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SCI-Arc Graduate Portfolio Fall 2009 - Summer 2011 Nathan Skrepcinski M.Arch 2

972.768.0407 nathan.skrep@gmail.com


Unlikely Things In a Likely World Grad Thesis

2

Mechanical Romanticism 3GB Studio

14

Artificial Matters 3GA Studio

24

Visionary Landscapes Visual Studies

36

Tokyo Fashion Museum 2GBX Studio

42

Design Documents Applied Studies

54

Hol(e)y Masses 2GAX Studio

60

Compound Masses 2GAX Studio

68

Processing Workshop 2GBX

72

Geometry of Light Visual Studies

76

Manifold Tectonics Applied Studies

82


G R A D U AT E THESIS

UNLI KELY THI N GS in a likely wor ld

Scene 1 “negative space” 31” x 42” (right)


04

UNLIKELY THINGS IN A LIKELY WORLD

Architecture is spatial storytelling. It has a unique capacity to uncover as well as tell stories. As a language it can negotiate the threshold between matter-offact reality and mysterious spatial happenings. Drawing on the literary genre and aesthetic style of magical realism, in which the real and the fantastic are accepted in the same stream of thought, this thesis employs a narrative model that weaves together a bevy of oppositions: fact/fiction, objective/subjective, technological/natural, rational and magical, to offer alternatives to the autonomous presumptions of architecture.


05

GRADUATE THESIS ADVISOR: ELENA MANFERDINI

Locating itself in the liminal territory between fiction and architecture, this thesis uses the unfinished and abandoned Sathorn Unique Tower in Bangkok as a skeleton for dreams. Incomplete architecture, or that which is otherwise unfinished, opens up to the realm of imagination. It exists in a suspended state that creates tension for the viewer and a desire for completion. The Sathorn Unique Tower, which combines just the proper mix of glitzy and gritty, offers the perfect framework in which to realize this potential. Photographs of the Sathorn Unique Tower in Bangkok


06

UNLIKELY THINGS IN A LIKELY WORLD Recent trends have seen architecture turned into an art form of the instant visual image, where flatness of surfaces and materials and uniformity of illumination cause architecture to exist only in a single moment in time. Perfection and completeness further detaches the architectural object from the reality of time. To return to a multi-sensory experience of architecture, this thesis takes an approach some might consider outside the discipline to design a series of scenes, rather than a building, that investigate spatial and sensorial experiences that are independent of function. For example, a scene describing how light filters through a cavernous shaft or the parallax created when moving through an improbably expansive network of exposed columns and beams.

Scene 2 “vertigo” 31” x 42” (right)


07

GRADUATE THESIS


Scene 2 “light through vertical space” 13” x 46” (opposite and right)


10

UNLIKELY THINGS IN A LIKELY WORLD

Whereas the inevitable effects of aging, weathering, and wear are not usually considered as conscious and positive elements of design, here they are used along with light and shadow, weight, gravity, materiality, and color to produce effects that are not based on form. These haptic

elements, combined with architecture’s potential as a storytelling language, allow it to go beyond existing in the perpetual present and to instead evoke the experience of a temporal continuum and to create a field of unpredictable potentials.


11

GRADUATE THESIS

Scene 3 “extension and compression” 50” x 13” (above)


COY HOWARD STUDIO


M E C HA NI CA L ROMA NTI CI SM


16

COY HOWARD STUDIO This studio focused on representation and developing a personal aesthetic. It was also about transcending the individual parts of a project to let them become about something. The studio was divided into three parts. The first focused on making a “junk sculpture� that went beyond being a mere collection of parts, or even a composition, to being an object with form. The second part did the same thing but in two dimensions using magazine cutouts. The final part involved designing a building for a fashion designer; however, the focus was on designing an image. Therefore, these are not pictures that depict a building, but images that have resonance, depth, and a sense of mystery.


17

3GB STUDIO

Final building images mounted on brushed aluminum 46” x 14” (previous page) 16” x 30” (right)


18

COY HOWARD STUDIO


19

3GB STUDIO INSTRUCTOR: COY HOWARD

Collages with typography (above and right)


20

COY HOWARD STUDIO


21

3GB STUDIO

Junk sculptures (left) Final sculpture photos (below and next page)


ARTIFICIAL M AT T E R S


MI LA N EXPO 2 0 1 5 TA I WA N PAVI LI ON


28

ARTIFICIAL MATTERS


29

3GA STUDIO INSTRUCTOR: ELENA MANFERDINI PARTNER: HAN-YIN HSU

Material has two characteristics: its physical properties and a sensation. Normally, the physical properties of a material produce an expected sensation. This project focuses on breaking or blurring the link between these two characteristics to create a new, artificial matter with a hyper-realistic experience. We used the architectural envelope and a landscape as a means to explore this synthetic material. Taking two recognizable materials, and controlling the geometry, texture, and color, we tried to shift the way the material is perceived. We focused on using two materials with contrasting properties such as soft and hard, vibrant and muted, sturdy and fragile, etc. and by weaving them together, allowed fact and fantasy to co-exist.


30

ARTIFICIAL MATTERS


31

3GA STUDIO ([SRDUHD

6HPSLRQHD[LV

The Expo Site is located just a few kilometers from the center of Milan in an area with highly developed infrastructure that makes it one of the most accessible zones in all of Lombardy. Expo Location (right) Pavilion Elevation with Landscape (below)

+LVWRULFDOFLW\OLPLWV

'XRPR


32

ARTIFICIAL MATTERS

Landscape (above) Expo Site (below)

thematic area5

thematic area 1 agro-ecosystems

Italian pavilion thematic area 1 greenhouses

expo village

expo village

cardo

performance centre

thematic area 6 cascina triulza

decumano

thematic area 4 thematic area 1 hill thematic area 5 thematic area 3

corporate area

amphitheatre


33

3GA STUDIO

Site (orange): 18 meters x 70 meters


34

ARTIFICIAL MATTERS

Section (above) Cut-Plan with Landscape (below)


35

3GA STUDIO

The Expo 2015 site has been designed to express the theme Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life. The area is configured as an integral landscape – an island circled by a canal, a veritable horizontal monument – organized along two strongly symbolic perpendicular axes: the World Avenue and the Cardo. The resulting grid determines the layout of the lots assigned to each country, each one of them giving onto the World Avenue.


VISIONARY LANDSCAPES


VI SUA L STUDI ES


38

VISIONARY LANDSCAPES Los Angeles... Freeway culture and urban sprawl. These two defining elements are combined into a visionary landscape imagining a modern version of Edgar Chambless’ 1910 Roadtown. Existing freeways are transformed into multi-layered “landscrapers” combining personal and public transportation, pedestrian traffic, housing, and commercial zones, while at the same time turning what was previously sprawl into restored farmland.


39

3GB VISUAL STUDIES INSTRUCTOR: ELENA MANFERDINI PARTNER: HAN-YIN HSU

Edgar Chambless’ Roadtown (right) Restored farmland (below)


40

VISIONARY LANDSCAPES


41

3GB VISUAL STUDIES


TOKYO 2010 FA SH I ON MUSEUM OMOTESA NDO STREET


44

TOKYO FASHION MUSEUM

Tokyo is like an endless sea of static boxes; however, Tokyo’s urban flow is anything but static. Omotesando Street in Tokyo is a street that serves as an architectural showcase and is home to a number of flagship fashion stores. As a street it begins to embody the movement of people attracted by the ever changing trends in fashion and entertainment. We wanted to capture this incredibly dynamic flow in a building. As a museum of fashion, we drew upon the movement of flowing fabric and the designs of Japanese fashion designer Issey Miyake. In the end, we still have to freeze the building in time, but we wanted to create an appearance that was always changing, for example with the time of day or with Japan’s dis-


45

2GBX STUDIO INSTRUCTOR: ELENA MANFERDINI PARTNER: KAZUAKI OGAWA

tinct seasons. It exhibits the fabric-like qualities of tearing, tightening, splitting apart, and peeling away at certain moments to reveal the inner body. Just as a dress needs a body inside to be truly beautiful, we also need an internal body to become architecture rather than merely sculpture. The folding does not stay solely on the outside. Curves falling from the ceiling, appearing to be pulled by the displays they showcase, create circulation from above without adding obstructions to an already constricted floor space. Ultimately, the museum serves as a cultural nucleus for Omotesando and both embraces and expels its dynamic atmosphere through its folds.


46

TOKYO FASHION MUSEUM


47

2GBX STUDIO


48

TOKYO FASHION MUSEUM

OFFICE

UP

UP

TERRACE TERRACE

OPENING

Typical Exhibition Floor Plan


49

2GBX STUDIO

BATHROOM PARKING_ENTRANCE OFFICE UP

SOUVENIR_SHOP

INFORMATION_DESK UP

Ground Floor Plan

UP


50

TOKYO FASHION MUSEUM

0

1

2

3

5

10 [M]

Omotesando Street Elevation (above) Section (right)


51

2GBX STUDIO ROOF ROOF 44.0M

JAPANESE GARDEN 11th FLOOR 40.0M

BALCONY / SKYBAR 10th FLOOR 36.0M

BATHROOM RUNWAY 9th FLOOR 32.0M

OFFICE EXHIBITION 2000’s 8th FLOOR 28.0M

TERRACE EXHIBITION 1990’s 7th FLOOR 24.0M

STORAGE EXHIBITION 1980’s 6th FLOOR 20.0M

EXHIBITION 1970’s 5th FLOOR 16.0M

EXHIBITION 1950’s - 60’s 4th FLOOR 12.0M

EXHIBITION 1930’s - 40’s 3rd FLOOR 8.0M

BATHROOM EXHIBITION 1920’s 2nd FLOOR 4.0M

ENTRANCE HALL GROUND FLOOR 0.0M

PARKING P1 -3.6M

PARKING P2 -7.0M


52

TOKYO FASHION MUSEUM

Initial Concept Using nCloth to simulate draping fabric over a mass


53

2GBX STUDIO nCloth simulations on building massing

Color-shifting car paint on physical model (above) Slabs with contours (bottom left) Site model (below)


54

DESIGN DOCUMENTS

Concrete Core Steel I-Beams W30x292

Tube Steel 24” x 32”

Exterior Structure

Slabs and Core


55

3GA APPLIED STUDIES INSTRUCTORS: TOM WISCOMBE, HERWIG BAUMGARTNER PARTNER: KAZUAKI OGAWA

Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) Panels

1

A8.1 Elevation

2

3

A8.1 P

Combined Structure

Surface Panelization


56

DESIGN DOCUMENTS B

A

C

1

2

3

A8.1 Panel Elevation Close-up (FRONT)

A8.2 Panel Elevation Close-up (SIDE)

A1

1.28m

B1

1.99m

1.20m

A2

2.16m

2.04m

1.30m

B2

2.46m

A3

1.26m

C1

1.13m

C2

1.84m

B3

1.91m

A8.3 Panel Dimensions (with molds)

1.44m

2.12m

1.22m

1.95m

C3

2.03m

1.36m

1.92m


57

3GA APPLIED STUDIES 4

2 A10.0

1

8

11

9

2 5

16

12 6

17 1 A10.1

13

10

18 14

19

7

15

2 A10.0

PANEL CONNECTION DETAIL

20 21 22

1 A10.0

WALL / FLOOR ASSEMBLY Outside 3

4

5

2

1

9

10 6

7

8

11

Inside 1 A10.1

WALL SECTION

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

5” GFRP Panel Silicone Joint Sealant Weatherproofing 2” Steel Decking 10” Rigid Insulation Steel Channel Air / Vapour Barrier 24” x 32“ Tube Steel Beam Casing Glazing Interior Drywall

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

5” GFRP Panel Anchor Bolt Silicone Joint Sealant Weatherproofing Bolt

12. 13.

Steel Channel Interior Drywall

14. 15. 16.

24” x 32“ Tube Steel Steel Plate 2” Finish Floor

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Steel Channel 2” Steel Decking Air / Vapour Barrier 10” Rigid Insulation Steel Channel

17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

Concrete Slab 3” Metal Decking W30x292 Steel I-Beam Suspended Soffit Steel Support Structure

11.

24” x 32“ Tube Steel

22.

HVAC Duct

3


58

DESIGN DOCUMENTS Secondary Facade Structure (Steel Channels) Primary Facade Structure (Tube Steel)

Beam Casing

Glazing Metal Decking GFRP Panels

Primary F (


59

3GA APPLIED STUDIES

Primary Facade Structure (Tube Steel) Interior Wall Panel Secondary Facade Structure (Steel Channels)

Metal Decking

loor Structure (Steel I-Beam) Ceiling Panel Finish Floor Concrete Slab Metal Decking


HOL(E)Y MASSES

WED D I NG CHA PEL


62

HOL(E)Y MASSES WEDDING CHAPEL

The aim of this project and the studio as a whole was to rethink the classical notion of poche. Poche mediates what is outside and what is inside. The less poche, the more the inside and outsides of a building are the same. More poche on the other hand can allow the inside to be completely disconnected with the outside. This project, a wedding chapel in downtown Los Angeles, produces poche from two interlocking masses. Then the solidarity of the poche is eliminated, leaving only an outline. The outline becomes a thin wall with a new space inside. Instead of solid mass mediating the outside and inside, now a habitable buffer zone is created with the same function.


63

2GAX STUDIO INSTRUCTOR: RAMIRO DIAZ-GRANADOS


64

HOL(E)Y MASSES WEDDING CHAPEL

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

Longitudinal Section

1


65

2GAX STUDIO

[RIGHT] 1. Side Chapel 2. Gift Shop 3. Administration 4. Chapel Support Space 5. Chapel Main Space 6. MEP/Storage/Support 7. Rooftop Terrace

7

6

[LEFT] 1. Cafe 2. Gift Shop 3. Administration 4. Chapel Support Space 5. Chapel Main Space 6. Outdoor Balcony 7. MEP/Storage/Support 8. Rooftop Terrace

5

4

3

S. Broadway

6th St.

1

2

Transverse Section


66

HOL(E)Y MASSES WEDDING CHAPEL

1 4 2

DN

3

DN

DN

DN

CHAPEL FLOOR PLAN 1. Main Stage 2. Groom Seating 3. Bride Seating 4. Outdoor Space

4

5

6 1 2

3

UP UP

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1. Main Entrance/Gallery 2. Side Chapel #1 3. Side Chapel #2 4. Cafe 5. Gift Shop 6. Bathroom


67

2GAX STUDIO

Broadway Elevation


68

COMPOUND MASSES POCHE FROM INTERLOCKING VOLUMES

Begin with NURBS sphere, create two simple primitive shapes, then go through a series of deformations

Final


69

2GAX STUDIO INSTRUCTOR: RAMIRO DIAZ-GRANADOS

Section

Elevation

Lower Plan

Mid Plan


70

COMPOUND MASSES

1/8” Acrylic Front

Back

Section Cut Model


71

2GAX STUDIO


import traer.physics.*; import SearchGeometry.*; import processing.dxf.*; boolean record; SGCamera cam; ParticleSystem physics;

PROCESSING WORKSHOP void setup(){ size(1200, 1000, P3D); cam = new SGCamera(this); physics = new ParticleSystem(0.0, 0.1);

}

import traer.physics.*; import SearchGeometry.*; import processing.dxf.*; boolean record; SGCamera cam; ParticleSystem physics; void setup(){ size(1200, 1000, P3D); cam = new SGCamera(this); physics = new ParticleSystem(0.0, 0.1);

for(int i=0; i<50; i++){ physics.makeParticle(1.0, random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10)); }

for(int i=0; i<500; i++){ physics.makeParticle(1.0, random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10)); }

for(int i=0; i<50; i++){ int randId1 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); int randId2 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); Particle p1 = physics.getParticle(randId1); Particle p2 = physics.getParticle(randId2); if(p1 != p2){ physics.makeSpring(p1, p2, 0.1, 0.1, 5); addSpacersToNode(p1, p2); } }

for(int i=0; i<500; i++){ int randId1 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); int randId2 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); Particle p1 = physics.getParticle(randId1); Particle p2 = physics.getParticle(randId2); if(p1 != p2){ physics.makeSpring(p1, p2, 0.1, 0.1, 5); addSpacersToNode(p1, p2); } }

}

void keyPressed() { if (key == ‘r’) record = true; if (key == ‘p’){ saveFrame(“line-####.jpg”); } }

void keyPressed() { if (key == ‘r’) record = true; if (key == ‘p’){ saveFrame(“line-####.jpg”); } }

void draw(){ physics.tick(2); background(255); stroke(0); cam.update();

void draw(){ physics.tick(2); background(255); stroke(0); cam.update();

}

if (record) { beginRaw(DXF, “output”+frameCount+”.dxf”); }

if (record) { beginRaw(DXF, “output”+frameCount+”.dxf”); }

for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle p = physics.getParticle(i); PVector pos = new PVector(p.position().x(), p.position().y(), p.position().z()); }

for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle p = physics.getParticle(i); PVector pos = new PVector(p.position().x(), p.position().y(), p.position().z()); }

stroke(0); strokeWeight(2); for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfSprings(); i++){ Spring s = physics.getSpring(i); Particle a = s.getOneEnd(); Particle b = s.getTheOtherEnd(); line(a.position().x(), a.position().y(), a.position().z(), b.position().x(), b.position().y(), b.position().z()); }

stroke(0); strokeWeight(2); for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfSprings(); i++){ Spring s = physics.getSpring(i); Particle a = s.getOneEnd(); Particle b = s.getTheOtherEnd(); line(a.position().x(), a.position().y(), a.position().z(), b.position().x(), b.position().y(), b.position().z()); }

if (record) { endRaw(); record = false; println(“done dxf~!”); }

if (record) { endRaw(); record = false; println(“done dxf~!”); }

}

void addSpacersToNode(Particle p, Particle r){ for (int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle q = physics.getParticle(i); if(p != q && p != r){ physics.makeAttraction(p, q, -3, 20); } } }

void addSpacersToNode(Particle p, Particle r){ for (int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle q = physics.getParticle(i); if(p != q && p != r){ physics.makeAttraction(p, q, -3, 20); } } }

import traer.physics.*; import SearchGeometry.*; import processing.dxf.*; boolean record; SGCamera cam; ParticleSystem physics;

import traer.physics.*; import SearchGeometry.*; import processing.dxf.*; boolean record; SGCamera cam; ParticleSystem physics;

void setup(){ size(1200, 1000, P3D); cam = new SGCamera(this); physics = new ParticleSystem(0.0, 0.1);

void setup(){ size(1200, 1000, P3D); cam = new SGCamera(this); physics = new ParticleSystem(0.0, 0.1);

}

for(int i=0; i<100; i++){ physics.makeParticle(1.0, random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10)); }

for(int i=0; i<1000; i++){ physics.makeParticle(1.0, random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10)); }

for(int i=0; i<100; i++){ int randId1 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); int randId2 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); Particle p1 = physics.getParticle(randId1); Particle p2 = physics.getParticle(randId2); if(p1 != p2){ physics.makeSpring(p1, p2, 0.1, 0.1, 5); addSpacersToNode(p1, p2); } }

for(int i=0; i<1000; i++){ int randId1 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); int randId2 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); Particle p1 = physics.getParticle(randId1); Particle p2 = physics.getParticle(randId2); if(p1 != p2){ physics.makeSpring(p1, p2, 0.1, 0.1, 5); addSpacersToNode(p1, p2); } }

}

void keyPressed() { if (key == ‘r’) record = true; if (key == ‘p’){ saveFrame(“line-####.jpg”); } }

void keyPressed() { if (key == ‘r’) record = true; if (key == ‘p’){ saveFrame(“line-####.jpg”); } }

void draw(){ physics.tick(2); background(255); stroke(0); cam.update();

void draw(){ physics.tick(2); background(255); stroke(0); cam.update();

}

if (record) { beginRaw(DXF, “output”+frameCount+”.dxf”); }

if (record) { beginRaw(DXF, “output”+frameCount+”.dxf”); }

for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle p = physics.getParticle(i); PVector pos = new PVector(p.position().x(), p.position().y(), p.position().z()); }

for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle p = physics.getParticle(i); PVector pos = new PVector(p.position().x(), p.position().y(), p.position().z()); }

stroke(0); strokeWeight(2); for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfSprings(); i++){ Spring s = physics.getSpring(i); Particle a = s.getOneEnd(); Particle b = s.getTheOtherEnd(); line(a.position().x(), a.position().y(), a.position().z(), b.position().x(), b.position().y(), b.position().z()); }

stroke(0); strokeWeight(2); for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfSprings(); i++){ Spring s = physics.getSpring(i); Particle a = s.getOneEnd(); Particle b = s.getTheOtherEnd(); line(a.position().x(), a.position().y(), a.position().z(), b.position().x(), b.position().y(), b.position().z()); }

if (record) { endRaw(); record = false; println(“done dxf~!”); }

if (record) { endRaw(); record = false; println(“done dxf~!”); }

void addSpacersToNode(Particle p, Particle r){ for (int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle q = physics.getParticle(i); if(p != q && p != r){ physics.makeAttraction(p, q, -3, 20); } }

}

void addSpacersToNode(Particle p, Particle r){ for (int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle q = physics.getParticle(i); if(p != q && p != r){ physics.makeAttraction(p, q, -3, 20); } }


import traer.physics.*; import SearchGeometry.*; import processing.dxf.*; boolean record; SGCamera cam; ParticleSystem physics; void setup(){ size(800, 600, P3D); cam = new SGCamera(this); physics = new ParticleSystem(0.0, 0.1); for(int i=0; i<60; i++){ physics.makeParticle(1.0, random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10), random(-10, 10)); }

}

for(int i=0; i<60; i++){ int randId1 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); int randId2 = int(random(0, physics.numberOfParticles()-1)); Particle p1 = physics.getParticle(randId1); Particle p2 = physics.getParticle(randId2); if(p1 != p2){ physics.makeSpring(p1, p2, 0.1, 0.1, 5); addSpacersToNode(p1, p2); } }

void keyPressed() { if (key == ‘r’) record = true; if (key == ‘p’){ saveFrame(“line-####.jpg”); } } void draw(){ physics.tick(.5); background(255); stroke(0); cam.update(); if (record) { beginRaw(DXF, “output”+frameCount+”.dxf”); } for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle p = physics.getParticle(i); PVector pos = new PVector(p.position().x(), p.position().y(), p.position().z()); noStroke(); fill(215,70,70); pushMatrix(); translate(p.position().x(), p.position().y(), p.position().z()); sphere(1); popMatrix(); } stroke(0); strokeWeight(2); for(int i=0; i<physics.numberOfSprings(); i++){ Spring s = physics.getSpring(i); Particle a = s.getOneEnd(); Particle b = s.getTheOtherEnd(); line(a.position().x(), a.position().y(), a.position().z(), b.position().x(), b.position().y(), b.position().z()); }

}

if (record) { endRaw(); record = false; println(“done dxf~!”); }

void addSpacersToNode(Particle p, Particle r){ for (int i=0; i<physics.numberOfParticles(); i++){ Particle q = physics.getParticle(i); if(p != q && p != r){ physics.makeAttraction(p, q, -3, 20); } } }


74

PROCESSING WORKSHOP

[Feathering Waves Script] This script generates an initial source wave over an array of units. The source location, amplitude, and wavelength of the initial wave are random within a specified range. Additional wave sources can be added with a keystroke. As waves with varying starting locations, amplitudes, and wavelengths build up, the patterns created by their interference become more complex and interesting. The units in the array are user definable. Simple 3-dimensional boxes were used inip tially lly to create a pixilated surface. To add complexity, rectangular planes that change nge length based on amplitude were used instead tead to give a fluttering effect. These results ults lend themselves architecturally to a louvered skin system or structural framework. mework. The primary usage of this script is to generate erate a pixilated wave pattern of varying complexities. The advantages are the modularity ularity of the units and the variation of patterns. The disadvantages are the regularity ularity of the units constrained to a grid d and the rectangular planar surface.

import processing.dxf.*; boolean record; int RIPPLES=1; float DAMPING=1.0; class source{ public float public float public float public float

x; y; amp; wavelength;

public source(float _x,float _y, float _ amp,float _wave) { x=_x; y=_y; amp=_amp; wavelength=_wave; } public float getPart(float xx,float yy,float time) { float distt=mag(xx-x,yy-y); return amp*(float)Math.cos(((time-distt)/ wavelength)); }

}

public void fade() { amp*=DAMPING; }

ArrayList ripples; void setup() { size(700,600,P3D); reset(); } void reset() { ripples=new ArrayList(); for (int i=0;i<RIPPLES;i++) { addNewRipple(); } } void mousePressed() { reset(); } void addNewRipple() { ripples.add(new source(random(-500,500), random(-500,500),random(1,6),rand om(6,12))); } void if if if }

keyPressed() (key == ‘r’) (key == ‘a’) (key == ‘p’)

{ record = true; addNewRipple(); saveFrame(“line-####.jpg”);

void draw() { background(0); if (record) { beginRaw(DXF, “output-####.dxf”); } for (int i=0;i<ripples.size();i++) { source s=(source)ripples.get(i); s.fade(); } translate(300,300,100); rotateX(mouseY/300.0); rotateZ(mouseX/300.0); float totalAmp=0.0;

Script variations (facing page) Script applied to non-planar surface (below)

for (float y=-60.0; y<6.0; y+=6.0) { for (float x=-130.0; x<130.0; x+=3.0) { float hite=0.0; for (int i=0;i<ripples.size();i++) { source s=(source)ripples.get(i); hite+=s.getPart(x,y,(float)frameCount); } totalAmp+=Math.abs(hite); float bx=6.0,by=12.0,m=6; float h=128+(2*hite); fill(h,h-255,225-h); if (h>60) { pushMatrix(); translate(x*2,y*2,hite); beginShape(); vertex(0, 0, m); vertex(bx, 0, m+(h/2-64)); vertex(bx, by, m+(h/2-64)); vertex(0, by, m); endShape(); fill(255); beginShape(); vertex(0, 0, 0); vertex(0, 0, m); vertex(bx, 0, m); vertex(bx, 0, 0); endShape();


75

2GBX SPRING 2010 INSTRUCTORS: TORU HASEGAWA, MARK COLLINS


GEOMETRY OF LIGHT VI SUA L STUDI ES I NSTA LLATI ON

Finished unfolded components for laser-cutting


78

GEOMETRY OF LIGHT

1. Magnetic field script generates frame

2. Each team designs unfoldable components

3. Attractor points vary the height of the components

4. Floral pattern overlaid on completed components. Figure-field script creates perforations based on pattern lines.


79

2GAX VISUAL STUDIES INSTRUCTOR: ELENA MANFERDINI


Soissons Rose Partner: Cat Pham

ROSE WINDOW OUTSIDE NURB MODEL RENDERING GOES HERE


MANIFOLD TECTONICS

A PP L IE D STU DI ES I NSTA LLATI ON


84

MANIFOLD TECTONICS INSTALLATION

This seminar began by examining and understanding the logic and geometry of Islamic muqarnas. The second stage was to develop our own interpretation of muqarnas logic using minimal surfaces. We developed three tiles based on minimal surfaces that could combine together to create a global minimal surface with unlimited pattern and variation.

Proposed form with 3 component types


85

2GAX APPLIED STUDIES INSTRUCTOR: MARCELO SPINA PARTNERS: CAT PHAM, KIM LAGERCRANTZ, JOHAN STENSTROM


86

MANIFOLD TECTONICS INSTALLATION

Installation details (below) component arrangement (above)


87

2GAX APPLIED STUDIES

COMPONENT B

COMPONENT C

8. 00

8.0 0

COMPONENT A

0 8.0

PLAN

0 8.0

00 8.

8

11.31

6.12

14.78

11.31

14.69

6.12

8.00

8.00

SIDE

8.00

FRONT


88

MANIFOLD TECTONICS INSTALLATION

[ PROCESS PHOTOS ]


89

2GAX APPLIED STUDIES 1

5

2

3

4

1. Milled component forms out of high density foam, sealed and waxed 2. Coated with silicone to make negative mold for casting 3. Plaster bandages applied to keep silicone mold rigid during pouring 4. Pouring polyurethane resin into molds 5. Final resin components before assembly



SCI-Arc Graduate Portfolio