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Spring Events Calendar page 20 Spring Sports Schedules page 18 Facebook Faves page 17 Crossing Boundaries page 8 Acing the Long Drive page 12

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A Window to Spring Lake page 10

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life-changing research new business opportunities powered by partnerships

discover star park

technology incubator

unparalleled learning

A RESEARCH PARK for the 21st century where BUSINESS and UNIVERSITY partners work together to move GROUNDBREAKING DISCOVERIES out of the lab and into our LIVES.

www.txstate.edu/discover Spring 2013

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Contents | Spring 2013 6

The Meadows Center Research right in our backyard

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Crossing Boundaries

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A Window to Spring Lake

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Acing the Long Drive Latvian sisters take Texas State golf to new levels of success

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Top 10 Undergraduate Minors

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Voices of Experience

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Facebook Faves

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Spring Sports Schedule • Baseball • Men’s Golf • Tennis • Track and Field • Tennis • Women’s Golf

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Spring Events Calendar

Campus Guide c/o Steve Blank 1904 RR12, Suite 116 San Marcos, TX 78666 512.392.7473 smcampusguide@gmail.com Campus Guide ©2013 All rights reserved. Advertising, sponsorhip or distribution of Campus Guide does not necessarily constitute endorsement of any editorial or advertising material. Distribution: Texas State University campus and the city of San Marcos

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The Meadows Center:

Research Right in Our Backyard

To learn more about The Meadows Center or the Texas Stream Team and how to become involved, visit www.meadowscenter.txstate.edu.

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Since 2002, The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State — located on campus near Spring Lake — has led the protection and preservation of freshwater resources. It conducts collaborative research on main river bodies as well as springs, wetlands and estuaries. It also studies the impacts of human activities on those bodies of water. The center received a gift of $1 million from The Meadows Foundation in August 2012. This windfall of support for its mission of promoting a holistic approach to the management of natural systems was followed by an additional gift of $1 million in December.

Volunteers participate in a one-day training session that teaches them to sample for pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature and basic environmental data. After a monitoring site is determined, volunteers can begin collecting monthly data.

Locally, the center is overseeing the massive Spring Lake restoration project. Upon completion of the restoration, the historic glass-bottom boat tours will continue along with scientific diving and underwater archaeology at Spring Lake. These activities involve many Texas State students, both as patrons and employees. But the Center’s reach goes much further, extending to virtually every corner of the state.

“It would be impossible to manage a statewide program for a state the size of Texas without the help of partners and all of the volunteers,” says Travis Tidwell, a staffer who manages the volunteer program.

One arm of that reach is the Texas Stream Team, which monitors water quality around the state. It enlists an army of local volunteers who have a passion for protecting local waterways. “We train volunteers, and they in turn are active with the mission, which includes education outreach and monthly monitoring,” says Jennifer Buratti, the Stream Team’s outreach specialist.

Spring 2013

Through its many programs, the center monitors water quality at hundreds of freshwater sites, maps waterways and studies flow. The center also works to inform the public about water conservation and protection. Anyone who lived here during the 2011 statewide drought can tell you: Water is among the most essential natural resources in Texas. The Meadows Center is here to make sure we all have the water we need to thrive.

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Crossing Boundaries Last November, when Texas State senior Eart Sinani required surgery as the result of a knee injury he incurred during a soccer game, his mother helped him recuperate. That wouldn’t be unusual, except that his mother had to travel more than 6,000 miles to do so. Sinani, 23, grew up in Tropoja, a village of approximately 5,600 people tucked away in the farthest reaches of northern Albania. The region is known not only for its great beauty — the Alps loom above the village, pristine lakes dot the landscape — but until just recently, it also was known for its hidden dangers; government agencies and the United Nations Development Programme cleared the town of landmines — remnants of the 1999 conflict in neighboring Kosovo — in just the past two years. “The conflict was very near us,” Sinani recalls. “Every day we would hear the fighting and guns. After the conflict was ended by NATO troops, the border still was not safe. When we would go to Kosovo to visit family, we could not step just anywhere because we were scared of mines. Nowadays, Tropoja is safe, but back then, it was considered the most dangerous place in Albania.” Sinani’s mother encouraged him to leave his country to attend college in the United States. His education began with online research about opportunities abroad. “Honestly, I didn’t know much about the American educational system,” Sinani admits. “I looked at the campuses, the learning labs, and read student reviews about how friendly and helpful the professors are. It is much better here. You know what courses you need to take and you know what’s going to happen next. Back home, it’s still a Soviet system. It’s more complicated and confusing, and it’s much harder to finish a degree.” Sinani narrowed his choices to colleges in California, Texas and Washington. “I’m happy that I picked Texas. I really like it a lot. It starts with people being friendly. It’s a huge state with a lot of big cities. Spring 2013

Anything I want, I can do it here. But I miss the cold weather once in a while. And my mother’s cooking,” he laughs. Speaking with Sinani, it’s hard to imagine that less than four years ago, his knowledge of English was, as he says, “only so-so.” He speaks fluently, using expressions common with native speakers; but it’s not only his proficiency with the language that contributes to his ease in conversation. Reaching that level of comfort required a shift in his way of dealing with people. “The culture back home is that we don’t really talk a lot to people that we don’t know. We’re more reserved,” he says. “People here talk to each other about anything.” The changes Sinani has faced have been enormous — beyond adjusting to college life and living in a dorm, he had to adapt to a different culture and an unfamiliar language. Sinani credits his ability to adapt to his new surroundings to the welcoming atmosphere at Texas State. An international relations major, he says the changes he’s faced have given him perspective and an opportunity to grow. “I’ve changed a lot. Now I am much more straightforward in my communication. My parents and friends back home notice a difference,” he says. “And being away from home has helped me to shape my personality a lot. I know myself better now.” Sinani spent two years in community college before transferring to Texas State, where he quickly immersed himself in student activities. He is the president of the International Student Association and the finance chair of the Underrepresented Student Advisory Council. His willingness to get involved led to his receiving the 2011 Robert M. Seese International Student Award,

given annually to Texas State’s outstanding international student. Lisa Damron, a coordinator at the International Office, says, “Eart received the award because he juggles many responsibilities and calmly considers how to achieve the best outcome in every situation. He has high goals and great leadership potential. He takes initiative to stand up for international students across the campus and successfully revived the International Student Association.” In addition to on-campus extracurricular activities, Sinani has taken advantage of Texas State’s Study Abroad Program, studying political science in Barcelona in 2011 and Spanish in Costa Rica during summer 2012. He hopes his demonstrated ability to adapt well to new environments will benefit him in his future career. “I’m very open to new situations. I open my mind to new things — another culture, another country, another language. I think employers will see that I can be flexible,” says Sinani. Because of his love of travel, Sinani’s plans after graduation in spring 2013 may include a move to Latin America or southeast Asia. No matter where he goes next, he’s certain he’s on the right path, and hopes to start a career that will make use of his ability to inspire and influence others. His skills in that department already have had an effect on his family. After a recent visit, his mother returned to Albania and enrolled in a class in conversational English.

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A Window to Spring Lake

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Gliding across the glassy waters of Spring Lake, gazing through the floor of a glass-bottom boat, you get a glimpse of a different world. Springs bubble up from the lake’s sandy floor while fish and turtles cruise through the watery environment. Glass-bottom boat tours have introduced visitors to the wonders of Spring Lake since 1946. Part of an early theme park called Aquarena Springs, Spring Lake and the surrounding land has been part of Texas State University since 1994. “There’s no other university in the world that has a resource like this,” says Andrew Sansom, executive director of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State. Texas State’s commitment to water research and to being a good steward of Spring Lake is demonstrated by the University Seminar program, which ensures every entering freshman learns about it by going on a glass-bottom boat tour. Another way to see Spring Lake is in a glass-bottom kayak. The sit-on-top kayaks are comfortable and easy to use, and provide an up-close look at the remarkable and abundant plant and animal life, as well as an eye-level view of surrounding scenery for a more personal experience than the glass-bottom boats offer. An interpreter guides visitors on both the glass-bottom boat and glass-bottom kayak tours and relays the history of the site. Interpreters identify the plants and animals living in and around Spring Lake and discuss critical water issues. The springs that form the lake have been important to the area for thousands of years, beginning with the humans who lived and hunted there 12,000 years ago. Mid-19th-century travelers described the largest of the 200 springs as fountains gushing water into the air. In 1845 General Edward Burleson, Texas Revolution veteran and former vice president of the Republic of Texas, acquired the property around the headwaters and the springs and built a gristmill. He constructed a dam across the river and the resulting body of water, Spring Lake, overflowed the springs. Spring 2013

Burleson’s dam had an unexpected consequence: Spring Lake sealed thousands of artifacts in a protected environment. More than a century and a half later, those artifacts remain protected. The legends and lore of Spring Lake are endlessly fascinating, and the plant and animal life are unique. The Texas State community and our visitors have a unique opportunity for a close-up look at this beautiful resource on a glass-bottom boat or kayak tour.

Seeing Spring Lake Glass-bottom boats Glass-bottom boat tours run continuously based on demand and last for 30 minutes. The last boat departs at 3:30 p.m. on the weekdays and 4 p.m. on weekends. Adults: $9 Seniors: $7.50 Ages 4-15: $ 6 Age 3 and younger: Free Glass-bottom kayaks One-hour tour: $20 No discounts are available. Two-hour tour: Adults: $40 Military, seniors 55+ and ages 6 to 15: $30 Texas State students, faculty and staff: $20 Sorry, no children younger than 6. Reservations should be made two weeks in advance. For more information, call 512.245.9200 or go to www.meadowscenter.txstate.edu.

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Latvian sisters take Texas State golf to new levels of success Two sisters from Latvia have impacted Texas State and its woman’s golf team unlike anyone before, achieving excellence on and off the green. During their childhood, the sisters developed golfing skills that today are internationally known. When the sisters came of age to attend a university, however, their choices were limited in their home country. Krista, finance senior, and her sister Mara, CIS junior, came to Texas State University for an academic and athletic opportunity not available in their native Latvia. “Back home in Latvia, the universities don’t offer as many athletic opportunities as the United States,” says Mara. “Athletics and education aren’t associated with each other, so we chose Texas State to nurture our potential as students and as women athletes.” During their time as undergraduates in the Central Texas area, Krista has noticed several differences between Latvia and San Marcos. Surprisingly, one outstanding difference is the driving in San Marcos, which, compared to Latvian driving practices, would be considered “orderly and organized.” “The people here at Texas State are very friendly,” Krista adds. “The amount of diversity on campus is reflected by the universit y’s grow th. It has been impressive to see the university grow.” Also notable is the range of opportunity presented for all students. “In Latvia, I would be restricted in both my education and athletic prospects because I am a woman,” says Mara, who is also a member of the Beta Gamma Sigma International Honors Society. “This is certainly not the case here at Texas State, where I am encouraged to excel in both spectrums.”

Mara describes herself as more outgoing and aggressive — a risk-taker on and off the green. The sisters don’t let their competitions divide their relationship with each other or the rest of the team. Michael Akers, head coach of the Texas State women’s golf team, says the Puisite sisters have taken the golf program to new heights, but have also been a tremendous asset in the classroom, contributing to the Texas State women’s golf team having the highest cumulative GPA of any NCAA sports team on campus. “Krista and Mara represent Texas State and our golf program in a positive manner and we are very fortunate to have them on our campus,” says Akers. “Both girls are extremely intelligent and have earned 4.0 GPAs virtually every semester. I have enjoyed coaching them and watching them chase their dreams of professional golf.” Krista, due to graduate in fall 2013, hopes to improve her already impressive golf record. Tournaments in spring 2013 will prepare her to qualify for the LPGA in late 2013. Akers mentioned that if the women decide not to pursue golf professionally, they have excellent degrees to pursue careers outside of the sport. “Texas State women’s golf has come a long way over the years,” he says. “We were ranked 149th in the nation six years ago, and now we are in the top 30. Texas State is a great institution with phenomenal academics, athletics and opportunity.” Mara Puisite

Krista Puisite

Although the Puisite sisters are often mentioned together, they have very different personalities. Krista, the older sister, describes herself as methodical, analytical and steady-paced, while 12

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Acing the Long Drive

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Top 10 Undergraduate Minors Choosing a minor can be just as hard as choosing a major. Some students pick a minor that complements their major. Others choose a subject that’s always interested them. Minors can be a way to explore a department, an interdisciplinary theme or a subject with less commitment of time than a major requires. Here are the top 10 majors by enrollment for the fall 2012 semester, compiled by Institutional Research at Texas State. The number of semester hours required and a description of each of the minors follow. Business Administration — 18-24 hours The undergraduate minor in business administration — the most popular minor at Texas State — is open to non-business majors. The minor combines foundational classes in accounting, economics, business law, finance, management and marketing. Psychology — 18 hours The psychology minor lets students explore the breadth of the field: abnormal psychology; biological, social and learned bases of behavior; adolescent psychology; forensic psychology; sports psychology; evolutionary psychology; and many other areas. Mathematics — 20 hours Mathematics — a field more than 4,000 years old — remains a very active research area, continually giving rise to new theories and questions. The minor includes courses in calculus, number systems and statistics, as well as advanced courses in deterministic operations, discrete mathematics and boundary value problems. Chemistry — 19 hours The study of chemistry provides the essential knowledge needed to address many of society’s most pressing needs: food, health, medicine, renewable energy, security and environmental stewardship. The minor includes courses in chemistry, organic chemistry and quantitative analysis, as well as an advanced elective. Biology — 21 hours Biology is the study of living systems and how they function. The biological sciences have profound impacts on human society — from what we eat and where we work to how long we live. The minor includes courses in functional and organismal biology and genetics as well as three advanced electives.

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243

250

267

MUSIC

SPANISH

SECONDARY EDUCATION

2,024

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

332

MASS COMMUNICATION

348

SOCIOLOGY

371

BIOLOGY

442

CHEMISTRY

487

MATHEMATICS

Sociology — 18 hours Sociology involves collecting, analyzing, interpreting and presenting data on social phenomena. Following introductory courses, the minor includes 12 advanced elective hours in areas such as popular culture, population dynamics, social deviance, criminology, gender roles, folkways and urban society. Mass Communication — 18 hours This minor introduces students to the broad framework of mass communication, emphasizing what is common and fundamental to advertising, electronic media, journalism and public relations. Secondary Education — 21 hours The minor in secondary education is available only to students who declare a major with teacher certification. Courses include the Curriculum and Instruction education core, a nine-hour field-based block and a semester of student teaching.

702

PSYCHOLOGY

Spanish — 15 hours The minor in Spanish focuses on establishing language fluency and refining knowledge of the traditions of Spanishspeaking people. The minor includes five advanced elective courses in Spanish language, composition, literature and culture. Music — 18 hours The minor in music lets students from non-music majors develop musical skills and cultural understanding. The minor requires lecture and performance courses — which give students a strong foundation in music literature, history and performance — as well as one advanced elective course. (Minor availability and requirements are subject to change. Find current information in the Undergraduate Catalog.)

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Voices of Experience Support Services on Campus

Texas State has support services to meet almost every need. We recently asked students to tell us about some of the services that have helped them the most. If you’d like to find out more about any of them, do a search on the Texas State website. Meg Elaine Boko’s Living Room

Hector Leal The Den. I get a lot done there.

Christine Malseed The Attorney for Students Office: They helped me understand my leases and fight identity theft. They are useful even if you don’t get into trouble.

Keri Ovalle Bobcat Bobbies. Whenever I needed a ride at night, I could call them and get a ride on the golf cart. Always made me feel safe!

Shelly Cruz The Mentoring Program Daniel Gray The Student Health Center. It’s cheap, it’s right on campus and everybody is really friendly. They found a tumor in one of my ribs and helped me find the right doctors to get it removed. Kennedy Peter McMinn SL AC is an awesome resource! I couldn’t have passed college algebra without it! Andy Bailey I have to agree that SLAC is definitely a lifesaver. Krystal and Dylan are great!

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Jack Higg Jones Dining Hall and the Athletic Academic Center Kali Souknary I can’t get over how much I love the UAC (Undergraduate Academic Center) building. It’s such a modern yet classic building and the area outside is a perfect place to sit and think. It’s one of the most peaceful spots on campus.

Tammy Kothe-Ramsey The Non-Traditional Student Organization lounge. Benefits of being a member include a very low fee for member dues, microwave, refrigerator, Kurig coffee machine (on a donation basis) , cheapest vending machine on campus, lockers (for rent), computer lounge and the company of great friends that are like family. What more could you ask for?

Jessica Briones The Writing Center is so useful. Making an appointment is so easy! Jordan Peterson The library by far. Could not do research without it.

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Facebook Faves PFW Classes

Research shows that exercise is strongly linked to overall health, including cognitive performance, disease prevention and longevity. To ensure students reap these benefits, every undergraduate at Texas State must take two physical fitness and wellness (PFW) courses in order to graduate. From water sports to yoga to endurance challenges, PFWs introduce a wide range of activities so every student can try something new. We asked Texas State’s Facebook fans to recommend their favorites. Brian M. Racquetball!

Molly N. Backpacking!

Travis B. Canoeing was the BEST, especially when it was your last class on a Thursday! Way to start the weekend!

Catherine R. High Ropes Challenge Course!

John D. Only in beautiful San Marcos, Texas! Sherrie M. I took this class! Loved it. So so much fun! Michael G. Whitewater rafting! Best PFW ever! Sam H. Marching Band. Please let me take it for two semesters! Kyle S. Badminton!

Ashley M. Scuba Diving! Eddie L. Volleyball! Russ B. Wakeboarding Christina C. Bowling, most definitely! Brittany G. Water Aerobics, hands down! Jonathan G. Country Western Dancing Brian C. Golf. Something useful for your future. Lots of business deals happen out on the course.

Travis J. I may be weird, but I have to credit Beginning Jogging and Conditioning for getting me started on my marathon quest! Summer C. Aerobics! Jaime G. Judo Terri S. Aquatic Conditioning and Pocket Billiards Matthew S. I really enjoyed both of my PFWs: Fencing with Moreau and Karate with Baker. Amanda G. Fencing with Moreau! Clarissa R. FENCING — need I say more?

Brooke J. Karate!

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Spring Sports Schedule

Admission is free for students with a valid Texas State ID at all home athletic events. For the general public, single-game and season ticket packages are available at the “Tickets” link at www.txstatebobcats.com.

BASEBALL Date

Opponent

Time (CST)

February 15 Missouri State 16 Tulane 17 Sam Houston 19 at Baylor 22 Houston 23 Houston 24 Houston 26 at A&M Corpus Christi

2 p.m. 1 p.m. 4 p.m. 6:35 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Noon 6:30 p.m.

March 1 2 3 5 8 9 10 12 13 15 16 17 22 23 24 26 28 29 30

Northern Kentucky Northern Kentucky Northern Kentucky UTSA at Oregon State at Oregon State at Oregon State at Oregon at Oregon A&M Corpus Christi A&M Corpus Christi A&M Corpus Christi at New Mexico State at New Mexico State at New Mexico State at Texas Seattle Seattle Seattle

6:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Noon 6:30 p.m. 5:35 p.m. 2:05 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 6 p.m. Noon 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Noon 6:05 p.m. 6:05 p.m. 1:05 p.m. 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 3 p.m. 11 a.m.

April 1 2 5 6 5 9 12 13 14 16 19 20 21 23 26 27 28 30

at Rice Prairie View A&M at Sacramento State at Sacramento State at Sacramento State at Texas Louisiana Tech Louisiana Tech Louisiana Tech Baylor at San Jose State at San Jose State at San Jose State Texas A&M Cal State-Bakersfield Cal State-Bakersfield Cal State-Bakersfield Houston Baptist

6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 3 p.m. Noon 1 p.m. 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Noon 6:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Noon 6:30 p.m.

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May 3 4 5 10 11 12 14 16 17 18

at UTSA at UTSA at UTSA at UT Arlington at UT Arlington at UT Arlington Rice Dallas Baptist Dallas Baptist Dallas Baptist

6 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Noon

WOMEN’S TENNIS Date

Opponent

Time (CST)

January 26 at Dallas Baptist 27 at SMU

3 p.m. 1 p.m.

February 2 UT Pan American 3 St. Edward’s 10 Houston 15 UTSA 16 Northwestern Louisiana March 10 at Rice 21 Louisiana Tech (San Jose, Calif.) 22 New Mexico State (San Jose, Calif.) 23 Seattle (San Jose, Calif.) 28 UT Arlington 31 San Jose State April 5 Denver (Logan, Utah)

6 13 14 20 25-28

at Utah State at Lewis-Clark at Idaho Oklahoma Christian WAC Championships (Denver)

11 a.m. Noon TBA 1 p.m. 11 a.m. Noon TBA TBA TBA 3 p.m. 10 a.m.

TBA TBA TBA TBA 11 a.m. all day

TRACK AND FIELD Date

Opponent

Time (CST)

January 18-19 Texas Tech Open Lubbock 25-26 Houston Indoor Invitational Houston 2 Red Raider Open Lubbock

February 9 Texas A&M Invitational College Station 21-23 WAC Indoor Championships Albuquerque, N.M. March 8-9 NCAA Indoor Championships Fayetteville, Ark. 15 TCU Invitational Fort Worth 23 Texas State Elite Meet San Marcos 27-30 Texas Relays Austin 28-29 Bobcat Invitational San Marcos April 6 Texas State Invitational San Marcos 13 Texas Relays Austin 20 LSU Alumni Gold Baton Rouge, La. 26-27 Bobcat Classic San Marcos May 8-11 WAC Outdoor Championships Arlington 24-25 NCAA Preliminary Round Austin June 5-8 NCAA Championships Eugene, Ore.

MEN’S GOLF Date Opponent

February 11-12 UTSA Oak Hills Invitational San Antonio March 4-5 Louisiana Classics Lafayette, La. 11-12 Louisiana Tech Intercollegiate Ruston, La. 15-16 Border Olympics Laredo April 1-2 Bancorpsouth Intercollegiate Madison, Miss. 8-9 Jim West Intercollegiate McKinney 29-30 WAC Championship and May 1 Las Vegas, Nev.

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WOMEN’S GOLF Date

Opponent

Time (CST)

February 4-5 University of Miami Invitational Miami, Fla. 10-12 UCF Challenge Orlando, Fla. 17-18 Jim West Intercollegiate Blanco March 15-16 Mountainview Collegiate Tucson, Ariz. April 1-2 Challenge at Onion Creek Austin 23-25 WAC Championship Mesa, Ariz. May 9-11 NCAA Regional 21-24 NCAA Championship

TBA Atlanta, Ga.

Texas State Athletics :: www.txstatebobcats.com Spring 2013

Western Athletic Conference :: www.wacsports.org Campus Guide

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Spring Events Calendar January

5

Singled Out LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

13

Open Mic Night LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

6

React2 Film, LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater 7 p.m.

14

6

“Teaching Science in the Developing World: Using Inquiry in Cambodia,” brown bag lecture. See Common Experience website for location, noon

Construction and Concrete Industriesa Job and Internship Fair, LBJ Student Center Ballroom, 1 – 4 p.m.

14

First day of class

14

Chad Daniels, comedian LBJ Student Center George’s, 7 p.m.

21

Martin Luther King Jr. Day, classes do not meet

22

Karaoke LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

24

Joseph Tran, magician LBJ Student Center Ballroom 7 p.m.

6

18

The Mystical Arts of Tibet Opening ceremony LBJ Student Center Mall noon

Victor Cruz, violin, and Paloma Gonzalez, piano Evans Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Karaoke LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

6

Summer Job Fair LBJ Student Center Ballroom 1 – 4 p.m.

19

Forums Event LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

7

RSO Workshop LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater, 5:30 – 8 p.m.

20

7

Musicians Forum Music Building Recital Hall 6:15 p.m.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Job and Internship Fair LBJ Student Center Ballroom 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

20

Shanelle Gabriel, poetry slam LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

21

The First Grader, Common Experience movie Education Building 1007 6:30 p.m.

26

Forums Event LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

27

“Preventing Neural Tube Defects Worldwide: New Approaches to Increasing Awareness and Vitamin Intake in Women at Risk,” brown bag lecture. See Common Experience website for location, noon

27

¡Viva Mexico! Festival and movie LBJ Amphitheater, 6 p.m.

28

28 to Feb. 1 Dedication Concert for the Wayne Barrington (Horn Music) Collection featuring former students and colleagues of Wayne Barrington, Music Building Recital Hall (MUS 236), 7:30 p.m. 29

The Mystical Arts of Tibet Mandala sand painting LBJ Student Center Mall 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

29

Forums Event LBJ Student Center Ballroom 7 p.m.

31

The Mystical Arts of Tibet Sacred music Sacred Dance Evans Auditorium, 7 p.m.

30–31 Organization Fair LBJ Student Center Ballroom 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

7

8

Hill Country Jazz Festival presents Eddie Durham Evans Auditorium 7:30 p.m.

9

Hill Country Jazz Festival Evans Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

12

“Home Front Girl: Global War Before the Internet,” brown bag lecture. See Common Experience website for location, noon

12

Carlie & Doni, musicians LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

February 1

The Mystical Arts of Tibet Closing ceremony and procession to the at San Marcos River noon

4–7 Business Leadership Week McCoy Hall

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¡Somos Musicos! A concert series showcasing student performances, Music Building Recital Hall 7:30 p.m.

12–17 Richard III by William Shakespeare, directed by Chuck Ney, Theatre Center, Mainstage Theatre, Tuesday–Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m.

15–16 2013 Leadership Institute Annual Conference LBJ Student Center 5:30 – 8 p.m. on Feb. 15; 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m. – Feb. 16

Spring 2013


March 4

5

5

23 Svet, hip-hop violinist LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m

Bobcat Build Strahan Coliseum parking lot 8 a.m.

27

Forums Event LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater, 7 p.m.

Nonprofit Fair LBJ Student Center Ballroom 1:30 – 4 p.m.

28

Battle of the Bands, LBJ Student Center, George’s, 7 p.m.

Mass Comm Fair LBJ Student Center Ballroom 12:30 – 3:30 p.m.

6

React2 Film LBJ Student Center teaching theater, 7 p.m.

6

Culture Fest LBJ Student Center Mall 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

7

7

“International Corporations, Political Sovereignty, and the European Union: Challenges and Opportunitiess” panel discussion, ASBN 353, 7 p.m. Karaoke LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

29

April 2

Karaoke LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

3

Teacher Job Fair, Strahan Coliseum, 9 – 11:30 a.m.

3

The Amazing Spiderman, LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater, 7 p.m.

4

10–17 Spring Break 19

Tommy and the High Pilots LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

20

Mall-a-palooza, LBJ Student Center Amphitheater/Mall, 6 p.m.

20

20

“The Impact of FDI on Repression and Civil War Onset,” brown bag lecture. See Common Experience website for location, noon

A Grimm Reading Honors Coffee Forum, 8 p.m.

21

Karaoke LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

21–24 All in the Timing by David Ives, directed by Elizabeth Buras, Thursday–Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m.

Spring 2013

Masquerave LBJ Student Center, George’s 8 p.m.

4–7 Top Girls by Caryl Churchill, directed by David Weynand, PSH Studio Theatre Thursday–Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. 9

10

Spring Job and Internship Fair Strahan Coliseum, 2 – 5:30 p.m.

21

Women and Gender Research Symposium, “Global Odyssey: Gender, Social Justice, and Leadership,” LBJ Student Center, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Forums Event LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater, 7 p.m. “The Perils and Promise of Globalization.” brown bag lecture. See Common Experience website for location, noon

11

Bobcat Fashion LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

12

4th Annual Spanish Documentary Festival “Puntos de Vista,” LBJ Student Center

15

React2 Film, LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m.

15-21 Urinetown, music and lyrics by Mark Hollman, book and lyrics by Greg Kotis, directed by Kaitlin Hopkins, Theatre Center, Mainstage Theatre, Monday at 7:30 p.m.; Tuesday–Sunday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. 16 Jen Kober, comedian LBJ Student Center, George’s 7 p.m. 18 Riverfest Sewell Park 5 p.m. 19–20 TXNAME 12th Annual Conference, Texas Chapter of the National Association of Multicultural Education LBJ Student Center 29

Last day of classes

May 9–11 Commencement 13–17 Multicultural Curriculum Transformation and Research Institute, “Infusing U.S. and Global Perspectives” Alkek Library 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Event information is subject to change. Check the following websites for current information and additional events. Career Services www.careerservices.txstate.edu Common Experience www.txstate.edu/commonexperience/ calendar.html LBJ Student Center www.lbjsc.txstate.edu Registrar www.registrar.txstate.edu School of Music www.music.txstate.edu/events.html Theatre and Dance www.theatreanddance.txstate.edu The Wittliff Collections www.thewittliffcollections.txstate.edu

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You Want It? WE HAVE IT! Ground Floor Entry on ALL Homes Townhomes & Garages Available Wood Floors in ALL Apartment Homes LARGE Floorplans Furnished Bedspaces Available, and…YOU Get to KEEP THE FURNITURE! Reliable 24-Hour Maintenance Friendly & Professional Management

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Campus Guide

13-099 Campus Guide Sp 2013.indd 22-23

Amenities FREE High Speed Internet, Phone & Cable Resort-Style Pool 24-Hr Fitness Center Gated Community Covered BBQ Area Sand Volleyball Covered Parking Available Bobcat Tram Route Computer Lab Coffee Bar Media Room Resident Activities

Spring 2013


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    

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| Texas State University is a tobacco-free campus. 13-099 Campus Guide Sp 2013.indd 24

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Campus Guide - Texas State University - Spring 2013  

Campus Guide - Texas State University - Spring 2013

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