by producing numerous portraits in the field of literature and cinema, and took part in the growth of a new kind of reportage photography. For about ten years, through media publications and collaborations with institutions, he has been interested in architecture and all the forms of urban landscape.

↘ P 156–173

Jonathan Fabreguettes, Angoulême (FR) typographies.fr Jonathan Fabreguettes is a 29-year-old type designer and graphic designer, graduated from École Estienne. He has created the type foundry typographies.fr, whose work has been exhibited in twelve countries. He has been awarded at the Letter.2 Competition of the Association Typographique Internationale and by the Type Directors Club of New York.

↘ P 17, 96

Fontyou, Paris (FR) Fontyou.com Fontyou is the first online platform dedicated to typography, which allows worldwide designers to create, sell, buy and use fonts. Fontyou team always had the same aims: collaborative design at heart, put type design within reach and give access to the best fonts and typographic contents. After the co-creation platform and the shop, they now have a new product: the first cloud based font manager.

↘ P 150

Fabienne Francisco, Paris (FR) fabiennefrancisco.tumblr.com be.net/fabiennefrancisco Fabienne Francisco is an illustrator and cartoonist who lives and works in Paris. She sketches people and brings out expression and sensitivity. Her inspiration comes from daily life, she draws with some sense of humor, absurdity and also poetry.

↘ P 14, 27, 44 / 45, 68, 70 / 71, 73–75, 113

Frédéric Teschner Studio, Paris (FR) fredericteschner.com Born in 1972, graduated from the Paris School of Decorative Arts in 1997, Frédéric Teschner started as a freelance graphic artist at the end of 2002. Since then, he has worked regularly with architects, designers, choreographers, art galleries, art centers, museums and theaters. He is member of AGI (Alliance Graphic International) since 2010 and the winner of the 23rd International Festival of Poster and Graphic Design in Chaumont (FR).

Slanted 25 – Paris


Publisher

Production

Slanted Publishers Leopoldstraße 33 76133 Karlsruhe Germany T +49 (0) 721 85148268 magazine@slanted.de slanted.de

Print E&B engelhardt und bauer – an enterprise of Kraft Druck GmbH Kraft Druck GmbH Industriestrasse 5–9 76275 Ettlingen Germany T +49 (7243) 591-0 F +49 (7243) 591–111 info@kraft-druck.de kraft-druck.de

Slanted Magazine #25 Paris

Cover Finishing Hotfoil Stamping Micro-Embossing Gold 220 by German Foilstamping Association Contact office: Hubert Minsch Postfach 1629 73506 Schwäbisch Gmünd Germany T +49 (0) 7171 41834 info@ak.praegefoliendruck.de look-and-feel.net Paper cover Strathmore Writing Wove Ultimate White by Mohawk, 298 g/sm Paper inside Extrarough White, 120 g/sm (p. 1–32) Silk Recycling White, 130 g/sm (p. 33–48, 81–96) Rough Coldwhite by Mondi, 115 g/sm (p. 49–80) Extrasmooth Recycling White, 120 g/sm (p. 97–128) Touch White, 115 g/sm (p. 129–144, 193–208) Extrarough Warmwhite, 105 g/sm (p. 145–160, 209–224) Smooth White, 100 g/sm (p. 161–192) Gloss White, 100 g/sm (p. 225–256) Paper Contemporary Typefaces Gloss White, 90 g/sm Distributed by METAPAPER T +49 (0) 800 9010033 service@metapaper.de metapaper.io metapaper.de

Editor in chief (V.i.S.d.P.) Lars Harmsen Managing editor Julia Kahl Art direction Lars Harmsen Graphic design Julia Kahl Assistance graphic design Leopold Lenzgeiger Graphic design Contemporary Typefaces Florian Fecher Photography Paris Lars Harmsen, Julia Kahl Video editing Hannah Schwaiger ISSN 1867-6510 Frequency 2 × p. a. (Spring / Summer, Autumn / Winter) Slanted weblog Editor in chief (V.i.S.d.P.) Lars Harmsen Managing editor Julia Kahl Editors slanted.de/redaktion Video interviews slanted.de/paris The publisher assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of all information. Publisher and editor assume that material that was made available for publishing, is free of third party rights. Reproduction and storage require the permission of the publisher. Photos and texts are welcome, but there is no liability. Signed contributions do not necessarily repre­sent the opinion of the publisher or the editor. Copyright © Slanted, Karlsruhe, 2015 All rights reserved.

Spot colors HKS Warenzeichenverband e. V. Sieglestraße 25 70469 Stuttgart Germany T +49 (0) 711 9816-608 F +49 (0) 711 9816-341 info@hks-farben.de hks-farben.de Inside HKS 18K, 39K

Fonts David, 2014 Design: Émilie Rigaud Label: A is for ... / aisforapple.fr Granville, 2015 Design: Jean-Baptiste Levée Label: Production Type / productiontype.com

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Suisse Int’l / Neue / Works, 2011 Design: Swiss Typefaces Design Team Label: Swiss Typefaces / swisstypefaces.com

Index

Slanted 25 – Paris


Sales and distribution

Acknowledgement

Slanted magazine can be acquired online, in selected bookstores, concept stores and galleries worldwide. You can also find it at stations and airports in Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands. If you own a shop and would like to stock Slanted magazine, please get in touch with us.

This Paris issue could not have been realized without the enthusiasm and support of all participants (alphabetical order): ABM Studio, Akatre, Quentin Aldhui, Amelange, Philippe Apeloig, Atelier de Création Graphique, Atelier Formes Vives, Atelier Michel Bouvet, Benoît Bodhuin, Caroline Bouige, Lea Brousse, c-album, Charlotte Cheetham, Coco, Jocelyn Cottencin, Sophie Della Corte, Des Signes, Pierre-Olivier Deschamps, deValence, Jonathan Fabreguettes, Fontyou, Morgan Fortems, Fabienne Francisco, Frédéric Teschner Studio, Amélie Gastaut, Stéphane Goddard, GUsto, Hannah & Joel, Ilka Helmig, Helmo, Mehdi Hercberg, Étienne Hervy, Laurent Fétis & Sarah Martinon, Olivier Lebrun, Les Graphiquants, Véfa Lucas, Ian Lynam, Guillaume Mary, Thibault Maupetit, Fanette Mellier, Isabelle Moisy, Charlotte Molas, My Name is Wendy, Vincent Perrottet, Pinar&Viola, Jean François Porchez, Émilie Rigaud, Étienne Robial, Raban Ruddigkeit, Alice Sfintesco, Julie Sittler, Spassky Fischer, Superscript², Syndicat, Frédéric Tacer, Pierre Vanni, Vier5, Yorgo&Co Thanks a lot to Sophie Denay from London who recommended some of the studios we visited. We hope to see you soon! A big thank you to Hannah Schwaiger who came with us to Paris and recorded and edited the video interviews. A very special thanks goes to the Shutterstock-team for supporting our trip to Paris and the production of the video interviews. Thank you, Kathy! Thanks also to Norbert Brey and Christian Klein (E&B engelhardt und bauer) and their printers for the wonderful printing and to Frank Denninghoff and the German Foilstamping Association for the awesome finishing of the golden cover! We would also like to thank Axel Scheufelen and his team from Metapaper for the fantastic papers of this issue – this selection really is crazy! A big hug to my friend Stefan Richter and his sister Pascale – you are family! As well as Natalie Seisser for her friendship since the Slanted Cuba issue. And of course François Dick, friend from early days in school – long long time ago!

Contact Julia Kahl, T +49 (0) 721 85148268 julia.kahl@slanted.de Slanted Shop (best!) slanted.de/shop Stores (all over the world) slanted.de/allgemein/stores Amazon Marketplace amazon.de Stations and airports IPS Pressevertrieb GmbH / ips-d.de International distribution Export Press SAS / exportpress.com Distribution Switzerland Niggli Verlag, niggli.ch / ISBN 978-3-7212-0940-2 Distribution US Ubiquity Distributors, Inc., / ubiquitymags.com Subscription Subscribe to Slanted magazine and support what we do. Magazines via subscriptions are at a reduced rate and get shipped for free directly at its release. slanted.de/abo National (DE) One year subscription, 2 mags: € 32 Two year subscription + premium, 4 mags: € 62 Gift subscription, 2 mags: € 32 Student subscription, 2 mags: € 26 Trial subscription, 1 mag: € 14 International One year Subscription, 2 mags: € 38 Two year Subscription, 4 mags: € 75

The photography on the first page of this issue has been taken by Lars Harmsen, showing the monument à la République that until today shows traces of the huge solidarity march after the Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack from January 7th, 2015. Peace!

Advertising We offer a wide range of advertising possibilities on our weblog and in our magazine – print and online! Just get in touch. More information at slanted.de/mediarates Contact Julia Kahl, T +49 (0) 721 85148268 julia.kahl@slanted.de

Awards (Selection of design awards for publications by Slanted)

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ADC of Europe 2010, 2008 ADC Germany 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2008, 2007 Annual Multimedia 2008, 2013 Berliner Type 2008 (Bronze), 2009 (Silver) Designpreis der BRD 2009 (Silver) European Design Awards 2011, 2008 Faces of Design Awards 2009 iF communication design award 2007 German Design Award 2015, 2014 (Special mention) Laus Awards 2009 Lead Awards 2008, (Weblog des Jahres), 2007 Lead Awards 2013, (Visual Leader / Silver) red dot communication design awards 2008 Type Directors Club NY, 2011, 2008, 2007 Tokyo Type Directors Club, 2014, 2015 Werkbund Label 2012

Index

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Paris – mon amour Hannah Schwaiger & Julia Kahl + someone happy Laurent Ungerer & Lars Harmsen, two old friends


Paris — je t’aime moi non plus. Loved and hated, hated and loved — seemingly no other European nation has a similarly segmented relationship to their capital as the French. Everything starts in Paris and everything conspires here. The city is the undisputed center of gravity of the country — almighty and omnipresent. All power originates and disperses from the city; politics, economics and culture. Hardly anyone can resist its loose-lipped charm. But this is also Paris. Shortly after midnight the last metro departs. Those who live outside the city, on the edge of town and on the edge of society, like so many immigrants from the former colonies, have a different outlook on life. Immigration is not perceived by many patriots as a cultural enrichment, but rather as a burden. At the same time a multi-cultural society has established itself over the decades, which stands in sharp contrast to the long-established bourgeoisie of the 16th arrondissement. The attack on Charlie Hebdo on the 7th of January 2015 has everyone shocked and shaken. Similarly, the design community is divided. There are designers of and for culture and then there are advertisers — but never both! The overlap of both factions: a virtuosic approach of the exposed wounds and contradictions of a rapidly changing society; spirit and humor as subversive tools. 1925, during the great international arts and crafts exhibition, the French responded to the very German Bauhaus with Art Deco (literally translated as “decorating arts”). In redundancy, the necessary was seen. «Le superflu, chose très nécessaire». And today? Which positions are representative of artists, designers, photographers, illustrators …?

This issue of Slanted Magazine is using Augmented Reality (AR) to provide additional digital content to readers. Discover extra content with your mobile device. We worked with Junaio, an app that already has several million users and is the most advanced AR browser. It is also free for iOS and Android devices! To get inside is easy! 1. Install the Junaio App for free on your mobile device 2. Start the Junaio App 3. Scan the QR code below to join the Slanted channel 4. Every magazine page containing the PLAY-sign links to additional content 5. Enjoy extra content by moving your mobile device over the pages. It’ll be like browsing the web.



Slanted Magazine #25 – Paris