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Memorial Day is May 27 See page 7

Vol. 34 No. 51

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Distinct in the District Your Weekly Community Newspaper

LB city prosecutor says work to reduce gang activity has helped put ‘dent’ in violent crime

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Though property crime has spiked this year, violent crime, such as murders, robberies and aggravated assaults, has actually remained relatively low in Long Beach, according to law-enforcement officials. Long Beach City Prosecutor Doug Haubert attributes the reported decrease to various programs that his office has helped implement in the last few years to eradicate gang activity throughout the city. “By targeting the gang members, I think we’re making a dent in violent crime,” he said. Haubert, who is running for reelection next year, gave an hour-long overview of his office’s duties and accomplishments during a North Long Beach Community Assembly last Saturday, May 18 at the Glad Tidings Church at 1900 E. South St. The meeting was attended by about 50 people and was jointly organized by 8th District Councilmember Al Austin and 9th District Councilmember Steven Neal. see NLB page 13

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill resident Hazel Wallace (center) was presented with a certificate of recognition during the May 21 Signal Hill City Council meeting for receiving the 33rd Senate District Outstanding Woman of Distinction Award. Also pictured, from left, are Councilmember Larry Forester and Mayor Michael Noll.

Signal Hill Mayor Noll calls for disclosure of political-interest groups behind ‘smear tactics’

Staff Writer

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Long Beach City Prosecutor Doug Haubert speaks to a crowd of about 50 people during a North Long Beach Community Assembly on Saturday, May 18 at the Glad Tidings Church, 1900 E. South St. Haubert gave an overview of his office’s duties and functions, including efforts to reduce gang activity and convict gang members.

At the end of a brief Signal Hill City Council meeting on Tuesday, May 21, under “new business,” Mayor Michael Noll proposed having the city attorney draft an ordinance that would require political-interest groups that attempt to influence city elections disclose their financial supporters and campaign contributions to the City. The rest of the Council acquiesced to Noll’s request but refrained from discussion. City Attorney David Aleshire said he would have staff provide a list of potential provisions for the ordinance when brought back to the Council at a future meeting. The ordinance may include putting certain restrictions on political action committees (PACs) or other forms of politicalinterest groups that are currently

Weekly Weather Forecast Sunday

May 24 through May 27, 2013

Friday

Saturday

Low clouds, then sun

72°

Low clouds, then sunshine

Clouds breaking for sun

Low clouds, then sunshine

Lo 58°

Lo 57°

Lo 59°

Lo 59°

68°

Monday

71°

This week’s Weekly Weather Forecast sponsored by: 1174 Wardlow Rd. Long Beach (West of Orange)

562-427-4630

May 24, 2013

K-9 unit demos its bond between City and canine allies

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Sean Belk

69°

“Under Water World,” watercolor by Moira Hahn See page 15

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not covered under Signal Hill’s municipal election code. Various political attack-ad mailers were sent out to Signal Hill voters leading up to the March 2011 and March 2013 elections as part of campaigns that Noll called “smear tactics” targeting Council incumbents running for re-election, as well as other longtime city officials. “We need to have fair and honest elections, where the voters can have the appropriate information to decide on the candidates and the issues,” Noll declared as Councilmember Tina Hansen held up copies of the fliers in question. “I think that this ordinance should be given a high priority since we have a special election in June of 2014, where outside groups may attempt to distort the issue again.” City code currently limits individual candidate campaign expenditures to about $500 per election

City of Signal Hill

Kasia, a bomb dog specially trained to search out explosives, joins her handler Officer Ernie Wolosewicz of the Long Beach Police Department at the Long Beach Police Officers Association Park located at the Long Beach Towne Centre. Kasia was briefly introduced to attendees at the Open Up Long Beach event on May 20 during which Wolosewicz discussed life on the police department’s K-9 unit. CJ Dablo Staff Writer

cycle and requires that candidates file financial documents with the City. PACs, however, aren’t covered under city code and currently file campaign contributions with the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters. In the weeks prior to this year’s March 5 city election, two separate fliers, which some people have called “hit pieces,” criticized the records of Noll, Vice Mayor Ed Wilson and former councilmember Ellen Ward. The fliers included snippets of various newspaper articles, attached to statements claiming that sitting councilmembers are “wasting our hard-earned tax dollars,” and compared Signal Hill to the City of Bell, which has been embroiled in scandal over charges of corruption and misappropriation of public funds, for which its city officials have recently been

Don’t let her size fool you. She may only weigh about 50 pounds, but Kasia, a dog with timid brown eyes and a strawberry-blonde coat, has been trained to detect explosives. She serves with the K-9 unit of the Long Beach Police Department to help keep the city safe. An audience of about 75 people gathered on picnic benches at the Long Beach Police Officers Association Park in the Long Beach Towne Centre on May 20 to learn more about the people and dogs who serve on the K-9 unit. Monday’s demonstration of the K-9 unit was the latest event of Open Up Long Beach, a series hosted by 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske that offers residents a behind-the-scenes look at various services and departments in the city. Kasia seemed like any other docile family pet that Monday night. The Belgian Malinois mix stood on her hind legs and then put her paws

see COUNCIL page 19

see K-9 page 8

Approved Watering Schedule Before 9am or after 4pm

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For more information, call the Water Conservation Hotline: 562-


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MAY 24, 2013


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NEWS

MAY 24, 2013

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, May 16 Residential burglary 7:30am– 2300 block Pine Ave. Residential burglary attempt 1pm– 500 block W. Hill St.

Commercial robbery 1:46pm– 400 block W. Willow St. Commercial robbery 4:24pm– 300 block E. Willow St.

Friday, May 17 Battery 2:29am– 3300 block Atlantic Ave. Assault 2:31pm– 100 block E. Willow St.

Garage/residential burglary 6:15am– 3000 block Chestnut Ave.

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide

Thursday, May 16 Non–injury hit–and–run 10:01am– 2600 block E. 28th St.

Attempt to take vehicle without consent 12pm– 3300 block Lemon Ave. Child abuse 12:54pm– 1700 block E. Hill St. Commercial burglary/shoplift 7:51pm– 900 block E. 33rd St. Friday, May 17 Personal robbery 2am– Cherry Ave./E. 21st St.

Petty theft 5:36pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Commercial burglary 9pm– 1800 block Redondo Ave.

Auto burglary 4:20pm– 1900 block Orizaba Ave.

Auto burglary 6:56am– 3300 block Lemon Ave.

Non–injury hit–and–run 1:14pm– E. Spring St./Cherry Ave.

Commercial burglary 1:17pm– 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Monday, May 20 Forgery 3:30pm– 2500 block Cherry Ave. Suspect identified

Battery 7:26pm– Long Beach Blvd./E. Willow St. DUI 9:44pm– E. 28th St./Rose Ave. Tuesday, May 21 Residential burglary Sunday, May 19 10am– 1900 block Magnolia Ave. Residential burglary 1:10pm– 3500 block E. Pacific Coast Residential burglary Hwy. 8:11pm– 2100 block Locust Ave. Suspect identified

Tuesday, May 21 Battery 7:53am– 3300 block Olive Ave.

Stolen vehicle 3:12pm– 1500 block E. Spring St. Forgery 2pm– 2500 block Cherry Ave. Named suspect.

Unauthorized use of ID 2:35pm– 2200 block E. Willow St.

LB Water Department proposes to raise water rates by 4 percent for five years

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Long Beach Water Department (LBWD) staff is proposing a 4-percent increase in water rates for the next five fiscal years, starting with 2013-14, which begins Oct. 1. Water department staff brought forward the five-year spending plan during the Long Beach Board of Water Commissioners meeting last Thursday, May 16. The suggested water-rate increase is being proposed primarily because of rising labor costs and rate hikes associated with pumping and purchasing potable water. LBWD staff is not suggesting an increase in sewer rates. According to a presentation, the department’s water fund accounts for 85 percent of the department’s total $119.7-million budget for fiscal year 2013-14. The department’s capitalimprovement program budget makes up about $16.4 million. The largest components of the budget that account for about 37 percent, or $38 million, are costs to purchase and pump water. More than half of the water supply in Long Beach is produced from groundwater wells, since the City owns pumping rights. On May 10, the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD), however, raised its pumping-assessment rate by 9.9 percent. The other portion of water is imported and treated surface water that the City of Long Beach purchases. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD), a wholesale distributor or imported water from the Colorado River and northern California, has also increased its rates. Last year, the MWD Board of Directors approved a two-year spending plan, increasing its wholesale water rate by 5 percent for this year and next year. LBWD staff assumes that, in future years, labor costs will jump by 2 percent, MWD rates will rise by 3 percent and WRD rates will increase by 5 percent, according to a staff presentation. The average monthly combined water and sewer bill for Long Beach single-family residents is $66.02, according to results from a rate study released in March. The average monthly bill for households in Los Angeles County is $73.34. According to LBWD staff, the combined rate

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

increase for fiscal year 2013-14 would add an additional $1.63 to the monthly bill of the average single-family resident in Long Beach. The water board will further discuss the rate-increase proposal in coming weeks and is scheduled to adopt the budget on June 20. The

Long Beach City Council is required to sign off on the budget sometime in September. The board is required to hold a public hearing and receive public testimony that allows property owners the right to protest any proposed rate increase. ß

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EGGS WITH THE ELKS What Monthly breakfast Who Bellflower/ Long Beach Elks Lodge 888 Where 16426 Bellflower Blvd., Bellflower When Sunday, May 26 from 8am to noon More Info Breakfast costs $6.50 per person and includes eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, biscuits with gravy, orange juice, assorted fruit, Belgian waffles and coffee. Call (562) 866-3027 or visit elks.org .

HEROES OF THE COAST What Special screening of Heroes of the Coast Who Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Where Art Theatre, 2025 E. 4th St. When Sunday, May 26 at 10am More Info The documentary tells the story of the heroes that fought to protect California’s coast through the California Environmental Quality Act. Two of the documentary’s heroes, Don May and Mel Nutter, will be present at the screening. Tickets are $10 in advance of the event and $12 at the door. Visit lcwlandtrust.org .

PIZZA PIG OUT What Fourth Annual Pizza Pig Out Who The Wrigley Association and the Long Beach Neighborhood Foundation Where Holy Innocents School parking lot, 2500 Pacific Ave. When Friday, May 31 from 6pm to 8pm More Info Participants will vote for the best pizza in Long Beach. Pizza parlors from all over town will be providing pizza. All you can eat pizza will cost $5 per person, $3 for Wrigley Association members. Visit neighborhoodlink.com/longbch/wrigley .

SAFETY FIRST What Community safety meeting Who City of Long Beach Where Jordan High School, 6500 Atlantic Ave. When Saturday, June 1 from noon to 3pm More Info Officials from the city will talk about the Long Beach Violence Prevention Plan. Residents are encouraged to ask questions. Lunch will be provided. Call (562) 570-5585.

MEET AND EAT What Supper club Who Bixby Knolls Supper Club Where Long Beach Petroleum Club, 3636 Linden Ave. When Monday, June 3 at 6:30pm More Info Residents are invited to support the local economy. Long Beach Petroleum will have a variety of dishes available, from pot roast to crab-crusted salmon. Email supperclub@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

FRIGHT NIGHT What 19th Annual Benefit for the Animals Who Long Beach Playhouse Where 5021 E. Anaheim St. When Thursday, June 6 beginning at 6:30pm More Info Event will include door prizes, raffles, a silent auction, and a musical presentation of Little Shop of Horrors. Hors d’oeuvres will be served and wine will be available for purchase. Tickets are $25. Call (562) 988-7647 or email Deborah@WheelyWilly.com .

LET’S BOOK IT! What Book club Who Los Altos Neighborhood Library Book Club Where Los Altos Neighborhood Library, 5614 E. Britton Dr. When Saturday, June 8 at 10am More Info The club will discuss Raymond Khoury’s The Last Templar. The club meets on the second Saturday of each month. Call (562) 570-1045 or visit lbpl.org .

CELEBRATE THE ELEMENTS What Medley concert Who Long Beach Chorale Where Rancho Los Alamitos, 6400 E. Bixby Hill Rd. When Sunday, June 9 at 3pm More Info The family-friendly concert will feature songs about nature’s elements. Musical selections will include a wide variety of genres. Refreshments, parking, and Rancho tours will be available. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students. Visit longbeachchorale.org .

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IN MEMORIAM

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Ruby Crabtree

MAY 24, 2013

Colleen Papadakis

Ruby Crabtree, longtime resident and successful realtor in Signal Hill, recently passed away and a local memorial service was held. In 1944, she came to California, where she met her future husband, Bill Crabtree. Ruby’s first career was as a civilian at the Naval Weapons Station in Seal Beach, where she attained great success and a high rank, at a time when few women reached elevated positions in the government. Ruby enjoyed her tenure at the Naval Weapons Station, forging many deep and lifelong friendships. She and Bill raised their family in east Long Beach. Aer retiring from the Naval Weapons Station, Ruby joined Bill as a realtor with Century 21 Sparrow Realty, eventually becoming partners in this company. Ruby and Bill eventually moved to Signal Hill, and this became their center and home. ey were both loved and respected by their peers and all the clients they helped to buy or sell homes, many of whom are Signal Hill residents. ey were very involved with the Long Beach Civic Light Opera and enjoyed many social activities. Ruby and Bill loved to travel and enjoyed their trips all over Europe. Aer Bill’s death, Ruby energized her real-estate business in Signal Hill and became more active in city affairs. She was a frequent attendee at Signal Hill City Council meetings, developing strong relationships with many in the city as well as establishing herself as the preeminent realtor in Signal Hill. Aer Bill’s death, Ruby reconnected with an old family friend, Leo Grant, and they married. She gained a warm extended family. Aer Leo’s passing in 2009, Ruby continued her real-estate business and her activities in Signal Hill. Ruby loved all of her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She is survived by her daughter Nikki Palley, son Scott Crabtree and his wife Deborah, grandchildren: Marta Palley, Tammy McCormic, Heidi Jenkins, Scott Crabtree and Adam Crabtree and many grandchildren as well as Leo’s daughter’s Teri Sakai and Stacy Grant and all their family members. Anyone wishing to make gis in memory of Ruby Crabtree may do so by making gis to: Braille Institute of Los Angeles or Pacific Symphony in Santa Ana.

June 6, 1927 – May 13, 2013

Colleen Papadakis passed away May 13, 2013 at age 85. Born June 6, 1927 in Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada, to Meletia and Peter Georgas, she came to Long Beach and married her beloved George in 1955. Signal Hill became their home where they raised Lisa, Cristina and Michael. She adored her two grandsons, George and Eli, and loved her son-in-law Falanai and her daughter-in-law Janel. Colleen’s love of culture and her Greek heritage led her to form a Greek folk dance group e Olympians, which continues today. Friends delighted in her unaffected charm, infectious smile and her Canadian “eh.” She had a wonderful life and was much loved. Memorial services were Sunday, May 19th at 7pm, and the funeral was Monday, May 20 at 11am at the Assumption Church at 5761 E. Colorado St. Donations can be made to the Church Building Fund.

OPINION

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

We have all read or heard about folks around our country who have dealt with burglaries that have left them saddened and at quite a personal loss. In some cases, it has been the theft of a wheelchair or other item necessary to the well-being of a handicapped person that has made the news. Once the news has spread, locals rally around and do their best to recover the stolen item or try to find a replacement for the stolen apparatus. Well, it looks as if we have a local case of our own to be made aware of. According to Long Beach resident Mike Mounce, his granddaughter Kathy’s tricycle was recently stolen out of his yard. I understand that many kids have their bicycles stolen, but this is an especially sad case. You see, Kathy is 14 years old with quite a history of medical issues. From what her Granddad Mike tells me, she was really looking forward to riding her “new” tricycle this summer. Here’s a little bit more of the story as Mike tells it:

Kathleen was 2 weeks old when she got meningitis. It ended up affecting her right side, which almost looked like stroke symptoms. Since [my wife] Linda and I have had custody of her and her sisters, we have strived to make her realize there was nothing she couldn’t do if she tried. Well, the one thing she was held up on was riding bikes with her siblings. We had tried small trikes, but they were too small. With therapy and exercise, Photos courtesy Mike Mounce we finally got her to ride an adult trike. It was funny because the whole family watched the first time she Kathy on her tricycle, which was recently stolen from her grandfather’s yard rode it, and her cousin said, “Now you can ride with us like a real kid,” which to her was a compliment. These bikes are not easy to come by and are pretty expensive. Her dad found one about nine months ago and bought it, although it needed work. So I refurbished it with new paint, new tires and a brand-new seat. Then on the 19th [of May] after 1am someone came up my driveway and took the bike. They had to lift it over and past my van. They took nothing else in the driveway. Three skateboards [and] a battery charger [were] not touched. Needless to say, Kathy is kind of down, but we will do, as always, and find another for her somewhere. My dad always said, “I'm sure they needed it more than I.” Kathy is now 15 and attends Lakewood High School in the CAD program (Culinary Arts and Design). Kathy enjoys the small learning community and has a dream to be a clothing fashion designer. Kathy has been in special classes since she was 3 years old with finally being mainstreamed 4 years ago when she became the first handicapped child at Preey Lindsey Academy. She receives services from CCS (California Children’s Services) at Tucker, Harbor Regional Services. Linda and I have had custody of her and her two sisters since 1998. Kat was just a little over a year when we got her and since then we have [given her] every option to help her thrive. [There have been] years of ongoing therapy and braces. Kathy’s neurologist at Miller Children’s calls her his little miracle. Kathy in all rights should be strapped to a wheelchair from the kind of damage that was done to the left hemisphere of her brain. Much like a stroke, it affected her whole right side from eye muscles to her toes. But with persistence she is high-functioning and swims like a fish. Kathy has always adapted to situations. If she wanted to skateboard she did it on her knees, but she just couldn't get down the bike thing until we tried a three-wheeler. She has to strap her right foot to the pedal, and she was getting the hang of it [when a person at] a bike shop said there was a strap she could slip into that could fit the pedal. That was my next project. She hadn’t been able to ride it much since she got it because of the weather. She and the girls were looking forward to riding this summer. She has shed a few tears, and we just look at other things to work for and go on. There is always a way, in most cases, and that has been our lesson for Kathy. The theft was just another obstacle to overcome. Kathy’s family is hoping that someone may have information about her stolen bike. ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

If you have any information on Kathy’s bike please contact her grandfather Mike Mounce at (562) 423-3709 or call your local police station. The bike is a blue Schwinn 3-speed with silver painted fenders, white basket, padded seat, new pedals and new tires. MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Jane Fallon

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

Barbie Ellisen

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

STAFF WRITER

CJ Dablo

Shoshanah Siegel

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

Tanya Paz

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ariana Gastelum Leonardo Poareo Brandy Soto

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

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MAY 24, 2013

New charter middle school nears lease agreement with Grace Brethren Church in Bixby Knolls

Sean Belk Staff Writer

A new charter middle school to be called Intellectual Virtues Academy (IVA) Long Beach is close to finalizing a lease agreement with Grace Brethren Church of Long Beach to operate on the church campus at 3601 Linden Ave., across the street from the Petroleum ClubLong Beach in Bixby Knolls, according to IVA officials. The Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) Board of Education approved the new public charter school in October of last year, and the school has plans to open by Sept. 6, starting with about 50 students split between two 6th-grade classes. According to IVA officials, the existing private Grace Christian Schools would share the same property as IVA, although the two schools would operate completely independent of each other. Loyola Marymount University (LMU) philosopher Jason Baehr and Biola University professor Steve Porter developed the vision for the new magnet middle school, which considers itself a “grass-roots development of parents, educators and community leaders who are passionate about the flourishing of students in Long Beach.” With a goal to eventually have 6th through 8th grades, the charter school is being funded through a $1million grant project at LMU and is sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation. The school will be governed by a 10-member board of directors, many of whom have backgrounds in marketing, commercial real estate, business management, educational theory, school administration, human resources, university administration and social services. The board will also oversee school staff. IVA plans to focus on promoting and fostering nine “master virtues,” which include “curiosity, intellectual humility, intellectual autonomy, attentiveness, intellectual carefulness, intellectual thoroughness, openmindedness, intellectual courage and intellectual perseverance.” These virtues fall into three categories, corresponding to three stages or dimensions of learning: “getting the learning process started and headed in the right direction; making the learning process go well; and overcoming challenges to productive learning,” according to the IVA website. IVA officials had viewed more than a dozen potential sites in the Los Altos and Bixby Knolls neighborhoods of Long Beach since last year. In January, the IVA board narrowed the options down to three properties that had the greatest potential of meeting the needs of the school, while staying within budget, according to a statement from IVA. “We faced a great challenge,” IVA Board member Bob Covolo said in the statement. “We had to find a space that would not only accommodate our growth over the next three years, but satisfy our need for a space that facilitated learning well.” The committee also worked with LBUSD to find space on existing public-school campuses, but no fitting options were found. “Because the site we pursued offered so many benefits to our prospective students and families, and the landlord was very accommodating, we were extremely fortunate to be offered

this flexible option,” said IVA Board member Eric Churchill. IVA officials state that the location provides “spacious classrooms, a large blacktop with basketball hoops for outdoor play, a fully functioning kitchen, lunch benches, a large multi-purpose room, and additional rooms for activities and assemblies.” Some parents of children in the Christian school, however, have expressed concerns that their students may intermingle with students from the public charter school. Still, in an interview with the Signal Tribune, Rebecca Irwin, spokesperson for IVA, assured that the two schools would run on completely separate campuses with different schedules to avoid any conflicts. Jacquie Bryant, IVA’s newly hired principal, said she plans to meet with the principal and other officials from the Christian school to work out separate bell schedules and lunch breaks. Although the landlord and IVA have unofficially agreed upon a lease, a formal rental contract is still waiting for City review, she said. “It has been finalized in the minds of the school and the operation on campus next year, and it has been finalized in the eyes of the landlords, but without the certain review of the City, we cannot sign the lease agreement yet,” Bryant said. She said there are still “a lot of processes” that have yet to take place. Bryant added that IVA would function much like Constellation Charter School, which operated on the same campus as St. Anthony High School for 10 years before closing last year. Grace Christian Schools Principal Pearlie Davis would not comment about the separate schedules or about the new charter school’s move, adding that she has yet to speak with Bryant about any plans. “I have not spoken with Jacquie Bryant concerning that program at all, so I cannot say that’s what’s going on,” she said. “I think they’re getting ahead of themselves perhaps, because we haven’t met and discussed anything.” Ralph Hampton, church administrator for Grace Brethren Church of Long Beach, could not be reached for comment before the Signal Tribune’s deadline. Chris Eftychiou, spokesperson for LBUSD, said via email that the school board approved the charter school on Oct. 9, 2012 for opening in fall 2013. He said California education code has specific requirements for developing a charter petition, including a mandatory timeline for approval. “Our district carefully reviews each petition submitted and certifies that all requirements have been met,” Eftychiou said. “Our board makes the decision based on LBUSD staff's review.” He added that LBUSD is not directly involved with the school site’s location but requires a lease to be finalized, which has yet to officially occur. “The school district will be requiring a finalized lease agreement, but we don’t have one yet,” Eftychiou said. “The school district has oversight responsibility and will be monitoring the charter school to make sure it complies with state regulations.”

NEWS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Intellectual Virtues Academy (IVA) Long Beach, a new charter middle school, plans to move into property owned by Grace Brethren Church of Long Beach at 3601 Linden Ave. in Bixby Knolls. The existing private Grace Christian Elementary and Preschool would share the same property as IVA, although the two schools would operate completely independently of each other.

According to Bryant, teachers will be hired and begin professional development by June. The initial deadline to enroll students was May 17. IVA is a tuition-

free public school with open enrollment. Students are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. If more students apply than spaces are available, students would be admit-

ted by lottery, according to IVA’s website.

Call today!

MORE INFORMATION ivalongbeach.org


ST3451 - May 24 issue_Layout 1 5/24/13 12:00 PM Page 6

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Manager of Animal Care Services discusses how to deal with coyotes in LB

leonardo Poareo Editorial Intern

What should local residents do when coyotes enter their neighborhoods and act aggressively? Haze them. “Hazing is basically speaking coyote. If you see that coyote coming across the street and you run at him– ‘HEY!!!’– and chase him, he’ll run,” said Ted Stevens, manager of Animal Care Services in Long Beach. “And then what has he learned as a smart, intelligent animal? ‘That person wants to kill me.’ That’s how you keep them afraid of people.” Stevens discussed coyotes, and how to deal with them, as well as other wildlife, in a presentation enti-

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tled “Living With Wildlife in Long Beach” at the Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance’s meeting at Veterans Park on May 20. Just as residential environments attract droves of people, they attract many coyotes too. What bring the coyotes and other wildlife to people’s homes are the essential elements of survival. “Wildlife are generally interested in only a few things– food, water, and shelter – and if you have those in your back yard, they’re going to hang out there,” Stevens said. Stevens recommended taking pet food inside and securing the areas under homes with raised foundations. Also, don’t feed animals, and make sure bird feeders are clean, he said. Coyotes, which are among the fastest land mammals in North America, are attracted to Long Beach because of the habitat and the food, Stevens said. Food and water attract animals like squirrels, rats, and mice to homes, and in turn this attracts coyotes because they normally eat smaller mammals, he added. With all of these lures, it’s no wonder that residents are seeing more coyotes. “I see coyotes all the time in these neighborhoods,” said Long Beach Police Department Lt. Kevin Coy. “It’s something that we’re living with, and it’s more so than I ever have before,” Coy added. With so many coyotes, some people might try to trap them or remove them. In California, however, it’s illegal to trap wildlife unless they’re damaging property, and it’s also illegal to try to relocate wildlife, Stevens said. He also highlighted the fact that it’s more important for people to remove what’s attracting the wildlife to their homes, since other animals

NEWS

MAY 24, 2013

Leonardo Poareo/Signal Tribune

Ted Stevens, manager of Long Beach Animal Care Services, gives a presentation on dealing with wildlife to the Wrigley

Area Neighborhood Alliance May 20.

“If you are going to

take your dog outside, go outside with them. You want that coyote to see you and associate you with your pet.”

–Ted Stevens, manager of Animal Care Services in Long Beach

just move in and replace the removed animals. But if people have legally trapped an animal, they can call animal control, he said. Yet humans don’t need to worry about coyotes too much. Coyote attacks against humans are rare, as “they don’t look at us as food,” Stevens said. “We’re too big…we’re too much hassle,” he said. “They don’t really have a reason to attack us.” Stevens mentioned that most attacks against humans happen when people try to defend their pets against coyotes. He recommended accompanying pets at all times when outside

and keeping small pets indoors. “If you are going to…take your dog outside, go outside with them,” Stevens said. “You want that coyote to see you and associate you with your pet.” Coyotes, which can jump more than eight feet high, can be aggressive toward large dogs during the winter breeding season because they see them as competition, Stevens added. He recommended clearing away any brush, securing trash cans, disposing of fallen fruit, purchasing motion-detecting sprinklers and lights, and even using water guns filled with vinegar and water as deterrents. Regarding children, Stevens advised that an adult should accompany them and they should make lots of noise and yell if they encounter a coyote. “You want them to be big and to make noise and…jump up and down and confuse the coyote,” Stevens said. Furthermore, since removal and relocation of coyotes aren’t efficient, it seems as if the best bet is to

engage in hazing, which Stevens said is “the use of various techniques to re-instill the natural fear of humans back to habituated coyotes.” Coyotes “understand…dominance,” and pass on their learned behavior to their pups, Stevens said. But he recommended calling Animal Care Services instead of hazing a sick coyote and warned against hazing a cornered coyote. Moreover, coyotes need to make the connection that it’s a person displaying that behavior, Stevens added. The coyotes in Joan Greenwood’s neighborhood made that connection when she hazed them. She would dress in a trench coat and growl at them, facing them down with her broom in the middle of the street “to make sure they wouldn’t come back,” she said. “They’re very cautious now,” Greenwood said. “They totally avoid my side of the street now.” For more information visit longbeach.gov/acs/wildlife/defaul t.asp .

Firefighter sustains burns in apartment fire

Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) responded to a structure fire in the 2400 block of Pacific Avenue on Wednesday, May 22 at approximately 6:30am, according to Will Nash, public information officer with the department. According to Nash, a two-story apartment building had heavy fire involvement showing upon the arrival of the first in fire companies. LBFD personnel made an aggressive interior fire attack, which kept fire damage to the apartment unit of origin. All occupants were accounted for and no injuries were reported. One firefighter was transported to the hospital after the incident for evaluation and treatment of a burns sustained, which were of a first and second degree nature. The firefighter is expected to make a full recovery, according to Nash. The cause of the fire is unknown at this time, but it is under investigation. Source: LBFD

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ST3451 - May 24 issue_Layout 1 5/24/13 12:00 PM Page 7

MAY 24, 2013

HONORING FALLEN VETERANS

American Legion post seeking donations to cover costs of veterans’ picnic

Each year, the American Legion Mayhew-Vincent White Cane Post #266 hosts a 4th of July “picnic in the park” for disabled veterans from the Day Treatment Center at the Long Beach Veterans Hospital as well as for members of Post #266. The picnic includes food, games and live entertainment. To cover the costs of the event, which is free to the disabled veterans, the post

is seeking donations from the public. A donation of $35 will sponsor one disabled veteran, $105 will sponsor three veterans, $175 will sponsor five, and $350 will sponsor 10. Post #266, which was founded in 1976, is unique in that it is the only American Legion post in the country that was chartered specifically for blind and disabled veterans. Today, only a small

Sunshine and blue skies make this time of year perfect for camping and outdoor activities. With Memorial Day weekend here, Cal Fire, which is California’s firedepartment and resource-management agency, has issued a reminder to all Californians about the increased fire danger this year and is asking everyone to be extra careful outdoors. “Holiday weekends are a great time for friends and families to go out and enjoy the outdoors, but we must all remain aware of the fire danger and the risks posed in the outdoors,” said Chief Ken Pimlott, director of Cal Fire. “We urge safety and preparedness when in wildland areas. California’s extremely dry conditions are primed for wildfires, and it takes diligence from everyone to avoid sparking a fire.” With one of the driest winters on

record, officials have already seen a drastic increase in fires. In an average year, by late May, Cal Fire responds to approximately 850 wildfires. Already this year, the agency has responded to nearly 1,600 wildfires– up 50 percent from last year at this time, when there were just under 1,050 wildfires. Cal Fire has provided the following safety tips for Memorial Day weekend:

Camping • Obtain a campfire permit • Check for local fire restrictions • Clear away grass, leaves and other debris within a 10-foot perimeter of any campfire • Have a responsible person in attendance at all times • Ensure all campfires are completely extinguished before leaving • When barbequing, never leave the grill unattended

From Memorial Day to Labor Day, Long Beach offers hundreds of free or low-cost cultural programs, sports activities and special events throughout the city through 100 Days of Summer, a partnership between the City of Long Beach Parks, Recreation & Marine and the Long Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau. “100 Days of Summer is your complete guide to summer fun here in Long Beach,” said Mayor Bob Foster. “We have more than 800 events, including movies, music, sports, camps and classes, so you will have plenty of fun and exciting activities to keep you and your family entertained.” 100 Days of Summer will kick off on Friday, May 24 with a performance by

Southern California cover band The Basix. The band covers the likes of Earth Wind and Fire, the Rolling Stones and The Doobie Brothers, the Bee Gees, Donna Summer, KC and the Sunshine Band, No Doubt, Maroon 5 and Justin Timberlake. The event will take place at Marina Vista Park, on Appian Way between Second and Colorado streets, beginning at 5pm with bouncers, face-painting, caricaturists and balloon artists– leading up to the Basix performance at 6pm. Admission is free. Concertgoers are encouraged to bring blankets, chairs and picnic dinners. Several food trucks will also be available. The 100 Days of Summer campaign encourages residents to “stay and play” in

portion of the post’s membership is blind, but, with ever increasing cuts to veterans benefits, American Legion posts are relying more on the generosity of others. To make a donation, mail a check payable to “American Legion #266” to: P.O. Box 606, Westminster, CA 92684.

Cal Fire shares tips for safety this holiday weekend Source: American Legion

In the water With temperatures up, California’s water ways are running high as remaining snow melts. Many take advantage of cooling off in local rivers, but this fun outdoor activity does come with risks. Drownings claim adults and children alike, and Memorial Day Weekend tends to see a spike in drownings. Under local agreements, Cal Fire responds to hundreds of water rescues across the state each year, and even the strongest of swimmers can be caught off guard by strong currents or cold water. • Always wear a life jacket • Children should always be supervised by a responsible adult • Never swim alone • Drinking and swimming is just as dangerous as drinking and driving. For more ways to be safe during Memorial Day, visit fire.ca.gov .

City of LB’s ‘100 Days of Summer’ series to kick off on Memorial Day

Long Beach. The website 100daysofsummer.org is a one-stop information source for detailed suggestions of summer activities in Long Beach every day from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The website is full of program listings for free concerts and movies, Long Beach Sea Festival events, the El Dorado Nature Center, Rancho Los Cerritos and Rancho Los Alamitos historic sites, and ideas for spontaneous fun like biking, golf, tennis, kayaking, swimming, and free drop-in youth and teen programs, and much more. For more information, call (562) 5703150. Source: City of LB

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

7

Flag Manufacturers Association of America provides suggestions for Memorial Day flag displays

The Flag Manufacturers Association of America (FMAA) sent out a press release this week to encourage Americans to display the Stars and Stripes in observance of Memorial Day on Monday, May 27. “Flying the American flag would not only be an expression of gratitude and respect for those who paid the ultimate price for our freedoms, but also show support for the men and women who are currently fighting to keep our country safe,” reads the press release. FMAA has suggestions for ways U.S. citizens can observe Memorial Day: • Fly the U.S. flag at half-staff until noon. For flags displayed on a short staff or for indoor flags that cannot be lowered to half-staff, tie a black bow above the full-staffed flag. • Fly the “POW/MIA” flag as well. • Visit cemeteries and place flags or flowers on the graves of fallen heroes. • Visit memorials and take part in services sponsored by veterans. • Participate in a “National Moment of Remembrance” at 3pm. Take a few moments to reflect on the true meaning of the day and be mindful of the sacrifices of others in defense of our nation. • Make a pledge to aid those families affected by fallen heroes and to aid disabled veterans. The correct procedure for displaying the flag at half-staff is to raise the flag to the top of the pole briskly, pause for a moment, and then slowly bring it down to where the top of the flag is at a position approximately halfway between the top and bottom of the pole. At noon, the flag should be raised quickly to the top of the flag pole. At the end of the day, the flag should be lowered slowly and ceremoniously for the day. With Memorial Day, Flag Day (June 14), and Independence Day all within a few short weeks of each other, summer is prime time for flying flags, according to the FMAA. The FMAA also encourages all citizens to be sure it truly is an American-made flag they are displaying. U.S. law requires every flag be labeled with its “country of origin.” Those designated “made in the USA” may be true to their name, however, only those bearing the FMAA Certification seal are guaranteed to adhere to the standards and continued compliance as monitored by a professional association and its domestic members. For more information on the Flag Manufacturers Association of America, visit fmaa-usa.com . Source: FMAA


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8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE FOR THOSE THAT MEOW, BARK AND HISS City of SH to host annual K-9 event for pets and their people The City of Signal Hill Community Services Department will host its annual “Hounds on the Hill” in Signal Hill Park, 2175 Cherry Ave. on Saturday, June 1 from 11am to 2pm. The event will feature vendor booths, pet vaccinations, activities for children, music, demonstrations and more. The goal of the pet-friendly event is to raise awareness about responsible pet ownership, including current laws regarding pets. It will feature more than 15 vendors, including Long Beach Animal Care Services, Friends of Long Beach Animals, Long Beach Animal Hospital, Pet Food Warehouse, Bark! Bark! Daycare & Grooming, Go Fetch, P.J.’s Pet Café, Fastfriends Greyhound Adoption, The Pet Post, Pawsitively for Dogs, Diggity Dawg, Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce, F.O.O.D. for Pets, Pet Sit Pros and Enchanted Portraits. For more information, call (562) 989-7330.

Source: City of SH

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up to greet her handler, Officer Ernie Wolosewicz. Wolosewicz currently cares for Kasia and two other K-9s, including one that’s been retired. “All the dogs that I have now have saved my life,” Wolosewicz said Monday. “Had they not been there, I probably wouldn’t be here.” He remembered one occasion when another dog died in the line of duty and saved his life and the life of another handler during a SWAT deployment. “So we don’t like to see it happen,” Wolosewicz said, adding that these dogs are there so he and the other officers can come home to their family. An officer who has served with the Long Beach Police Department for about 20 years, Wolosewicz also trains dogs on the K-9 unit to sniff out explosives and narcotics. He evaluates the dogs regularly and can speak to the rigorous training that both dogs and handlers must complete. Schipske praised the members in the department and the Long Beach K-9 Officers Association, which raises money to offset the costs of the dogs. “This is a labor of love,” Schipske said during the presentation, adding that the men and women behind the program even care for their dogs in their home. The association also plays a large part in the dogs’ care in coordination with the City and the officers. The officers who serve on the K-9 unit have to show a special amount of dedication that takes up both time and a considerable amount of money if they want to be K-9 handlers. Daniel Kachel serves as the president of the Long Beach K9 Officers Association. He said that officers must commit to the unit for

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Attendees of the May 20 Open Up Long Beach event view markers at the memorial park located near the LBPOA Park, where dogs who have served on the K9 unit have a final resting place.

five years and pay $3,000 out of their own pocket to purchase their first dog. The association covers the balance of the cost to purchase that first dog since they are not cheap. The association recently purchased one dog for $12,000. The military has a huge demand for dogs to be deployed overseas, and the costs were driven up,

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according to Wolosewicz. In addition to the costs of care, the dogs are outfitted with special equipment: bulletproof vests and even video cameras. According to Kachel, the association pays for replacement dogs. The City of Long Beach covers the costs of the dog while they are on duty. The association pays for the needs of the dogs when they are off duty. This includes the cost of medical care, food and even the costs to cremate the dogs and bury the ashes in the memorial cemetery in the police academy, according to Kachel. The K-9 unit has only about eight dogs at this time. Schipske said that while there have been budget cuts to the police department for the past few years, the K-9 unit was not affected. She said that she looked forward to this upcoming budget cycle, for which she didn’t anticipate that the City would have to deliver bad news to the police department. The councilmember explained that since the City’s redevelopment program has been dissolved, the City is seeing an influx of $26 million because property-tax money that had previously gone to the redevelopment agency will now stay in the general fund. Schipske said that the City is also enjoying additional oil-revenue money and that the City will be able to restore necessary services that improve residents’ quality of life. Kasia sniffed the ground as Wolosewicz kept her at a safe distance from the kids and adults who beamed at her from their perch at the park’s picnic tables. Then Wolosewicz apologized to the crowd that they had to leave. He and his furry warriors had been called to duty. ß

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MAY 24, 2013

FOR THOSE THAT MEOW, BARK AND HISS LB animal shelters see jump in pet adoptions, but homes still needed Sean Belk Staff Writer

Animal shelters in Long Beach continue to be inundated with pets that have been dropped off or abandoned by their owners because of economic hardships, such as the loss of a job, a foreclosure or simply not being able take care of an animal anymore. The good news is, other pet owners have heeded the call and are more willing to open up their homes– and their hearts– to an extra dog, cat or rabbit in the last year, a trend that has occurred across the country. “Although more animals are being turned in and abandoned, people are responding to this problem, and we are all seeing an increase in adoption rates,” said Madeline Bernstein, president of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles (SPCALA). “It’s kind of an interesting trend. There’s more coming in but more going out. Overall, the percentage is probably equalized to some extent.” SPCALA, a nonprofit organization that’s been in existence for 126 years, partners with the Long Beach Animal Care Services (ACS) Department and takes in the majority of animals that are brought into the pound, providing shelter and pet-adoption services, in addition to a multitude of other programs, through a public-private partnership. Next door, ACS provides animalcontrol, field operations, investigation, kennel-care and various other services

for Long Beach and four contract cities: Cerritos, Seal Beach, Signal Hill and Los Alamitos. The P.D. Pitchford Companion Animal Village & Education Center located at 7700 E. Spring St. in El Dorado Park houses SPCALA’s adoption center in addition to ACS facilities. Ted Stevens, ACS manager, said last year the city department took in a total of 11,653 live animals. More than 9,500 of those animals were dogs and cats, and about 2,000 were wild animals. In the last four months, the number of pet adoptions from ACS alone, however, has increased, Stevens said. From January through April there were 152 rescues and adoptions of dogs, while last year during the same time period there were 122, he said. For cats, there were 58 rescues and adoptions during the last four months in 2013, while there were 29 during the same time in 2012, representing an almost 50-percent increase. In addition, ACS saw a 9-percent increase in cat adoptions last year over 2011, accounting for the highest number of cat adoptions in 24 years, according to the department’s 2012 year-in-review. A big push for adoptions is expected to be this year’s Pet Adoption Day, which will take place June 8 at the village campus and is being hosted by the Heidi & Frank Show on KLOS 95.5 FM radio. The daylong, annual event will include booths, venders, music and pet-food samples.

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Ana Bustilloz, spokesperson for SPCALA, said the event is expected to draw about 200 pet adoptions, adding that it is “kitten season.” She added that SPCALA found homes for about 3,700 animals last year, which was an increase of a few hundred over the prior year. With help from a pool of more than 500 volunteers and 70 employees, SPCALA provides programs for shelter, law-enforcement, domestic-violence, at-risk-youth, court-appointed juvenile sentencing, disaster response and animal assisted therapy.

see PETS page 17

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

9

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Bruno jumps over a hurdle as part of the agility course provided by the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles at the P.D. Pitchford Companion Animal Village & Education Center at El Dorado Park.


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10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

MAY 24, 2013


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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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COMMUNITY

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Nutrition

Think before you shake: the sodium saga continues Carol Berg Sloan RD Columnist

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Back in 2011 when the 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines came out, health professionals, especially registered dietitians were shocked by the “51 and older” population recommendation for sodium intake. It said: Reduce daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) and further reduce intake to 1,500 mg among persons who are 51 and older and those of any age who are African-American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. The 1,500 mg recommendation applies to about half of the U.S. population, including children, and the majority of adults.

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My colleagues and I knew that such a recommendation would be impossible to instill in older clients and actually pondered why such a drop was recommended, realizing that statistics do show that the average American consumes about 3400 milligrams a day (about 1½ teaspoons of salt). The Dietary Guidelines are based on scientific evidence (science has been done to show proof) but now the Institute of Medicine (part of the National Academy of Sciences and another government body giving dietary recommendations) suggests such a low level could be harmful. They are now stating a more realistic amount of 2,300 milligrams per day. For reference, a teaspoon of table salt (sodium chloride) has 2,000 milligrams of sodium. A one-ounce bag of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos© has 250 milligrams. An apple contains two

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milligrams, and a one-ounce piece of dark chocolate has 5 milligrams. Research shows that most of us get our sodium from processed foods, eating out and fast food. If sodium is an issue for you for medical reasons, then by all means reduce your intake if high. Generally speaking, we should all be aware of how much is in the foods we eat. If you are over the 2,300-milligram mark, maybe it’s time to pay attention to your savory side. One easy way to cut back is by cooking at home. Try this “hot weather” salad (with 371 milligrams of sodium for an entire meal) courtesy of Eating Well© magazine.

Chicken & Fruit Salad Chicken, melon, walnuts and feta top mixed salad greens for a refreshing summer salad. Use your favorite summer fruit in place of the melon if you wish. (Four servings)

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MAY 24, 2013

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So far this year, north Long Beach alone saw a 29.6-percent drop in violent crime over the same time period in 2012, while property crime is up by 2.3 percent, said North Patrol Division Police Commander Robert Luman, who provided statistics during the meeting. Although there was a 700-percent increase in shootings at the beginning of the year, the number of shootings so far this year has fallen relatively flat compared to last year, he said. In January, the Long Beach Police Department reported in its year-end report that Long Beach was at a 40year low for violent crime in 2012, though property crime had jumped by 10 percent. That reduction in violent crime, however, has come despite cashstrapped times in which the City has slashed its police force and cut back on after-school programs and recreational activities for children. At the same time, Long Beach and other cities across California have seen an influx of criminals being let out of jail early because of the State’s “realignment” legislation. “If anything, there should be a huge spike,” Haubert said. “The fact that it’s at a record low is good news, and I think it’s a testament of how the [gang] injunctions are being used in part. But it’s also, I think, due to the fact that we’re working smarter now… We need to continue on this path.” Though the Long Beach city prosecutor’s office handles an average of about 14,000 cases per year, Haubert said one of his main objectives after being elected in 2010 was to go after gangs in particular. He said the Federal Bureau of Investigation states that 48 percent of all violent crimes committed nationwide are gangrelated, and in some communities the percentage of violent crimes attributed to gangs can be up to 90 percent. Long Beach currently has various gang injunctions throughout the city in which an established gang in a particular neighborhood or area is sued by the City of Long Beach and is served a court order as an unincorporated association. Under the injunction, affiliated gang members in the bounded gang “territories” are ordered to follow certain rules, such as not being allowed to congregate with each other in parks or public places and not being allowed out past their injunction-ordered curfew. If gang members break the injunction order, they could be subject to arrests. Ultimately, however, the injunctions prevent other crimes by allowing police officers to more easily identify known gang members, who are often stopped and found to be in possession of drugs, guns and even weapons that have been used in murders. Within the last few years, many gangs have been moving their organizations out of the city and moving others in as a way to bypass the injunctions, Haubert said. As a way to crack down, the Long Beach city prosecutor’s office has become the first to target a prison gang known as the Mexican Mafia by filing an injunction against its affiliate, the Sureño (“Southerner”) gang, which had been organizing Hispanic street gang members and criminal activities in north Long Beach and throughout Southern California, Haubert said. “These shot-callers were allowing different gangs to operate in other gangs’ territories… almost like pieces on a chess board, moving them around at will,” he said. “The organizational structure was being influenced here at the local level, and we decided we were going to be the first city to actually target the Mexican Mafia by adding the Sureño gang organization… Long Beach is a

leader in that respect.” Haubert said technological advancements, such as enabling officers to use a gang-injunction database from their vehicles, has helped the program become more efficient to do “more with less.” In fact, as of last year, there have been roughly eight times more gang-injunction arrests since 2009, increasing from 35 to 269 per year, he said. Haubert’s office has also established Operation Opt Out, which provides an opportunity for gang members to break out of the court order and, ultimately, the gang life. In order for that to happen, however, gang members are required to be enrolled in school or working full time, perform community service, completely disaffiliate with the gang and come forward with two community sponsors willing to vouch for them. “What happens is sometimes people grow up, and they get a family and get a job and you know what? They’re not involved in the gang life anymore,” Haubert said. “Not only are we creating an avenue to remove people from an injunction that helps them personally but it helps our program by showing that there’s a way out of the injunction. It’s the carrot and the stick. There’s hope at the end of this. If you don’t want to gang bang anymore there’s a way off the injunction. We could help you if you want to do that.” Another way to stop gang violence is to discourage children from joining a gang in the first place. Haubert said gangs in Long Beach recruit children as young as 12 and 13 years old, many of whom skip school. The city prosecutor’s office, however, has implemented a truancy program in partnership with the Long Beach Unified School District to prosecute parents who don’t force their children to attend school. “When school’s in session [gangs are] finding them on the streets,” he said. “They’re easy targets. They’re prey. They’re sitting targets for the gangs to come up and say, ‘Hey, you want to do this? You want to sell this? Just by getting kids to school every single day and having them stay in school, not only is it good for the schools… because they get money … it’s harder for the gangs to recruit kids who are in school.” Haubert said about 75 percent of those in state prison are school dropouts, which shows that statistically those dropouts have a higher chance of becoming involved in criminal activity or drugs. He said the number of dropped school days is cut in half once the children and their parents come to the city prosecutor’s office. Haubert added, however, that he wants to continue to expand the truancy and opt-out programs, in addition to allowing low-level offenders to participate in community service as a way to resolve convictions instead of taking up court time. Still, Councilmember Austin noted that the LBUSD has had to cut summer school this year due to budget cuts and has also chopped its truancy program. This is why, he said, it’s imperative for the City to allocate more funds ($100,000 per council district from oil revenue) this year toward parks and recreation programs for atrisk youth. For the first time in many years, the 8th and 9th district council offices are organizing a new midnight basketball program, aimed at at-risk teenage girls and boys to help them stay safe and productive during the summer, in addition to other programming at Houghton Park and Scherer Park in north Long Beach this year. “We’re really putting a lot of emphasis on making our streets, our parks and our communities safer,” Austin said. “Unintended consequences actually happen… I can guarantee you I will be working to collaborate more with our school district and paying a lot more attention to the decisions made at the school-district level.” ß

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NEWS

Our Our C Control ontrol # CN885188.DOC

P.O. P.O. Box Box 60859 60859 Contact Contact L Legal egal Ad Advertising vertising C00al-Net L egal A dvertising Our Our C Control ontrol # CN88518 Los Los Angeles, Angeles, Ca 9 90060 60 Ref. Ref. # P P.O. .O. Box Box 60859 60859 Pub. Contact Con Legal Adve ve Pub. Paper Paper S Signal ignta alctT Tribune ribune (3 (345) 4L 5e ) gal Ad Los L os A Angeles, ngeles, Ca 9 90060 0 0 6 0 Ref. Ref . # Run Dates Dates M May ay 2 24,31, 4,31, 2 2013 013 Pub. P uT .1 Paper P0a,p2 e0r 13 a Signal ig8naA lM T Trib rib SIGNAL Phone: (21 46-0033 Phone: (213) 346-0033 Printed Printed M May abyRIBUNE 10, 2013 att 10:48 10S :4 AM Run Dates M May ay 2 24,31, 4,31, FAX: (213) Page Page (21 687-3886 7-3886 FAX: 1 of 1Dates Ph one: (21 46-0033 Phone: (213) 346-0033 Printed Printed M May ay 1 10, 0, 2 20 0 TST4360 017-014 (21 7 38 86 FAX : FAX: (213) 687-3886 Page Pa g e 1 of 1 PUBliCATioN N O T I C E O F D I V INoTiCE D E D PU B L IoF C A TDiViDED ION $2,132.92 4968 $2,132.92

13

Made pursuant to Section Section 3381, Revenue Revenue and Made pursuant to Section 3381, Taxation Code

WISE,ALFRED JR TR AL FRED WISE WISE JR T RUST AIN: 7207 WISE,ALFRED ALFRED TRUST 7207-Revenue and Taxation Code 017-015

Pursuant to Sections WISE,ALFRED ALFRED TRUST 7207-Sections 3381 through through 3385, 3385, Revenue Re venue and Taxation WIS E,ALFRED JR TR AL FRED WISE WISE JR T RUST AIN: 7207 Pursuant 3381 through 3385, Revenue andto Taxation Code, ofE,Power TaxMade pursuant Section 3381, Revenuethe TRUST AIN: 7207 Section Revenue and Notice WIS ALFRED to AL FRED WISE WISE JR TRUST WISE,ALFRED JR Sell TR ALFRED Code, to the Sections Notice of Power Notice to Sell Tax-Defaulted in and 017-017 Sell Tax-Default ed Property Taxation Code 017-015 and distributed osProperty Angeles County, for L Los Angeles State of Los California, has been divided 4970 $2,132.92 Couin nty, Statefor California, divided State $2, 132.92 Defaulted and Angeles County, of California, has been divided $2, 132. 92 4969 $2,132.92 and distributed to various WISE,ALFRED 7207TRUST AIN: 7207various newspapers newspapers of general general circulation WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED ALFRED WISE WISE JR TRUST to various general circulation published A portion of the appears in to Sections 3381 3385, Revenue WISE,ALFRED JR TR AL ALFRED TRUST Sections through017-018 33in 85,the Re vCounty. enue and Taxation WIS E,ALlist FRED FRED WISE WISE JR T RUST AIN: 7207 lished newspapers in the County. A of published portion ofPursuant the list appears in each ofthrough Notice of Power to Sell Code, the Notice in and 017-017 Tax Sell Tax-Defaulted -Default ed Property such newsp apers. newspapers. 4971 $2,132.92 $2,132. 92 of such newspapers. each for L os Angeles Angeles County, Los 4970 $2,132.92 County, State State of California, California, has been divided divided $2,132.92 $2,132.92 4969 $2,132.92 N O T I C E O F D I V I D E D PU B L I C A T I O N

017-014 $2,132.92 4968 $2,132.92

RUST AIN: 7207 WISE,ALFRED ALFRED TRUST 7207-WISE,ALFRED JR TR AL FRED WISE WISE JR T WISE,ALFRED ALFRED TRUST RUST AIN: 7207 vXarious newspapers newspapers general circulation WISE,ALFRED JR TR AL FRED WISE WISE JR T N O T I C E O F I M P E N D I N G P O and W E Rdistributed 017-019of general T O S E L L toT Avarious published the County. A portion 4972 of the $2,132.92 list132. appears 017-018 D E F AOF U L T EIMPENDING D PR O P Elished R T Y inPOWER $2, 92 in each of PROPERTY NOTICE TO SELL TAX-DEFAULTED newsp such apers. newspapers. 4971 $2,132.92 92 $2, 132. Made pursuant to Section RUST AIN: 7207 WISE,ALFRED ALFRED TRUST 7207-Section 3361, 3361, Revenue Revenue and Taxation Code WISE,ALFRED JR TR AL FRED WISE WISE JR T WISE,ALFRED TRUST WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED ALFRED WISE WISE JR T RUST AIN: 7207 Made pursuant to Section 3361, Revenue and Taxation Code 017-020 O T sI Cand E Oassessments F I Msm W E R$2,132.92 S E92 L L T A X017-019 P Eents N D I N G P O4973 TO Notice is her eby given given that real property hereby propertyNtaxes taxe asses $2, 132. D Efive F AeUorL T E D PR O PE,EAL R TFRE Y D JR TR ALFRED $2,132.92 $2, 132. on the parcels described below will have RUS T 92 WISE,ALFRED TRUST AIN: 7207 7207-have been been defaulted fiv WIS ALFRED WISE WIS4972 E JR T Made pursuant Section 3361, Code JR TR ALFRED TRUST RUST AIN: 7207 to Section 336assessments 1, Revenue Rev enue and Taxation WIS E,ALFREDbelow AL FRED WISE WISE JR T Notice hereby that ofreal property taxes and on the parcelsWISE,ALFRED described will m oreisyears, or, given in the case more nonresidential 017-021 nonresid ential commercial co mm ercial 017-020 proper ty, defaulted property, property on which aor nuisance abatement lien in has beencase of 4974 $3,262.05 abyears, atement or, hasthe $3,262.05 haverecord been five more nonresidential property, property Notice her eby gproviding is efit hereby that taxes assessments iven propert taxe s and asses mcommercial ents $2, 132. ed or that can serve recorded by given 7207T$2,132.92 RUS T 92 WISE,ALFRED g real property TRsALFRED AIN: 7207E JR TRUST serve the public publ ic benefit ben pro vidin WISE,yAL FRE D JR AL FRED WISE WIS4973 the parcels described below will have defaulted five or public WISE,ALFRED JRproviding TR ALFRED TRUST AIN: 7207 havthat e been beencan fivethe WISbenefit E,ALFREDby ALFRED WISE WISE JR TRUST on which ag nuisance abatement lien has recorded or serve housin or serv ices directly housing services related toonlow-income persons when 017-048 low -inc ome been more years, or, in thebycase of 4975 nonresidential 017-021 nonresid ential commercial three or more more years have a ore request has been made $3,604.00 have elapsed and m $3,604. 00 commercial housing or services directly related to low-income persons when three or more years have elapsed and ty, property property, on which has been ab ate ment hasALFRED $3, 262. a city, county, city and county, or proper nonprofit organization that a nuisance 7207T$3,262.05 RUS T 05 WISE,ALFRED organization JR TR AIN: 7207E JR TRUST WISE,abatement AL FRE D lien AL FRED WISE WIS4974 record edcounty, recorded or s that can serve public benefit by providing WISE,ALFRED TRUST RUST AIN: 7207 ser ve the public or benefit providin g WISE,AL FREproperty D JR TR ALFRED ALwill FRED WISE WISE JR T 017-051 will become to the Collector's power to sell. propertyhas becom e subject Collector' been made byTax ahousin city, city and county, nonprofit organization that a request ices directly related 4976 g or serv housing services to low-income persons when 017-048 low-$3,604.00 inc604. ome00 $3, become subject to the Tax Collector's power to sell. threetoorthe m years have and a E, request has made by D WISE $3,604.00 have elapsed $3, 604. RUS T 00 AIN: 7207 WIS ALFRE D been AL FRE WIS4975 E JR T Tax Collector's The parcels listed will become become subject tmore heore Collector 's WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED TRUST 7207-a a. city, city of andlaw. county, or nonprofit organization WISE,ALFRED TRUST RUST AIN: 7207 organization that WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED ALFRED WISE WISE JR T July a.m., ly 1, 2013, power to sell on Ju 2013, at 12:01 m., by bcounty, y operation 017-052 will the become to sell. 017-051 becom e subject Collector' s power $79,735. 99 arise unless property is to the Tax The Tax Collector's Collector's power power to sell willproperty unless property 4982Collector's $79,735.99 The parcels listed will become subject to the Tax Collector's power to sell on July 1, 2013, at 12:01 a.m., $3, 604. 00 4976 $3,604.00 TUS:1140 E MOR A,JOSE S AND SANT MARIA D SI either redeemed redeemed or made made subject to an installment installment plan of MORA,JOSE SANTILLAN,MARIA SITUS:1140 RUST AIN: 7207 WISE,343 AL3FRE D JR TR AL FRED WISE listed will WISE,ALFRED ALFRED parcels bec ome subject the Collector 's C 907557211 -025WILL Oto W the ST Tax SIGNCollector's AL Hproperty ILL A 90755-3433 90755 redemption as provided by The law prior 5:00 p.m., on re demptionofinitiated provTax ided Collector's prio r topower p. m., become WILLOW ST SIGNAL HILL CA AIN: 7211-025by operation law. The sell will arise the is either redeemed or WISE JR TTRUST July a.m., of law. 017-052 power sell on Ju ly 1,to2013, 2013 m., by bunless y operation 032 a. June 28, 2013 2013.. The rig right terminates on , at 12:01 ht to an installment installm enttoplan term inates $79, 735. 99 Tax Collector's power to sell will arise unless the property is 4982 $79,735.99 The C ollector ' s powe r un less pr operty made subject to an installment plan of redemption initiated as provided by law prior to 5:00 p.m., on PROPERTY T AX DEF AULTED IN YE AR 22008 008 FOR T AXES, June 28, 2013, 2013, and after that date the entire entire balance balance due must must be TAX DEFAULTED YEAR TAXES, MOR A,JOSE S AND TUS:1140 MARIA D SI redeemed toESSMENT, an installment planOTHER of MORA,JOSE SANTILLAN,MARIA SITUS:1140 eitherat public redeemauction. ed or made made subjectASS installmeAND nt D CH ARGE ent sale S that FOR F ISCSANT AL to prevent of theto property paid in full prevThe ASSESSMENT, CHARGES FISCAL June 28, 2013. right an installment terminates on and after date the WILL OW ST ST SIGNAL SIGN AL HILL H ILL C A 90755-3433 90755 90755-3433 AIN: 7211-025 7211-025 redemption as provided law prior 5:0028, p.m., WILLOW CA re dem ption initiatedplan pro vided by prio r-June p.m.2013, , on YEA R 2007-2008 2007 2to008 YEAR 2013. right to an installment plan terminates on 032 June 28, 2013 . The rig ht installm ent term inates entire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale of the property at public auction. survives the property becoming becoming subject $9,676.22 The right of redemption redemption survives 4980 $9,676.22 A X AULTED IN YE AR 22008 008 FOR T AXE 2013, that date the entire be S:2209 PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED YEAR TAXE June entiER, re balance bKATHER alance due must must ONG terminates p.m,. and MY RTLET A VEDEF L GL OV C SITU to the power to sell, but it terminates at 28, 5:002013 p.m. on after the last GLOVER,KATHERINE SITUS:2209 MYRTLE AVE LONG D OTHER CH ARGES FOR F ISCA ASS-026 ESSMENT, AND full to prevent public auction. ASSESSMENT, CHARGES FISCA prev property BEA CHatCA 90806 -4437 AIN: 7211 -014business day before actual sale of paid the inproperty by ent thesale Taxof the property BEACH 90806-4437 7211-014-026 2007 YEA R 2 008 YEAR 2007-2008 of redemption survives the property becoming subject to the power to sell, but it terminates at The right $807.44 Collector. 4981 $807.44 survives the becomin g subject $9,676. 22 becoming The right of redemption redemption survives L EMON A VE S TRproperty AUGHTER, W ILLIA M by TU4980 STax :2325$9,676.22 STRAUGHTER,WILLIAM E SI SITUS:2325 LEMON AVE 5:00 p.m. on the last business daytobefore actual sale ofH the property the Collector. RTLE A VE L ON terminates p.m . on GL OV02 ER, KATHER SITUS:2209 MY sell, of butan it terminates p.m. the -last C SITUS:2209 MYRTLE AVE LON to the concerning redemption redemption 72111-033 AL5:00 ILL C A 90755 3419 AI N:GLOVER,KATHERINE 7211 SI at All information or power the initiation A ll infor mation concerning SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-3419 AIN: 7211-021-033 actual sale of property BEACH CA 90806-4437 90806-4437 AIN: 7211 -014--026 day upon the $1,487.72 property BEACH 7211-014-026 business before redemption will be furnished, $1, 487.72 by the Tax installment furnished, request, installment plan of redemption 4983 $807.E44 4981 $807.44 EVA,ANGI LINE AND Los A ngeles Collector. County Treasurer and Tax A LO,JOHN G AND V Angeles by Mark J. Saladino, Los APELO,JOHN VILLANUEVA,ANGIELINE All information redemption ofPEan plan of redemption be furLEMON A V SATR W ILLIA M E SITUS:2325 SITUS:2325 LEMON STRAUGHTER,WILLIAM AV CALIC Ainstallment ,VIRGINIA SI TU S:2296 G VIAUGHTER, OTA A VEwill UN IT 12 Floor, or Losthe Aninitiation geles, Collector, North Hill Street, First Floor, Los Angeles, Col lector, 225 concerning CALICA,VIRGINIA SITUS:2296 GAVIOTA AVE UNIT AL ILL C A 90755 -3419 AI N: 7211 7211021-033 g redemption redemSIGNAL SI7215 All information or H the initiation of-36 an HILL CA 90755-3419 AIN: 7211-021-033 A ll Saladino, infor mation concerning concernin SIption GN AL ILL C A 90755 62 AI N:SIGNAL 7215007H -073 California Californ ia 90012. HILL CA 90755-3662 AIN: 7215-007-073 nished, upon request, by Mark J. Los Angeles County Treasurer and Tax Collector, 225 North $1, 487. 7 2 redemption will4984 furnis hed, installment be furnished, upon request, 4983 $1,487.72 in stallment plan of redemption $14,092.21 $14,092.21 Hill Street, First Floor, Los Angeles, 90012. EVA,ANGIELINE AN A:2 PE LO,JOHN G AND L os A ngeles County Mark Los Angeles Treasurer Tax APELO,JOHN VILLANUEVA,ANGIELINE 081 S T LEY MILL ER,California CH ARLES and JJR R SITUS:2081 SITUS A VEV redeem, in in dollars cents, andbycents, is J. setSaladino, forth opposite The aamount mount to redeem, MILLER,CHARLES E STANLEY AVE CALIC A,5VI RGINIA SI TUS:2296 G AVIOTA A VE UN IT 1 FH loor, LA os90755 Angeles, Collector, Northtaxes, Hill Street,SIGNAL Los Angeles, SITUS:2296 GAVIOTA AVE UNIT Collector, -6017 AI 7216SI First 00 -018 ALFloor, ILL C N:CALICA,VIRGINIA 7216 amount includes all 225 all defaulted its parcel number. number. This amount HILL CA 90755-6017 AIN: 7216-005-018 SI GN AL H ILL C A 90755 36 62 AI N : 7215 7215007-073 California SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-3662 AIN: 7215-007-073 Californ ia 90012. $2,120.54 have accrued from the date of tax-default tax-default penalties, pen alties, and fees that have 4985 $2,120.54 The amount to 28, redeem, in dollars and cents, is set forth opposite parcel number. This amount $14, 092. 21 4984 $14,092.21 SA SI TUS:1991 THERE CHAMBER LAIN,JitsS COT AND 28 , 2013. date of June to the CHAMBERLAIN,J SCOT THERESA SITUS:1991 MILL ER,6011 CHARAIN: LES 77216R SITUS:2081 SITUS:2081 S V T LEY A redeem, in in dollars and cents, cents, setVE forth opposite MILLER,CHARLES E -JJR STANLEY AV The aamount mount to redeem, 90755JJUNIPERO Paccrued EROis A SI GN AL H ILL C A 90755 AVE SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-6011 includes all defaulted taxes, penalties, and fees that have from the date to216 the AL H ILL C A 90755 -6017 AI N: 7216 SIof tax-default 7216005-018 amount all defaulted This includes all taxes, SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-6017 AIN: 7216-005-018 its the parcel nu mber. 017-031 foregnumber. oin g is true foregoing andamount I certify, under penalty of perjury, that $2,120.54 hav e accrued tax-default penalties, fees that the date of tax-default 4985 $2,120.54 pen alties, anddate of have June 28, from 2013. correct. Dated this 2nd day of May, 2013. COT AND THERE CHAMBERLAIN,J S SA SI TUS:199 28, 2013. CHAMBERLAIN,J SCOT THERESA SITUS:199 to the date of June 28, 6011 AIN: 77216 J PERO A VE SI GNAL H ILL C A 90755 90755216 JUNIPERO AVE SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-6011 foreg oing is true under penalty of perjury, thatand the foregoing and this017-031 I certify, under penalty of perjury,I certify, that the foregoing is true correct. Dated 2nd day of May, 2013. correct. Dated this 2nd day of May, 2013. ALAD MA RK J. S MARK SALADINO AX CO LLECTOR TAX COLLECTOR TREASURER AND T COUNTY OF L OS A NGELES LOS ANGELES STATE CALIFORNIA S TATE OF CALI FORNIA

MARK J. ALAD MA RKSALADINO J. S MARK SALADINO T AXCOLLECTOR CO LLECTOR AND TAX COLLECTOR TREASURER M E XPL A N A T I O NAND P A R C E L N U M B E R I N G SYST ETREASURER TAX OS A NGELES LOS ANGELES COUNTY OF L OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY Sused TATEtoOF CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA Assessor's Number (AIN), (AIN), when STATE The A ssessor's IIdentification dentification Number describe Assessor' s map map book, boo de scribe property in this list, refers to the Assessor's STATE OFkI,NCALIFORNIA BER C E L N U Mand map the G SYST E M E X P L A N A T I O N block on the map, map, PifA applicable, aRpplicable, the m ap page, page, the block individual map page page or in the block. block. The indiv idual parcel on the map TheofA Assessor's Number ssessor 's numbering IIdentification dentificati Number (AIN), (AIN), when used to Assessor's maps further the parcel her explanation num bering on A ssessor's m aps and furt PARCEL property this list,SYSTEM refers to the EXPLANATION Assessor's deOffice, scribeNUMBERING Assessor's map map book, book, 500 West Assessor'sdescribe Wesin t Temple Te mple system are available available in the Assessor's the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, m ap pa g e, bloc k m ap, applicable, and the Street, Los Angeles, Angeles, California 90012. 90012. S treet, Room Room 225, Los individual individual parcel on the map map page page or in the block. block. The The Assessor's Identification Assessor's Number (AIN), when used to describenum property in this list, refers to the maps further sm apiss and furt bering ofssess thisor' notice situated in explanation of the parcel numbering is the subject subject A notice situate dher The real property property that is system available in the 500 West are available Assessor 's Office, West Temple Temple Assessor's map page, the onAssessor's the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on Angeles, State of California, described Angeles,the Californ ia, and isblock describ ed the Countymap of Losbook, Street, Room Room 225, Los Los Angeles, Angeles, California 90012. 90012. as follows: the map pageTAX or DEFAULTED in the block.N Street, The Assessor's maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering YEAR TAXES, AULTED IIN YE AR 22010 010 FOR T AXES, PROPERTY T AX DEF The real property that is the subject of this notice is situated propert y i s su bject notice situate d in 225, Los Angeles, Califorsystem are available in the Assessor's Office, 500 West Temple Street, Room ASSESSMENT, AND CHARGES FISCAL D OTHER CH ARGES FOR F ISCAL ASS ESSMENT, A the County of Los Angeles, California, described Angeles, State of Californ ia, and is describ ed YEAR YEA R 2009-2010 2009-2010 90012. nia as follows: 4965 $2,132.92 $2,132.92 PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED YEAR TAXES, AU-LTED IIN N YE AR 22010 010 FOR T AXES, X DEF WISE,ALFRED 7207WIS E,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED 7207 ALFRED WISE WIS E JR TRUST TRUST TAAIN: ASSESSMENT, AND CHARGES FISCAL D OTHER CH ARGES FOR F ISCAL ASSESSMENT, A 017-012 The real this notice is situated in the County of Los Angeles, State of CaliYEAR 2009-2010 YEAR of 2009 -2010 4966property $2,132.92 $2,132.92that is the subject $2, 132. 92 WISE,ALFRED WISE TRUST 7207WIS E,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED ALFRED W IS4965 E JR T$2,132.92 RUS Tand AIN:is 7207 fornia, described as follows: WISE,ALFRED ALFRED TRUST 7207-WISE,ALFRED JR TR AL FRED WISE WISE JR T RUST AIN: 7207 017-013 PROPERTY IN YEAR 2010 FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENT, AND OTHER CHARGES 4967 $2,132.92 $2,TAX 132.92 DEFAULTED017-012 $2,132.92 $2, 132. 92 WISE,ALFRED ALFRED TRUST AIN: 7207 7207--YEAR 2009-2010 FRED WISE WIS4966 E JRFOR T RUS TFISCAL WIS E,ALFRED JR TR AL WISE,ALFRED WISE 7207-WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED ALFRED W ISE JR TRUST TRUST AIN: 7207 4965 $2,132.92 017-013 4967 $2,132.92 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFREDWISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED 7207-017-012 JR TRUST AIN: 7207WIS E,AL FRE D JR TR ALFRED 7207 ALWISE FRED WISE WJR ISETRUST TRUSTAIN: -

4966 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-013 4967 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-014 4968 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-015 4969 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-017 4970 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-018 4971 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-019 4972 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-020 4973 $2,132.92 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-021 4974 $3,262.05 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-048 4975 $3,604.00 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-051 4976 $3,604.00 WISE,ALFRED JR TR ALFRED WISE JR TRUST AIN: 7207-017-052 4982 $79,735.99 MORA,JOSE S AND SANTILLAN,MARIA D SITUS:1140 E WILLOW ST SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-3433 AIN: 7211-025-032 PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED IN YEAR 2008 FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENT, AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007-2008 4980 $9,676.22 GLOVER,KATHERINE C SITUS:2209 MYRTLE AVE LONG BEACH CA 90806-4437 AIN: 7211-014026 4981 $807.44 STRAUGHTER,WILLIAM E SITUS:2325 LEMON AVE SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-3419 AIN: 7211-021033 4983 $1,487.72 APELO,JOHN G AND VILLANUEVA,ANGIELINE AND CALICA,VIRGINIA SITUS:2296 GAVIOTA AVE UNIT 12 SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-3662 AIN: 7215-007-073 4984 $14,092.21 MILLER,CHARLES E JR SITUS:2081 STANLEY AVE SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-6017 AIN: 7216-005-018 4985 $2,120.54 CHAMBERLAIN,J SCOT AND THERESA SITUS:1991 JUNIPERO AVE SIGNAL HILL CA 90755-6011 AIN: 7216-017-031 Cal-Net Legal Advertising Our Control # CNfilename885188.DOC P.O. Box 60859 Contact autho rLegal Advertising Los Angeles, Ca 90060 Ref. # subject Pub. Paper Signal Tribune (345) Run Dates May 24,31, 2013 Phone: (213) 346-0033 Printed May 10, 2013 10:48 AM FAX: (213) 687-3886


ST3451 - May 24 issue_Layout 1 5/24/13 12:00 PM Page 14

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CULTURE

MAY 24, 2013

Local theater offering high-school students free tickets In an effort to cultivate the next generation of theatergoers, International City Theatre (ICT) is offering high-school students free tickets to preview performances for the remainder of the 2013 season. “To ensure that younger audiences are exposed to the theater, we are making it easy and affordable with complimentary tickets to preview performances,” says ICT Artistic Director caryn desai [sic]. “We all know that a

well-rounded education includes an appreciation for the arts. But even more important, we want to help kids learn to connect on a human level– not through texting or emails, but people-to-people through theater, the most human art form.” This special year-round invitation is limited to high-school students, but it is not restricted to Long Beach and is open to any high-school student with a valid ID. Reservations are required, and students must present their ID at will call. Free tickets are available for high-school students on the following dates. Wednesday, June 5 and Thursday, June 6 at 8pm: Dead Man’s Cell Phone by Sarah Ruhl– a quirky comedy about our need to connect in a technologically obsessed society.

Wednesday, Aug. 21 and Thursday, Aug. 22 at 8pm: Red by John Logan– Tony Award winner for Best Play about radical artist Mark Rothko.

Wednesday, Oct. 9 and Thursday, Oct. 10 at 8pm: Don’t Dress for Dinner by Marc Camoletti, translated by Robin Hawdon– a fast-paced, mischievous comedy in the French tradition.

All performances take place at International City Theatre in the Long Beach Performing Arts Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd. For more information or to make a reservation, call Erik Garcia at (562) 495-4595, ext. 13 or email him at erik@ictlongbeach.org .

Source: ICT

!lay a Par" on the Mainstage

May 25-June 22 It’s hard to keep friends when your plant keeps eating them. Will Seymour stop this botanical carnivore bent on world domination? Remember the lesson: Don’t Feed the Plants

Helen does what society expects of her, however resistant she may feel. She marries her boss, has a baby with him and is driven to murder him. Inspired by the real life case of executed murderess Ruth Snyder.

May 4-June 1

In the Studio

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ST3451 - May 24 issue_Layout 1 5/24/13 12:00 PM Page 15

MAY 24, 2013

Inspired by 19th-century Japanese woodblock prints, artist often casts animals as protagonists

Brandy Soto Editorial Intern

You could say that art has always been in Moira Hahn’s life. Her father’s parents met each other in a landscape painting class, and their own daughters went on to become artists themselves. So, it is no surprise that Hahn would develop a creative streak from a young age. She says that she can’t remember a time in her life when she wasn’t drawing. “I’m told I drew a lot when I was 2 to 3 years old,” she recalls. “A visiting great-aunt remembered

“Maiko Rabbit” (2011), watercolor

Grandma Darling’s ANTIQUE MALL

WEEK-LONG

MEMORIAL DAY

STOREWIDE SALE!

May 20th–27th 10 to 50% OFF except sale or firm items

Architectural & Garden Center now open & renting spaces!

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North of PCH - Next to Panini’s

me doing that, not my immediate family– it must have been a constant ‘tic’ that they’d long since stopped noticing. I clearly remember drawing pictures for hours, years before I could read, write or ride a bike.” Hahn says she knew she wanted to pursue a life in art since she was 5 years old and she did just that. She earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in art, attended additional classes at various art schools and participated in a five-year apprenticeship with a Japanese artist. Her studies involved expansive traveling in the U.S., Japan and Europe. She creates bold, colorful drawings and prints often inspired by Asian and Western artwork. Artists that have influenced her work include, but are not limited to Shibata Zeshin, Daniel du Plessis, Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Barbara A. Thomason. “The works best recognized as mine, within the past decade, have stylistic roots in classical Japanese art history,” she says. “Those paintings resemble mid-19th century Japanese woodblock prints, and the protagonists are animal rather than human ‘actors.’ Many of the situations represented have more to do with 21st century social and political commentary in California than Kabuki plays in

CULTURE

Edo Period Japan. Issues such as global warming, predatory species (for example, pet cats vs. wild birds) and disappearing habitat for endangered wildlife are more likely to take center stage than love poetry by serene and elegant Imperial courtesans, or samurai war epics.” Hahn has experimented with several different mediums, but she says there is one medium of which she is especially fond. “I’ve painted in oil, acrylic and gouache, and worked in other media including sculpture, electronics, printmaking and mixed media,” she says. “But so far, I always come back to watercolor.” Because she uses watercolor, creating the pieces is often a tedious process for her. “There’s a lot of planning involved,” she explains. “Unlike with oil or acrylic painting, one cannot erase or make changes once the painting is underway. The technique and style are very specific, controlled and tightly rendered. So this work is far from ‘ad lib’ or freestyle, but rather, intensely and methodically planned.” Hahn enjoys hearing others’ interpretations of her art and says it is like “buried treasure.” “I love to eavesdrop anonymously on docent- or instructorled tours of my art in museums and colleges,” she confesses. “Sometimes very obvious ‘reads’ of the image under discussion eluded my consciousness while I made the art, but once I hear a comment, I instantly know that the viewer is right.” She remembers a time when a

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

“Under Water World” (2012), watercolor

college instructor had asked her students what they thought one of Hahn’s paintings meant. One male student said, “I don’t want to know what it means. It’s completely mysterious, I enjoy it as such, and hearing what the artist intended would ruin that pleasure.” Hahn says she agrees with his philosophy. “[My pieces] are not political cartoons or book illustrations, but fine art,” she says. “So my

15

wish is that each person’s interpretation is individual, personal and revelatory.” Hahn will be featured in the Mid-City Studio Tour in Long Beach on Saturday, June 1 and Sunday, June 2. She will share the studio space with her friend and “excellent fellow painter” Daniel du Plessis. M ORE I NFORMATION moirahahn.com/bio/index.html

Come start the 100 Days of Summe Summerr with a

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at Marine Stadium Appian ppian Way betwe between e Second St. & Colorado Ave A .

Call 570-3150 for more information.


ST3451 - May 24 issue_Layout 1 5/24/13 12:00 PM Page 16

16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4356 TSG No.: 7852235 TS No.: CA1300251489 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 7211-004-011 Property Address: 924 E VERNON ST SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/24/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU CONTACT A LAWYER. On SHOULD 06/06/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 05/31/2007, as Instrument No. 20071312499, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: JACK ROLAND MCCLANAHAN, A SINGLE PERSON, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 7211-004-011 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 924 E VERNON ST, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $288,523.50. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1300251489 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Title Insurance Company 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 FOR TRUSTEE'S INFORMATION PLEASE CALL SALE (916)939-0772 First American Title Insurance Company MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.NPP0216424 SIGNAL TRIBUNE 05/17/2013, 05/24/2013, 05/31/2013

TST4359 Trustee Sale No. : 20120159900612 Title Order No.: 1153934 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 01/12/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 01/27/2006 as Instrument No. 06 0203326 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: MICHAEL CARESS, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 06/17/2013 TIME OF SALE: 9:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2008 2010 2012 CHERRY AVE, SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA 90755 APN#: 7216-009-010 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said

PUBLIC NOTICES

Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $427,326.15. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120159900612. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: PRIORITY POSTING & PUBLISHING, INC. 17501 IRVINE BLVD., SUITE ONE TUSTIN, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www.priorityposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 05/17/2013 P1040602 5/24, 5/31, 06/07/2013 TST4355 / 2013 095600 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MANNY'S AUTO CARE, INC., 1441 E. Anaheim St., Wilmington, CA 90744. Registrant: MANNY'S AUTO CARE, INC., 1441 E. Anaheim St., Wilmington, CA 90744. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Manuel Medina Castillo, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on January 8, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 9, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013.

TST4354 / 2013 092701 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SQUARE ONE FINANCIAL SVCS, 5700 Ackerfield Ave. Apt. 246, Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: TYRONE GREGORY, 5700 Ackerfield Ave. Apt. 246, Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tyrone Gregory. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013.

TST4358 / 2013 094692 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HARBOR OCEAN SPA, 24815 Western Ave., Harbor City, CA 90717. Registrant: KEVIN A. MURRAY, 5062 Quail Cir., Huntington Beach, CA 92649. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kevin A. Murray. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on May 8, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 8, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 17, 24, 31, & June 7, 2013.

TST4357 / 2013 083504 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: NINA'S PIZZA, 2403 W. Cameron St., Long Beach, CA 90810. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on September 10, 2012, original File No. 2012181333, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: AGUSTINA MENDOZA DE CARRILLO, 2403 Cameron St., Long Beach, CA 90810. This business is con-

ducted by: an Individual. Signed: Agustina Mendoza De Carrillo. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on April 23, 2013. Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 17, 24, 31, & June 7, 2013.

TST4364 / 2013 105471 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LOCKDOWN BOARD SHOP, 4401 Atlantic Ave., 2nd Floor, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 420 Kush Clothing Inc., 4401 Atlantic Ave., 2nd Floor, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: A Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Eva Quintero, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4365 / 2013 105472 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: TRANCE ON ATLANTIC, 3846 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 1. SUSANNE LEE, 2. BRUCE LEE, 3945 California Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Susanne Lee. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013. TST4366 / 2013 105473 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: KAYMICHAEL HAIR DESIGN, 3505 Long Beach Blvd. Suite 2E, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: MICHAEL GORMLEY, 23371 Villena, Mission Viejo, CA 92692. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Gormley. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4367 / 2013 105474 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: COMSTOCK COMMERCIAL PLUMBING, 5574 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: COMSTOCK COMMERCIAL PLUMBING, INC., 5574 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Earl Comstock, CEO. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4368 / 2013 105475 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: NO1SPECIAL, 2201 E. Willow St., Ste. D #348, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: NANCY CERVANTES, 2810 Daisy Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Nancy Cervantes. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013. TST4363 / 2013 098637 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: SMARTER COOKIE, located at 2172 Eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on April 27, 2010, original File No. 2013 098636, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: HARVEY, JO ANN, 2172 Eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Jo Ann Harvey. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 13, 2013. Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4369 / 2013 xxxxxx FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PARLAY PRINCIPAL, 2286 E. Carson St. #217, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: RYAN SIMMONS, 2286 E. Carson St. #217, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ryan Simmons. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 17, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

MAY 24, 2013

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4362 NoTiCE oF A PUBliC HEARiNG

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, June 4, 2013, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the following: ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 13-02

AN AMENDMENT TO SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 20.52, ENTITLED “SITE PLAN DESIGN REVIEW,” TO INCLUDE: CONSTRUCTION TIME LIMITS BASED ON PROJECT SIZE AND PROJECT TYPE; PROVISIONS FOR EXTENSIONS; EXTENSION APPROVAL PROCESS INCLUDING A MAXIMUM OF 2 EXTENSIONS AND PUBLIC NOTIFICATION; AND ESTABLISHING FEES AND PENALTIES

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter.

If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. A NEGATIVE DECLARATION 05/03/13(2) has been prepared in conjunction with the subject project based on an initial study finding of no significant environmental impacts associated with the project. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Selena Alanis, Assistant Planner, at salanis@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7341.

Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code §65091(a)(4): May 24, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: May 24, 2013

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4370 NoTiCE oF oRDiNANCE ADoPTioN

Ordinance No. 2013-05-1453 was introduced by the City Council at their meeting of Tuesday, May 7, 2013, and adopted by the City Council at their meeting of May 21, 2013. A summary of the ordinance is as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING CHAPTER 9.08 OF THE SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING CONDUCT IN PUBLIC PLACES

AYES: NOES:

ABSENT:

The ordinance was adopted by the following vote:

Mayor Michael J. Noll, Vice Mayor Edward H.J. Wilson, Council Members Larry Forester, Tina L. Hansen, Lori Y. Woods None

ABSTAIN:

None

None

Pursuant to Signal Hill City Charter Section 315, this ordinance shall become effective 30 days from and after the date of its adoption. A certified copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the City Clerk’s Office. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on May 24, 2013. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and Reservoir Park on May 24, 2013.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4361 NoTiCE oF PUBliC HEARiNG

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, June 4, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to review: ORDINANCE AMENDMENT RELATED TO STORM WATER/URBAN RUNOFF AND LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 12.16 ENTITLED STORM WATER/URBAN RUNOFF, TO EXPAND THE APPLICABILITY OF THE EXISTING POLLUTANT SOURCE REDUCTION REQUIREMENTS BY IMPOSING RAINWATER LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID) STRATEGIES ON PROJECTS THAT REQUIRE BUILDING, GRADING, AND ENCROACHMENT PERMITS Applicant: City of Signal Hill

THIS PROJECT IS CATEGORICALLY EXEMPT from the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act pursuant to Sections 15307 and 15308 of Guidelines for implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (for activities that enhance or protect natural resources and enhance or protect the environment). The project is also exempt pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the California Administrative Code, Title 14 (for projects that will not have a significant adverse effect on the environment). ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions, or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing as described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearing.

THE FILE CONTAINING MATERIAL relevant to the proposed project may be inspected by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and on Friday until 4:30 p.m. in the Public Works Department located at City Hall.

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Public Works Department prior to or at the public hearing. Written comments may also be submitted at the public hearing. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Public Works Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Steve Myrter, P.E., Director of Public Works at smyrter@cityofsignalhill.org or calling (562) 989-7356. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper (Gov’t Code (§65091(a)(3)(1): May 24, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 May 24, 2013


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MAY 24, 2013

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The primary goal of SPCALA, however, is to prevent cruelty to animals through intervention, enforcement, education and advocacy, Bernstein said. “Through all of the things that we do, in some way we hope we will prevent animal cruelty either by changing future behavior or by intervening when it’s happening,” she said. Bernstein added that each city has specific requirements in regards to keeping animals as pets. In both Long Beach and Signal Hill, for instance, city code allows each household to have only four animals. Deborah Turner, outreach coordinator for the Friends of Long Beach Animals, who provides education to schools in Signal Hill and Long Beach, said it’s important to educate people about neutering or spaying their pets, particularly to manage the influx of stray cats. Currently any cats that are adopted from SPCALA are required to be kept inside. She added that cats are often seen as wild animals instead of pets. “We have a lot of problems to solve,” Turner said. “Education is a very big part of it.” ß

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18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

MAY 24, 2013

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MAY 24, 2013

Council

continued from page 1

convicted. A group that calls itself Coalition for Clean Affordable Water was named as the party responsible for the fliers mailed out during the last election cycle. City officials are currently investigating what individuals or entities helped finance the group. “These two fliers included misleading and inflammatory statements including that crime is up [and] our streets are unsafe to walk at night,” Noll said. “The flier accused the City Council of destroying property values and the moral fabric of our community.” Signal Hill City Manager Ken Farfsing told the Signal Tribune in a phone interview that only in the last two elections have interest groups tried to sway voters by sending out such mass mailers, some of which were printed on expensive, colored, hard-stock material. “It’s been a rather recent phenomenon,” he said. “It takes significant resources to do these types of fliers… That’s not an inexpensive proposition to do.” Farfsing said Aleshire is looking into the financial records of the groups through the state’s Fair Political Practices Commission at the request of the Council. However, he could not confirm any further information before the Signal Tribune’s deadline. “It takes a while for the records to get up to the State,” Farfsing said. “We’ll continue to do research and track it down.” The goal of drafting an ordinance is to proactively “shine a spotlight” on PACs, said Noll, who added that during the last two elections, “significant money from outside our community poured into Signal Hill” in an attempt to influence voters. “The Constitution provides every citizen with the right to freedom of speech, so I have no doubt that the interest groups will attempt to spread lies about Signal Hill in the future,” he said. “I also believe that our voters deserve the right to know the individuals that are supporting the smear tactics.” In 2011, the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters (LALCV) PAC sent out mailers that criticized incumbent Councilmember Larry Forester’s environmental record, showing a cartoon-figure of the councilmember with a sign that read, “I Protect Polluters.” LALCV has its own 25-member board of directors made up of “activists, advocates and professionals committed to protecting the environment and improving the quality of life for those who live and work in Los Angeles County,” according to the group’s website. The PAC endorses political candidates in L.A. County and its 88 cities. Signal Hill will be holding a special election on June 5, 2014 in which voters will decide the fate of the controversial initiative “Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote.” The statewide direct primary election will also be held in June next year. Earlier this year, proponents of the initiative successfully gathered enough signatures (871) to get the initiative on the ballot for a special election. The initiative, which would change the city charter if approved by voters, has several components, including requiring that voters approve all taxes, assessments and fees with a two-thirds majority.

Other City Council highlights: Wastewater service charges Prior to the Council meeting, the Los Angeles County Sanitation District No. 29 Board of Directors, which is governed by the Council, voted unanimously (5-0) to readopt its wastewater servicecharge report for Fiscal Year

2013-2014. A public hearing on the item was required for continued collection of the service charge on the tax roll of residential, commercial and small industrial dischargers. However, L.A. County Sanitation District staff recommended no increase in the service-charge rate for the upcoming fiscal year. In District No. 29, the current wastewater service charge rate per single-family household is $28.31 per month ($339.75 per year). “You would have been up for a [Proposition] 218 process this year, but, when we looked at the numbers, you’re in good shape going forward,” said Grace Chan, chief engineer and general manager for the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County. She confirmed that staff would look at a possible three-year rate increase next year. The last time the rate was increased was in Fiscal Year 2012-2013, when it was raised 1.8 percent.

Recognitions and proclamations During the Council meeting, Mayor Noll presented proclamations to the Signal Hill Community Development Department in recognition of National Building and Safety Month and to the Signal Hill Public Works Department in recognition of Public Works Week, which was from May 19 to 25. Noll and Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston recognized Gary Weinberger, Romeo Cantos and Judy Jacobus for their service as Signal Hill police volunteers. Cantos was not present. In addition, Noll presented a certificate of recognition to Signal Hill resident Hazel Wallace, who received the 33rd Senate District Outstanding Woman of Distinction Award. As director of the Long Beach Health and Human Services Department’s laboratory, Wallace was instrumental in implementing the first HIVscreening program in Long Beach. She has served on the boards of directors for AIDS Walk Long Beach and the health department, and she currently serves on the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District board.

Conduct in public places In a second-reading vote, the Council voted 5-0 to adopt an ordinance that amends the city charter regarding regulations for conduct in parks and other public places. The ordinance was introduced in a public hearing during the May 7 Council meeting. Signal Hill’s 10 city parks have become increasingly popular throughout the years due to their “unique designs, cleanliness and safe feeling,” according to a city staff report. However, the influx of organized fitness groups, particularly at Discovery Well Park and Hilltop Park, and other incidents have recently created challenges for staff to be able to manage the parks and facilities, according to the staff report. New language adopted in the ordinance requires permits for various uses, including: personal barbecues that use bottled gas only; an organized fitness activity, such as a boot camp; any private party with a group of more than 25 people; and temporary personal canopies or tents. Any party may appeal a decision on a permit through the Signal Hill Parks and Recreation Commission. A violation of the ordinance may be charged as either an infraction or a misdemeanor, depending on the violation.

The next Signal Hill Council meeting will take place Tuesday, June 4 at 7pm in the City’s Council Chamber. ß

NEWS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

19

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston (left) shakes hands with Judy Jacobus for her many hours of service as a Signal Hill police volunteer. Also pictured is Signal Hill police volunteer Gary Weinberger (third from left), who was also recognized, and Mayor Michael Noll.

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