Page 1


e c n a g e l E is the only beauty that never fades. – Audrey Hepburn

B R E A K FA S T AT T I F FA N Y ' S sisterMAG N ° 34 SISTER-MAG.COM

2


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

DEAR READERS, While it is still gloomy and cold outside, we get cosy inside with sisterMAG issue number 2 of this year and a true film classic: »BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S« . Not only does the romance bring NEW YORK CITY flair to the screen, it also inspired us to a colourful mix of topics and articles. We portray one of the most beautiful women of the 20th century: AUDREY HEPBURN . Who was the charming actress who – besides her timeless beauty – won over a generation of viewers with her clear mind and inspires fashion to this day. That is why we don’t just honour the grande dame but also her grande robe: THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS . Something else that we took a closer look – or listen – at for this issue ist he »BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S« soundtrack. How did the memorable

3

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


melody of »MOON RIVER« become the work of a century? However beautiful this nostalgia is, we don’t want to remain in the past entirely. What is an important part of NEW YORK CITY to this day? The cabs! Our author Christian Naethler shows how evolving technologies and more and more mobile apps are rapidly changing a classic industry. Another important topic when we talk about our movie focus this time: BREAKFAST! Together with our partner ALPRO we created an exclusive event report of our breakfast clubs in Hamburg, Cologne and Berlin this past month – and we are sharing some motivational tips on how to transitions to a healthy and wholesome nutrition in the long run, avoiding the most typical struggles. When it comes to fashion different fabrics inspire us this year. Our designer Evi took a closer look at JERSEY MATERIALS for the first collection – and created four lovely outfits from it. A warm fabric, many bright colours: the best ingredients for grey late winter days! Now, we hope you enjoy reading and exploring this issue!

YO U R S I S T E R M AG T E A M

SISTER-MAG.COM

4


BREAKFAST

AT

5

TIFFANY'S

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


W H AT H A P P E N E D S O FA R

2018

JAN

sist er MAG is published ever y m on th ! READ NOW 

SISTER-MAG.COM

6

In 2018, everything will be about FILMS in sisterMAG! There is almost no other topic that influences us as society as much and as versatile as audio-visual art does. Our opening section for this year is inspired by the 1980s film »THE BREAKFAST CLUB.« The storyline is simple: Five students and stereotypes are in detention together – and learn a lot about themselves and their fellow human beings. A comedy with socio-critical approach that makes us question ourselves, our identity and our external perception more accurately. However, this issue is not only about the own identity. We also look for the world’s most extraordinary schools and dedicate a feature to chalk. We also acknowledge the 1980s with the cult sport aerobics – with skin-tight sports suits and wildly teased hair. So, what are you waiting for? We are looking forward to a colourful year with you and everything a good film is about: great protagonists, exciting stories, beautiful settings and, of course – a happy ending.


Sales

Marketing & Finance

ANNI Social Media

SASKIA Administration

THEA

TIFFANY'S

FRANZISKA

Editor-in-Chief & Design

SOPHIE

Content Management

CHRISTINA

Content Management

C R E AT I O N

MARKETING & ADMIN

TONI

AT

EVI

Content Management

MARIE

Fashion

Design & Creation

LALE

VERA Content Management

JEMIMA Intern

sisterMAG

ALEX

O P E R AT I O N S

PA R T N E R S

BREAKFAST

SONGIE

Video & Design

7

Design

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


CONTENT PAG E 22 - I N T R O D U C T I O N

B R E A K FA S T AT T I F FA N Y ' S

FEBRUARY 03 07 10 14 22 34 36

EDITORIAL TEAM LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS FILM HISTORY PART 2 From silent film to talkies INTRODUCTION FILM »Breakfast at Tiffany's«

58 64

78

MOON RIVER One film, one song, one

82

THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS Reinventing an icon MODE AUS JERSEY Four Women, four dresses

SISTER-MAG.COM

Ursprung, Eigenschaften &

AN OSCAR FOR ANIMALS Outstanding four-legged actors

90 98

AUDREY HEPBURN The Style icon

JERSEY Funktion

PRODUCTCOLLAGE

desire

46

PAG E 126 - B R E A K FA S T AROUND THE WORLD

104

ONE DIVA, ONE CANVAS DIGITAL A TO B How technology has changed the taxi industry BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S Will the dream come true?

109 BREAKFAST IN NEW YORK


#34

PAG E 109 - N E W YO R K F E AT U R E

122

PAG E 46 - AU D R E Y

CROISSANTS, CENTRAL PARK, 5TH AVENUE Is this New York?

126

BREAKFAST AROUND THE WORLD Part 2

150

THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB

PAG E 64 - M O D E AU S J E R S E Y

Dein perfekter Morgen in Kรถln, Hamburg & Berlin

178

IMPRINT

PAG E 150 - A L P R O


CONTRIBUTOR TEXT Barbara Eichhammer

the-little-wedding-corner.de

TEXT Dr. Michael Neubauer sisterMAG Team

PHOTO & VIDEO Robin Kater

robinkater.com sisterMAG Team

Angela Peltner

@angelapeltner Alex Kords

kords.net

ILLUSTRATION

Robert Eberhardt

roberteberhardt.com

Maëlle Rajoelisolo

Christian Naethler

maellerajo.myportfolio.com

@iamvolta

Nicole Xu

Heike Niemeier

@nicolexu_

heikeniemeier.de

Carola Koberstein

carolakoberstein.de

PROOF Stefanie Kießling

@kiesslingS Alex Kords

kords.net Christian Naethler

@iamvolta Dr. Michael Neubauer

SISTER-MAG.COM

TRANSLATION Ira Häussler Alex Kords

kords.net Christian Naethler

@iamvolta Tanja Timmer

@tanjastweets

10

STYLING Evi Neubauer

pinterest.com/evin


RS

BREAKFAST

HAIR & MAKEUP Patricia Heck

patriciaheck.de Lisa Zeitler

lisazeitler.com

AT

#34

TIFFANY'S

MODEL Mi

@mi.nani Aline

@pollymcgeary Katharina

@kathastrophal Nadine

@beautyressor Nina

@hedinaeht

THE COVER PHOTOS Robin Kater MAKEUP & HAIR Lisa Zeitler

MODEL Mi

PA RT NE R OF THE ISSUE You can recognize our partner features by the logo at the top of the page. We thank our partners alpro very cordially, because without them this issue would not be possible!

11

OUTFIT Evi Neubauer PRODUCTION Sophie Siekmann

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


DOWNLOADS HAWAIJ- SPICED FRENCH TOAST

CRÊPES

BUHTLE

SATIN-TRIMMED PINK FLEECE DRESS

BEIGE COLOURED JERSEY DRESS

DARK GREEN JERSEY DRESS

VIDEOS PHOTO FRAME SISTER-MAG.COM

CHAIR CUSHION 12


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

S TA Y I N T O U C H !

FOLLOW US!

Follow along with our stories and daily news from the sisterMAG office easily on Instagram! You can find magazine contents, many behind-the-scenes and snapshots of our contributors. And of course, giveaways, invitations and other exclusive activities can be found on @SISTER_MAG.

13

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Film ry o t s i h part

2

SISTER-MAG.COM

14


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Text: Jemima Oettler Illustrations: Nicole Xu

t n e l i s m Fro s e i k l a t o film t s e i v o m w o H o t d e n r a le speak

In the first part of our film history series we explained how the moving picture was created from a drawing. In the second part, we will explore how silent films found their voice. What events shaped the silent film era? How did classical silent films become talking pictures (or ÂťtalkiesÂŤ)? Read on to learn all this and more...

15

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


s g n i n n i g e b t n e l i s e of th film

When watching a silent film these days, an actor's facial expressions and gestures may seem a little unfamiliar and strange. But when silent films were first made at the end of the 19th century, they were a real marvel. Even today they are considered an art form.

The silent film era began with the first screenings in 1895. The Skladanowsky brothers, who presented nine short films in the Berlin Wintergarten as SISTER-MAG.COM

part of a variety show, were among the first major players. Although the event was only 10 minutes long, it was the first European screening in which the audience paid for a film. Most short films at that time didn't contain a proper plot. Over time, the first

16


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

humour sequences emerged. Nevertheless, interest in this new art form had yet to catch on, and it wasn't possible to record images and sound at the same time. Silent films were often accompanied by orchestras or pianos. The art of the silent film remains their universal ingredient to this day. As they are understandable for everyone, their language doesn't matter.

films e s o p r u p h wit

Georges Méliès understood that films presented a very good way to tell stories. The French illusionist and film pioneer is thus regarded as the inventor of »narrative film.«

Because of the potential he saw in this art form, he began to make staged films. Méliès was very attached to the theatre and therefore only used setting sizes that were no larger than an audience's total field of vision. That's

17

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


the first t n e n a m r pe cinemas d e n e p o e ar

why his films contained little visual variation. It was Arthur Melbourne-Cooper who would choose not to comply with theatre rules in the film ÂťThe Little DoctorÂŤ (1902). For the first time ever, you could see close-ups in a film. In this case, it was of a cat. It was now possible for changing perspectives to narrate films. The montage brought the change of perspective and image size into a particular rhythm. This eventually led to the development of film language.

SISTER-MAG.COM

The demand for film as a medium was very high and enthusiasm increased, which welcomed the construction of cinemas.

Films became more complex and a trip to the cinema became a popular amusement. In 1908, the number of visitors gradually declined as films were still relatively short and the content not particularly enthralling. That's why filmmakers began implementing literary devices for the first time.

18


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

from t r a t n e l i s m l i f g n i k l to ta

Films were accompanied by music in cinemas since the first screenings. Special events such as film premieres were even supported by 60-person orchestras.

It would be 30 years after the invention of the film that talking pictures – or »talkies« – came to life. On October 6, 1927, the first talking film made its world premiere in New York City.

19

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


The Warner Bros.' »The Jazz Singer« is credited with the breakthrough. With the words, »You ain't heard nothin' yet!« the vaudeville star Al Jolson wrote history. This was made possible by Warner Bros. and Western Electric's invention of the Vitaphone system, where a film projector was connected to records that were scanned by a needle. After a few years, however, this procedure was replaced by the sound-on-film process, as it proved to be very impractical.

1918 In 1918, the technicians Joseph Engl, Joseph Masolle, and Hans Vogt began to further the sound-on-film process and called it »Tri-Ergon«.

SISTER-MAG.COM

This photoelectric method involved a soundtrack that was scanned with a light beam and connected to moving film strips. After initial successes, the German film production company UFA decided to adapt the technology in 1925. However, the first premiere of a talkie in Berlin's Mozartsaal failed due to technical problems, causing UFA to withdraw from the project. It was not until years later that the sound-on-film process was established and the first films with audio were created. Shortly after, Tobis (Ton-BildSyndikat AG) was founded on August 30, 1928. It was created by Tri-Ergon Musik AG. Major companies in the electrical industry were being summoned to collaborate, and Tobis was already looking for international partners at

20


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

the year s e i k l a t f o

its inception. In 1929 it signed a contract with its competitor, Klangfilm GmbH, which stipulated that the market was going to be divided between the two companies.

In 1929, the film »Ich küsse deine Hand, Madame« signalled the premiere of the Tobis system. A few months later, the 40-minute Tobis film »Melodie der Welt« premiered. This was the longest talkie in Germany at the time. The Tobis-Klangfilm-Group came into being and the industry took off from there. In 1930, talkies became established worldwide. Now you know how the still image evolved into a moving picture and how the silent film learned to speak. But how did films get their colour? We'll explore that in our next issue!

21

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


SISTER-MAG.COM

22


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Illustration: Maelle Rajoelisolo Text: Barbara Eichhammer

Blake Edward’s romantic comedy »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« (1961) did not only challenge conventional gender roles and concepts of femininity at the time, but also turned Audrey Hepburn into a global style icon. Most Memorable: The cult scene in which she has breakfast in her black Givenchy dress in front of the shopping windows of Tiffany & Co.

23

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


The Film

SISTER-MAG.COM

24


BREAKFAST

AT

New York, the deserted Fifth Avenue on an early morning: Audrey Hepburn arrives with a Yellow Cab after a long party night in her little black Givenchy dress, paired with oversized glasses, long gloves and a pearl necklace. While she is looking at all the precious jewellery in the shop window of Tiffany’s, she has breakfast with a coffee cup and croissant in her hand. Accompanied by the melancholic sounds of Henry Mancini’s »Moon River«, it is this very moment that writes film history . Blake Edward‘s romantic comedy »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« (1961) is based on the eponymous novel by Truman Capote: The film is about the exciting New York city life of eccentric socialite Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn):

TIFFANY'S

She usually celebrates noisy parties until late, smokes a lot, gets drunk, meets several men (also in exchange of money) and has her breakfast in evening wear in front of Tiffany’s.

But it was not only Audrey Hepburn that became a cultural icon; the black dress by Hubert de Givenchy gained cult status: In 2006, it was auctioned off for 792.165 USDollar at Christie’s in London.

25

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Holly became the epitome of a New York It-Girl and »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« became the forerunner of such famous New York depictions such as Barefoot in the Park (1967) or Sex and the City (1998 – 2004). In the film, Holly Golightly flirts with her neighbour and author Paul Varjak (George Peppard) and despite some trials and tribulations they can enjoy a happy end. The romantic comedy comprises some humorous scenes: Script writer George Axelrod, for instance, added a scene to Truman Capote’s story, in which Holly and Paul try to have a ring engraved at Tiffany‘s that they have from a sweets carton. The scenes with Holly’s Japanese neighbour Mr Yunioshi were intended to be similarly funny, especially when he complains about her late-night noise in a lisping voice. Shortly after its release, however, the film was heavily criticised for its racist portrayal of the Japanese character.

SISTER-MAG.COM

26

Truman Capote AND THE A D A P TAT I O N


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

AND WHAT DID THE AUTHOR OF THE EPONYMOUS NOVEL THINK ABOUT THE FILM? In fact, Truman Capote was quite upset about the film. In an interview he claimed that »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« had so much similarity with his book like the Rockettes with the famous prima ballerina Galina Ulanova. While Truman Capote’s novel portrays Holly Golightly as a call girl (or in his words as an »American geisha«), who takes 50 Dollar for the powder room, the film sketches Holly as a lost romantic heart, which craves for a better life. All

allusions to sex in the original have been deleted. Script writer George Axelrod also changed the homosexual narrator and added comedy scenes. Nonetheless, the film permanently changed the image of femininity and related gender roles in Hollywood. A short gaze at the history of film shows how revolutionary »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« was with respect to its portrayal of women in film.

27

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


along came Holly: FILM & GENDER

SISTER-MAG.COM

28


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

IT WAS ALREADY IN SILENT FILM THAT EMANCIPATION TOOK A START: Liberality and autonomous women could be found on screen during the Roaring Twenties, for instance, with depictions of femme fatales or flapper girls, who wore short dresses, provided for their own income and were portrayed by such stars as Theda Bara, Clara Bow and Joan Crawford. The »Hays Code«, however, put an abrupt end to this early wave of screen emancipation, when it became effective for all film producers in Hollywood in 1934. Notably, it was not abolished before 1967. Until then, the censorship code comprised a series of strict rules for the production of US-American films, which should guarantee a morally acceptable portrayal of sexual

and criminal content. In short: representations of female sexuality on screen were taboo. Instead of emancipated women, rather conservative female figures were shown, who embodied the roles of housewife and mother (films of the Fifties) and after World War II the roles of secretary or assembly line worker. »There was always sex in Hollywood«, US-American film historian Sam Wasson writes in the introduction to his book, Fifth Avenue, »But before Breakfast at Tiffany's, only the bad girls were having it.« Hollywood’s women at the time were often reduced to the stereotypical and discriminating role of blond bimbo (Marilyn Monroe), chaste saint (Doris Day) or glamourous diva (Liz Taylor).

29

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


... AND ALONG CAME HOLLY!

She is single, intelligent, humorous, independent, witty and unrestricted – that was new and unconventional in 1961. For the first time, film audiences saw a young independent woman, blunt and frivolous, who does not want to get married and meets men when and how she wants. Actually, it was Marilyn Monroe who had been envisaged for the role of Holly Golightly, but her acting teacher Paula Strasberg turned it down quite clearly with the words: »Marilyn Monroe will not play a whore«. Audrey Hepburn, however, turned out to be a lucky find – even if Truman Capote preferred Marilyn Monroe. She embodied a new kind of femininity, which differed from

SISTER-MAG.COM

established Hollywood clichés and American women (blond and curvy) of the Fifties: With her androgynous physique, her tomboyish short dark hair, small figure and flat shoes she embodied something fragile, petite and elegant. Her look soon became cult after the film: The little black dress, ankle-length trousers and ballerina shoes became the fashion assets of generations of women worldwide. Interestingly, Paramount Studios were conscious of the rather delicate, moral situation of the film. Thus, they launched a series of press releases in which they emphasized that the real Audrey Hepburn bore no similarity whatsoever with Holly Golightly.

30


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

The actors

Audrey Hepburn With Holly Golightly, Audrey Hepburn played her most famous role. With no other film did she have such a longlasting success. Although she had been known from such hit comedies as Roman Holiday (1953) or Sabrina (1957), it was

Paul Varjak

31

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


»Breakfast at Tiffany’s« that finally cemented her as an undisputable fashion icon and glamourous film star. She was also nominated for an Oscar for the fourth time. George Peppard, who had previously played in rather second-rate films, became famous through his male lead role as author Paul Varjak. With his role as Colonel »John Hannibal Smith« in the TV series A-Team he had a successful comeback. Director Blake Edwards had already been known from his turbulent comedy Operation Petticoat with Cary Grant and Tony Curtis. He became internationally famous after »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« as director of several hit comedies such as the Pink Panther series.

SISTER-MAG.COM

32

Further reading • Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M. Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany's, and The Dawn of the Modern Woman Sam Wasson - Steidl Verlag • Breakfast at Tiffany's Truman Capote


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

The soundtrack What remains unforgettable is also the catchy soundtrack: From Big Band Jazz to acoustic numbers, the music captured the zeitgeist of the Swinging Sixties in New York and life of socialite Holly Golightly. One scene remains unforgotten: Audrey Hepburn sitting on the fire escape staircase in Manhattan, in casual blue jeans and singing with a little guitar and a dreamy gaze Moon River; for which music composer Henry Mancini also won the Oscar.

33

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


1

2

F I F T H AV E N U E , 5 A . M

Sam Wasson T I F FA N Y

3

Eau de Parfum

Breakfast at

s ' y n a f f i T

S K AG E N

Bracelet Agnethe

sisterMAG N°34

4

5

S T E L TO N

To Go Click Thermo Cup SISTER-MAG.COM

AC E & TAT E

Suzy Bio Black 34


6 BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

U TO P I AT

Breakfast at Tiffany's Sleep Mask

7 BURBERRY KISSES

Peach Delight N°57

& O T H E R S TO R I E S

Velvet Dress 8 H AY

Beak Scissor

A girl can't read that sort of thing without her lipstick

– Breakfast at Tiffany's

9

35

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


, m l i f e On , g n o s one

SISTER-MAG.COM

36


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

one

DESIRE MOON RIVER AS A COMPOSITION OF THE CENTURY

Text: Angela Maria Peltner What is kitschy, longing, and everybody can sing along? Exactly, an American classic. Some classics become a myth,like the song »Moon River« from the film »Breakfast at Tiffany’s«. But what elevated »Moon River« to this status?

37

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


SISTER-MAG.COM

38


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

First, it managed to hit the heart of the zeitgeist of a whole generation. And second, it’s about the outrageous otherness of the protagonist Holly Golightly, played by Audrey Hepburn. She inhales life lightly and trendily, like the first 'It' girl, and, on the other hand, was able to be so deep that we could hear her melancholy and spirit of optimism in every line she rather whispered than sung. Until today, the myth is unbroken. A search for traces…

About the author Because of her parents, the musician studied history and German literature at Humboldt University where she ultimately found her love for language. Since then, she’s been doing what she likes most: writing. She published four books, developed scripts for various formats, and writes lyrics for her band. Her second big love is music. She likes performing in the TV show »Fernsehgarten« with her band when she’s not on tour with Nena. She is also part of the ensemble of the German daily soap »Gute Zeiten, schlechte Zeiten«.

39

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


»M At the dawn of the Berlin wall, while Juri Gagarin became the first person to fly through space and John F. Kennedy fought to end racial segregation, a graceful actress sang a song during the shooting of »Breakfast at Tiffany’s«. It was written only for her and would go down in history. But what makes this song immortal? It’s not because of the great singing of Audrey Hepburn, who was second choice after Marilyn Monroe. Without anticipating SISTER-MAG.COM

it, composer Henry Mancini and lyricist Johnny Mercer wrote an Oscar hit – one that would become a myth. The song that connects the bittersweet melancholy of a starting autumn wind and the innocence of a huge, colourful lollipop was interpreted in almost 1,000 cover versions by Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, Judy Garland and others.

40


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

MOON RIVER« »Moon River«, named after the Savannah River that flows through the hometown of lyricist Johnny Mercer, is a tribute to his home where the young Mercer and his friends once looked for huckleberries. But the song also spoke to the young America of those days. The youth stood somewhere between the old, chaste, homophobe, and racist America and the wildness of the budding and finally black rock’n’roll. Song and film were lucky enough to catch exactly the zeitgeist of this generation and to carry the

spirit of optimism far beyond national borders. However, the dream of a carefree life already showed its first cracks. Understanding between young and old was lost. And the stink of old narrow-mindedness should be gone sooner rather than later. The youth didn’t feel at home in society and within the values of their parents. It was much easier for them to identify with the first 'It' girl, Holly Golightly, than with the war hero and president Dwight D. Eisenhower. Audrey Hephurn was a great anti-role model – beautiful

41

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


MOON clothes, fabulous parties, and a disorientation that left no doubt about the fallibility of the charming party girl who relentlessly went to bed with men, even with black ones, and showed the middle finger to America’s prudery. What comes along as a minor remark nowadays was an enormously progressive statement back then. That's because women of Hollywood either played brainless sillies, like Marilyn Monroe did, chaste-frigid ice statues, like Doris Day, or glamorous goddesses, like Liz Taylor. There were almost no independent beings with lust, vigour, and distinct flaws. Especially for the welleducated women of America who eventually lived as housewives with four children

SISTER-MAG.COM

and a stock of Valium, Holly Golightly was a revelation of the free life. The cheeky, revealing, and liberal woman boasted more and more charisma with every new look.

42

HOWARDPOWELL - FLICKR CC BY-SA 2.0


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

RIVER« Only one single time did she appear simply clothed in jeans and sweater, void of jewellery and Givenchy, on the windowsill. She sits there with the guitar and sings the four short verses of »Moon River« with weltschmerz and unfulfilled longing. And every tone carries the hope that all dreams can come true. Of course, more ingredients are required than this tender film moment. Fortunately, »Moon River« has several of them. The foundation was laid by the tremendously fine book that brought the breakthrough of one of America’s greatest authors, Truman Capote. But the fact that the film Truman Capote hated ended happily was connected to its groundbreaking success. And what a happy ending that was! One that makes the »two drifters, off to see the world« give love a chance.

43

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


»MO Oh dream maker, you heart breaker Wherever you're goin, I'm goin' your way

»We’re after the same rainbow’s end, waitin’, round the bend. My huckleberry friend, moon river, and me.« – Ultimately, we owe »Moon River« to the duo Mancini and Mercer. The musicians produced

SISTER-MAG.COM

44


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

OON RIVER« 2,000 songs throughout their careers and received 32 Oscar nominations, eight statuettes, and 20 Grammys. The conflation of big art of two exceedingly successful originators. For more than a month, they worked on »Moon River« because they had to make the song as simple as possible to adapt it to the voice of Audrey Hepburn, who was said to be »extremely limited«. Nevertheless, the bosses of Paramount Pictures found the performance so bad that they banished Audrey Hepburn’s »Moon River« from the soundtrack and replaced it with an enormous orchestra version of the song. Only after her death in 1933 was »her

version« published for the first time. Mancini played quite a role in this. Throughout his life, he stuck to his opinion that nobody sung the song better than Audrey Hepburn, thanks to the much-cited, charming fragility in her voice. There had to be a close connection between Mancini and Hepburn anyway. She once wrote to »her Hank«: »Everything we cannot say with words or show with action you have expressed for us. You have done this with so much imagination, fun and beauty.« A few days after Hepburn’s death, Tiffany placed an obituary. It only consisted of three words: »Our Huckleberry Friend«.

45

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


SISTER-MAG.COM

b ep

au

u

drey H 46

n r


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Text: Barbara Eichhammer Illustration: Nicole Xu

.. .

e l y st

n o c i

»MY LOOK IS ATTAINABLE. WOMEN CAN LOOK LIKE AUDREY HEPBURN BY FLIPPING OUT THEIR HAIR, BUYING THE LARGE SUNGLASSES, AND THE LITTLE SLEEVELESS DRESSES.« AUDREY H EPBU RN on herself

47

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


THE FAMOUS LITTLE BLACK DRESS, LONG CIGARETTE HOLDER AND OVERSIZED SUNGLASSES – IT IS THESE TRADEMARKS THAT MADE AUDREY HEPBURN WRITE FILM HISTORY. In »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« (1961), she turns into an undisputed style icon. Millions of women would like to look like her. But what is so special about the Audrey Hepburn Look? A little introduction. AUDREY HEPBURN – slender figure, tomboyish short hair, fair complexion, and flat shoes. A rather unconventional appearance at the time, which stood out from the usual Hollywood beauty ideal. Neither full-breasted or curvy like Sophie Loren, nor blonde like Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn established her look as a delicate beauty. This is how the audience had known and loved Hepburn since her first blockbuster, Roman Holiday (1953), in which she plays a rebellious princess who falls in love during her forbidden ramble through Rome with a reporter (Gregory Peck). SISTER-MAG.COM

48


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

ROMAN HOLIDAY turned the 24-year-old actress into an international star; she was also awarded an Oscar for best actress. The film coined her image as androgynous and doe-eyed princess, for in her big screen debut the brunette actress discards her royal taffeta dresses and swaps them for a more contemporary summer wardrobe: Circle skirt, white

49

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


cinema and fashion cotton blouse, black lace-up sandals, and a silk scarf around her neck constituted her unique film look and were from then on inextricably linked to Audrey Hepburn. Similarly legendary: The scene in which she has her long hair cut in favour of a stylish Pixie Cut with short bangs .

SISTER-MAG.COM

50


BREAKFAST

AT

Audrey Hepburn’s films also show how closely fashion trends are related to cinema. Cinema has time and again written fashion history, and likewise fashion has written film history. During the Hollywood Age, film influenced, or rather constructed, certain gender images and thereby also fashion trends that became popular and shaped generations of women. Fashion in film serves as a social, gender-specific and cultural sign or even medium:

CLOTHES COMMUNICATE TO THE AUDIENCE, FOR INSTANCE, THE STATUS OF A CHARACTER, THEIR RELATIONS, AND IN THE CASE OF AUDREY HEPBURN’S PRINCESS, HER PERSONALITY.

TIFFANY'S

AS A CULTURAL ICON, AUDREY HEPBURN CHANGED IDEALS OF FEMININITY DURING THE 50S AND PAVED THE WAY FOR INDEPENDENT, TOMBOYISH, AND THEREFORE OTHER FEMININITIES.

American director Billy Wilder, with whom she made the romantic comedy Sabrina in 1957, once said: »This girl will make breasts go totally out of fashion«. In fact, she paved the way for those skinny models like Twiggy during the Swinging Sixties. Her slender figure, however, was due to her fateful life during World War II in the Netherlands, where she had to suffer from the great famine

51

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


during German occupation. The beauty ideal, that Audrey Hepburn co-founded, was based on effortless grace and subtlety rather than overt sex appeal, which most actresses personified in the 50s. Unlike so many other screen beauties at the time, her distinctive style had not been created by a film studio, but by her own.

givenchy und Hepburn » GIVENCHY’S CLOTHES ARE THE ONLY ONES I FEEL MYSELF IN. HE IS MORE THAN A DESIGNER, HE IS A CREATOR OF PERSONALITY. « Audrey Hepburn

SISTER-MAG.COM

52


BREAKFAST

AT

One year after Roman Holiday, Audrey Hepburn played the female lead in Billy Wilder’s romantic comedy Sabrina (1954). It's another Cinderella story, in which plain chauffeur’s daughter Sabrina turns into a young, elegant woman after a long visit to Paris. In order to achieve a coherent filmic mood, Audrey wanted to wear Parisian fashion. At the beginning of the film shooting, she came to the studio of Parisian couturier Hubert de Givenchy and asked him to dress her for the film. This would be the beginning of a life-long friendship: She became his muse and she included a boilerplate into all her film contracts that only Givenchy should design her costumes. Sabrina turned into the blockbuster of the year and Audrey Hepburn was once again nominated for an Oscar.

TIFFANY'S

Together, Givenchy and Hepburn brought Parisian chic to the American audiences:

A BLACK SATIN COCKTAIL DRESS, CROPPED TROUSERS, AND QUILTED BALLERINA SHOES, AS WELL AS A PLEATED CHIFFON TURBAN, HELPED THE FLAIR OF THE FRENCH CAPITAL TO COME ALIVE ON SCREEN. With Audrey’s help, Givenchy made trends like the boat neckline (also called Sabrina neckline) and tea-length wedding dresses popular. Another Hollywood novum: Instead of stilettos or high heels, Audrey Hepburn wore flat ballerinas by Salvatore Ferragamo or kitten heels.

53

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


LBD Little black dress Audrey Hepburn had already been famous during the 50s, but it was her legendary role as Holly Golightly in »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« (1961) that ultimately turned her into one of the greatest film stars and into a fashion icon of the 20th century. One of the most significant scenes of film history: She has her breakfast with a coffee cup and croissant in her hand in front of the shop window of Tiffany & Co. in black evening wear by Hubert de Givenchy, which the designer had specifically tailormade for her .

SISTER-MAG.COM

54


BREAKFAST

AT

Her outfit is characterised by clear simplicity and timeless elegance: The Givenchy evening gown is made out of black satin, has a straight-lined cut and a low-cut back. She combines the dress with tinted eyeglasses by Oliver Goldsmith, black gloves, elegant pearls, and a Chignon.

HER LOOK GAINED WORLDWIDE APPRECIATION After the film’s release, Audrey Hepburn was shown on almost every fashion magazine cover in 1961. Since »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« , the little black dress has become the fashion epitome of style and elegance: » SHE [Audrey Hepburn] HAS TAUGHT US HOW TO WEAR THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS, NOT WITH AN EXAGGERATED RED SCARF, BUT WITH SIMPLE PEARLS«,

TIFFANY'S

remarked fashion journalist Ellen Melinkoff in her book, 'What We Wore'. The fashion classic celebrated its biggest success in this film. Whereas the little black dress was regarded as rather indecent during the Roaring Twenties, an article in Vogue made it a cult fashion object in 1926. On screen, the little black dress turned into the symbol of femme fatales and during the 50s. Many directors used it to make their actresses look even more seductive like Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, and Marilyn Monroe in Some Like it Hot (1959). All the more effective was Holly Golightly’s appearance in »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« : Hubert de Givenchy succeeded in freeing the LBD from its indecent image and making it chic and socially acceptable.

55

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Doe eye Look Audrey Hepburn’s eye makeup and her big, dark doe eyes are equally memorable and part of her iconic appearance. Her look is characterised by the elegantly curved eyeliner, full natural eyebrows, and her black mascaraed lashes. Her whole career, she worked with Italian make-up artist Alberto de Rossi, who was responsible for her famous doe eye look. A simple beauty trick helped

SISTER-MAG.COM

provide for her big doe eyes: After having used mascara, Alberto de Rossi separated each eyelash individually with a pin. Audrey Hepburn paradoxically never found her style unique and also remarked that it was easy to copy:

56

»MY LOOK IS ATTAINABLE. WOMEN CAN LOOK LIKE AUDREY HEPBURN BY FLIPPING OUT THEIR HAIR, BUYING THE LARGE SUNGLASSES, AND THE LITTLE SLEEVELESS DRESSES. «


BREAKFAST

AT

At the end of the sixties, Audrey Hepburn ended her career in the film industry and dedicated her time to her role as a UN ambassador. She travelled to more than 20 countries to support UNICEF projects. Until today, the Audrey Hepburn Children’s Fund promotes education programs for children. When it comes to her iconic look, it is still popular in the 21st century.

TIFFANY'S

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Barbara Eichhammer has a degree in cultural studies. She is a writer as well as the editor of the blog »The Little Wedding Corner« where she writes about modern weddings.

The words of Hubert de Givenchy still apply when he said that Audrey Hepburn is one of the biggest fashion role models in Hollywood.

57

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


The Little

BLACK DRESS REINVENTING AN ICON

TEXT | FRANZI WINTERLING ILLUSTRATIONEN | CAROLA KOBERSTEIN

SISTER-MAG.COM

58


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

ALTHOUGH THE COLOR BLACK MIGHT SEEM SIMPLE AND SOMETHING THAT »GOES WITH ANYTHING« TO US, IT IS ACTUALLY FULL OF VASTLY DIFFERENT MEANINGS THAT DEVELOPED When the Museum of Modern Art in New York City dedicated an exhibition to the question whether FASHION WAS MODERN , you would probably expect to see futuristic textile constructions rather than a little black dress from the 1920s. However, there it was among the 111 items that – according to the curator – shaped modern fashion. And not just one little

THROUGH TIME.

black dress was on view – but 11 of them, showing us how THE CHANEL ICON was constantly reinvented. How the LBD speaks of social change, of technological innovation, of new roles for women and – maybe most of all – the beauty of simplicity.

59

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


BLACK IS EVERYWHERE. Although the color black might seem simple and something that »goes with anything« to us, it is actually full of vastly different meanings that developed through time. In 15th century Spain it was worn by the aristocracy, the complicated dye processes a sign of wealth and privilege. However, black has also been worn by church representatives, indicating asceticism and virtue as well as people who were connected with being very serious about their work such as governesses or even writers. In the 20th century it was also known as the color of mourning, made chic for widows since QUEEN VICTORIA.

So, what was it that fascinated COCO CHANEL about the color in combination with a straight and simplistic cut? What were the VOGUE editors intrigued by when putting a sketch of Chanel in an LBD in a 1926 issue, labeling it »The Chanel ‘Ford’ – the frock that all the world will wear.« Possibly, it was just that simplicity as opposed to the popular orientalist fashion of the early 1920s. Perhaps it was the promise of a life without corsets and bare legs. A vision of freedom, actively chosen by the women – the infamous flappers – wearing it.

BACK TO OLD PATTERNS? About 20 years later, after simple and utilitarian black dresses during the war, the fashion piece came back with a major change: as part of CHRISTIAN DIOR’S »NEW LOOK« , the LBD received a full skirt and narrow waist. Reminiscent of corset days?

SISTER-MAG.COM

No, but rather a symbol for dangerous women – not too far from the flapper image of the 1920s – who established a seductive counterpart to the image of the conservative housewife of the 1950s.

60


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

AND THEN THERE WAS AUDREY. The 60s came with youth culture, even shorter skirts, sheer fabrics and of course: AUDREY HEPBURN . In 1961 she ate a croissant in front of a Tiffany’s window and turned the movie – as well as the dress – into an icon. Audrey’s little black dress speaks of the glamour that even a small-town girl such as Holly Golightly can achieve when she is determined not to let herself be

defined by the boundaries of her time and space, but to reinvent herself and make it in the big city. Almost sounds like Chanel?

AUDREY’S LITTLE BLACK DRESS SPEAKS OF THE GLAMOUR THAT EVEN A SMALLTOWN GIRL SUCH AS HOLLY GOLIGHTLY CAN ACHIEVE …

61

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


TECHNOLOGY TAKING OVER. The story of the LBD didn’t end after »BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S« , quite the opposite. Shapes continued to change – from sculptural and sexy to fluid and creative. And more: the production mechanisms changed as well. In 2014, the design studio NERVOUS SYSTEM »printed« a little black dress, making it clear that the story of this piece of garment is anything but over.

LITTLE BLACK DEATH DRESS. The last »little black dress« shown in the MOMA exhibition seems to offer a rather dark outlook. The designer, PIA INTERLANDI , created her »garments for the grave« with the idea of a burial garment as a piece of clothing that will symbolize the body as it is returned to the earth. Interlandi does not want to criticize fashion

SISTER-MAG.COM

in her creation, but rather use it to show death as »natural, undeniable, inevitable and at times, beautiful.« And even more than that in a constant dialogue between the wearer and ist environment as handtouches on the fabric turn it white, memories oft he touches of one’s loved ones.

62


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

GA R M EN T S F O R T HE GR AV E BY P I A I N T E R L A N D I

THE STORY OF THE LBD DIDN’T END AFTER »BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S«, QUITE THE OPPOSITE. SHAPES CONTINUED TO CHANGE – FROM SCULPTURAL AND SEXY TO FLUID AND CREATIVE.

And with all these innovations and recreations, what about Coco Chanel’s 1920s LBD? Is it now outdated because it was produced almost a century ago and the statement of women not having to wear corsets is no longer relevant? Not at all, but rather can the original LBD still be seen

as an example of a woman going her own way and being who she wants to be. It can be understood as a symbol for freedom and selfdetermination of women. And who wouldn’t want to still dance the night away like a 1920s flapper or enjoy a croissant in front of a Tiffany’s window?

63

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


FOUR WOMEN S I S T E R M A G

SISTER-MAG.COM

64

A N

F A S H


AT

OR JE F RS S N

Y

R

TIFFANY'S

E

R

LE B A

BRICS

PAT

FA

TE

BREAKFAST

I O N

FOUR

W E A

N D

FOUR DRESSES C O L L E C T I O N

65

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Models ALINE NIEDRICH NADINE KUBASCH

, KATHARINA HESSE , , NINA VERHOEVEN

Styling & Design EVI NEUBAUER Photographer CRIS SANTOS Hair & Make-Up PATRICIA HECK

SISTER-MAG.COM

66


FRENCH

MAUVE

Jersey, a fabric that you can make dresses without zippers from, that always stretches more and goes where we need it to. Endless varieties - comfortable, cozy or even sexy. A fabric that is as versatile as jersey can be worn by all different women and bodytypes. Our designer Evi took a closer look and created four unique looks - worn by four unique women. We invited four bloggers from very different topics – DIY, Beauty as well as Fashion/ Lifestyle – to our studio in Berlin and spent a colourful day together. Our four models are all very different, but there is one thing that they all have in common. They look just lovely in Jersey!

67

SISTERMAG 31 | 10 / 2017


DOWNLOAD PATTERN

A GOOD FEELING Jersey is a popular DIY fabric for a reason. The stretch makes it feel good on our skin, enables us to

SISTER-MAG.COM

68


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

EMBROIDERY An pearl embroidery on the back becomes a highlight: choose your favourite beads and gems and create your own design.

DARK GREEN JERSEY DRESS

NINA on hedinaeht.de

move freely and is super soft. The elegant shift dress becomes a cozy feel good look!

69

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


BLUSH JERSEY DRESS

70

SISTER-MAG.COM


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

DOWNLOAD PATTERN

POWER JERSEY IN BLUSH For all pink lovers, Evi created this super-comfy jersey dress with a flexible hem.

KATHARINA on kathastrophal.de

71

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


ALINE on Polly McGeary

SISTER-MAG.COM

72


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

DOWNLOAD PATTERN

The elegant variation in woollen jersey and with a shift dress shape

LIGHT BLUE

BLUE EYES, BLUE DRESS

SHIFT DRESS

A BEAUTIFUL BACK While the dress has a high neckline in the front, there is a v-shaped backline as a playful detail

73

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


BEIGE JERSEY DRESS

DOWNLOAD PATTERN

THE RIGHT ACCESSORIES The dress shows its full power when paired with a few colorful accessories, such as the patterned shoes. A statement necklace completes the look. SISTER-MAG.COM

74


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

EVERYDAY ELEGANCE The square neckline and the waist fitting shape make this dress perfect for any business meeting.

NADINE on beautyressort.de

75

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


SISTER-MAG.COM

76


FRENCH

MAUVE

SEWING PATTERNS FREE DOWNLOADS

77

SISTERMAG 31 | 10 / 2017


[Jersey] fabrics. , s c i t s i r acte

r a h c , n Origi s n o i t c n u f

TEXT DR. MICHAEL NEUBAUER

SISTER-MAG.COM

78


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

[

In order to be irreplaceable on must

always be different. – Coco Chanel COCO CHANEL

Jersey is not t h a t certain fabric but a collective term for many knitted or machine-knitted soft, warm and elastic materials. Because of its use, the fabric’s name »jersey« is connected to leisure time, sports and comfort, the British island in the English Channel, however, to money and tourism. In the second half of the 19th century, neither financial activities nor tourist centres were dominant on the island. Instead, the inhabitants fished or bred cattle and sheep for a living. What could have been more

]

reasonable than using the abundant sheep’s wool to knit warm sweaters for the fishermen? »Jersey« was born but unknown and undesired by big fashion. The famous fashion icon COCO CHANNEL recognized the value of the machine-knitted jersey fabrics for practical, light, functional and comfortable clothes. During the First World War, she bought up the relatively cheap fabrics and used them for her modern design, even in haute couture. From then on, jersey fabrics were firmly established.

79

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


WHAT MAKES THESE FABRICS SO PRACTICAL? They consist of

wool, cotton, viscose or synthetic material, partly even silk. And they are flexible. Supplemented by elastane, every jersey becomes elastic and supple which is extremely practical for the daily life. And the tailor needs fewer stitches for jersey dresses to fit well and to fall pleasantly. Today’s industrially manufactured jersey fabrics are produced with different knit techniques by using just one needle, two needles, offset pattern placement or double knitted, rather firm and resistant fabrics. They are called single jersey, double jersey, interlock jersey, jacquard jersey or cloqué jersey. All kinds of fabrics can be designed for children or for festive and sporty usage by applying decorative elements,

SISTER-MAG.COM

colours or patterns. The range of applications is almost universal. At first, it was hand-knitted sweaters, then especially men’s underwear, and then, jersey started its triumph in almost every textile scope. Depending on the components of the jersey, this fabric is suitable for bed linen, fitted sheets, dresses, shirts, pants, cardigans, sweatshirts, leggings and even caps. The fabric is hard-wearing and easy-care. It should be ironed in direction of the meshes, the temperature is depending on the direction of the fibres. Jersey is washed in lukewarm water, outer clothing should be dried flatly afterwards. Jersey fabrics are produced throughout Europe, especially in the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and Turkey.

80


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not

luxury – Coco Chanel

81

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


OUTSTANDING FOUR-LEGGED ACTORS Some animals in Hollywood films are in no way inferior to human actors. In light of this, it’s a nice thing that dogs, cats, and co. are awarded with their own film award. We have a look at why the award was initiated and let you know how often the nameless cat from »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« has received it.

SISTER-MAG.COM

82


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Text: Alexander Kords

Two Oscars, two Golden Globes, a Grammy for the soundtrack – when »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« was released in 1961, it was showered with awards. One of those went to an actor we probably didn't expect to take home any hardware. We're talking, of course, about the nameless cat of Holly Golightly, which received a PATSY Award for its performance. Never heard of this award? Let us fill you in.

83

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Dead horses

IN HOLLYWOOD There was a time in Hollywood when filmmakers didn’t care that much for the wellbeing of the animals in their productions. While shooting the film »The Charge of the Light Brigade« in 1936, for example, more than 200 horses died. That’s why the United States Congress felt obligated to introduce laws to prevent animals from being tortured on film sets. And yet, a horse had to jump off a 20-metre cliff while making the film »Jesse James« in 1939. Because the animal panicked and kicked wildly, it eventually drowned.

SISTER-MAG.COM

84


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

This incident brought the American Humane Association to the scene. The organisation had already looked after the well-being of animals since 1877 and was commissioned by the Motion Picture Association of America to do the same on film sets.

» No animals

WERE HARMED « Shortly after the American Humane Association got involved, it introduced the sentence »No animals were harmed« to the final credits of every Hollywood film. This stamp of approval remains today. In addition, the organisation initiated the PATSY Award to honour

outstanding performances of animals in films. The acronym PATSY stands for »Picture Animal Top Star of the Year«. However, the first awards were only given in 1951. Ronald Reagan who was a film star and the eventual U.S. president, presented the gala in the Carthay Circle

85

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Theatre in Los Angeles. The first winner was the mule Molly, which played the title character in »Francis the Talking Mule«. Until 1958, the PATSY Award was only given to Hollywood animals. After that, actors

from TV productions could receive it as well. That’s when stars like Lassie (1964), Flipper (1965 and 1966), and Judy, the chimp from »Daktari«, also won the award.

The end of the

PATSY AWARDS Orangey, as the cat from »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« was actually called, already won its second PATSY Award in 1962. It received its first one 10 years before for its role in the film »Rhubarb«, in which it played the sole heir of the owner of a baseball club. Orangey’s trainer, Frank Inn, who was responsible for Lassie and many

SISTER-MAG.COM

86


BREAKFAST

AT

other animals, guided them to around 40 PATSY Awards during his career. From 1973 on, the award ceremony received greater attention since it was broadcast on American television and presented by show stars like Bob Barker and Betty White. Nevertheless, the show of 1986 was the last one. The reason: lack of funding. In the same year, the Genesis Awards were initiated to draw attention to the well-being of animals in showbusiness. The awards weren’t given to the animals anymore, however, but to humans – like the producers of the feature »Species protection: Fight against tiger trading« that was part of the German news programme »heute journal« on ZDF last year.

TIFFANY'S

The

PAWSCARS

It took some time until dogs, cats, and co. were awarded again. In 2011, the American Humane Association announced that it would start awarding the Pawscars. Creative categories brushed up the slightly outdated concept of the PATSY Awards; Hedwig the owl from the »Harry Potter« movies, for example, received the award for Best Recurring Character. Responsible people can receive Pawscars as well – like the producers of the

87

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Orangey, as the cat from »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« was actually called, already won its second PATSY Award in 1962.

SISTER-MAG.COM

88


BREAKFAST

AT

film »Shutter Island«, who thoughtfully cared for the 85 rats on the set. The animals had their own heated trailer where they could warm up after a wet shooting. Also, some cats were employed to catch the rats if they fell off a recreated cliff.

A German,

BUT NO SHEPHERD

TIFFANY'S

during the 1920s that were praised by both the critics and the audience. But because the Academy didn’t want to make a fool of itself by giving an Oscar to an animal, it gave it to runner-up Jannings. And even though the official rules of the Academy don’t exclude animals from receiving an Oscar, it will certainly never happen. Instead, our talented four-legged friends can be pleased with receiving a Pawscar.

One of the most famous dogs of film history wasn’t that far away from winning an Oscar. At the first edition of the Academy Awards in 1929, it wasn’t the German actor Emil Jannings who was supposed to receive the golden statuette. As the author Susan Orlean found out while researching for her book »Rin Tin Tin: The Life And The Legend«, the dog Rin Tin Tin got the most votes from members of the Academy in the category Best Actor. The German shepherd played the main character in numerous films 89

About the author Alexander Kords has been a freelance editor for years. With his wife and kids – but no pet –, he lives in Wiener Neustadt. SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


SISTER-MAG.COM

90

Andy Warhol - Marylin Diptych Bryan McDonald- Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

How the faces of celebrities became icons of modern art

Text: Robert Eberhardt

91

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


We all know the loud series of prints Andy Warhol colourfully staged famous faces with: Frederick the Great, Marilyn Monroe, Goethe, Mao and many more. To this day, there are several imitators, relatively inexpensive art prints of Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe and Marlene Dietrich can be purchased almost everywhere. But how did this image type that achieved cult status in modern art come to be?

Andy Warhol - Marylin Diptych Bryan McDonald- Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

One of the most important and styledefining works is, without a doubt, Andy Warhol’s series portraying Marilyn Monroe. The »prototype«, the so-called »MARILYN DIPTYCH«, is part of the collection of the Tate Gallery of Modern Art in London today. SISTER-MAG.COM

92


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Andy Warhol - Mao (1972) von cea+ Flickr, 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

After her death, caused by an overdose of sleeping pills in 1962, the New York-based artist created this first series: He replicated Monroe’s face 25 times in vibrant colours and 25 times in black and white. His basis was a promotional photo for the 1953 film »Niagara«. With the »DIPTYCH«, the practising catholic Warhol (son of a Slovakian peasant family that emigrated to the USA in 1914) picked up a sacral image type. For his works, he used the technique of silkscreening, as he explained later: »In August 62 93

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


I started doing silkscreens. I wanted something stronger that gave more of an assembly line effect. With SILKSCREENING you pick a photograph, blow it up, transfer it in glue onto silk, and then roll ink across it so the ink goes through the silk but not through the glue. That way you get the same image, slightly different each time. It was all so simple quick and chancy. I was thrilled with it. When Marilyn Monroe happened to die that month, I got the idea to make screens of her.«

WARHOL PUBLISHED THE WORKS AS ART PRINTS THAT TURNED OUT TO BECOME SOME OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL WORKS OF MODERN ART.

SISTER-MAG.COM

They were among the first products he distributed via his studio »THE FACTORY«. He made Monroe’s face a work of art, but also a mass product and an icon of a century and an attitude towards life. The various faces are different in colour, the hair is blonde most of the time, the lips are coloured in deep red.

Like all works of pop art, this Monroe portrait is part of MASS CONSUMPTION since it matches the requirements of the fast art consumption with its simple visual identity, its reproducibility and its inexpensive production. The pop artists knew that. They wanted to supply their works to exactly that kind of economisation und art consumption: The famous art prints illustrated the energetic time of the 1970s in a fast, colourful and fun-loving way.

94


BREAKFAST

AT

WE MUST NOT IGNORE THE IRONIC LEVEL: THE POP ARTISTS SERVED THE MARKET BUT SHOWED IT UP AT THE SAME TIME.

Which artist before Warhol could have come up with the idea of calling their studio, their workshop a »FACTORY« in which works of art are produced mechanically by machines.

TIFFANY'S

With their technically simple works, the artists of that era exposed the mechanisms of art trade – and earned good money themselves. Their works became icons of modern art. Right after the death of Andy Warhol in 1987, the prizes for »SERIES« skyrocketed. In 2011, »THE COMPLETE ATHLETES SERIES« was auctioned for 5.7 million US dollars at Christies in New York. Of course, Warhol and his serial

95

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


art prints achieved cult status, despite their reproducibility. Warhol became a downright patron of modern art.

About the Author Robert Eberhardt is art historican, publisher of Wolff Verlag and gallery owner in Berlin.

ART HISTORIANS QUESTIONED THE COLOURFUL SERIES AND CREATED ALL KINDS OF THEORETICALLY UPGRADED THESES: The identical works and the technique of reproduction are a criticism of society in which human beings are just products and no people anymore. They would criticise the obsession of mass media with a few »CELEBS« who are famous but under constant observation. Or the SILKSCREENING Warhol used for his print series would show the superficiality of Monroe or – more generally – of

SISTER-MAG.COM

the people of our time because of its effect of flattening the twodimensionality, the reduced shadows and the flat colours. Monroe is just a sex symbol of the conservative 1960s? He himself once said: »If you want to know everything about Andy Warhol, just look at the surface of my paintings and films and me ... and there I am. There’s nothing behind it.«

96


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

»If you want to know everything about Andy Warhol, just look at the surface of my paintings and films and me ... and there I am. There’s nothing behind it.« ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol - Mao (1972) von cea+ Flickr, 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

97

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


A to B

HOW TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED THE TAXI INDUSTRY SISTER-MAG.COM

98

TEXT CHRISTIAN NÄTHLER


BREAKFAST

Do you remember what it was like to get around back in the day? Memorizing the phone numbers of every taxi company in town. Researching addresses in the Yellow Pages. Guiding the driver to your destination. Or maybe you employed the Carrie Bradshaw method: frantically hailing a ride as you tiptoed through traffic. All that has changed drastically over the last decade, of course. The digital revolution has disrupted the taxi industry as rapidly and with as much friction as any. For consumers, fetching a ride is more convenient than ever. For traditional taxi companies, lawmakers, and governments, however, the shift has created challenges every step of the way.

AT

TIFFANY'S

THE BEGI N N I N G… Though the term »taxicab« – formed by contracting the words »taximeter« and »cabriolet« – is only about a century old, the first rides for hire can actually be traced back to the early 1600s. Innkeepers in London and Paris would make their horse-drawn carriages available to merchants and visitors, a practice that spread throughout Europe by the mid1850s. Modernization began in the early 19th Century, with fleets of electric-powered cabs becoming a common sight in urban areas. It was three German inventors who would introduce the modern taximeter, which became the standard in Paris, London, and New York, in 1891.

99

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Cairo

Rio

New York City

T H E 2 0 T H CE NTU RY

D I GI TAL DI SRUPT I ON

From Rio to Cairo, taxis became a staple of everyday life. As fleets increased in size, so did their form, function, and features. The global taxi market became an enterprise valued at $50 to $100 billion USD, complete with maxicabs (wheelchair accessible), limos, three-wheelers, taxi stands, central dispatching, unions, monopolies, and the adoption of greener vehicle technology. A trip to New York wouldn’t be complete without snapping a photo of the iconic yellow cabs. Ditto London’s Hackney carriages.

Then along came Uber. Founded in 2009, the peer-to-peer ridesharing service undercut the cab industry with a business model suited to the sharing economy – one that sometimes skirts the rules to provide what’s best for the customer. With Uber, users could hail a taxi from their smartphone, pre-calculate the fare of their route, and automatically pay from a paired credit card or bank account. Most importantly, fares were usually cheaper than those charged by traditional taxi companies.

For many people in the world, life without taxis was unimaginable.

This was fantastic for those on the go, but Uber was treading

SISTER-MAG.COM

100


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

in Paris in 2016 – in response to Uber’s abrasive and legally questionable foray onto their turf. The company was subject to bans, fines, and massive lawsuits, but one thing was clear: It was time for the taxi industry to adapt – or die.

Uber

London a fine line. With the launch of UberX, pretty much anyone with a smartphone could operate as an independent taxi driver. This is an important distinction because classifying drivers as independent contractors instead of employees caused headaches for governments trying to regulate Uber’s fluid business model. Taxi unions, meanwhile, staged highprofile protests – most notably 101

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


CATC H I NG U P Recognizing that the people had spoken, traditional taxi companies have found ways to remain competitive. The MyTaxi app, for example, merges a city’s existing taxi infrastructure with most of the features people have come to love about Uber – an easy-to-use app, digital map, cashless payment, driver ratings, and electronic billing. MyTaxi boasts 70 million passengers and 108,000 registered taxi drivers in more than 50 towns and cities in ten European countries – all within a solid legal framework.

Didi Dache

b a C e l

SISTER-MAG.COM

my taxi

Easy Taxi

And it’s far from the only example: Easy Taxi has over 17 million riders around the world, Didi Dache has a presence in more than 300 cities across China (a country where mobile payments have become standard in taxis), and LeCab is picking up the pace in France, where Uber is semi-banned. These platforms employ, licence and verify drivers under the same rules traditional cab companies must abide by.

102


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

T H E F UTU RE Technology has obviated many of the things we associated with taxis growing up: telephone numbers, street maps, physical money, interaction with the driver. Soon, it’s very likely drivers themselves will become obsolete. Thanks to advances in the programming of autonomous vehicles, it isn’t too farfetched to assume we’ll be passengers to robots in the near future. Many experts are predicting the first consumerready driverless taxis to be on the road by 2020, with one company sending a robo-taxi on pilot missions in Singapore as early as 2016. All the big names – Google,

Perhaps teleportation . n o i t a n i t s e d l a n is the fi Uber, General Motors – are in on the action too, so it’s just a matter of time. And so the circle is complete: from horse-drawn carriages to robo-cars. Or is it? Perhaps teleportation is the final destination.

103

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


TEX

T|F RAN ZI W INT ERL ING

, g n u r p s Ur

, n e t f a h c s n e g i E n e n o i t Funk

SISTER-MAG.COM

104


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

will the dream come true?

t s a f k a e r B

AT T I F FA N Y ' S

Whether it's Holly Golightly in both film and novella, Blair Waldorf in Gossip Girl, or THE COUNTLESS GIRLS and women in remakes of the world-famous opening scene, they all dream of having a »Breakfast at Tiffany's«. And with the right plan, you can get a little closer to fulfilling this dream. In November 2017, Tiffany & Co. opened a café in its flagship store on 5th Avenue in New York City (yes, Tiffany's from the film). The »Blue Box Café« takes its design

inspiration, as the name suggests, from the typical Tiffany's Blue, which is almost as famous as the renowned breakfast scene. Serving croissants and coffee, as well as salmon bagels and pancakes, the cafe boasts a stunning marble, silver and turquoise interior. Other New York and American classics, such as lobster rolls, BLT sandwiches, and cheesecake can be found on the lunch menu.

105

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


the blue b ox ca f É 727 5TH AVE 4TH FLOOR M O N - S AT 1 0 : 0 0 - 1 7 : 3 0 SUN 10:00-16:30

SISTER-MAG.COM

106


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

N E W YO R K C I T Y M A N H AT TA N

the blue b ox ca f è

So during your next visit to New York, you can simply make a small detour and pay a visit to the Blue Box Café – right? Unfortunately, it's not that easy. As a result of the ever-increasing popularity of the movie and its cult appeal, the Blue Box Café is fully booked weeks in advance. Reservations

open at 9:00 a. m. (EST) 30 days before a desired date and usually sell out almost immediately. However, if you are fast and can secure a hotly contested reservation, the Blue Box Café is sure to make you feel almost like Audrey Hepburn!

107

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


New Yorkers and their breakfast – whether it is a coffee and bagel on the go or an elaborate brunch with friends – seem to have a special connection that goes beyond simply consuming food.

SISTER-MAG.COM

108


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Breakfast in NEW YORK

109

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Just like anywhere, breakfast is part of a culture or lifestyle. For many New Yorkers, this lifestyle is driven by business and career – from early emails to long office hours to lunch meetings to after-work office outings. Many days, and meals, are spent with colleagues and clients rather than with a partner or friends. A pleasant exception (if you don’t happen to have an early morning meeting)? Breakfast. The first meal of the day can oftentimes be the only true »me-time« in a hectic work week and should therefore be embraced. And whether you get up early to sit down at your favourite bakery or you just rush by your favourite food cart and immerse yourself in the city, your breakfast is a time when you don’t yet have to be professional, sophisticated, or driven – maybe just a grumpy morning hater gaining life from that first cup of coffee.

SISTER-MAG.COM

BREAKFAST. THE FIRST MEAL OF THE DAY CAN OFTENTIMES BE THE ONLY TRUE »ME-TIME« IN A HECTIC WORK WEEK AND SHOULD THEREFORE BE EMBRACED.

banter west bourne

And on the weekend? Breakfast is turned into brunch and a valid reason to spend hours at cozy restaurants, to catch up with friends, family or your loved ones, and to enjoy bottomless mimosas. And – especially if the place you picked is a well-loved brunch spot – to consciously slow down and take an hour to wait for your table, aimlessly strolling around with the promise of food on your mind. So, do New Yorkers even eat breakfast at home? Probably some do. But with so many cafés, restaurants, and brunch spots yet to discover, doesn’t that almost seem like a waste?

110


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

high street on hudson

lafayette prune Clinton St. Baking

Bubby's

NEW YORK CITY

111

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PHOTO: NICOLE FRANZEN

Name and address of the place as well as brief description of your breakfast menu.

West~ Bourne

westbourne.com

137 Sullivan Street Mo-Sun 08:00-22:00

SISTER-MAG.COM

Now open on Sullivan Street in SoHo, west~bourne is an allday breakfast restaurant that embodies a distinctly West Coast spirit while focusing on its local community. Guests can enjoy an approachable, vegetable-focused menu of flavorful, seasonallyminded dishes all day in a setting that conjures the irreverence of 1960s Los Angeles. With west~bourne, founder Camilla Marcus, a Los Angeles native, pushes the give-back model

112


BREAKFAST

AT

forward: through a partnership with the Robin Hood Foundation, a portion of every purchase made at the restaurant will benefit The Door, an organization that supports local job training.

If I could only have one breakfast dish at your place, which one should I order? The Sunrise Kingdom breakfast sandwich is a house favourite! It’s scrambled eggs, shallot labneh, pickled onions, and hot sauce on a toasted English muffin.

TIFFANY'S

Morning treat before heading to work or a big brunch on the weekend - what can I expect? We serve the same all-day menu from 8am—10pm every day, so it’s perfect for breakfast or morning coffee on the way to work, a postworkout breakfast or brunch, or big brunch with friends on the weekends!

113

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


169 Sullivan Street Mon-Sat 08:00-23:00 Sun 08:00-18:00

banter nyc

banternyc.com

Where can we find you and what does the breakfast menu look like? Banter, 169 Sullivan Street, New York, NY 10012. Our breakfast is the perfect balance between healthy, unhealthy, and breakfast and lunch. Our menu leaves our repeat customers wanting to come back to try items on the menu that they weren't able to squeeze in the first or second time. We pride ourselves on sourcing organic, SISTER-MAG.COM

fresh, and local ingredients to serve to our locals.The breakfast menu is available from 8-11am every day, offering pancakes (ÂťJames BeardÂŤ sour cream or sourdough style) with decadent options for toppings, buttermilk biscuits and biscuit sandwiches, egg entrees and more.

If I could only have one breakfast dish at your place, which one should I order? Banter Bowl w/ smoked salmon OR Golden Folded Eggs - I can't choose between the two!

114


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Morning treat before heading to work or a big brunch on the weekend - what can I expect?

PHOTO: MARK WEINBERG

For a morning treat or big brunch on the weekend you will ALWAYS be greeted with a smile and a hello. The vibe will be strong with curated playlists (type in Banter NYC into playlists on Spotify). The design of our cafe is bright and has loads of charatcter. I often describe the space as an extension of one's living room at home. You're also going to walk away with a cup of the finest coffee in Manhattan. Since 2001 we have served American-eclectic eats. Decadent dishes like fluffy pancakes, eggs benedict, crispy buttermilk fried chicken & waffles, and brioche French toast are cult favorites.

Clinton St. Baking

clintonstreetbaking.com

If I could only have one breakfast dish at your place, which one should I order? Blueberry pancakes with warm maple butter

Where can I find you and what does the menu look like? Clinton St. Baking Co. & Restaurant on the Lower East Side. 4 Clinton St. NY, NY 10002. We also have locations in Tokyo and Nagoya, Japan, Dubai, Bangkok, and Singapore.

115

4 Clinton Street Mon-Fri 08:00-16:00 / 17:30-23:00 Sat 09:00-16:00 / 17:30-23:00 Sun 09:00-17:00

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


How would you describe the atmosphere? Our restaurant is sunny and bright, cozy yet urban. In the morning it smells like blueberry muffins and fresh ground coffee. We serve the same breakfast/ brunch menu all day all week. We use local and organic ingredients as much as possible. Almost everything in-house is homemade; from our jam and bread to our corn tortillas and hot sauce.

high street on hudson

highstreetonhudson.com

637 Hudson Street Sun-Wed 08:00-23:00 Thur-Sat 08:00-00:00

SISTER-MAG.COM

116


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Where can I find your restaurant? The High Street on Hudson is located at 637 Hudson Street, New York, NY, 10014.

If I could only pick one dish, which one should I have? Our signature breakfast dish and most popular egg sandwich is The Bodega: sage-black pepper biscuit with malted breakfast sausage, egg and aged cheddar.

It’s a chef-driven take on a classic NYC bodega/deli breakfast sandwich.

During the week or on a weekend, when should I visit and what can I expect? High Street on Hudson serves breakfast daily as well as weekend brunch. Additional signature dishes include the Breakfast Tartine (pastrami-cured salmon, avocado, hard-boiled egg, anadama toast); and The Forager (vegetarian egg sandwich with seared king oyster mushroom, braised kale, farm egg, green meadow young Swiss, black trumpet mayo), along with delectable pastries. The restaurant’s (led by Executive Chef Sean McPaul) menu highlights simple and familiar dishes with elevated flavors and techniques, along with seasonal and thoughtfully sourced ingredients.

117

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PHOTO:NOAH FECKS

lafayette

lafayetteny.com

How would you describe the atmosphere? Lafayette is an everyday grand cafĂŠ and bakery in ceremony of French cooking at the corner of Lafayette Street and Great Jones Street in downtown Manhattan. Our market-driven bistro menu is a worldly homage to the genre that spans a variety of regions, from Provence to Normandy to neighbouring Mediterranean coasts, offering a re-mastery of traditional dishes we love and some signatures.

380 Lafayette St Mon-Wed 08:00-22:30 Thur-Sat 08:00-23:00 Sun 08:00-22:00 Where can we find you? The Lafayette Grand CafĂŠ and Bakery is located at 380 Lafayette Street, New York NY 10003.

SISTER-MAG.COM

What are some of the signature dishes? Among others, the smoked salmon benedict on brioche with

118


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

PHOTO: PAUL WAGTOUICZ

If I could only have one breakfast dish at your place, which one should I order? I’m always torn between a classic eggs benedict with a classic bloody mary or the wurst plate, a bibb lettuce salad, and a danish mary.

PHOTO: ERIC WOLFINGER

sauce choron, lemon pancakes with fresh berries, frisée salad with bacon maison and poached organic egg and prime beef tartare »New Orleans« with tabasco aioli and quail egg.

prune

prunerestaurant.com

54 E 1st Street, NY 10003. Mon-Fri 17:30-23:00 Sat-Sun 10:00-15:30 / 17:30-23:00

Morning treat before heading to work or a big brunch on the weekend - what can I expect? Brunch only! 119

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


bubby's

bubbys.com

Where is the restaurant located and what does the breakfast menu look like? Bubby's opened as a pie shop in Tribeca in 1990. Soon breakfast followed and so did the crowds. Bubby's is a beloved NYC institution best known for its homestyle cooking using the best, highest quality local ingredients. Everything at the restaurant is still made from scratch. They now have a second location in Meatpacking and several international outposts in Japan! The family-owned restaurant is still owned and operated by husband and wife Ron (chef and co-owner) and Melissa Silver (co-owner).

squeezed and cold pressed juices, as well as housemade, naturally flavoured sodas.

If I could only have one breakfast dish at your place, which one should I order? Bubby's has won NUMEROUS AWARDS for its outstanding pancakes, heralded as the best in New York City. The sourdough pancakes are crêpe thin, with a slightly crisp, golden-brown exterior

The breakfast menu is available from 8-11am everyday offering pancakes (»James Beard« sour cream or sourdough style) with decadent options for toppings, buttermilk biscuits and biscuit sandwiches, egg entrees and more. Beverages include fresh SISTER-MAG.COM

120


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

tooth – it would taste just as good with a side of fried chicken (chicken & pancakes is an option on the menu!) as it does with the housemade tart blueberry sauce.

Morning treat before heading to work or a big brunch on the weekend - what can I expect? Bubby's is a popular destination for weekend brunch, and the lines are worth the wait. Insider tip: come during the week when the restaurant breakfast crowd before heading to work is mostly families in the neighbourhood or business breakfast meetings.

Tribeca (120 Hudson St.) & High Line (73 Gansevoort St.) Mon-Thur & So 08:00-22:00 Fri/Sat 08:00-23:00 that gives way to an incredibly flavourful, custardy interior that packs a tangy sourdough punch. The sourdough pancakes are perfect for the sweet or savoury 121

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


C R O I S SA N T S , C E N T R A L PA R K , 5 T H AV E N U E IS THIS N E W YO R K ?

TEXT | FRANZI WINTERLING

SISTER-MAG.COM

122


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Many tourists come to New York with a distinct »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« moment in mind – whether it is a croissant on 5th avenue, singing on the fire escape, searching for a cat in the rain, or strolling through Central Park. But how do New Yorkers feel about it? Do they love the movie just as much, and does it represent »their New York«?

What we wish for

MINA, HAS LIVED I N N YC FO R 8 Y EA RS :

I have seen »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« many times. I like it a lot. It is a beautiful movie, made glamorous with Audrey Hepburn, her charm, and her look. It seems to never go out of fashion. And I do think that it captures some of the things that the city is or used to be. The intellectual life, for example. Or the idea of a young woman who is coming to the city to

make it. People who come here are very serious about their goals and ambitions. However, the film romanticizes that part. It leaves out the cruelty of the city, the hardship, and chance of NOT making it. Of course, we don’t want to see real life when watching a film – that is why we love it. It’s a beautiful fantasy.

123

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Never seen it

JESSICA, HAS LIVED I N N YC FO R 1 5 Y EA RS :

I fell in love with the city when I went to college here. I can’t really say what it is that I like so much. Probably how energetic New York is. Oh, and of course that there is so much great food everywhere! I have actually never seen »Breakfast at Tiffany’s«. But I know that it is about Audrey Hepburn, going to Tiffany’s, all dressed up with her sunglasses and pearls and dress. It somehow reminds me of the holidays. Because the movie is such a classic, it has a lot of nostalgia to it, and I think that is what many people look for when they come to visit the city. There is even a café at the Tiffany’s store where you can reenact the movie. I think I should watch it now! It is such an iconic movie and it seems like I might be missing out on something if I don’t ever see it.

SISTER-MAG.COM

124


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Not my New York RIMA, BORN AND RAISED I N N E W YO R K C I T Y :

I have lived here all my life and I really feel like there is a soul to the city. The energy, characters, and all the cultures coming together here shape it into what it is. I have seen »Breakfast at Tiffany’s«, but I actually don’t remember very much about it. I know that it is based on a Truman Capote story and I liked that better than the Hepburn

film. It is a beautiful movie, but it doesn't show a New York that I can relate to. I feel like it is mostly taking place in her apartment, which could be anywhere. And besides that, what we see is mostly 5th Avenue, Central Park, and so on. It is a very upper class and elite part of the city, much more polished than what I think of as my New York.

JOINED BY CHRISTIAN, A VISITING FRIEND OF HERS:

I feel the same, of course – »Breakfast at Tiffany’s« has these iconic pictures, but when I think of movies about New York, what comes to mind are much darker images. Films like »Escape from New York«, »Rumble in the Bronx« or »Westside Story« represent how I feel about the city much better. I guess it is more about the dark back alleys than the shiny avenues for me. 125

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Breakfast d l r o w e h around t [PART 2]

RECIPES & PHOTOS ELISE | LES FILLES DE MADELEINE ZAIRA | ZAIRA ZAROTTI JANINE | NUTS AND BLUEBERRIES SANDA | LITTLE UPSIDE DOWN CAKE AMANDINE | BLÉ NOIR SISTER-MAG.COM

126


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Do you remember our breakfast feature from last year? We took you on a virtual journey to very different breakfast traditions and countries - with dishes ranging from classic porridge to fancy smoothie bowls. This time, we are headed to new countries to show you what breakfast looks like in France, South Africa, Italy, Bosnia and Belgium. Bon appetit!

E L ISE H A W A I J S P I C E D F RE NCH TO A ST W I T H C A R A ME LIZE D AP P LE S

SANDA B UTHL E & CROI SSAN TS

Belgium

Bosnia France AM AND I NE CRÊ P E RE CIP E

Italy ZAIRA O ATME AL COOKI ES & C A STA G NA CCI O CREPES

J A NINE MIE LIE PAP PORRI DGE TR AD ITIO NAL & MODERN

South Africa

127

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


�

More than anything, breakfast in Belgium is still a very typical - and often very tumultuous family affair.

Elise Noyez Elise Noyez is a full-time editor, a freelance food and lifestyle photographer, a passionate baker, a perpetual writer, and a purebred nostalgic. She has a proclivity towards warm minimalism and believes food is nourishing for the body as well as the soul. Elise shares stories and recipes on her blog Les Filles de Madeleine.

SISTER-MAG.COM

128


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Belgium A Family Affair Milk bottles and cereal boxes. A loaf of bread and a jar of Nutella. Yogurt and fruit. The makings of a weekday breakfast in Belgium are usually pretty simple. There are no long preparations or big traditions; everything has to happen quickly. I vividly remember the hectic mornings of my childhood: me and my brothers reaching over the table, shouting and fighting as my mother tried to get everyone fed and off to school, and the mess of crumbs and cereal milk we left behind. More than anything, breakfast in Belgium is still a very typical - and often very tumultuous - family affair. Things do tend to settle down during the weekend, though. With fewer obligations, it’s not wholly uncommon for one to linger at the breakfast table until it’s time for lunch (and well after). Newspapers are read, coffee cups filled and refilled, stories exchanged. Food is decidedly more rich these mornings, but still pretty low-effort: pastries and croissants from the bakery, soft-boiled eggs with bread soldiers or, my personal favourite, quick French toast made with the bread scraps from the week before. As one would expect from a nation of epicureans, perhaps we like to spend our time savouring breakfast rather than making it.

129

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Hawaij Spiced French Toast with Caramelized Apples INGREDIENTS

– SERVES 2

FOR THE FRENCH TOAST

FOR THE CARAMELIZED

4 slices of day-old bread

APPLES

2 large eggs

1 apple, sliced or cubed

75 ml whole milk

1-2 tbsp unsalted butter

1 tbsp vanilla sugar

2 tbsp brown sugar

½ tsp hawaij spice mix

pinch of salt

1-2 tbsp unsalted butter

TO SERVE Maple syrup Sliced almonds, toasted

FOR THE FRENCH TOAST

butter over medium heat. Add

1. In a large, shallow bowl, whisk

apple slices and toss to coat.

together eggs, milk, sugar and

Allow to cook for 1 to 2 minutes,

spices, until just combined. Soak

until just starting to soften, then

each slice of bread in the egg

sprinkle with brown sugar and

mixture.

toss again. Lower heat to medium

2. Meanwhile, in a large frying pan,

low and cook for an additional 5

melt the butter over medium

to 7 minutes, tossing occasionally,

heat. When the butter starts to

until soft and caramelized.

bubble, add the soaked bread slices and bake over medium heat until bottom is golden

TO SERVE

4. Serve French toast warm.

Sprinkle with maple syrup or

brown, 2 to 3 minutes per side.

sugar of your choice (optional)

FOR THE CARAMELIZED APPLES

and top with caramelized apples

3. In a medium frying pan, melt SISTER-MAG.COM

and toasted almonds.

130


BREAKFAST

AT

131

TIFFANY'S

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


For me the most traditional and common French breakfast is »tartine«, a slice of bread (baguette or whatever kind of bread you like) eaten with butter, jam or honey.

Amandine L'hyver Amandine is a photographer and a food stylist living in the French countryside in a little town near the Brittany coastline. The recipes she shares are mostly inspired or adapted from classic French and Breton dishes; they are also vegetarian and made with seasonal, local, and fresh products. blenoirstudio.com

SISTER-MAG.COM

132


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

France If I ask a non-French person to describe what a French breakfast looks like, I’m pretty sure they will think immediately about croissants. But that ignores France’s very first love, way before the pastry: bread. For me, the most traditional and common French breakfast is »tartine«, a slice of bread (baguette or whatever kind of bread you like) eaten with butter, jam or honey. Add coffee and maybe a glass of orange juice and there you go, you have your classic French breakfast. Side notes: Dipping your tartine or even your croissant in your coffee is totally acceptable (if you ask yourself why, French people drink coffee in a bowl). In France, we have an old saying that says, »long like a day with no bread«. That tells you how much we love it. Tartine is a regular weekday breakfast – quick and delicious – but weekends are dedicated to more comforting food like croissants and other viennoiserie, French toasts, or crepes (my personal favourite). Personally, I tend to eat a quick breakfast during the week, but Sunday mornings are dedicated to a slow and delicious late breakfast (crepes with lots of chocolate or fresh brioche). I read somewhere that traditional French breakfast is not very healthy – mostly because of the butter – but since we are the people who invented tartiflette, I think we can handle it.

133

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


SISTER-MAG.COM

134


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Crêpe INGREDIENTS

– SERVES 25 CRÊPES

500 g all purpose flour

3 eggs

150 g sugar

750 ml milk

1. Combine the flour and sugar

together in a big mixing bowl.

2. Add the milk to the dry mixture very gently to avoid making

lumps. If lumps appear, don't worry; continue to mix vigorously and they will go away. Beat the batter until smooth

3. Break the eggs and put aside

the whites for later. Add the yolk slowly to the batter.

4. Whisk the whites and a pinch of salt with an electric mixer (or

manually if you're a brave one) until it forms stiff peaks. Add the whites to the preparation and very, very gently fold into the batter until no streak remains.

5. Cook your crepes on medium

heat in a pan greased with butter or coconut oil.

6. Bon Apétit ! NOTES For a dairy-free version, you can use your favourites milk alternative (almond milk is delicious) and cook the crepes in coconut oil instead of butter. You can eat crepes with whatever your heart desires. My personal favourite is butter, honey, and roasted almonds but you can also stick to tradition and eat them only with salted butter and a glass of buttermilk.

135

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


My feeling is that every breakfast needs time – a slow and relaxed occasion to enjoy the beginning of a new day.

Zaira Zarotti Zaira brings ingredients from a Venetian garden onto her »Freaky Table«. She posts about food, life, photography and Raku ceramics by Zaira Zarotti. zairazarotti.com

SISTER-MAG.COM

136


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Italy Breakfast in Italy My feeling is that every breakfast needs time – a slow and relaxed occasion to enjoy the beginning of a new day. I hate to have a fast in the morning; sometimes I prefer to set my alarm clock long before I actually have to wake up so I can take things slowly. Thus, when possible, I like when morning is a homage to slowing down and I can have enough time to prepare myself something good and with care. My breakfast varies every time, but if I don’t have coffee, I definitely have a problem! In Italy, the majority of people have a sweet breakfast; quick and not very abundant, with cookies and espresso when at home, or capuccino and croissant when at a cafe.

At the moment I am a little obsessed with crepes - a French thing, actually - and all the possible variations and »italianization« of them, from sweet to savoury. But dipping freshly made cookies into coffee just makes me feel at home! During the warm season I love having breakfast in the garden. I sit at a little round table under a blooming wisteria pergola with my breakfast tray. I like to stay in silence, sipping coffee (rigorously made with a moka pot) and looking around. In winter, meanwhile, I have a sort of simple ritual that makes me feel good, especially when I have to get up early and the light is still feeble: I light some candles on the table where I have my breakfast.

137

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Strawberry Oatmeal Cookies

In conclusion, I am not the kind of person so much interested in food itself: I am first of all an aesthete, I like beautiful things, comfortable moments, and beauty in general – exactly the same approach I have to food photography.

SISTER-MAG.COM

138

My dream breakfast is simply a lovely moment. It doesn't really matter what's on my plate; I care more about who and what is around me – exept when I have warm homemade oatmeal cookies or chestnut flour crepes flavoured with honey, rosemary and orange peal...


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Castagnaccio Crepes with chestnut flour & rosemary

139

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


�

Breakfast is the first meal of the day, the first moment we take to sit around the table with our family. It's probably my favourite meal.

Sanda Pagaimo Although having moved to Portugal, blogger and photographer Sanda still thinks of her Bosnian roots when it comes to breakfast. littleupsidedowncake.com

SISTER-MAG.COM

140


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Bosnia

Breakfast in Bosnia I remember waking up in the morning with our house smelling like ustipci, buhtle or scrambled eggs , fresh bread, and coffee. My mum used to wake up early to prepare breakfast for us. It´s something I do for my kids nowadays. Even if our lives are much faster than at the time I was a kid, I always try to find time to sit around the table with my family and have a peaceful breakfast. There is no better way to start a day. I remember summer holidays we spent at my grandmother's house... my aunts and my mum would prepare a huge breakfast every day, all pastries made from scratch, fried eggs made in a huge pan for all of us. I would go to sleep in the evening thinking about the breakfast that would wait for me in the morning and all the fun when being with my whole family around the table. Breakfast in Bosnia can be very heavy – bacon with bread, burek, cheese and ajvar or sausages and bread. But it´s still a very important meal in my country. Even if it’s not had at home, people stop in a bakery on the way to work and get some traditional pastries with coffee.

141

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


Buhtle INGREDIENTS

400g spelt flour

200ml luke-warm rice milk

1ts dry yeast

pinch of salt

2 egg yolks

icing sugar, for dusting

80g soy margarine

jam or chocolate spread for

80g coconut sugar

filling

1. Combine all the dry ingredients and mix.

2. Slowly add the egg yolks and milk and work with your hands until

you get a soft dough. Cover with a cloth and leave to rise for about 1 hour at room temperature.

in a well greased baking tray with the folded edges facing down.

6. Bake in a preheated oven at

190ÂşC for about 30 minutes, or until golden-brown in colour.

7. Remove from the oven, sprinkle

3. On a floured surface, roll the

with confectioner’s, sugar and

dough flat to about 5mm thick.

leave to cool for about 5 minutes before serving.

4. Using a knife, cut in 8x8mm

squares, put 1 tsp of jam (or other filling) into the centre of the square, fold and close the edges tightly at the top.

SISTER-MAG.COM

5. Place them closely side-by-side

142


BREAKFAST

AT

143

TIFFANY'S

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


SISTER-MAG.COM

144


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

Vegan Spelt Croissants INGREDIENTS

– MAKES 32 SMALL CROISSANTS

800g spelt flour

200ml olive oil

7g dry yeast

200g

200ml rice milk

temperature)

200ml coconut yogurt

pinch of salt

1. Preheat the oven to 200ÂşC. 2. Mix all the ingredients (except

coconut

oil

(room

of the other; repeat with the other 7, finish with the disks without oil.

coconut oil), work well.

3. Cover with a tea towel and let rise 6. Roll it again with a rolling pin

(until 1cm thick) and cut into 16

for two hours in a warm place.

equal peaces.

The dough should have doubled in size.

4. Make 16 balls, and roll each one

with a rolling pin (to the size of a dessert plate).

5. Spread coconut oil on 14 of the

small disks and put 7 each on top

7. Roll it into croissants and put on a baking sheet.

8. Brush with water and sprinkle with poppy or sesame seeds.

9. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden.

145

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


�

'Pap' stands for porridge and is prepared in countless variations for breakfast.

Janine Hegendorf nutsandblueberries.com

SISTER-MAG.COM

146


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

South Africa Breakfast in South Africa As a passionate safari traveller, Janine Hegendorf of nutsandblueberries shows you two South African breakfast variations of the traditional mieliepap. This is a variant of the basic food of many South Africans: cornmeal. 'Pap' stands for porridge and is prepared in countless variations for breakfast. Served with papaya, mieliepap is a traditional breakfast in Africa. The papaya gives the porridge a sweet taste. Janine got the breakfast inspiration on one of her South African safaris in the Kapama Game Reserve , where four lodges in different designs are located. After every morning's game drive, breakfast consisted of a selection of freshly baked bread, scones, and muffins, as well as the traditional mieliepap. Various South African fruits rounded off the breakfast table. Next to the traditional variation that is only cooked with milk, salt, and butter, mieliepap can be prepared as a modern breakfast alternative with an orange and chia seeds and served with modern toppings like almond cream. You find both recipes here.

147

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


TRADITIONAL

South African Mieliepap Porridge with Papaya INGREDIENTS

250ml vegan milk

1 tsp grounded vanilla

40g cornmeal

1/2 tsp butter

pinch of sea salt

1 papaya

1. Boil the vegan milk, then reduce the heat and immediately stir in

3. Halve and core the papaya. Peel the halves and cut them into

the cornmeal with a whisk

2. Then add sea salt, grounded

vanilla, and butter and stir with the whisk

small cubes

4. Save some papaya cubes for decoration

5. Fold the papaya under the porridge

SISTER-MAG.COM

148


BREAKFAST

AT

TIFFANY'S

MODERN

Modern Mieliepap Porridge with chia seeds & almond cream INGREDIENTS

1 organic orange

1/2 tsp butter

250ml vegan milk

1 tbsp chia seeds

40g cornmeal

2 tbsp almond cream

pinch of sea salt

orange slices

1 tsp grounded vanilla

1. Squeeze out the organic orange 2. Boil the vegan milk, then reduce

4. Then add sea salt, grounded

the cornmeal and the chia seeds

5. Serve with orange slices and

vanilla, and butter and stir with the whisk

the heat and immediately stir in with a whisk

almond cream

3. Add the freshly squeezed orange juice when the porridge is firm. Stir constantly.

149

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

SISTER-MAG.COM

150


E H T

ALPR O

t s a f k a e r B b u l C

TEXT | VERA SCHÖNFELD

, JEMIMA OETTLER

, HEIKE NIEMEIER

ANNA | ZEIT FÜR VEGAN , JULIANE | CRAFTROOMSTORIES , JANA | NOM-NOMS , SARAH | ALLES UND ANDERES , CLAUDETTA | DO IT BUT DO IT NOW PHOTOS | LALE

, MARIE DARME 151

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

#alprobreakfastclub

THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB – your perfect morning in Cologne, Hamburg & Berlin Back in sisterMAG33 , we introduced you to the Alpro Breakfast Club. Together with Alpro, we started it to provide you with new recipes, tips and ideas to change your breakfast habits for the better. We truly believe that this important part of our day gets lost in the hustle and bustle of early starts way too often. So we came up with the #alprobreakfastclub to start a real-life blogger-project in different cities that focuses on the delicious plant-based drinks and yoghurts by Alpro. For all of you who couldn’t be there, this is your opportunity to sit back down at the table with our bloggers from Cologne, Hamburg and Berlin and listen to the inspiring early-morning chats that happened at the ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB.

SISTER-MAG.COM

152


153

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

Anna

zeitfuervegan.de zeitfuervegan Her love for vegan food and coffee makes Anna from Zeit für vegan the perfect Alpro Breakfast Club member!

THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB COLOGNE

FEB

3

WHAT DID YOU LOVE ABOUT THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB? ANNA | Weekend, chatting with

girlfriends, a healthy meal that starts the day off right: That’s the #alprobreakfastclub. It’s a wonderful idea to begin an early morning with talking to other bloggers about their breakfast routines. As a vegan, I love the fact that sisterMAG and Alpro managed to host a delicious and animal-free breakfast! Combine that with our stunning location and you’ve got the perfect event!

SISTER-MAG.COM

WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL BREAKFAST ROUTINE? Weekends are for long, indulgent breakfasts. During the week, I usually grab something to go to have at the office – everything from smoothies to overnight oats and chia pudding or avocado on toast. I want my first meal of the day to be healthy and balanced!

154


Wndrfuel wndrfuel.de

ZÃœLPICHER STR. 30, 50674 COLOGNE MON-FRI 8-20 S AT- S U N 1 0 - 2 0 155

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

Juliane

craftroomstories.com craftroomstories

Juliane uses her blog Craftroomstories to share creative ideas – everything from jam jar DIYs to room makeovers!

WHAT DID YOU LOVE ABOUT THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB? JULIANE | Thank you so much for

the wonderful time at the Alpro x sisterMAG Breakfast Club. Such a special morning with my blogger friends! I finally had the opportunity to chat to girls I hadn’t seen in ages and loved trying all the different alternative soy yoghurts while talking about breakfast routines. It really inspired me to put more effort into my daily breakfast at home!

SISTER-MAG.COM

FEB

10 WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL BREAKFAST ROUTINE? JULIANE | During the week, I

usually have some sort of warm breakfast oatmeal with yoghurt and fresh fruit. I drink some fresh juice (my favourite is pineapple, cucumber and coriander) with it.

156


THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB HAMBURG

WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL BREAKFAST ROUTINE? JANA | I usually get up quite late

because I like to savour every last minute in bed. My breakfast has to be quick, usually some yoghurt with fruit and seeds or nuts. I love having a light breakfast because it gives me energy but doesn’t weigh me down.

Jana

nom-noms.de nomnoms_jana Jana shares vegan and vegetarian recipes on her blog which are usually inspired by her travels.

Torrefaktum torrefaktum.de SPEERSORT 1, 20095 HAMBURG MON-FRI 8-19 S AT 1 0 - 1 8

WHAT DID YOU LOVE ABOUT THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB? JANA | We had such a slow and

relaxed morning, it was wonderful! Chats with lovely people, a healthy and light breakfast and a beautiful location – I could get used to this!

157

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

SISTER-MAG.COM

158


D OW N LOA D THE ALPR O B R E A K FA ST CLUB BOOKLET 159

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL BREAKFAST ROUTINE? CLAUDETTA | I try starting my day

Claudetta

doitbutdoitnow.blogspot.de doitbutdoitnow

Claudetta is inspired by all the beautiful things in life. Her favourite food, interior and Berlin-related inspirations can be found on her blog.

with a glass of water and then I usually have two or three cups of coffee. I don’t like having the same thing every day so I switch between toast, eggs, porridge and muesli. Sometimes I indulge and have breakfast somewhere else (usually the chia pudding at Daluma).

FEB

11 WHAT DID YOU LOVE ABOUT THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB? CLAUDETTA | An invitation to a

delicious breakfast with healthy food in a stunning location decorated with the most beautiful flowers – what’s not to love?

SISTER-MAG.COM

160


THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB BERLIN

n i l r e B n r o c Uni unicorn.berlin

, 3 7 1 E S S A R T S N BRUNNE 10115 BERLIN MON-FRI 9-19 S AT- S U N 1 0 - 1 8

161

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

SISTER-MAG.COM

162


WHAT DID YOU LOVE ABOUT THE ALPRO BREAKFAST CLUB? SARAH | I can’t imagine a better

way to start a weekend than having a delicious breakfast with my favourite people. I really enjoyed the Alpro breakfast and was absolutely overwhelmed by the fantastic choice of products, fruit and other treats!

Sarah

WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL BREAKFAST ROUTINE? SARAH | I am an early bird and

need my breakfast to start the day. During the week, I usually have yoghurt with fresh fruit and some muesli. On weekends, I enjoy having big breakfasts as long as I can to have some time to myself to gather my energy and get in a good mood.

allesundanderes.de alles_und_anderes While cupcakes and other sweet treats are Sarahs specialty, breakfast is an important meal for her.

163

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

D OW N LOA D THE ALPR O B R E A K FA ST CLUB BOOKLET

The Alpro Breakfast Club was brought to life to bring you the latest breakfast inspiration – but we know very well that it can be incredibly hard to drop old habits and introduce new ones. We talked to dietician and nutritionist HEIKE NIEMEIER and asked her for her top 5 tips on staying motivated…

SISTER-MAG.COM

164


MOTIVATION!

. . . a e d i n a e How to pursu When changing our diet, we often think of missing out, hunger and perseverance. The word diet (greek »diaita«) really means a healthy lifestyle – which, of course, includes the way we eat. We gathered a few ideas and tips to make your lifestyle change easier.

S TAY R E A L I S T I C When your goals are just not realistic or too much of a departure from your old lifestyle, it is absolutely normal to feel overwhelmed and give up. After all, not every habit you have is a bad one! SNOOZERS just need quick recipes that they can prepare while running out of the door, while LOVERS usually enjoy

starting their day with a more indulgent meal. Start with goals that are specific and realistic for you! If you enjoy hitting the snooze button a little too much, let this banana-chocolate granola be what gets you out of bed in the mornings! As soon as you enjoy getting up, you can switch to a spicy avocado toast so you won’t get bored.

165

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

NEW-OLD-NEW-OLD-NEWOLD

T W O S T E P S FO R WA R D , O N E S T E P B AC K If you aren’t used to trying new things, it is easy and normal to fall back into old habits. First steps are always difficult. It is best to focus on what you have achieved (two steps forward) and not what set you back (one step back). Remember that you are still further along in your journey to healthier habits than you were when you started out! This metaphor usually helps: New things are to our brain like walking the small path off the beaten track. It would be much easier to take the paved road, but the beaten track will get you where you need to be. Hang in there!

SISTER-MAG.COM

The Alpro Breakfast Club provides you with a huge choice of breakfast recipes for every morning. If you feel overwhelmed by the variety of possibilities, use this trick from interval training: To change your habits, slowly introduce new things instead of trying to do everything at once. During the first week, have a new breakfast every second day to get used to trying different things. During the second week, you might be ready to only have your ‚old‘ breakfast every third day and so on… Practice makes perfect!

166


S WA P - H A P P Y

F I N D I N S P I R AT I O N It usually helps to visualise a solution. Choose someone you know and admire for their lifestyle and eating habits, observe them and adapt their ways to your needs. Observe, copy, repeat – not only kids can learn this way! If you don’t know a real person, make someone up or visualise your better future self to focus on.

The Alpro Breakfast Club recipes are made to make your lifestyle change easier. They are sorted by breakfast type to make your individual journey fun and smooth. We have everything from hazelnut-mint smoothies for ACTIVE SOULS , to banana cookies for MULTITASKER and crunchy almond quinoa for people who RISE & SHINE! The recipes are all adaptable to the ingredients you might have at home to avoid earlymorning frustration– swap fruit for different fruit or exchange the kind of nuts you use. It makes all the difference and will make your mornings brighter, healthier and full of energy!

167

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

D

SISTER-MAG.COM

168

D A O L OWN

 E P I REC


1

Coconut

BANANA BREAD 8 servings /

Snoozer Made with:

INGREDIENTS 100 ml Alpro Hazelnut Drink

200 g sugar

300 g flour

4

ripe bananas, mashed

4

tbsp desiccated coconut

1

100 g butter,

Naturally low in saturated fats. Source of vitamin B12.

This recipe is: Vegan, if you substitute the eggs with a ripe banana.

Keep half of this loaf in the freezer to whip out on those mornings when time is sparse and you need something quick!

2 eggs

tsp baking soda

½ tsp salt

Alpro Hazelnut Drink

15 min.

PREPARATION: • Preheat the oven to 180 °C. • Sieve the flour, baking soda and salt into a small bowl. Mix in the desiccated coconut. • In a bigger bowl, beat the butter and sugar until fluffy and white. Mix in the mashed banana, eggs and hazelnut drink. • Add the flour mixture and mix well. Pour the batter into a previously greased and floured tin and bake for 40 – 55 minutes or until golden brown.

169

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

2

umbly r C BREAKFAST 2 servings /

5 min.

Lovers

Made with:

Alpro alternative soy yoghurt

rich in plant-based protein. Contains calcium and vitamins B12 and D2.

This recipe is: lactose free

INGREDIENTS: 300 g alternative soy yoghurt 2

pink grapefruits

4

ginger biscuits

PREPARATION: • Pour the soy yoghurt in two bowls • Peel the grapefruit and cut into bite-sized pieces. Arrange on top of the yoghurt. • Break up the biscuits and crumble them over the top. Voilà!

vegan (depending on your choice of biscuit) Make it pretty. This recipe gives you plenty of opportunities to be creative and use colourful fruit toppings. So lovely!

SISTER-MAG.COM

170


DOWN LOA D R E C I P E 

171

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

D OWN LOAD R E C I P E 

SISTER-MAG.COM

172


3

t n i m t u n l e z HaSMOOTHIE 2 servings /

Active Soul

Made with:

Alpro Haselnussdrink Original

Source of vitamin B12 and vitamin E

This recipe is: lactose free gluten free vegan

10 min.

INGREDIENTS: 500 ml Alpro Hazelnut drink 1

banana

1

orange

Fresh mint

PREPARATION: • Peel the orange and banana and cut into rough pieces • Add all ingredients into a food processor • Pour in the hazelnut drink • Turn the processor on and let the magic happen. Yummy!

Hazelnuts are rich in vitamin B12, which is responsible for keeping you awake! Please avoid whole or roughly chopped nuts when serving this to children as they are a choking hazard.

173

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

4

lmond A CHIA PUDDING 1 serving /

Rise & Shiner

Made with:

5 Min.

INGREDIENTS: 25 ml unsweetened almond drink 32 g quinoa (not cooked) cinnamon

Alpro unsweetened almond drink

Naturally low in saturated fats. Without added sugar.

This recipe is: lactose free gluten free Pumpkin seeds offer plenty of health benefits (rich in magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc and proteins) and add a deliciously unexpected twist to this recipe.

SISTER-MAG.COM

1

pinch of salt

Almond flakes

½ an apple, de-stoned and cut into pieces ¼ tsp honey

PREPARATION: • Cook the quinoa, then add cinnamon and salt • Heat the almond drink in a separate pan • Layer the quinoa, apples and alternative soy yoghurt into mason jars • Pour the warm almond drink over the top and add the honey.

174


DOW N LOA D RE C IPE 

175

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


PROMO

DOWN LOA D R E C I P E  SISTER-MAG.COM

176


5

e l p p A y r r Blackbe COMPOTE 4 servings /

Multi­ tasker

Made with:

8 min.

INGREDIENTS: 1

l alternative soy yoghurt with almonds

2 apples

Alpro alternative soy-yoghurt with almonds

Rich in plant-based protein. Contains calcium and vitamins B12 and D2.

This recipe is: lactose free gluten free vegan Use your favourite berries for this delicious compote – even frozen ones will work with the warm apples.

1

tsp sunflower oil

1

tsp cinnamon (optional)

250 g blackberries

PREPARATION: • Preheat the oven to 200°C. • Wash and de-core the apples, cut into cubes and put into a small baking tray. Dust over the cinnamon, mix with the oil and cover in tinfoil. Bake for around 25 minutes or until golden brown. Mix in the blackberries. • Put the yoghurt into 4 bowls • Add the hot apples and blackberries to each of the bowls

177

SISTERMAG 34 | 02 / 2018


IMPRINT

SISTERMAG – JOURNAL FOR THE DIGITAL LADY www.sister-mag.com Chief Editor

Theresa Neubauer

Operations

Jemima Oettler, Christina Rücker, Vera Schönfeld, Sophie Siekmann, Franziska Winterling

Fashion

Eva-Maria Neubauer (Fashion Dir.)

Design

Theresa Neubauer (Art Dir.), Marie Darme, Lale Tütüncübaşı, Songie Yoon

Illustration

Maelle Rajoelisolo, Nicole Xu, Carola Koberstein

Contributing Editors (Text)

Barbara Eichhammer, Robert Eberhardt, Alexander Kords, Christian Näthler, Michael Neubauer, Heike Niemeier, Angela Peltner, sisterMAG Team

Contributing Editors (Photo)

Robin Kater, sisterMAG Team

Video Translation Proof

Lale Tütüncübaşı Ira Häussler, Alexander Kords, Christian Naethler, Tanja Timmer Stefanie Kiessling, Alexander Kords, Christian Naethler, Dr. Michael Neubauer

Published by Carry-On Publishing GmbH, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, 13355 Berlin, Germany. Re-use of content is only allowed with written permission of the publisher. There is no liability for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. The Carry-On Publishing GmbH assumes no liability or guarantee for the accuracy, currency and completeness of the information provided. All information is provided without warranty. Contact: mail@sister-mag.com Management Sales Marketing

Antonia Sutter, Theresa Neubauer, Alex Sutter Alex Sutter (Sales Dir.) Antonia Sutter (Marketing Dir.), Anna Gnörich


Six years of sisterMAG – celebrate with us and show us your #sistermagmetime moment on Instagram!


We are looking forward to seeing you again in our next issue sisterMAG! Until then you can keep in touch on Social Media or suscribe to our Newsletter!