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The Code of Creation

Book 2


Chapter 1 Prime Matrix

In Development 90%

6.0 The Point of Becoming

In Development 95%

6.1 The Triskelion Center

The Seed of Consciousness The Three Appendages of Formation

In Development 90%

6.2 The Great Triangle The Pyramid of Significance

In Development 80%

6.3 Three Jewels of Truth The Physical, Spiritual and Ideal

In Development 85%

6.4 Linga Trinity Triadic Nature of the Creator

In Development 85%

6.5 The Linga Tao The Secret Links of Sacred Unity

In Development 85%

6.6 Sacred Sex The Dance of Compatible Difference


6.0 The Point of Becoming As our adventure into the Sri’s universally vast terrain continues 3 we will map out two primordial areas, Creation of ‘humanity’ 1 and the ‘world of things’, and 6 9 Creation of the ‘word’ and ‘world 8 of concepts’. In the “Code of 2 Creation”, the second volume of 5 this work, we will see how the densification of pure conscious7 ness into matter is analogous with thoughts solidifying into sound and speech. At present our focus Figure 27 While at first unapparent, the will be on the former, the creation nine principle triangles upon which the of humanity and the world of Sri is based, come forth in clarity, things, the world we populate. The Sri with her field of lines, their points of conjunction and the many shapes they form, takes the eye on a visual odyssey. With an extended gaze it even appears to three-dimensionally transcend the surface. The nine principle triangles upon which it is based become clear. These represent the nine primordial degrees of becoming, of creation. (Figure 27) They 4

“Symbolically represent the stepping down of Ultimate Reality, Sat-CitAnanda (Being-Consciousness-Bliss) from the sublimest to the grossest Universe of nama (name) and rupa (form)....” 1 The elements came out of chaos in successive but overlapping stages. From inconceivable, spaceless space and timeless time, the Sri Mandala’s primeval seed {•} the Bindu appears. “Thus the point which is the first form to emerge on the surface of the void (represented by the center of the Sri Mandala) is wholly transcendent, the germinal state of the world... It projects a level of creation on which all the combined energies of the universe lie dormant, a realm of infinite possibility.” 2 As pure consciousness the Bindu represents the formless principle, the core of all potential. It is the compass point which makes use of what ‘isn’t’. Being a hole it is a type of void and being the pillar of the universe it is what life circumvolves. “Consciousness is the ultimate irreducible reality out of which and by whose


power, mind and matter proceed.” 3 The absolute beginning is the incomprehensible firmament of undiluted possibility. It is greater than all conception, realization and perception. The origin from which the Bindu springs is the eternal mystery; it is hidden and remains unknowable. Any symbol used to suggest it is but a facade covering an unlimited and nameless supernature. “It is external to existence, to the worlds it invents. It is neutral, non active, without substance, duration or place...”4 The Bindu is like the nameless God; it does not change, dissolve, deteriorate or even evolve. It is pre-cause. From beyond all limits and the infinite, the possibility of existence, like a dream, forms the void like, ‘point potential’ of desire. “From the uncreated comes the ‘possibility’ (avakasha), the conditions that will permit the development of creation. This possibility is the principle of space (akasha).” 5 The Bindu void spans the chasm of boundlessness to become the point of unqualified desire. “Siva, in his absolute state called Samvit, is a clear mirror who in his inexhaustible freedom reflects the universe as a mirror reflects an image... Sakti is the immense power (vimarsa) that causes the reflection of the universe which shines forth as a radiant seed point (Maha bindu).” 6 The Bindu-point infers volume. It is like the tip of a cone or the apex of a pyramid. It sits on top of a mountainous body, whose conceptual base, like space, reaches out in four directions. (Figure 28)

Figure 28 A pyramid is a volumetric example of the dilating bindu. The pyramid itself coresponds to the first triangle of the Sri Mandala


Through the Bindu, existence becomes a location of conscious space. The Bindu’s birth and subsequent division is imprinted on every created thing. Myth the world over recalls it, the mystic experiences it, and it appears scientists will always debate it. Such is the legacy of our origin. “Just as the seed of a tree is not a ‘manifested’ tree yet holds the essence of a tree, so the bindu holds a universe not yet differentiated from the original monad.” 7 The appearance of the Bindu and the entry of consciousness into space-time and existence, is re-lived and transparently superimposed on each era of time and dimension of space.

6.1 The Triskelion Center From the Bindu we revisit the concept three’ness that first appeared in our exploration of the Kalachakra Tantra. The Sri’s three times three or nine fold constitution delineates the triangular intervals of the Bindu’s materialization. “The bindu rests in the first form of cosmic location, the downward-pointing triangle in the center of the Sri Yantra... This phase is marked by Sakti’s awareness of her threefold characteristics: her creative will (iccha) which is the prime cause of creation; her inexhaustible power of discrimination, or knowledge (jnana) which gives rise to multiplicity; and her power of action and movement (kriya).” 8 The Sri’s triangles, like mind and the sensible realm, are limited quantums marking degrees in the manifestation of Bindu consciousness. They can only represent its unlimited nature by the nature of their own limits. In the same way that water isn’t separate from the river in which it flows, the triangle with its plane, degrees and lines, must be understood in relation to the whole symphony of form, geometry and number itself. The one monad is the point, the manifest Bindu, the origin (the circle’s center). Duality occurs in the two, two points engender a line (the circle’s radius). Neither the one nor two contain space. The one and two are practical in counting yet in relation to quality they are like the black and white of numbers and it was for this reason that the triangle, the geometric personification of three, was considered by the Pythagoreans to be the symbol of the first whole number. Three dots when connected form a triangle that does indeed enclose space.


According to Plato’s Timaeus, triangles: “ have three dimensions, in unity they gather the elements which in themselves are absolutely divided and changing; they are filled with the infinity characteristic of matter...” 9

6.2 The Great Triangle In the mysterious land of Ancient Egypt, (originally the land of ‘mr’ meaning triangle), the triangle was regarded as the ‘basic constituent of the cosmic order.’10 The great, triangular Pyramid of Giza, one of the seven wonders of the world, is encyclopedic in significance. It is constructed by way of the Golden Mean (phi) triangle. (Figure 9, Pg. 29) This triangle exhibits the proportions of 3-4-5 of which the first triangle in the Sri Mandala is a near perfect approximation. Besides the inexhaustible properties of the Great Pyramid of Giza, upon its four sides the entire northern hemisphere of the earth can be accurately mapped. The right angle 3-4-5 triangle, the most ‘beautiful’ and ‘perfect’, was adopted by the Pythagoreans, who carried the Egyptian torch of knowledge into the Grecian eras. Although dimly lit, it is this torch that still illuminates the world today. The Pythagorean triangle shares an indirect relation with the circle, the magic rectangle and the gnomonic spiral all of which are embodied by the Sri Mandala.

6.3 Three Jewels of Truth The triune scale appears in every facet of existence and relates to all levels of creation, which in itself exhibits three aspects: (one) a creator, (two) an act of creating and (three) a creation. The three levels of knowledge: physical, spiritual and symbolic was also present in the Kalacakra teaching. The following, while perhaps slightly repetitive, takes a much wider approach and will broaden the perspective we previously explored. In speaking of a triangle one could give a physical dictionary type of definition that describes its material characteristics. The myths and legends that the triangle has engendered or that have a triangular theme, as in the Round Table’s Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere, partakes of the spiritual dimension of knowledge. In the metaphysical realm, as populated by Plato’s Ideals, the triangle


is seen as a supra-existent pattern and as the number three, a formative integer in the equation of creation. The triangle itself is a meeting place where the physical, spiritual and symbolic conjoin. Upon each level of knowledge there is a set of laws that applies across the whole strata. These relative laws or limits are true for that strata only and when applied to other stratas, become obstructions of truth. The first step is to identify what strata any particular thought or consideration occupies. It wouldn’t make sense to write the names Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere, in lieu of cutting a triangular shape in stained glass. It also wouldn’t make sense to speak of Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere in terms like angles, lines, surface and volume which apply to the geometric shape. In the case of the triangle one strata can be used to explain the others, but this isn’t always the case. Sometimes inversion occurs between stratas, say, between historic and legendary distinctions. No matter what one is attempting to understand, it is extremely helpful to keep in mind the level of knowledge that applies to it. The boundaries between stratas aren’t always easy to define and this is where the intuitive mind bears great influence.

6.4 Linga Trinity On the spiritual plane the triangle is the collective embodiment, the morphogenetic form behind all the subsequent sacred trinities. The first example of such a trinity is the three forms of the Linga. Being that it is the oldest it is the primordial trinity from which all others were derived. The three facets of the Linga correspond to the three bodies of the Buddha, to the Father, Son and Holy Ghost of Christianity and to the Vedic Prajapati, Pasupati and Vastopati who later became known as Brahma the creator, Vishnu the preserver and Siva the destroyer of contemporary Hinduism. There are many divine triads and no matter how they are expressed the Linga appears to be at the root of them all. In simple terms the triangular nature of Linga basically illustrates the triangular relation between ‘man and nature’ (the two point of the horizontal base) and God (the vertical peak of a triangle). Like the three points of the Sri’s first triangle “The linga of Siva has three significations. They are linga as sign (the Buddha’s ‘Beatific body’); linga as phallus (the Buddha’s ‘Emanation body’), and linga as cosmic substance (prakriti or pradhana) (the Buddha’s ‘Truth


3 1

2

1

2

3

Figure 29 The three is illustrated by the first triangles, three points and by the first three triangles.

body’), which is the subtle body, (linga sarira) of Siva who is the absolute reality,” the imperishable Purusa” (L.P.I.20.70) “The original meaning of the word linga is “sign”, a mark that proves the existence of a thing.” 11 The Linga’s three basic qualities are expressed by the Linguam (phallus), Yoni (vagina) and their ecstatic point of sexual convergence. Buddhists render the three attributes of Linga as the ‘Three Buddha Bodies’: the supreme ’Body of Truth’, the ‘Body of Beatitude’ a subtle pervasive body, and the ‘Emanation Body’ which is the Buddha expressed on the plane of individualized multiplicity.12 The theme of three’ness appears upon each level of the Sri Mandala’s unfoldment. It initially comes forth as the first triangle and then as the Sri’s first three triangles. (Figure 29) Its crowning glory is achieved by the three square or nine triangles of the completed Sri. This ‘sexogismic unfoldment’ is at the crux of all existence. The two, as previously noted, is absorbed by three, for the splitting of the Bindu, like the division of a fertilized egg into two cells, requires three continuous terms; on the one hand we have the original Bindu and on the other its two personifications. The world of color is as well based on three primary ingredients: red, yellow and blue. Black and White, the only place where stark dualism may be implied are actually not colors at all and when mixed give us a third, neutral element, grey.


According to the ‘Tantras’: “the two Bindus, white (the presence of all colors) and red (the color of desire), are Siva and Sakti, who in their secret mutual enjoyment are now expanding and now contracting (in manifestation of the universe.)” 13

6.5 The Linga Tao The Linga as a sign is synonymous with the Chinese Tao symbol. An amazing 1 cor relation appears 2 bet ween the Sr i Mandala and the Tao. The first two triangles in the Sr i Ma nda la generate the points upon which the Tao can be constructed. (F igure 30) The 1 1 geometric significance that this figure implies, 2 2 is ripe with much more meaning than we can presently explore. What is clearly evident though is that the Sri, Figure 30 The Sri Mandala’s first two triangles provide Linga and Tao have the basis upon which the Tao Sign can be drawn much in common and represent the same basic underlying reality. They symbolically represent the basis of creation, when we speak of one, we are as well speaking of the other. Another striking correlation is found in the tetragrams of Lao Tzu’s, ‘Tao of Power’. The following excerpt equally applies to both the Tao and Linga. “Knowing the Collective Origin”: “The natural expression of Power “ Proceeds only through the Tao. (Linga)


“The Tao (Linga) through Natural Law;

acts

“So formless, so intangible. “Intangible, formless! “At its center appears the Image. “Formless, intangible! “At its center appears Natural Law. “Obscure, mysterious! “At its center appears the Life Force. “The Life Force is very real; “At its center appears truth.

Figure 31 This is an image of Dionysus, the Siva of ancient Greece.

“From ancient times to the present, “Its name ever remains,“Through the experience of the Collective Origin.” 14 The Tao is composed of the Yin which is dark, cold and receptive and the Yang which is light, hot and projective. The Linga, the ‘Sign Sexual’, expresses the very same precepts through the Linguam which is the yang phallus, symbolic of Siva/Purusha); and the Yoni which is the yin vagina, symbolic of Shakti/Prakriti). The Yoni is the ‘Ideal Female’ and is symbolic of Venus, Aphrodite, Hera, Shakti, Parvati, Kali, Lakshmi and the myriads of other goddesses that have been revered through time. Yoni is the Sanskrit word used to denote the female sexual organ. It is derived from the verbal root ‘yu’ which means to fasten or join. The Yoni is the place of birthing, and it is to the Earth’s womb that we return with death. The Yoni is the passage to ecstasy and the gateway to liberation. The Sun, in that it casts off and extends itself corresponds with the Linguam (the phallus), the ‘idyllic’ male. The Linguam is symbolic of Rudra, Dionysus (Figure 31), Bacchus, Pan, Hermes,


Siva, Prajapati and the endless array of other male deities. The place where the Sky/Linguam enters the Earth/Yoni is the center of perception, the place of existence.

6.6 Sacred Sex

1 2

Figure 32 T he L ing a’s dual expression is here suggested. The Sri’s first two triangles also illustrate the circular body and four arms of the Hermaphrodite

The sexual organ also

The dance of alternation, between life, death, night and day and man and woman, is characterized by Linguam and Yoni’s dynamic copulation. The rhythm of their lovemaking defines time with quality and consciousness with experience. We are all procreated and with the advent of birth bear a sign denoting our gender. Our physical presence is the result of the fiery fertilization of the seed and the sexual reality of our origin is branded into the very marrow of our identity. (See: Organic Totem of Sex) The timeless bliss of the sexual peak is a glimpse of what preceded creation. Through sex, we take part in and celebrate creation’s re-enactment. has a double role:

“the lesser role of procreation, and the higher role by which it becomes a means of contact with the divine state, the ecstasy of sensual pleasure (ananda)... While paternity ties man to things of the earth, the ecstasy of pleasure can reveal reality to him...” 15 The Linguam/male and the Yoni/female are the above and below, they are fire and water and are present in each pair of complementary opposites. This dual quality is represented by the first two trines in the Sri Mandala. (Figure 32) The courtship of the Linguam and Yoni, the rhythm of their dance, the transcendence and pure pleasure of their play are indicative of the qualities of the Linga/Bindu. The Linga, as the ‘sign’ of gender, is the initial and primary signature of identity. The sexual inclination of the Linga/Bindu in the Sri is also the first characteristic to appear. If the first triangle is the fiery one pointing up towards the zenith, it indicates Linguam/ Purusha and if it is the water triangle pointing downward, it then


indicates Yoni/Prakriti. (Figure 11) The Linga, usually represented by an egg shaped stone, is suggestive of both the Linguam and Yoni. Earlier we saw that when the crescent moons are delineated, an egg shape is formed across the face of Sri Shambhala. (Figure 17) An ancient Japanese legend which was obviously influenced by Taoism, states that “of old, Heaven and Earth were not yet separated, and the In and Yo (the masculine and feminine principles) not yet divided. They formed a chaotic mass like an egg, which was of obscurely defined limits.. the purer and clearer part was thinly diffused and formed Heaven, (Triangle’s apex) while the heavier and grosser element settled down and became Earth. (Triangle’s baseline)” 16 The Linga/ Bindu is the ‘unity’ that extends itself through ‘duality’. In other words the Linguam (one) is born in nature through the Yoni (two). Combined, the one and two become the triangular three. “A Mande creation myth from Africa describes twins of opposite sex conceived in the “Egg of God,” which is also the “Egg of the World” 17 No matter how or where it appears, the Linga is the most awe inspiring form in which to worship and identify with the source of creation. In the Linga/Bindu the matriarchy and patriarchy are united. It encompasses all sexuality, which can only really be considered in its entirety. The Linga is the sign that enforces distinction and the totality which resolves it. The Tantric traditions glorify and worship Shakti/Yoni, the feminine, changing power of Linga, while the Shivaite traditions are distinguished by their worship and association with the Siva/ Linguam, the masculine, fixed or causative potential of Linga. At the highest initiated stages of both traditions, this distinction consciously dissolves into the realization of the Sri Mandala’s Linga/ Bindu. “Siva has said in the Tantra Shastra that there is “no difference between those who are inseparably connected. He who is Siva is also Shakti. She who is Shakti is also Siva. Fatherhood and motherhood are merely distinctions by name. In reality they stand for one and the same thing; male and female are verbal, not real distinctions.” 18 At first this proclamation may seem suspiciously cryptic, yet through gender it describes the wave/particle theory of quantum physics, and illustrates the creative polarity of our cells, the secret


of our body’s biological genesis.


Sexual Cosmo Genesis

In Development 90%

7.0 The Wild One The Dawning of Divinity

In Development 85%

7.1 Heaven and Earth The Dawn of Genesis

In Development 85%

7.2 The Immortals The Mind Born Super Beings

In Development 90%

7.3 Androgeny and the Hermaphrodite The Power of Sexual Wholeness and Unity

In Development 85%

7.4 The Fatal Split The Chasm Sets In

In Development 85%

7.5 The Mystical Power of Sex The Sexual Magic of Rejuvenation

In Development 85%

7.6 The Orgasmic Tumble The Fall of Man


7.0 The Wild One “A hymn in the Rg. Veda (RV.10.61), the most sacred and most ancient work of the Indian religious tradition, begins by calling itself a ‘wild creation’ — ‘poem about the wild god’ (raudra brahman) (RV.10.61.1). 13 The wild god is the nameless god who takes on vital character as creation. “He has two natures or two ‘names’: the one, cruel and wild (rudra), the other kind and tranquil (siva-santa). These he assumes at will (MS.4.2.12.). They are interconnected, springing from the same root hidden deep in this god.” 1 The ‘wild god’ is the guardian of the pure realm of Bindu potential. He is the inspirer of desire and the sacrifice that becomes creation itself. This ‘wild god’ is also the ‘lord of yoga’. Crowned with antler horns he sits in a yogic posture (with a large erect phallus (Linguam)) on Steatite stamp-seals. These Indus Valley seals date from around the third millennium B.C. or more than five thousand years ago. The writing on this seal has still yet to be translated. This is characteristic of the Indus valley civilisation, which is steeped in profound mystery. Although located hundreds of miles apart, the two Indus sister cities of Mohenjo Daro and Harrapa are replicas of each other. The plans on which the cities were built appear to have been well thought out and prepared long before any actual construction. What is undisputable is that they were not made by ignorant savages but by people well adjusted to the collective needs of a highly evolved civilisation. Many legacies have been spun on the Indus loom, yet the secrets of their weaving and significance of their culture is dimly lit by the starry light of time. Through the frosted bifocals and tunnel vision of our evolution-bound academics, the magnificence of the Indus is all but lost. According to Vedic legend, the divine figure pictured upon the Indus seals existed in the timeless, unimaginable realm, and when time began, he became known as Pasupati-Rudra and later as Siva, ‘Lord of the Genii’ who also reigned supreme among the gods. It was Pasupati who caused a fault in time, making immortal life a possibility in the living rhyme. Pasupati is the greatest spiritual experience, the pristine bliss of liberation and is also the healer, ‘the remover of pain’, the red one whose body is composed of (tapas) the fire of yoga.


Pasupati is ‘Tat Dewa’ which transliterated from Sanskrit means ‘That God’. Tat Dewa is ‘That God’ who came out of the fold between what is created and destroyed. He is ‘that’, which simply, ‘is’. In the Vedas, it was Pasupati-Rudra who guarded the Uncreate and sprang through the portal of Brahma’s mind into creation. Ancient seals with similar motifs to the one bearing the image of ‘That God’ have been found scattered about the world. There is abundant proof that indicates a world wide web of interchange occurred at and before the dawn of our historic period. Indus contacts with Sargon of Akkad (about 2370-2284 B.C.), and with King Urnammu (about 2100 B.C.) have been documented.2 “Objects coming from Mohenjo Daro have been found at Tel Asmar and at Troy (about 2300 B.C.), as well as in a royal tomb at Ur...Identical painted steatite necklaces have been found at Knossos.... A great number of steatite seals bearing inscriptions in characters of the Indus were discovered at Bahrein (Dilmun), as well as at Ur (about 2350 B.C.).” 3 According to Danielou the Indus was founded well before 3800 B.C. and lasted until their destruction in 1800 B.C. Seals like the ones mentioned above carried motifs that included the ithyphallic and horned god, the lord of dance, the bull, snake and fertile goddess. These animals and figures not only represent different physio-emotional traits that appear in and influence the human state of affairs, but also have a heavenly counterpart configured stellar interactions. The extent of this knowledge confounded as it has been by time and prejudice, is just now beginning to reappear and from it much will surely be gleaned. The ‘wild god’ is the most ancient god. He is the prototype of the Vedic Pasupati, ’lord of the beasts’ and the primordial hunter. Scenes from his legends, inscribed on the walls of caves, have survived hundreds of thousands of years. “Raudra in the Vedic myth of the primordial hunter and avenger showed himself in his yoga power. He let his arrow fly against the course of events in the cosmic drama that he as Fire had directed, having prepared seed for the father and having inflamed the father with sexual passion. When Father Heaven vaulted over the first dawn of the world and his seed started to flow, the wholeness that was before the beginning of things was ruptured. Eternity flowed as time into a world of contingency... When the semen of the Lord of Generation touched the earth, it became a lake of fire (MS.4.2.12) 4


“The Sun rose first from the flaming seed. Animal life arose from its ashes, and from the still glowing coals the fire priest and Brhaspati, the great master and teacher of gods, came into existence (A.B.3.34). This earth in its sacred aspect is the site of the sacrifice, the vedi. (cf. R.V.I.164.35)”17 “The wild God, the essence of fire, is in fire, in the waters, in the plants; he has entered all beings (KaS.40.5;TS.5.5.9.3;cfAV.7.87.1). Inwardly he marks them with his signature.” 5 The poetry of the unknown carries on across the waves of time and with each crest and valley another subtlety found deep within Rudra’s character is revealed. Pasupati-Rudra-Siva is also the Linga, the sign and Bindu.

7.1 Heaven and Earth While keeping in mind the Vedic scene of the first dawn, let’s journey across the world of tradition and look at how the Linguam and Yoni masquerade as Adam and Eve in the Old Testament Book of Genesis. Since this Biblical narrative has been interpreted and vehemently debated for over two thousand years, I must pre-empt our sojourn into its symbolism by stating that it is but another angle from which to appreciate the immense and dynamic meaning of creation. The play begins with a blanket of virgin darkness, the curtain is closed: “And the Earth was without form, and darkness upon the face of the deep. And God said let there be light; and there was light... and God divided the light from darkness. And God called the light day and the darkness night.” 6 God spoke and the world (word) was. The sound or word of God predominates in the beginning of things. “Having created the cosmos on the firm foundation of the Vedas (Eternal Wisdom) (SB.6.1.1.8), the Creator desired to create creatures. By his Mind he united with Speech and became pregnant. By the union of the creative intellect and articulate speech, the cosmos came to exist and all who have their place in it...” 7 The Maori creator Lo “ dwelt within the breathing space of immensity. The universe was in darkness, with water everywhere. There was no glimmer of dawn, no clearness, no light.


And he began by saying these words “Darkness become light-possessing Darkness”.8 A Maori priest refers to the words of Lo as The ancient and original sayings. The ancient and original words. The ancient and original cosmological wisdom (Wananga) Which caused growth from the void, The limitless space-filling void.9 In view of the above passages we can see that even the farthest ranging traditions directly imply that speech or the primordial sound of God was the first step towards creation, a subject that we will return to in the next book, the “Code of Creation” and find out just what the meaning of this is and rediscover the power of the creative word. As we have seen, the Sri’s first two triangles face in opposite directions and, representing alternation, proclaim the division of night/darkness and day/light. (Figure 32) They are the firmament’s expression of (Siva-Purusha-Linguam) and (Sakti-Prakriti-Yoni), soon to be figuratively embodied in Adam and Eve. Having created the palette of elements that eventually become nature, the Biblical God says: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created him; male and female he created them.” 10 Again, the naming or speech of God is prominent and precedes the actual act of creating. The ‘us’ and ‘our’ to which the God above refers, suggests that the Creator is not alone. Did you happen to notice that male and female are in this verse both created? Man’s dominion or custodianship of Earth is reminiscent of a tribal and totemistic perspective of the world. In this view, each animal and the part of nature it corresponds to, is represented microcosmically in the tribe and body of humanity. “ if each animal reflects particular aspects of Great Spirit, human beings, on


the contrary, may include within themselves all the aspects” 11 The term ‘man’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘manas’, which translates as the ‘mind’ of; ‘those who reflect upon themselves’ and have the capacity to witness the distinction of ‘other’. The name ‘Manu’, the first ancestor of humanity and brother of death ‘Yama’, is derived from the same root and is another Vedic equivalent of Adam. The name Adam is not as is often thought a proper noun but a generic term used to designate humanity in general. In Iran, Yama’s name was replaced or confused with his sister’s ‘Yima’. ‘Yama’ is also attributed with the same characteristics as ‘Manu’. “It is said of Yima that: “ he was the most glorious of all mankind... and so powerful that he gave men and beast immortality... In the reign of Yima, the valiant, there was neither heat nor cold, neither old age nor death, nor disease...” 12 The separation of man/Linguam and woman/Yoni although verbalized by God, at this stage in Genesis remains indistinct; the polarization of the Linga is still fresh and ambiguous.

7.2 The Immortals The Vedic Brahma/Prajapati’s creation was first populated by his direct offspring who, being mind born ascetics, refused to procreate, opting instead to carry on with the experience of ecstatic absorption, Samadhi. Rudra, the lord of ascetics and yoga “refused to cooperate with Brahma and left the creation of fallible, vulnerable mortals to Brahma. Rudra withdrew into himself; he became Sthanu and, in the sparse, motionless shape of the pillar of self containment, he then and for all time upheld what he had guarded before creation had become an issue: the inviolate integrity of a state beyond words, to which as Lord of Yogis he now showed the way.” 13 Rudra/Siva’s creation was unsatisfactory to Brahma who desired a ‘created sphere’, a mortal state, sustained by procreation. The Old Testament God shared this same desire for he said; “Be fruitful, and multiply.” 14 With the prototypical world complete the Creator took a day off and rested. “Man himself had not as yet come to exist, and after a long sleep Brahma


awoke in a new aeon (kalpa) (LP.1.41.37-38). The past aeon in which Rudra was born of Prajapati saw the Great God inwelling in the cosmos... That aeon with its universe was ideational. It adumbrated the forecast; it provided the setting of a world where man would live and die.” 15 Before we pick our story back up lets take a quick look at the origins of the Biblical book of Genesis. Besides incorporating narrative from earlier traditions the book of Genesis is also a composite of different literary strands. Two of which are differentiated not only by style and content but also by the different names they use for god. One uses the name Elohim for god and the other the name YHWH. It is generally agreed that the Elohistic account was composed in the northern kingdom of Israel while the Yahwist account in the souther kingdom of Judea. Both are thought to be composed between the 10th and 8th century BCE. It wasn’t until later that they were redacted into one work. After the first Elohistic account of creation, Genesis changes and repeats the story. “Related to the (reversibility of origin) is the flexibility of overlapping situations and conceptual levels. Time and space, as mythical dimensions, allow not only the same objects or symbols but also the same actions to be grouped in several ways.” 16 The reversability of origin is the point of view of the created, which must look back towards the source of creation. However, from the source or Creator’s perspective, creation steps forward. The tricky orientation of perspective gives rise to much confusion and can make a world of difference. However, because linear progression is but a one dimensional quality and creation is nonlinear, both perspectives coexist and overlap. In Genesis, the second version of creation is conceivably where the conditions formed in the pure, conceptual state are created again as the living nature of things. With the matrix set, the generation of things could unfold. “These are the generations of the heavens and the earth... and the Lord god formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life;... and the Lord god commanded the man saying, of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat. But the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shall not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die”.17 Originally,the creative God, in the six days of pre-creation, gave


dominion of the whole world sphere to mankind, yet here (as the creative inspiration takes on a manifest nature), God limits this dominion and forbids man from tasting the fruit of knowledge. If the first rendition of creation as recounted in Genesis happened in the realm of mind (Manas), then it was somehow wedged between the uncreated source and what was to become creation. At this point the Bindu/Linga’s inherent polarity had not yet yielded any solid distinction; it only enjoyed distinction as a potential. Supportive of this view is a North American Indian legend that recalls a time when: “all creatures, including man, were spirits. They moved about in space between earth and the stars (the heavens)...” 18

7.3 Androgeny and the Hermaphrodite In the Vedas, the legendary entities who populated this ‘in-between’ era of divine formation were powerful principalities not unlike the Creator, Linga/Prajapati/Brahma. They were close to the ‘undiluted wholeness’. The mind-born offspring of Brahma were whole in themselves and had no desire to procreate. These circumstances persisted even after Rudra, taking pity on the creator’s plight, allowed himself to be born as “an androgyne, the right half male, the left female, but the male and female halves had no procreative association. In their contiguous closeness there was no room for desire.” 19 Could this have been an era when humanity appeared in the form of hermaphrodites and men and women were together in a united body? One of Plato’s characters in his “Symposium of Love” seems to think so. Aristophanes posits the idea that masculinity and femininity were originally constructed in one being: “ First of all, you must learn the constitution of man and the modifications which it has undergone... In the first place there were three sexes, not, as with us, two, male and female; the third partook of the nature of both the others and has vanished, though its name survives. The hermaphrodite was a distinct sex in form as well as in name, with characteristics of both male and female... each human being was rounded whole, with double back and flanks forming a complete circle; it had four hands and an equal number of legs, and two identically similar faces upon a circular neck, with one head common to both the faces, which were turned in opposite directions. It had four ears and two organs of generation and


everything else to correspond.” 20 This is a metaphorical description of the Earth, with her four cardinal d i r e c t i o n s , fo u r i n t e r m e d i a t e directions and two poles. The circle, roundness and the number four in traditional philosophies represent completeness. The four arms, one head and two faces pointing in opposite directions are also illustrated by the Sri’s first two triangles. (Figure 32) “Having transferred prakriti from the linga to the yoni (vedi),.. (and)... from the union of linga and yoni (vedi) came Ardhanarisvara”, the hermaphrodite.21

3 1 2

Figure 33 The third triangle in the Sri Mandala is drawn through the point where the first two triangles intersect. It metaphorically alludes to the division of the hermaphrodite into male and female parts.

The hermaphrodite possessing both generative organs, shares a close association with the Linga/ Bindu. The Sri Mandala’s first triangle is also an expression of the Linga/Bindu-hermaprodite. It has both sexes present. Its vertical apex denotes the Linga-Sign/Bindu, while the two poles of its horizontal base signify the Linga Purusha/SIva and Linga Prakriti/ Yoni (Figure 29). The hermaphrodite in Genesis is Adam and in the Vedas is Ardhanarisvara.

7.4 The Fatal Split Aristophane’s diatribe goes on to explain that “Their strength and vigor made them very formidable, and their pride was overweening... ’So Zeus and the other gods debated what was to be done with them... At last after much painful thought, Zeus had an idea. “I think”, he said, “that I have found a way by which we can allow the human race to continue to exist and also put an end to their wickedness by making them weaker. I will cut each of them in two;” 22 Zeus bisected them and had Apollo (god of light and knowledge) healed the wounds. This is illustrated with allegorical perfection by the third triangle in the Sri Mandala, which cuts through the place where the first two triangles join. (Figure 33) After the hermaphrodites were cut in half, they had only two arms and two legs; one half was made male, the other female. Hence the attraction


of the sexes and the relentless search for our ‘soulmate’ is really our longing to find and regain this wholeness. Back in Genesis, God gives all the animals birth and the logos this time comes from Adam who officiates by naming them or calling them forth. Soon after, God under the pretence of alleviating Adam’s loneliness, “caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept: and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh thereof; And the rib... made he a woman, and bought her unto man. And Adam said, this is now bone of my bones, flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken from Man.” 23 In the Purana’s: “Sakti manifested from the body of Siva. She had all the divine qualities of the Great God. Though she pervaded everything, she appeared like a wonderfully embodied woman, bewildering the entire world with her maya, her magic illusion, for in reality she is unborn, though apparently born of Siva. (SP. 7.1.16.6-11) “the Great Goddess, the highly illustrious one, sharing half the body of the lord, on having been separated by him, became Sati,” The Real” (LP.1.70,326-27).” 24 Adam/Purusha is the Linga/Bindu, the intangible source of desire. Through the medium of nature, of the Goddess, the Linga/Bindu manifests as the first triangle in the Sri Mandala. Eve/Prakriti, the second triangle, is also the ground upon which desire’s seed takes root. And that ground is creation itself, the manifest nature of the world. (Shunyata refer to notes) Ardhanarisvara as ”Rudra split his undivided male-female self into a male and a female entity.” 25 From Adam one rib is taken. In the legends of Rudra this analogy is taken a step further. He separated himself from his virile member. “Drastically, he severed his procreative limb from his vast body, and set his linga free... In its fiery light it held all the potentialities of becoming...” 26 This dismemberment is symbolic of the primordial ejaculation. It represents the extra part that makes Eve distinct from Adam. The second triangle of the Sri Mandala is greater than the first by exactly one part, or 1/48th of the circle’s diameter. This is the one ‘part’ that is metaphorically alluded to by the legends. It is from the Sri Mandala’s second trine that dynamic contrast is able to come forth


in the third trine of mind, illusion and time.

7.5 The Mystical Power of Sex The Linga/Bindu’s unlimited potential dilates into the first triangular form, which is Linga/Purusha-Adam, the plan or matrix of desire. The second trine is the Purusha/Linguam-Adam’s ‘metamorphic’ identification with the Yoni/Prakriti-Eve state. Together the first and second trines comprise a geometric hermaphrodite as demonstrated in Figure 32. Their intimacy is then divided by a third trine (Figure 32), that pre-empts the birth of time and solidifies the illusion of separation in the body/mind. “Out of the timelessness of his stasis, Sthanu (who is Rudra) communicated his being to Time... Sthanu, in ascetic withdrawal from the world, motionless and beyond time, represents eternity realized from within.” 27 One principle tenet shared alike by Tantra, Saivism, Taoism and Tibetan Buddhism, is that sexual energy can be circulated within the body of a copulating couple in a manner that rejuvenates them both, with the life-giving vitality of the raised seed or sexual charge. In this sense the man and woman are united in body, mind and soul, linked in an ecstatic experience of nurturing reciprocity. We didn’t age or even need to eat as long as this sexual alchemy was unimpeded. It was a dangerous balance, for the third trine, in one sense Linguam and Yoni’s offspring and in another their sexual vitality, marked a quality that would eventually facilitate their fall and lead to death. “The sexual union of Siva and Parvati was beyond compare; on one occasion they made love for a thousand years (SP.2.4.1.27-28) The love-making of Siva and Parvati was as hot as fire, for Rudra is Fire, and there was no end to their love play, for the Great Yogi retained the semen in his body. The love-making of the Great God...was different from any other, human or divine.” 28 The substance that irradiated within the body of the divine couple as they made love was Soma, the substance of immortality. Soma has eluded any steadfast definition and has subsequently been translated in a variety of ways. It is at once a mysterious plant, a magical elixir, the sperm, the moon and a powerful psychedelic medicine. In the Vedas, Indra changed into a falcon and stole its recipe from the guardian Vrtra, who like the Grecian Python, was the ancient ‘Naga’ (serpent) guardian of the Uncreated. During the primordial period marked by the dawning of the


world, the Soma substance was held sanctified and protected by Vrtra. Rather than arising from an external cause or substance, Soma arose as the substance of life and remained within, as a yogic experience. Biophysicists have found psychomimetic substances present in our chemical constitution and the make of our neuro-pathways and glandular system. One of these, known as 6-methoxy-tetra-hydroharmane, is a close relative to the active harmaline substance found in Yage, a vine growing in South America. It should come as no surprise that the Indians “believe that the intoxication it produces marks a ‘return to earth,’ a return to the beginning of things... there is some belief that this chemical is in the pineal (so called ‘third eye’) gland of highly advanced yogis and other mediators.” 29 So Adam and Eve are blissed out in a nurturing, carefree environment, making love, rejuvenating their bodies and peaking on inner substances. It is easy to imagine that under these conditions time and space had an entirely different meaning. During Siva and Shakti’s legendary love ceremony, they distilled the sacred sexual wisdom that invoked and sustained the eternal experience of Paradise. Remnants of this knowledge survives in the Tantras which are written as a type of lovers dialogue between Siva and Shakti. Could the Biblical portrayal of Adam and Eve in Paradise really be a disguised memory of Siva and Shakti, and a morally tinted version of their love play? The ecstatic state of being that this stage in creation facilitated, corresponds to a realm of which we are mainly unconscious, yet it seems as if it is this realm for which we most yearn. Creation, in order to fulfil the initial desire of Linga the Creator, took on a manifested, phenomenal body.

7.6 The Orgasmic Tumble “The Perfect Age, the Krta Yuga, had passed. It was perfect inasmuch as it contained the abiding themes on which the myth of Mahadeva, the Great God, was built. They were to sustain and determine the on-going structure of his presence. The Krta Yuga, however, was less than perfect if it were assessed in human terms. It began with the fall from the Uncreate into creation.” 30 In Genesis, God said, “Do not eat of the tree of wisdom for surely you shall die”. The serpent, who enters the Biblical script, in the


time before time, was Vrtra, the guardian of Soma and the Uncreate. In Genesis the serpent is considered to be more subtle than any beast of the field. The serpent tempted Eve, by saying: “Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden? And the woman said unto the serpent, We may eat of the fruit trees of the garden; But of the fruit of the tree which is in the center of the garden, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall not surely die. For God doth know that within the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as the gods, knowing good and evil. And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat.” 31 The relation of sex and food is all but common knowledge. In many languages the terms used to describe the taste of food, are the same as those used to describe a sexual experience. Adjectives like tender, hot and spicy, sweet and tasty, delicious, creamy and succulent, obviously have a dual application. Fruit holds the seed and is particularly suggestive. Some fruits blatantly represent the Linguam and Yoni (Cacao Dimilio, maybe enter picture). From the ripening of one’s sexuality with puberty to the fruits of intimate love, food is closely linked to the sexual experience. The apple and eating are both symbolic of the sexual act. The presiding God referred to above is thematically Rudra, the Linga/Bindu, the overseer of the initial plan. Eden is Linga’s creation or Purusha/Linguam-Adam’s potential, existentially expressed through the body of Prakriti/Yoni-Eve. The materialization of nature is essentially the solidification of the Linga’s desire for pleasure (Paradise). Adam-Purusha/Linguam is the universal man (the cosmic plan) and Eve-Prakriti/Yoni, being an extension of the previous, is the universal nature, (the unfoldment of the plan). The serpent, representative of the pre-existent ‘order’, has a Linguam shaped body and in dreams, esoteric traditions and the global compendium of myth, symbolizes the powerful sexual energy that lies at the base of all things. It is in keeping with this theme that the serpent becomes associated with the sexual potency of Adam/Linguam and Eve/Yoni. Nada is a term generally taken to mean sound and its similar to the word Naga, meaning serpent. The third triangle of the Sri


holding the potential of illusion, befittingly is represented by the serpent. “(From the union of Siva and Sakti arises creative ideation). This union and mutual relation is called Nada... Nada is really Siva-Sakti; passing from the state of mere potency into that of the first ideating movement, from which at length, when finally perfected, the whole universe is evolved... it is said that the Nada is the Maithuna (Love making) of Siva and Sakti... Two involves a third, which is the relation of both...” 32 The Biblical Adam and Eve, like Siva and Shakti, were initially immortal, for in Genesis their fall from God’s grace is what brought the curse of death and separation. “And I will put enmity between thee and woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel. Unto the woman he said, I will greatly multiply thy sorrow and thy conception, in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee. And unto Adam he said, Because thou has hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hath eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life... in the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.” 33 At the crux of this uncompromising vengeance is the act of eating and procreation. Both result from the loss of the vital state of sexual bliss, that sustained itself and had no need for food. The eating of the fruit which brought the fall, is an analogy of the first external ejaculation. As mentioned earlier in the Vedas, dawn of creation began as Prajapati/Brahma’s burning seed fell to earth. The outpouring of vital substance is what broke the enchantment that had carried over from Adam/Linguam and Eve/Yoni’s original togetherness. Even after being separated, they maintained wholeness through the enjoyment of their independent bodies, timelessly existing in the unity of immortal copulation. With the ejaculation of the serpent-like sperm, the web of illusion grew in strength and time set in. Woman was cursed to procreate and man was cursed to toil and die. What the curse describes is the terrifying result of the first ejaculation. The serpent, the sexual might of Adam and Eve is the principle behind Maya, the illusionary nature of the created world. The serpent, identified with Maya, is the third trine in the Sri. It is an


aspect of nature ‘create’ and is thus an extension of Eve-Prakriti/ Yoni. As we saw in Figure 33, the sides of the third triangle cut through the place where the first two triangles meet. The serpent, the universal symbol of sexuality comes into the myth and teases Eve, tempting her with the sweetness of the prohibited fruit. The fruit itself is symbolic of the ovum whereas the serpent represents the agility and movement of the sperm. After Adam and Eve spill their vitality into the exterior realm, a sexual imbalance sets in, and they felt strange, depleted and guilty. God, knowing what had occurred, curses them; “woman must bear child and serve man and man must work and die.” This curse is the underlying mandate for every family, society and culture and has been since the beginning of time. The experience of sexual bliss and rejuvenation is the fountain from which innumerable progeny spring. The fountain of immortality has been turned upside down, inverted and exteriorized as procreation. The super potent energy that kept the primeval couple vitalistic and young was redirected towards the birth of children. Death and time were thus unleashed and came forth in their full, awesome might. When God created Adam, he formed a sexually whole being, one who naturally existed in a state of perpetual balance. Following the platonic train of thought, the Gods were worried about the ability and strength of the one, complete, singular body of humanity and so separated the female from the male (Refer to “Skanda Mara” of the Iron Age in the “Oracle of Revelation”). Duality, the parent of multiplicity intercedes between the original state of sexual unity. In this way the three principal triangles of the Sri Yantra are metaphorically shaped. The initial state is represented in the “Oracle of Revelation” by: the “Golden Trumpet Blows”, the origin of all things; it is both the Bindu and the first triangle, the moment of creation. The second triangle is represented by, the “Mask Face Dances” and the third triangle quite aptly corresponds to the “False Prophet”. With the completion of these three primary triangles, the expression of time begins and plays the primordial drama again and again across the strings of its scythe-like harp. We will now leave the land of anthropomorphic myth. In the next volume the “Code of Creation” we will enter the mantric realm of sound and vibration,


where the scission of the three primary triangles into nine, and then into the composite micro-trines, is more easily followed.


Chapter 1 Introducing Sri Logos

In Development 80%

1.0 The Legacy Unfolds In search of the Lost Logos

In Development 80%

1.1 The Power of Words The hidden Meaning of Words

In Development 75%

1.2 Sense and Sensibility The Two Faces of the Word

In Development 95%

1.3 The Roots of Significants The Five Dimensions of Speech

In Development 90%

1.4 Stratas of Synonymy The Weaving of the World/Word

In Development 90%

1.5 Echoes of Logos The Sacred Languages of the World

In Development 85%

1.6 The Logos The Language of Creation

In Development 85%

1.7 The Sacred Science The Universe of Samkhya

In Development 90%

1.8 The Primordial Samkhya The Streams of Intelligence


1.0 The Legacy Unfolds What attracted me to the Tibetan oracle, the “King of Wisdom Mantras”, (my source of inspiration for this book), was that each of its symbols were accompanied by a related sound. It provided a mantric (sound based) system that could be used to activate the symbol and thereby influence destiny. I wasn’t looking for another arbitrary system, another great belief in nonsense. I sought something more, something that could stand up to my dialectic inquiry yet ultamately remain unlimited by its narrow range. Stubbornly, I battered my head against the proverbial wall attempting to discover how the sounds were related to the symbols. How come the sound ‘Ra Ah’ is associated with the second symbol in the oracle, the “Sun Suddenly Shines”? I used logic and every intuitive method that I could muster and after two long years was still at my wits end. In 1987, Robert Lawlor handed me a pre-release edition of the late Alain Danielou’s “While the Gods Play”. His ex wife, Deborah Lawlor, had helped translate it from French to English. An appendix at the back of this magnificent book, entitled— “Language: Instrument for the Transmission of Knowledge”, introduced an ecclectic code called “the Maheshvarä Sutra”, (MS)1. “The seeds of all human knowledge, the sciences and all that language can contain and express, can be derived from the Mahesvarä Sutra, which means “Sacred Formula of the Great God.” 2 The MS was only preserved through the long seasons of millennia by the steady hand of providence. A synchronistic chain rippled through god knows how many generations before this secret code made its way to Danielou and then landed in my hands. It held the key to what I was searching for that is, clues to the primordial language, Logos. During the early part of the century Danielou lived in India. This is where he met a Shivaite ascetic named Swami Karapatri. Karapatri made a deep impression on Danielou and their discourses over the following years were published in a Sanskrit periodical, and later summarized and expanded by Danielou in his landmark book “Hindu Polytheism”. Swami Karapatri, the head of the Hindu order of ascetic’s (Yogi’s) was also a master of the Maheshvarä Sutra, a verbal code that is so old that it has no written letters. With his musically tuned ear


and phonetic dexterity, Danielou, sat down with Karapatri, and commemorated the Maheshvarä Sutra to writing. Being a true master of language, fluent in most European tongues and thirteen dialects spoken on the continent of India, Danielou was the perfect man for the job. He was also a musical genius and one of the most distinguished Hindu philosophers of our time. Because no language contains all the sounds listed in the MS Danielou had to borrow diacritical conventions from several different tongues. I was deeply moved by “While the Gods Play”. As I devoured its pages I poured feverishly with perspiration and my sleep patterns went berserk. The “Maheshvarä Sutra” was perhaps the most puzzling piece I had ever read but somehow I knew that it held the key to answering my queries. I have had many Extraordinary experiences meditating on the sounds of the Maheshvarä Sutra. Gazing into the Sri Yantra and contemplating the various types of “Samkhya” have opened my eyes and mind. It is these experiences that have led the way and without them this work could never have been scribed. Driven by an irresistible urge I began the process of unravelling the material. After crossing four language barriers the MS arrived in English tainted by well intentioned but doubtlessly over worked editors. Danielou admitted that even in its original state the MS code was quite cryptic and in places sketchy. Even though it amounts to a relatively small number of pages it took me several years to clean up the text. I was intuitively guided and verified my thoughts and findings with Danielou. When the MS came into focus and could be read it intelligibly, I uncovered a fairly obvious link between its vowels and the formative triangles of the Sri Yantra. The successive unfoldment of the Sri Yantra’s nine triangles fit together in aligorical perfection with the ordinal appearance of each the Maheshvarä Sutras nine vowels. Eventually the scheme opened fully and the for ty three consonants took their place. With the hidden plan underlying the MS exposed it wasn’t difficult to discern the various streams of philosophic influence that had crept into the MS over the ages and corrupted it in places. Now for the first time in millenia the MS and the Sri Yantra stand reunited and yoked in power. Much of what we explore look into is still in its infancy, similar to a freshly blossoming flower (the Mind), opening before the rising sun (intelligence). With roots deeply embedded in all the languages


and philosophies of the world, the soil that nourishes the “Code of Creation” is as old as time itself. I’m honored and humbled by the small part that I have played in the legacy of the MS. The “Code of Creation” is not a book—it is an act of destiny.

1.1 The Power of Words Whats in a word but the world itself. The linguistic field is intimately connected with experience. The world we know is the world that we describe. Without speach we would not be. Language stands at the threshold of experience, between the inner being and the apparently external world. There are two very different approaches to the subject of language. There are those who view language as a matter of happen-chance, a mistake, an accident that has no inherent meaning, besides that which society has invested it with. Then there are those that take language as being essentially an expression of the principle of intelligence, that is in itself, innate and universal. In this view the meaning of a word is firstly transcendental and secondly social. In some ways both views are valid. Words have a dual meaning: On the one hand they have a vibrational meaning, an innate frequency, (pitch, tone and tember); and on the other hand, words have a cultural meaning that is built upon lexical layers of useage. Words of this type are constantly shaped by the tides of social change. They express a cultural meaning that is referential but not necessarily innate. However the transcendental aspect of language is composed of the sounds beneath language. These sounds do not change from language to language but the social context in which they are spoken and the meaning to which they are afixed does change. The main difference between the two is that cultural meaning is fickle and varies from person to person, while the vibratory meaning is constant and universal but largly un-communicable. Regardless of if we are aware of it, vibratory meaning underlies the words that we speak. The meaning of the word in a lexical sense may or may not agree with the underlying vibratory meaning, but there are a suprising number of instances when they do. The influence of vibratory meaning, like a river on a stone, naturally bears upon the make up of words. As we shall, see there are many examples of words that exhibit a phonetic (vibrational)


influence and meaning, a sound byte of symbolic resonance. The closer the lexical (dictionary) definition of a word is to its innate, vibratory meaning, the more potent the word would be. The innate meaning of a word not only inseminates the mind and molds society, but also inseminates the world with recognisable phenomena. The Logos of the Creator, is lettered by the organizational modes of intelligence that take form as phenomina. It is these wrinkels in the universe that take shape as the world we know, and evoke the great epic of Creation.

1.2 Sense and Sensibility Conventional mercantile languages like English, wherein cultural meaning predominates, are communicable but remain far from the ideal. While there is still a trace of phonetic symbology present in them, it is faint. This was also evidently true of the ancient Greek tongue some twenty-five hundred years ago. In Plato’s “Cratylus”, the character Socrates speaking about the meaning of names, says: “My friend, you do not bear in mind that the original words have before now been completely buried by those who wished to dress them up... and have distorted the words in every way for ornamentation or merely in the lapse of time... so they keep adding to the original words until finally no human being can understand what in the world the word means.” 3 The story of language is continually changing and its evolution depicts the tendency of the society in which it exists. In this capricious environment the meaning of words is invariably in a constant state of flux, between true and false, between sense and nonsense, and between what’s fashionable and what’s not. Language can be spoken in a sensible manner like: “John ran after the kite” or in a way that makes no sense at all, like: “the kite ran after John”. To someone who doesn’t understand the Language spoken it would appear as nonsense even if it wasn’t. Sense and nonsense do not follow straight paths. Theytwist and turn as they overlap and interchange positions. What may be nonsense at one moment could very well make perfect sense at another. The meaning of the words we use must be common to all speakers of our language. The dictionary meaning that defines our words is collective and social, shared by all the members of our society. However the meaning that we find in the dictionary is based upon individual and personal usage. One word, like the word love, means different things to different people. What words mean to us


is associated with how we have experenced them. While words La ng establish a point of reference u Wi age that is temporal and individual, nd ow they are also indicative of a level of meaning that is eternal. Sacred languages like Hebrew, Mind Sanskrit and to a lessor degree Latin are somewhat fixed. They have been taken off the thread Figure 1 Language acts as a window mill of daily use. Sacred languages between the ‘inner’ mind and the outer are preserved and mainly used in ‘world’. a ceremonial, liturgical context. They are not socially dead but participate in the generative and religious sectors of society. The study of language is as old as speech itself. However, it was only reborn as a ‘soft’ science after the renaissance and didn’t gain ground until around the turn of the century. Many theories and ideas, have since been put forth, ranging from the “logicism” of Gottlob Frege to the genetically inclined, universal grammar of Noam Chomsky. A review of these theories would require such complexity that our topic would be quickly over burdened. Several philosophies that did emerge from the ‘new school’, post nineteenth century, of thought sought to rationalize language. They wanted to forget about its emotional dimension, erase its irrationality and ignore its legends. The origin and character of language will always be imbued with mystery—with a mystery that logic may point out and trace but never fully explain. There are aspects of the world and patterns of thought that are valid but not logical. Patterns of Chaos surround us—the weather, global economics, and Language. Language is a mirror of the world on one side and a mirror of the mind on the other. (Figure 1) Our thoughts take the form of words and words borrow their form from both phenomena and ‘feeling’. It makes little difference if this phenomena be made of the matter of the mind or of the material of the world. To understand our place in the world we must use language whether internally or externally, whether as signs, pictures, concepts or as references. Many beliefs (perspectives) that we take for granted and rarely notice, are ‘hard wired’ into the grammar and structure of our


language. Linguistic philosophy offers an immensly rich area of inquiry but one quickly enters a level of complexity that requires the concentration of a specialists. Rather than a review of the latest linguistic theories our path of discovery involves the names of things and what the sounds mean that make up these names—the underpinnings of language. Ours is a bottom up approach.

1.3 The Roots of Significants What is the meaning, of the meaning, of a word? This question may look like a misprint, but it isn’t. What it asks for is a deeper level of significance. Instead of asking about the meaning of a word, it is asking what the meaning of a word, means—where was it derived and first described and how has it evolved and changed through time and association. Words rest upon letters and letters upon sounds. In search for the basis of meaning, and the meaning of language and ultimately the Creator’s ‘Logos, it is only reasonable to begin with the sounds (letters) and their arrangement (words). These sounds are written into the structure of our ‘Being’. They are defined by the possibilities present in the human vocal organ. If the Vocal organ is the ‘hardware’ and language the ‘software’, sound would be the energy that empowers the whole. Our physical instrument of speech, the chamber of our mouth, the movement and shape of our tongue and wind pipe resists change. Our bodies evolve and adapt through many generations and over great spans of time. The different vocal potentials arising from this ‘evolution’ play a part in the cladogenetic shift of consciousness and bodily form, that occurs at the twighlight of the ages. A striking change in our physicality is one of the main qualities that define the various epochs of our existence. Was the first language of the first epoch of man born within us and then developed through us? If it was not born with us we would not have the attributes that give us the ability to speak. With no mouth it would be impossible to utter a word. Can you imagine a world with no words? What would your experience be like? A world devoid of language is similar to infant who can cry and yell but has yet to learn speech. On the one hand consciousness or common awareness in this nearly inconceivable time would have been much different than our thoughts and awareness today. Either our ancestors had an intuitive


connection with the intelligent principle and simply knew what Cerebral in todays terms they Dental would have had know way of knowing. Even with this extra prowess each and every one of Guttural Labial the conventions of the Palatal first language would have required a great deal of concentration and cognitive ability to discover and employ. I’m continua lly fa s c i n a t e d by t h e ability demonstrated Figure 2 The five modes of pronunciation are by what anthropologist indicated in red. The Guttural are formed in the refer to as primitive throat, Palatal sounds at mid tongue, Cerebral sounds are formed by the tongue touching the man. central roof of the mouth, Dental sounds when the The first language tongue touches the ridge behind the upper front of man had no past teeth and finally the Labial sounds are formed when usage, no vocabulary, the lips come into play. n o g r a m m a r, n o spelling and no letters. Where did it come from? While each of us was born into a language, like English or French, the children of the first epoch would have had only goo goo ga ga, to go by. In baby speak, “I have to go to the bathroom sounds a lot like; “Please give me some milk.” Can you remember when you were a toddler learning the sounds of the alphabet? Did you ever wonder where those sounds came from or how they were chosen? Clearly, the basic sounds of any language must first be speakable (able to be spoken), and secondly they must fall within the range of human hearing. The phonetic sounds of every alphabet in the world are but a specialized selection, a set taken from the spectrum of human verbal potential. The chamber of our mouth, empregnanted by the tongue, bears ‘Conception’ into the world. Thorugh its lips a vibrational entity is born. The structure of our mouth, the movement of our lips and tongue, the current and velocity of inhalation and exhalation and the posture of our body, mind and awareness, limit the possibilities


of speech to a finite number of variables. Like keys on a piano they represent the range of vocal notes that can played by our instrument of speach. While there are an immense number of vernacular variants, they can be reduced to, and are derived from, a prime set of sounds. In the same way that the hundred and seven elements of the periodic table can be reduced to five essential modes (spacial or informational, gaseous, igneous, liquid and solid), the elements of speach can be reduced to five primary categories. “The organ of speech is constituted like a yantra,... The palatal vault (like the celestial vault) forms a hemisphere with five points of articulation (Figure 2) allowing the emission of five groups of consonants, five main vowels, two mixed vowels, and two secondary vowels, assimilated to the planets. Likewise in the musical scale, there are five main notes, two secondary ones, and two alternative notes, which are not arbitrary but correspond to fundamental numerical relationships between the sound vibrations that we find at the base of all musical systems.”4 Vernacular sounds are classed according to five places or modes of pronunciation (Guttural, Cerebral, Palatal, Dental and Labial). (Figure 2) Each mode of pronuciation corresponds with an elemental mode of manifestation. We will return to this area in greater detail later in the book. Our approach to uncovering the hidden meaning of sounds is fairly staight forward. It doesn’t require a conceptual ‘great leap’ to see that the sounds produced by guttural region of the vocal organ, the depths of voclalisation, correspond to the deeper levels of meaning and the origin of things and concepts. In the words of Plato—the original naming of things— “was based upon the intention of showing the nature of the things named... For the expression of anything, I fancy, would be accomplished by a bodily imitation of that which was to be expressed.” 5 To indicate that a wolf was approaching to the left, the last thing that you would do is point right. To fully represent (evoke) a thing or (invoke) a concept the arrangement of the vocal organ, the principle of action behind speech, must in some way resemble it. “There are parallels between the transmission of life and the transmission of knowledge, between the Being of Flesh and the Being of Knowledge. The elements that form the genetic code are, like those which form language, similar and limited in number. They are called the Aksharä(s) (constants)...


“As far as language is concerned, the Aksharä(s) are the various elements of articulation that the vocal cords can emit and the ear can recognize... The basic instrument for the formation of knowledge is language, whose limits establish the possibilities for analysis and the transmission of thought... there must be some relation among thought, perception and language; without it language could not act as a vehicle for the others.” 6 The way that each of the periodic elements are defined by a particular atomic arrangement is simmular to how each primary sound is defined by a particular arrangement and movement of the vocal orifice. Matter is composed of chemicals while speech is composed of vibration and again at the basis of the chemical world is an atomic matrix of vibration. Through pronunciation the internal posture of the vocal organ takes on the external characteristics of sound and inturn language. The basic elements of sound form a field of information. They intone vibratory variations that reflect the elemental play of phonemina in the Paradise of Creation.

1.4 Stratas of Synonymy The relationship of sound to words and words to things is a connection based upon what I refer to as “cross class synonymy”. Cross class synonymy is similar to the dynamic correspondence and magical metaphor that were explored in the first book, the “Flower of Bliss”. The lexical definition of words is largly based on synonymy: whereby a word, such as ‘above’ is used to define another, such as ‘heaven’ and vice versa. Synonymy between words forms a bridge between languages, between conceptual worlds. Synonymy also makes it possible to translate one language into another. The French word ‘jour’ is synonymous with the English word ‘day’. Any attempt at representing something in terms of something else requires a system of equivalence.” 7 The synonymous relationship between words that have a similar meaning is indicative of the synonymous relationship inherent throughout all of creation, the ‘symmetry’ between say hearing and sound or sight and light and ultimately between sound and significance, between mind and matter. “It is this reflection that makes magic theoretically possible, an action on one plane being able, under certain circumstances, to move by a sort of resonance the entity that corresponds to it on another plane.” 8


Language is a form of magik where the spelling of words move another to feel, understand and act. Language brings our inner world together with the outer. The synonymy between words is a dynamic reflection, an animated scale by which the standards of meaning are set and refined. Language itself is a medium of synonymy. Its words are synonymous with the concepts and things they describe. “In the Hindu cosmological theory symbolism is conceived as the expression of reality, as a search for the particular points where different worlds meet and where the relation between entities belonging to different orders of things may become apparent.” 9 The crown of the human body, the cerebral dome and the concave roof of our mouth are resonant chambers rich with harmonic potential. In one, thought resonates and in the other, the sound of speech. The inner voice of the mind inspires contemplation while the mouth inspires communication. It is the mouth that feeds the world with thought and the body with nutrients.

“So as above so as below of the one thing.” If the metaphorical crown of the Creator is the celestial vault of stars, then the Creator’s palate could be seen as the the atmosphere. The sky symbolizes air, the element that carries sound. The celestial sphere symbolizes space (the ethers) the carrier of waves, energy and galactic particals. The air element is a densification of the ethers in the same way that speech is a densification of thought. The principles that coordinate, generate and preside over the timing, order and unfoldment of nature are reflected in the prime sounds of language. The intelligent principles that influence and shape each modality of the natural world from point to wave are innately positioned in these sounds. Through the medium of their own conditional limits and scope, they suggest the existence of a broader spectrum of reality. In this way the greater whole is represented in and by the limited nature of its parts. “True symbolism far from being invented by man, springs from Nature (prakriti) itself. The whole of Nature is but the symbol of a higher reality.” 10 The basic sounds are dynamic elements of correspondence that weave the threads of diverse perception into a great tapestry of conception. Language, the symbolic medium, is used to share the perceptive experience with others and the mind’s intelligence with pure consciousness. Human language is a miniature of the Creator’s Logos, the basic composition of which parallels the order


underlying the universe. Socrates speaking about the meaning of names asks: “can you suggest any better way of making them representations than by making them as much as possible like the things which they are to represent?... Representing by likeness the thing represented is absolutely and entirely superior to representation by chance signs.” 11 Since the names of things no longer imitate the nature of the things they describe, our focus must be on the letters which form the names, and then on how the sounds are made that form the letters. Nandikeshvara, on whose work the Mahesvara Sutra is based, like Plato— “attributes a basic meaning to the various linguistic elements according to the placement and movements of the vocal organs that produce the different sounds of the spoken language.” 12 The methods used to fore-actively develop the proto Sanscrit language from the Mahesvarä Sutra were similar to those employed by Plato, in his book “Cratylus” to retro-actively discover the meaning and origin of the ancient Greek language.

1.5 Echoes of Logos Is the language of creation composed of sacred words of power, of utterances that not only reflect but create or generate reality? What would constitute such a language? Actually, even ordinary language molds our world and to a great extent creates our view of reality. The divine Logos is something more. However, the more saturated wine is the less it is able to intoxicate and the more saturated language is the weaker its influence. In Greek, the meaning of Logos is word—a word whose meaning has shifted towards reason as its offspring, logic would imply. The Logos to which I refer is the sacred language that called creation forth and named the regions of emptiness—the legendary vernacular notes that enchant the sun to rise and the river to flow. “The theory of the Creative Word is based on an analogy between the process involved in the transformation of thought into word and sound vibration, and the process of divine thought, which becomes the substance of the world in the shape of energy vibrations. This analogy enables the Yogi to start from the word and work his way backward, thereby reaching, without going outside himself, the birthplace of the manifested, the limits of the “beyond” (Parä), the “Principle of the Word” (Shabdä Brahman)... 13


There is a lot of hocus pocus and metaphoric cobwebs encrusting the great Logos. Rediscovering Logos is only half the problem. If such a language existed how would we know it, define it and how would we use it? How could modern man unlock the full potentcy of its power. One could assume that at the very least it must be spoken ‘correctly’, that is, with the right mind and at the right time in the right place and in the right way. What would determine all of these ‘rights’?. A whole sacred technology would nessassarly be involved lest one be guided by a very intelligent, intuitive force. Is the tongue Hebrew the Logos, the sacred language of God? It is to the tribes of Israel and Cabalistic Sages. Is Latin the sacred language? It is to the three billion Catholics in the world. Is Arabic the sacred language? It is to the billions of Islamic followers and the mystical Sufis. Is the sacred language Sanskrit? It is to the Hindus and Yogis of India. Perhaps this sacred language is genetic and made up of the four letters of the DNA? How can all of these languages be the one sacred language of the creator, the great mysterious Logos? They can’t. No matter how vehemently one believes or which way we want to look at it, billions of people are simply wrong. Besides DNA which is bio-chemical, each language mentioned above, even the most refined language known to man, Sanskrit, is a hybrid that is built upon the synonymic roots of more ancient tongues. The study of the symbolic meaning of the phonemes, whose use is to be found in Manträ(s), the formulae used to evoke the various aspects of the supranatural world, belong not to the Sanskrit language, but to a general theory of the symbolism of sounds.”34 “The use of a few vowels and consonants which did not originally exist in Sanskrit seems to indicate that Sanskrit is not at the base of the phonetic system even though it became closely linked with it. The phonetic system is independent of the diversity of languages...”35 Even the most beautiful mutt will never be a thoroughbred. Like the great blocks of ancient ruins rearranged in new buildings, these languages are fragments of the universal Logos. Rediscover Logos is all about rediscovering the power within.

1.6 The Logos The primeval Logos is a subject as immense as the universe it has created and describes. Because of its close proximity, of its


intimacy with experience and thought, the vernerable logos refuses to be pinned down by mere facts alone. The inner workings of language, its sanctum of subtle mysteries, are bond to be self-secret and confusing to the uninitiated. Entry into the inner penetralia of Logos requires concentration, contemplation and a very still mind. Although these qualities are apparently unique faculties present in mankind, they, like a muscle must be developed and refined. The practice outlined in the “Temple of Paradise Trilogy”, ‘Sri Jnanna Yoga’ (the Yoga of immaculate wisdom), not only develops the higher levels of mind but also cultivates ‘supra-natural’ degrees of perception and cognition. Understanding is the pillar upon which faith stands. To truelly understand the Logos we must enter the misty land of legend that hold the secrets of the first tongue and recall the primordial language that gave birth to creation. “In the beginning was the word (Logos), and the word (Logos) was with God, and the word (Logos) was God.” 14 “At a new beginning of the world the gods made Vastospati... from... a “word of power,” a mantric poem, uttered by them when the seed of the creator fell on the earth:” 15 “Vak is the unborn.” It was from Vak that the maker of the Universe (Visvakarma) produced creatures... Various texts associate the Lord of creatures (Prajapati),... with his Sakti Vac... ‘By His mind He united with Vac... Creation was preceded by the Word from which the whole universe of Devas and organic and inorganic earth-life are produced.’” 16 The divine origin of speech and the cosmic play of creation walk hand in hand across all the legends of the world. Scientists come close when they describe the ejaculation of Prajapati as the Big Bang. However, those who insist that language and higher levels of cognition stem from a larger brain volume17 suggesting that consciousness itself is formed by matter, seem to have gotten this one bass-akwards. In the same way that imagination precedes discovery and thought precedes speech, the mind precedes matter. The design or ‘plan of embodiment’ must precede the ‘act of embodiment’—the tree springs forth from the unseen formula of the seed in the same way as sound comes forth


out of silence. Everything is silent and— “In this Infinite Calm there arises a metaphysical Point of stress or Bindu, which stirs forth... as the multiple forces of the universe.” 18 As the pure sounds (the elements of Logos) step into form, an imprint of their original nature is embedded upon each stage in the unfoldment of creation. The letters of Logos step into form as elements, not only of the material world, but of the perceptive and intellectual faculties the make the world ‘real’isable.

1.7 The Sacred Science The evolution of consciousness, from its mysterious origin, nothingness, to the great galactic intellegence that encompasses everything, was outlined by the Sages in the vernerable ‘Samkhya’. Samkhya, a categorical system that is derived from the experience of Yoga, is the ancient equivalent of physics. “According to the Samkhyä, the universe has developed from elemental formulae that are mathematical in nature, or at least able to be expressed in mathematical or geometric terms (in this case Yanträ[s]) and which are common to all aspects of creation. There is no difference of nature between the formulae at the base of structures of the atoms of matter, the movement of the stars, the principles of life, the mechanisms of perception and thought, which are, all of them, parallel and interdependent manifestations of energy, resulting from common patterns.” 19 Samkya is the organizational model through which the prime elements of “That’ness” (Tattva) evolve into Creation. It is these elements that underlie and give rise to our cognition and experience of the world. Each element of ‘That’ness’ (Tattva) corresponds to a primary sound, a digit of Logos, a modality of consciousness and a tendency of potential. Samkya is the ‘Emerald Tablet’ of the once great sacred science. It is the alchemical palette of creation. Samkya in some ways resembles the ‘Periodic Table of Elements’. However, instead of being determined by the variations in atomic cycles Samkya envisions reality as being built upon elements or evolutes of consciousness. Beginning in nothingness and steping through the point of becoming the exsistence is born as the offspring of Principle and Power, of Mind and Matter, of Heaven and Earth.

1.8 The Primordial Samkhya Samkhya’s orgin is concieled by the veil of time and its influence


has pread through the immemorial traditions of the East. The renowned ascetic, Kapila, the skull bearer and founder of the Kapila lineage, is the earliest known adherent of Samkhya. For some, Kapila is considered to be an incarnation of Maha-Vishnu and for others, an avatar of Siva. The paradigmatic form of Samkhya has branched like a river into many tributaries and streams. These offshoots carry the same essence (water) as the main river, however their path is precarious and their destination unsure. “The Vedic literature, and especially the Upanishadic, has various seed thoughts and doctrines as also terminologies without precise meanings. This provided the intellectual climate required for the emergence of different systems of thought based on the same text. Basic terms of Indian philosophy like Brahman, Atman, Prakriti, Akshara, etc.”20 — only came to have precise meaning in the later philosophies. The Feminine principle, Prakriti, is also called as Maya— “a term which in earlier literatures was known as Brahman, Akshara, Avyakta, and Mahan-atma... Prakriti is called His Yoni (source of creative power) and also as Devatma shakti (the inherent Power of the Lord)”21 To rediscover the original Samkhya I followed the tributaries, the hints and wily currents back toward their origin. The haze of bewilderment was eventually dissolved by determination. The yoga, ceremony and contemplation slowly transformed my raw intuitiion into awe inspiring realization. Pre-classical Samkhya, like the Veda, is considered to be of the class of supernal or revealed wisdom. It is logical in many respects yet the ultimate meaning of Samkhya is reserved for those who are able to realize it through direct experience. Samkhya is dressed in such rich metaphore throughout the Vedanta that it is barely recognisable. The earliest remaining work devoted to Samkhya is Ishvara Krishna’s, “Samkhya Karika”. A text which dates from around the 3rd to the 5th century A.D. The “Samkhya Karika” declares itself to be a summary of an much earlier, more elaborate treatise known as the “Shashti-tantra”22 which unfortunatly has been lost in the chasm of time. Samkhya is a Sanskrit word that is— “Derived from the root ‘Khya’, enumeration, together with the prefix ‘Sam’,


it imparts wisdom through the analysis and enumeration of experience into the categories constituting it.”23 Most Samkhya based systems exhibit strikingly similarities. The discrepancies that do exist between its various forms— PreClassical of the Vedas, Classical Samkhya of the Karikas, Trika Samkhya as found in the Tantras, Epic Samkhya of the Mahabharata and Bhagavata Samkhya as found in the Kapilopadesha— generally involves terminology, the number of elements (Tattva) and their order of appearance. The arguments for or against any particular form of Samkhya have a tendency to draw attention away from their common source and evolution. The variants of Samkya differ by the degree of their imperfection, of their deviation from the prototypical Samkya that engendered them. However, there are some mutant varients of Samkhya that have become so twisted that they are used to validate an atheistic dogma. This is clearly a departure from its pre-classical roots which are intimately connected with the mystery of creation’s sacred and divine cause. It also suggests that Samkhya has been influenced by Buddhist and Jain thought which— “ developed a spiritual and ascetic view of life without a God or a soul.”24 The Samkhya philosophy is one of the most exciting, challanging and potentially rewarding areas of spiritual exploration. It is however, heady stuff that has been weighed down by wayward arguments and dry dissertations. While often helpful, ultamently, logic and inference, are secondary to the realisation of Samkhya as experienced through the higher forms of Yoga, when the universal and individual merge. After wading through a number of discourses on Samkhya and meditating on its principles and their sounds, I abandoned the idea that one existent tradition could fully represent it and concluded that the difference of views, instead of being right or wrong, simply mark its evolution with the confusing and conflictual nature of this era, the Kali Yuga. The elements of Samkhya, the dimensions of the Sri Yantra and their phonetic corollary, the sounds of the Mahesvarä Sutra, are a threefold emanation of the same certain truth. Resting like stones at the base of sacred science they are exquisite artifacts of the great primordial, nameless tradition that remains active behind all forms of cabalistic and magical workings. Through the lapse of time they were separated and then splintered into a plethoria of different


esoteric systems, one of which was remarkably Mi-pham’s, “King of Wisdom Mantras”.


Chapter 2 The Sounds of Genisis

2.0 Opening the Way In Development 95%

Rediscovery of the Mahesvara Sutra

2.1 The Mahesvarä Sutra In Development 95% In Development 75%

Entering the Sanctuary of Sound

2.2 The Path of Definition The Letters of Significants

2.3 The Nine Vowels: A-I-U-N In Development 75%

2.3.1 The Vowel A

In Development 75%

2.3.2 The Vowel I 2.3.3 The Vowel U

2.4 The Second Vowel Group— Ë-Ü-K In Development 85%

2.4.1 The Fourth Vowel Ë

In Development 75%

2.4.2 The Fifth Vowel Ü

2.5 The Third Vowel Group— É-Ó-N In Development 80%

2.5.1 The Sixth Vowel É

In Development 70%

2.5.2 The Seventh Vowel Ó

2.? The Fourth Vowel Group— È-Ò-CH In Development 65%

2.5.1 The Eighth Vowel È

In Development 75%

2.5.2 The Ninth Vowel Ò


2.0 Opening the Way The quest to wield and understand the power of sacred utterance (Mantras) has been undertaken by man for at the very least, hundreds of thousands of years. During the Tantric and Puranic revival period in the far East the magical and religious use of sound was taken to new heights. However what emerged were characteristically superstitious, fragmentary and prejudiced. Few were based upon firm inquiry and research During this revival, between the 5th and 11th centuries, a complex web of superstition, interwoven with the glistening strands of wisdom, was spun across the vestiges of Logos. The liturgical (mantric) codes found in the Tantras and related treatises is beyound the scope of this work. They would require a familiarity with Sanskrit, ancient history and eastern philosophy to be understood Rather than a full expose on the great web of mantric mystery, a subject that would require an extensive work of its own, our focus is on the ‘Formula of the Great Being” (the Mahesvarä Sutra). The sound groups of the Mahesvarä Sutra, their correlative elements as described by the Samkya and the place they hold in the Sri-NJ. Mag mandala have been reunited for the first time in millennia in the “Code of Creation” Diagrams have been extensively employed to clearly show how the graphic construction of the Sri Yantra perfectly recipicates the phonetic structure of the Mahesvarä Sutra. They further depict how the sounds of the Mahesvarä Sutra fit with immaculent precision into the Sri Yantra. Each of the Mahesvarä Sutra’s sounds intone one of Samkyas elements of consciousness and correspond to each of the fifty two symbols in the “Oracle of Revelation”. The representation of phonetic sounds by letters is tricky especially when they are the letters of a language that relatively few people speak. Verbal direction and actually hearing the sound makes a world of difference. However when a sound is properly intoned one would be hard pressed not to feel it and feel it with certainty. I have clarified and expanded the Mahesvarä Sutra’s basic information and provided a pronunciation key for those of you who may be unfamiliar with Sanskrit. With careful practise the Mahesvara Sutra’s sounds can be used by everybody for meditation. “The Mahesvarä Sutra... is symbolically described as issuing forth from the Damaru, the god Shiva’s little drum, whose rhythm accompanies the dance by which he gives birth to a world which “ is nothing but movement.” (jagat).25


The Mahesvarä Sutra is a primeval form of ‘theo-phonetic Samkhya’. Say What? Because ‘theo’ is greek for divine, ‘theophonetic Samkhya’ referes to a divine order of sound. The reason and riddle of the Mahesvarä Sutra lead to the mysterious depths of intuitive understanding and engender heightened level of discrimination. It arose from the very legends it preserves and rather than a purely arbitrary and superstitious system, the Mahesvarä Sutra describes how one sound, one element of consciousness, actually evolves into another and they inturn beget the many that follow. The Mahesvarä Sutra is composed of seed sounds that are qualified by the shape of the mouth and place of pronunciation. These sounds represent the basic hierarchical constitution of cognitive exsistence. “We can use sound vibration as a departure point and means of comparison for an understanding of the other, more complex vibratory states— whether they concern the structures of matter or of life, or the phenomena of perception and thought.”26 In stark contrast with the sound elements (mantras) of the Mahesvarä Sutra, the sounds that accompanied the text that originally inspired this work, the “King of Wisdom Mantras” are part of a closed system. One that orientated toward a particular religious inclination of belief, with little consideration given to the basic tenets of pronunciation, of how the sounds are formed. Not only did the Mahesvarä Sutra make it possible to supersede the sounds accompanying the “King of Wisdom Mantras”, it made it nessassary. Alain Danielou in his appendix “Language: Instrument for the Transmission of Knowledge”, introduces the Mahesvarä Sutra and explores some of the features of sound symbology. To compile this, Danielou— “relied on a long article by Swami Karapatri, published in the Hindi language journal Siddhanta with the title “Shabda aur artha” (Words and their meaning).” 27 The artical itself was based on two short treatise attributed to Nandikesvara, who lived prior to the founder of Sanscrit grammarian Panini.


2.1 The Mahesvarä Sutra “The Mahesvarä Sutra attempts to bring out the relationship between the sounds and the meanings of the various basic elements of language... What is important is to establish the connection between sounds and fundamental notions, allowing one to express the other, which is the primary problem of language. The structures of language, formed from elementary meaningful units, appear parallel to those of the elementary cells that give birth to matter and life.” 28 The way that the Maheshvarä Sutra appears in Danelou’s “While the Gods” is as a series of letter groupings. “A-I-U-N; Ë-Ü-K; É-Ó-Ñ; È-ò-CH; Ha-Ya-Va-Ra-T; La-N; Ña-Ma-Ña-Na-Na-M; Jha-Bha-Ñ; Gha-Dha-Dha-Sh; Ja-Ba-Ga-Da-Da-Sh; Kha-Pha-Cha-Tha-Tha-Chha-Ta-Ta-V; Ka-Pa-Y; Sha-Sha-Sa-R; Ha-L” What you are actually looking at is thirteen groups of sounds or thirteen and a half depending on how we define the closing of group five with La-N;.

1. (A-I-U-{N}); 2. (Ë-Ü-{K}); 3. (É-Ó-{Ñ}); 4. (È-ò-{CH}); 5. ((Ha-Ya-Va-Ra-{T}); La-{N}); 6. (Ña-Ma-Ña-Na-Na-{M}); 7. (Jha-Bha-{Ñ}); 8. (Gha-Dha-Dha-{Sh}); 9. (Ja-Ba-Ga-Da-Da-{Sh}); 10. (Kha-Pha-Cha-Tha-Tha-Chha-Ta-Ta-V; 11. (Ka-Pa-{Y}); 12. (Sha-Sha-Sa-{R}); 13. (Ha-{L})...

The series of the nine vowels are divided into four sets and each of these end in ‘a half sound’, referred to as ‘it’. Danielou described the ‘it’ at the end of each group as a kind of mnemo-technic punctuation. Each group may be mentioned by its first letter and the final half letter. For example, ‘Ha N’ refers to the five elements”.29 The ‘it’ sound is a duplicate that is also listed in its respective group in the Mahesvarä Sutra. Although this peculiar doubling up has not been touched on by the commentary, it is interesting to note that there are thirteen of these ‘it’ sounds, (52\4=13). The Mahesvarä Sutra’s first four sections describe the formation of the vowels and are relatively smooth and free of error. After this however, information becomes more sparse, labyrinthine and riddled with apparent inconsistencies. This is compounded by the general mix-up in the technical terms used in common by


The Nine Vowels AIUN:ËÜK: È Ò N : É Ó CH:

Ña Ma Ña Na Na M; Ñ M N N N; M Ñ Ma Na Na Na; M Ñ M N N N; M

Labelling Variations: Ha H Ha H

Ya Y Ya Y

Va V Va V

Ra R Ra R

T; La N T; L N T; La N T; L N

Sutra Varga Series Group Heading Commentary

Jha Bha Ñ; Gha Dha Dha Sh;

Sutra Varga Series Group Heading Commentary Sutra Varga Series Group Heading Commentary Sutra Varga Series Group Heading Commentary

Figure 3 This chart is a reconstruction of the one I used to standardise the glymphs in the Mahesvara Sutra. The original was destroyed when my house burned down in 1996. While it doesn’t depict the variations in the order of the sound groups it does shos how some sounds are represented by several different phonograms in the various places in the commentary. The Sutra refers to the first listing of the sounds as appearing on the opposit page; the Varga Series refers to the chart of sounds on Pg ?, the group heading refers to the heading of each sound group and the commentary refers to the accompaning text. I have not included the times when there was more than one varition in any one of these areas.

the various branches of Samkhya. When the meaning of one of these terms of designation is altered, as they have been by the many strands of Samkhya thought—then, as Plato says, the original meaning becomes distorted— ”until finally no human being can understand what in the world the word means.” 30 There are aspects of the Maheshvarä Sutra that will always remain a mystery. However, some of its information although mysterious need not remain so. The full fifty four sounds that are said to compose it, I have yet to identify. Excluding the thirteen duplicate half sounds at the end of each group and including the exhalation


[H] and inhalation [H] as well as nine unlisted silent vowel sounds, gives us fifty two sounds. The code has also slightly been corrupted by an inconsistency in the phonetic symbology, (Figure 3). The Maheshvarä Sutra, like all forms of verbal wisdom, after crossing countless generations from master to apprentice, entered the era of writing and became the subject of the pen. Their surrender however was only in part. Many times crucial pieces were left out for the initiated guide to fill in orally. This coupled with technical terms and the ‘twilight language’—a code often employed in the Tantras, to keep their potent secrets from the uninitiated, plus the margin of error that becomes more probable as time passes, all combine to make for quite a challenging cipher. Even with all of the mystery and apparent contradictions, the Mahesvara Sutra answered many of my questions and opened a plethria of others. I wish that I could say that it was my brillance that unlocked its secrets but this would not be true. I was guided by an inner sense of knowing, the Sutra seemed to open in my heart and somehow I knew things that I had no way of actually knowing let alone of explaining or proving. Uncovering the link between the MS. and Sri Yantra, between sound and form, helped bring the message etched between the lines of the Maheshvarä Sutra into focus not only intuitivly but also with reason. As we enter its eclectic sanctuary, keep in mind what Socrates said to the inquisitive Hermogenes: “But do not, my friend, demand too much precision lest you “enfeeble me of my might.” 31


2.2 The Path of Definition Letters, the digits of speech, the elements of vocal vibration, are generally divided into three groups: vowels, semi-vowels and consonants. “It is through the word or Son of God that all creation was made, for the voice and the vowel give life to the consonants, just as the Sun gives color to bodies, to matter; and the consonants or radical letters, animated by the vowels, form the roots that compose the primitive, monosyllabic language...” 32 Vowel is the Latin vocalis (sounding), vox (voice), and Vak in Sanskrit. Vak “means literally both voice and the word it utters.” 33 “The vowels are continuous sounds formed by varying the size of the mouth cavity.” 34 Vowels are produced by an out pouring of energy from different parts of the body and levels of the mind. Generally these are identified as the diaphragm and chest. The anatomy of a vowel is commonly described as a current of air travelling through the vocal cords which: “are rather like a small pair of lips attached to the walls of the windpipe, and we are able to adjust these lips to various positions, from fully closed... to wide open... In one of the intermediate positions, the vocal cords vibrate as air passes through, and produce a musical tone called voice. We can vary the pitch of the voice (how high or low it is on the musical scale),... In a vowel sound, voice is switched on, and the mouth cavity is left unobstructed,... The quality of a vowel is determined by the position of the tongue, lower jaw, and lips... different shapes give different resonances... If we raise some part of our tongue, we divide the mouth passage into two cavities of different sizes.” 35 (Maybe give illustration with musical correlations) This description of the vowels is complete except in respect to the more subtle and metaphysical levels of their nature. It is like saying that walking consists of just putting one foot in front of the other with no regard to the mental desire which communicates to the muscular skeletal levels through the nervous system, etc. A more subtle origin of the vowels can be identified by observing slight vibrational variations in the part of the body/mind to which they correspond.


“All things have a threefold sense, supreme (Para), subtle (Sukshma), Gross (Sthula).”36 In relation to speech there is Para-Vac or causal stress, the principle behind all sound, vocalization and ideation. Then comes Madhyama-Vac, the silent speech or spoken thoughts that remain in one’s mind, this is how we deliberate and speak to ourself. Then there is vocalized speech or Vaikhari-Vac.37 The physicalities involved in the vocalization of the sounds are the end result of a chain reaction that begins in silence. The spark of inspiration enters the mental realm of thought as a point of apprehension, an idea and then solidifies into internal dialog. It finally evolves into an exteriorized expression by riding the breath through the organ of speech. The subtleties of sounding vowels, the principal agents behind all other spoken sounds, are more involved than most of us would think. After all, “vowels are the way in which the human being creates and perceives the phenomena of harmonics. Subjectively speaking, harmonics are the foundation of number made audible... In making vowels, we are speaking or singing numbers.” 38 Jocelyn Godwin in “Mystery of the Seven Vowels”, goes on to state that the basis of vowels “was not verbal or musical, but harmonic; that the vowels were used as a means of bringing to resonance the harmonics.” 39


2.3 The Nine Vowels: A-I-U-N 2.3.1 The Vowel A “A represents Purushä, Universal man, the plan, the first stage in the manifestation of the world. In the first group, A-I-U-N, the first letter, A (pronounced as in father), is the least articulated sound. It is produced when all the organs of articulation are at rest. All the other sounds are but its modifications. “The totality of speech is contained within the A”, says the Aitareya Aranyaka;... “This is why A, the first of letters, represents the form (rupa) which the undifferentiated, unqualified, informal principle, the Nirguna Brahman, takes on when he creates the world. Omnipresent throughout his work, he is the universal ego (Aham) in which the beginning and the end are united” (Nandikeshvara Kashika 3-4)... A is thus the symbol of the first stage of existence, of the passage from the nonexistent, indivisible, and impersonal absolute to a totality of personified existence, represented as the Universal Man, Purushä, whose form is the universe.”40 The sound [A] as the link to the ‘undifferentiated’ signifies the Linga/Bindu or the first sign the seed of the cosmos. As the first form of manifestation it holds the primordial place, the first trine in the Sri. As we have seen in “Book One, the Flower of Bliss” the triangle is the first graphic shape that encloses space. It is composed of less lines than any other form. This is why the three is considered as the first complete number. The sound [A] as the Bindu is the entirety of the plan. It is the whole and as such it assumes the vastness of nothing: through location (intonation) the sound [A] takes on the face of quality and then becomes the source of volume. “Before all things were, there was a point (punctum: Bindu) not the Atom or mathematical point (which though it is without magnitude has position) but the diffusive (neither with magnitude or position). In the One (Monas) there was implicitly contained many (Myrias)... This point may be regarded as a mathematical point in so far as it is without any magnitude whatever, but as distinguished from it, in that it has in fact no position.” 41 The [A], like all the pure vowels in Sanskrit has both a long and


short sound. These are represented by the symbol {A}, pronounced as in {A}merica, and the capped symbol {Ã}, pronounced as in F{a}ther. The short {a} is a variant of the long {ã}, which is probably why there is only one phonetic digit given for the [A], as is also true for the rest of the vowels in the Maheshvarä Sutra. The Nine Vowels form the causative field whereupon the consonants come to be. Similarly, the nine primary trines of the Sri Yantra form the field whereupon the smaller micro-trines assume their position. Each of the vowels in relation to the “Temple of Paradise trilogy” have a double character—on the one side they are silent and formative—and on the other particular and vocal. In Figure 4 and 4a you can see how the apex of the [A] trine is used to denote the particularized [A] sound and its correlative principle of the universal man. The particularized is verbalized whereas the formative [A], the principle trine of trines is the silent, unspoken sound [A]. This is true not only for [A]—all of the vowels have an audible particularized form as well as an inaudible non-particularized place of formation. (Figure 4 & 4a) Alex Wayman in his book, “The Buddhist Tantras”, recounts a phonetic system somewhat similar to the Maheshvarä Sutra that appears to be more recent in that it includes not just the nine basic vowel sounds but all of the sixteen vowels in Sanskrit. The text he quotes, the “Sri Raga-raja-tantra-raja”, states that these vowels are

A

A

Figure 4 The causative & formative silent sound [A] corresponds to the first triangle in the Sri Yantra.

Figure 4a The verbalized sound [A] corresponds to the Particularized Micro Triangle at the apex of its formative and silent partner.


“identified with the sixteen voidness’es”.42 In this Tantra the short {a}, as in {A}merica is considered to be— “the voidness of inner and outer”43 whereas the long {Ã}, as in father— “is the voidness of voidness.”44 The inner-outer attribution attributed to the short (A) is befitting when related to the Bindu and first triangle, the Bindu of course being the ‘inner’ with the first trine being the ‘outer’. “Bindu implies both the Void (Sunya) and Guna (category).”45 This is to say, the Bindu is both with characteristics and without. Among the various Tantras there is reputed to be fifty to fifty two voids. The voids, the mothers (Matrika) and the indestructible elements (Akshara) are represented by the Sanskrit letters (bija). It is these that are suggested by Maha Kali’s garland of skulls. Maha Kali, The Personification of Great Time, is where the indestructible principles reside. The silent sound [A], the unspoken sound beneath all others, is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Golden Trumpet Blows”, symbol of the Golden Age of Paradise in the “Oracle of Revelation”. Its audible counterpart is the mantra used in conjunction with the “ Stainless Clear Sky”, the first symbol in the Golden Age of Paradise. The sound [A] is the Greek Alpha, the beginning that we met in the “Flower of Bliss” as the Linga/Bindu and the Linga/ Linguam/Purushä/Adam. It is interesting to note how the sound [A] appears in the words that are aligned with its significance as portrayed by the MS. Words like Author, Awesome, Authentic, and names like Allah, Aunn carry a meaning that pertains to the innate message of the sound [A].


2.3.2 The Vowel I “I evokes Shakti, the energy and substance of the world. “I represents the conscious part (cit kala) of organized matter” (Nandikeshvara Kashika 3). It is the closest vowel to A, and to produce it, it is necessary only to add an intention or a tendency toward the exterior without moving the lips. Nandikeshvara explains that “when, in the undifferentiated Principle, the desire to create a world which does not yet exist appears, this corresponds to an I. I (pronounced as in bit) is termed the ‘seed of desire’ (karma bija)” (Kashika 8). “Without the I, which represents his energy, the eternal Shiva remains as inanimate as a corpse (shava). It is only when united with his energy that he can act. From man’s point of view, the letter A represents the object of knowledge, while I is the instrument of knowledge—consciousness (cit).” (Kashika 9)”46 Everything that exists must belong to a category. The three primary categories (Guna), Sattvä, Rajas and Tamas, only present in the sound [A] as a latent possibility, appear as mutually counterbalanced attributes of the sound [I]. In [I], Prakriti, they remain in equipoise. The three Guna strands are spun into the threads of the illusionary weave. In the sound [I] these strands although present have yet to be woven. The [I] sound as {i} in b{i}t, is conscious-consciousness. Later in the text we will come back and more fully explore the three Guna.

I

U A I

Figure 5 The causative & formative silent sound [I] corresponds to the second triangle in the Sri Yantra.

F i g u re 5 a T h e s p o k e n s o u n d [I] corresponds to the Particularized Micro Triangle at the apex of its formative and silent partner.


The [I] sound corresponds to the second triangle in the Sri Yantra. ˆtis drawn in the opposite direction across the face of the [A] triangle. (Figure 5) The [A] triangle’s spacial plane is where the realization of desire appears as the [I] triangle. While the [A] trine, is one fifth of the surrounding circle’s diameter, the [I] trine is one fifth plus one fortyeighth of the circle’s diameter. Their difference provides the contrast upon which the dynamics of creation come into play. “All is engendered from the central indivisible point of the double triangle (that is, what is called in the Tantras, Satkona-Yantra) regarded as the symbol of creation.”47 The long sound [I] in Sanskrit is comparable to the sound of {ee}, in d{ee}p, with the short [I] similar to the {i} sound, in f[i]ll. In the Raga-raja Tantra-raja the short [I]— “ is great voidness” 48 while the long [I]— is the voidness of the ultimate reality.” 49 The [I] (sound and triangle) correspond with the Linga-Prakriti/ Yoni/Eve that we explored in the first volume, the “Flower of Bliss”. At this stage as symbolized by the (I), the potential for desire, or the “Great Voidness”, solidifies into a conscious impression and becomes as noted above, the “voidness of ultimate reality.”50 The second formative triangle in the Sri Yantra corresponds to the non verbalized [I] sound which is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Mask Face Dances” — the symbol of the Silver Age in the “Oracle of Revelation”. The particularized audible [I] sound, located in the tip of the of the formative [I] trine (Figure 5a) is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Sun Suddenly Shines”, the second symbol in the Golden Age of Paradise.


2.3.2 The Vowel U “U (pronounced as in rule) represents the accomplished plan, the materialized desire, that is, the universe.

U A I

If our organs of articulation combine the positions for A and I, and the result is exteriorized through the lips, the sound U is obtained. U is A + I exteriorized, that is, the plan exteriorized in matter...” 51

Figure 6 The red circles show how the point of conjunction between the A and I trine determines the position of the U trine. The U trine is indeed produced by the matrimony of the A and I trine.

In light of the fact that the link between the Sri Yantra and the MS have for the first time in recorded history been re-united by the “Temple of Paradise trilogy“, it is quite remarkable that the above description, of how the (U) sound is vernacularly pronounced, not only describes the graphic construction of the (U) trine but also its positional interrelation with the both the (A) and (I) trines. As you can see in Figure 6, the position of the (U) trine is determined by the place where it’s sides intersect with the sides of the [A] and [I] trines. “U represents the sovereign principle (Ishvara) of which the universe is the expression” (Kashika 3)... “ U represents the consciousness (Mahat) which is present in all things and which we call Vishnu, the Omnipresent” (Kashika 9). The first group of letters in the Mahesvarä Sutra thus evokes the eternal Trinity of the ideating principle, the active principle and their result, the manifested principle (the world). The sounds that are the symbols of these three principles constitute the roots which, in the primordial language, evoke these notions... “The letter A by making vibration perceptible, is the image of the creative principle of the world. I, representing Shakti, suggests the energy which is at the origin of [all the aspects of the apparent world represented by] the other letters” (Kashika 7)... U represents localization, the apparent world.” 52


The [U] sound is existential consciousness, the Mahat Tattva. It is the realised object of primal desire. The coupling of Idea (A) and its Energy (I), have found their strength in the (U). “Impregnated by the will of the Supreme Being, Prakriti brought forth her first evolute, the Mahattattva (all-comprehending Entity) of golden hue... What is called Mahat-tattva in the cosmic aspect, has got involved in itself its own individual aspect known as Chitta.” 53

U

Figure 7 This image shows how the first group of trines come to a close with the U. Now the nine lines of the first three trines in Sri Yantra, have formed nine smaller ‘micro-trines’.

The counter checked balance of the three guna (categories) that is present in the [I] dissolves in the [U], where Rajas (existence) predominates. In the [U] the three guna strands begin to be spun and with each revolution of the spinning wheel one of the guna strands (qualities) comes to rise above the other two, thus influencing the course of nature, of ‘things’ (Tattva). Everything in the entire universe of diversity and change is woven out of these gunas. They are the direct descendents of the principle and power of pure consciousness. “These three gunas really represent three stages of modification which a thing undergoes in order to assume a particular form. “When a thing is by nature subject to modification, then it must have a stage from which modification should start and it must offer some amount of resistance to modification. This implies its inertia which is called tamas. Secondly, the process of modification implies its stage of activity or change which is called rajas. Thirdly, the stage at which it arrives as a result of its modification is the stage of self manifestation or sattva.” 54 As the Sri Yantra comes into manifestation, the root power of nine being three is suggested by its first three trines. (Figure 7) The [U] trine completes the Sri Yantra’s first three triangles and sets the stage for the six remaining ones to emerge. The [U] sound brings the first group in the Maheshvarä Sutra to a close.


The (U) trine is drawn in the same direction as [A] and opposite to the direction of [I]. One triangle facing one way and two facing the other (1+2=3), illustrates the principle of alternation (1:2—2:1). Refer to Figure 7. This trinity of trines lay at the base of Various compositions of many yantras most particularly the Nava Yoni Chakra.55 “The Whole... is threefold. It denotes two opposites and their resolution... Therefore each of the three parts of the whole (creation, preservation and dissolution) is necessarily split into triads, bringing the numerical order of 9. This concept of the Whole is embodied in the nine circuits of the Sri Yantra, and the nine Siva-Sakti triangles, which are an expansion of the unity of 3 of the primordial triangle” 56 A miraculous correlation is beginning to blossom. The [A]-[I] and [U] vowels are the three pillars of speech in the same way that the [A] and [I] and [U] triangles are the three pillars of the Sri Yantra and the [A]-[I] and [U] tattva (elements of that’ness)— the Ideating principle, the Energetic principle and the principle of Materialization—are the three pillars of consciousness. The sounds [A]-[I] and [U] adumbrate what has yet to crystallize. They form a subtle lattice, a matrix from which all other sounds evolve. The Maheshvarä Sutra’s remaining vowels and letters all unfold from them in the same way that the Sri Yantra’s remaining triangles project out and through the [A]-[I] and [U] triangles. Its nine triangles are all derived by the positioning of the first three. This is also true of numbers, the numbers one, two and three, provide the numerical foundation on which all other numbers stand. The numerical code and the universe it measures and describes are the effect of these three causative principles. As numbers come forth out of the ‘accountable’, form comes forth out of the ‘measurable’ and names come forth from the trinity of the Logos, the sounds [A]-[I] and [U] An alternating cycle of evolutionary particularization begins in the (A). There is a fragment of passive resistance, an inflective thought of ‘Self’ in [A], a conscious realization of ‘That’ in [I]—the Universal Being and its power of personification blend into the realization that is achieved with the [U]. It is through a projective scission that the infinite realm of possibility was able to take form in the [U]. With the completion of the primordial trinity the universe became, a realm of existence. The long Sanskrit {Û} is similar to the English {u}, as in r{u}le, and


the short {U} is pronounced like the {u}, in f{u}ll. In the “Raga-raja Tantra-raja”, the short {U} is designated as being the— “voidness of constructed things ” 57 while the long {Û}— “ is the voidness of the unconstructed”.58 In the sound and principle [U], both the (“constructed” [I]) and the (“un- constructed” [A]) are conjoined. [U] pronounced like {u} in yo{u} is where the power of magic, the power of illusion (Maya), first appears. The particularized, audible sound [U]i s situated at the Sri Yantra’s apex (Figure 8). It is U the mantra used in conjunction with “The Meritorious Moon”, the third symbol in the “Oracle Figure 8 The audible sound (U) of Revelation” corresponds to the particularized The non-verbal (U) sound, Micro Triangle at the apex of it s only voiced in the mind, is the formative partner, the silent (U). mantra used in conjunction with the “False Prophet”, the symbol that represents the entire Bronze Age in the “Oracle of Revelation”, the third book in the “Temple of Paradise Trilogy. The silent and spoken [A], correspond to the “Golden Trumpet Blows” and ”The Stainless Clear Sky”; The silent and spoken [I], correspond to “The Mask Face Dances” and “The Sun Suddenly Shines”: The silent and spoken [U], correspond to “The False Prophet” and “Meritorious Moon”. These sounds like their corresponding symbols in the “Oracle of Paradise” are primary where as all of the following sounds, although unique, are fragmentary.


2.4 The Second Vowel Group— Ë-Ü-K “Ë-Ü-K “A is pronounced with the throat, I with the palate, U with the lips. The two vowels of the following group are pronounced in the intermediate spaces corresponding to a cerebral and a dental... “Ë and Ü symbolize movement, the activity (vritta) of thought, an activity which can be compared to that which the Divine Being engenders through his power of illusion a universe which is pure movement” (Kashika 10)... “Ë and Ü are not truly distinct from each other. There is no real difference between the tendency itself and the one in whom that tendency exists; the relationship is the same as that between the moon and its light, or between a word and the meaning it expresses. (Kashika 11) “It is through his own “power to conceive” (cit) it, that the Sovereign God is able to make the world appear at his whim (God and the world are neither opposite nor complimentary principles). Existence is not truly separate from the Being which it reflects; yet a reflection does not have the ability to act autonomously. This is why the verbal symbols Ë and Ü are termed impotent, neutral or androgynous (kliba). (Kashika 12).” 59

2.4.1 The Fourth Vowel Ë The [Ë] sound is the ‘experience of consciousness’—the experience can not act or be considered independently of the experience. At this stage it is helpful to introduce the ‘virtual reality’ metaphor. Virtual reality is a phenomena that replicates reality in a way that fools the senses into believing it’s the real thing. The subject puts on a special head mask fitted with a three dimensional screen. Headphones transmit holophonic sound in simulcast with visual imagery. Special gloves and boots are worn to give the experience a sense of movement. Besides an exciting breakthrough, Virtual reality is a technological model, that attempts to re-create the Golden Age, even if only as a fantasy. Ultimately the experience of virtual reality is an illusion, an illusion within an illusion. The great illusion that we call reality commences when Unlimited Consciousness steps into conscious limit (energetic postures). It is with the three guna strands of identity, that mind and intelligence weave the cloak existence. Once established, Consciousness provides ears for hearing, eyes


for seeing and so on until all the sensibilities become pronounced. The sense organs are the instruments of perception through which the eternal (divine) witness experiences temporal existence. This is how the unlimited, the universal becomes limited and individual. The limitation is but a modality or pathway of illusion, wherein the eternal witness itself is temporal. The difference between virtual reality and reality itself is also one of degree. The virtual reality that we have created technologically is a pale replica of the virtual reality of the divine, the universe that encompasses all that we know as real. The limits of reality are closer to those of the mind than to those of the body. The mind can travel to the stars while the body is hard put to even get to the moon. Virtual reality provides the means to experience whatever one can imagine. With all of its limitations, one thing that this technology has shown, is that reality itself holds the same potential, to create whatever experience one can imagine. What ever can be conceived by the mind can be evoked in time. Can you imagine a time without time, a Golden Age when humanity was close to divinity and in harmony with the spheres, a time when we molded reality by the undiluted power of the creative word? What was life for, but to be the entertainment of consciousness, the pleasure garden of divinity. Desire had only to be but called forth to be realized in paradise. It is not so hard to imagine a time when instead of relying on the ‘magical contraption’ that we call a ‘telephone’, telepathy was employed for reaching out and touching somebody over long distances. Our inner gifts and supra-natural ability have in the present age become exteriorized and ‘technofied’. Twenty four hours a day we are surrounded by a virtual reality, one that our bodies are ill designed to accommodate. The illusion within the illusion is a reenactment of the play of the gods but like a third generation video, its quality suffers. “The cerebral E corresponds to the French e, according to its definition by the ancient grammarians. Modern Indians, who cannot pronounce it precisely, call it ri which is clearly wrong since a vowel is defined as a prolonged, sustained sound.” 60 The [Ë] sound of the Mahesvara Sutra and the [RI] of current Sanskrit are both pronounced as the tip of the tongue touches the cerebral point on the roof of the mouth, (Figure 9). When sounding


the [Ë] which is similar to the French {è}, the tongue, pressed against the roof Cerebral of the mouth, vibrates the cerebral vault, (Figure 9). This sound when repeated leads to lightness of mind and a vibrancy of sensation that stimulates thought. The Sanskrit sound {Ri} is like the {er} in butt{er} but rolled as in Spanish. It is produced from the same place as the French Figure 9 The arrow points to the sounding [Ë], however, in cerebral position where sound [Ë] is the case of {Ri} the tongue is pronounced. The tongue divides the vocal resonant chamber in half with more active and instead of the utterance of the sound [Ë]. being secure in the cerebral position, it moves loosely, only brushing the surface. The vibration that stimulates the mind in the sound [Ë] is in [RI] played out in the air current between the tip of the tongue and the roof of the mouth. The long [Ri] in Sanskrit according to the Raga-raja Tantra-raja— “ is the voidness of the limitless” 61— like the reach of the four directions, while the long [RI] “ is the voidness of the beginningless and the endless.” 62 As we have seen in the previous section, the first three sounds, [A], [I] & [U]) in the Maheshvarä Sutra represent the numerological order of one through nine. The forth vowel sound [Ë] represents the ten (the zero that comes after the nine). At the forth stage of manifestation, with the addition of the [Ë] trine added to the Sri Yantra’s composition, the ten micro-trines crystallize on it’s periphery, (Figure 10). The uncountable zero placed before one, in a sense, ‘one zero’, is an abstraction of the monad or Linga/Bindu. “Ten itself, the decad, is a lower form of the monad, representing the created universe.” 63 The number ten is formed by a one and a zero. Zero at the end of a number marks that number as an open ended category that


can endlessly increase in magnitude. As the zero after the one, the sound [Ë] is indeed what the “Raga-raja Tantra-raja” suggest, that is, the limitless as well as the beginning-less and endless. By taking its place as the fourth trine the [Ë] sound becomes the symbol of perfect symmetry. This is because four is the sum and product of duality [(2x2=4), (2+2=4)]. This arrangement is particularly befitting for, 1+2+3+4=10. The four integers of the Pythagorean tetraktys form a triangle of ten points (Figure 11). These:

8 7

9 10

6 5

1

4

2 3

Figure 10 The arrow shows how the position of the causative/formative trine [Ë] is determined by the intersection of the [A] and [U] trine. With the addition of the [Ë] trine ten micro trines form around the periphery.

”symbolize, like the musical scale, a differentiated image of Unity; in the case of Tetraktys, it is an image of unity starting at One, proceeding through four levels of manifestation, and returning to unity, i.e., Ten. In the sphere of geometry, One represents the point [•] Two represents the line [—], Three represents the surface [∆], and Four the tetrahedron [ ], the first three-dimensional form. Hence in the realm of space the Tetraktys represent the continuity linking the dimensionless point with the manifestation of the first body;... the Tetraktys, or the Decad, was called Kosmos (world order), Ouranos (heaven), and Pan (the All). In Pythagorean thought the Tetraktys came to represent an inclusive paradigm of the four-fold pattern which underlies different classes of phenomena...”64

Figure 11 The ten dots of the tetrakty describe the successive unfoldment of the one through the four. When connected these form nine inner equilateral triangles, a star and hexagon.


In the completed Sri the apex of this triangle is either the four th one counting d o w nw a r d o r u p w a r d , depending on what type of Sri Yantra is constructed. The apex of the [Ë] rests Ë on the base of [I], and its two sides pass through the place where the sides of [I] intersect with the base of [U], (Figure 10 & 12). Figure 12 This image depicts how the The height of trine [Ë] is spoken sound [Ë] corresponds to the equal to twenty four parts Particularized Micro Triangle at the apex of the circle’s diameter of its formative and silent partner. which is its radius.65 This is indicative of its relation to the whole and is an expression of the one to two. The [Ë] sound being pronounced at the mid point along the vernacular cavity (Figure 9) also is infused with the relation of one to two or one half to one whole. The non verbalized [Ë] sound is the inner mantra used in conjunction with the symbol of the Iron Age, “An Honest Man is Persecuted”. Its counterpart, the audible [Ë], located in its apex, (Figure 12) is the mantra sound used in conjunction with the fourth symbol in the Golden Age, “The Golden Earth”.


2.4.2 The Fifth Vowel Ü The [Ü] sound represents consciousness that is manifest within existence, within the mind. “The fifth vowel is the last of the pure vowels, for we have only five distinct places of articulation. The obstruction or explosion of the vowels in these very five places constitutes the five groups of consonants: the gutturals, the palatals, the cerebrals, the dentals, and the labials”.66 The apex of [Ü], the fifth trine in the Sri Yantra, not only faces opposite to [Ë], the previous trine but also comes to rest upon the baseline of the [Ë] trine, (Figure 13). The [Ü] trine comes into the Sri Yantra by way of the points of intersection established between the four previous trines, the (A), (I), (U) and (Ë) trines, respectively. The two sides of the [Ü] trine must past through the points where the [A] and [Ë] trine intersect and through the points where the sides of the [A] trine intersect with the baseline of the [I] trine, Below in Figure 13 you can clearly see that it is these points of intersection that define the position and character of the [Ü] trine. The apex of the [Ü] and [I] trines face downward and opposite to the other three trines. This symbolically illustrates the ratio of two waves to three or 2:3 which is the measure of the musical fifth. “Four is the sacred number of manifestation and orientation. Five, the quintessential number,... is the sacred number of Siva... the panca-brahmans invoke, one by one, five different forms of Siva. These are Sadyojata, Vamadeva, Aghora, Tatpurusu and Ë Isana... U “One should know all things of the phenomenal world as being of a fivefold character, for the reason that the eternal verity of Siva is of the character of the fivefold Brahman” (PBU p.31)... The fivefold mantra bodied forth from linga, compacts and coordinates the hierarchy of manifestation, from the sense

A

I Ü

Figure 13 The four previous trines are all instrumental to the construction of the fifth triangle [Ü]. The red circles highlight the points of intersection between the [A], [I], [U] and [Ë] trines.


Samhara Krama Sri

Sasti Krama Sri

Ü

Ü

Figure 14 This diagram shows how a star pentagram can be constructed by way of the Sri Yantra’s coordinates. The pentagram interplays with the fifth trine Ü while connecting several significant points in the Sri Yantra.

powers and the subtle elements to the sense particulars... Besides these categories, the five faces of the linga are also the symbols of the metaphysical levels, from manas (cosmic mind) upward to ahamkara, the individuating principle, to mahat and finally to prakrti and purusa, cosmic substance and spirit... Siva-tattva (the ultimate reality) has its symbol in the usually invisible face of lord, Isana, who is “the knower of the field” (ksetrajna); his presence vibrates in mantra. Tatpurusa is the symbol of prakrti; Aghora is the symbol of mahat (buddhi) or cosmic intellect; Vamadeva, the symbol of ahamkara, and Sadyojata the symbol of manas (mind) (LP .214.6-10).” 68 As this quote describes each of the five personifications of Rudra Siva is related to one of the five great tattva (Elements). The five fold order is the stage upon which organic life takes root. The fifth trine [Ü] and the five faces of Linga are also related to the five Tathagata Buddhas, the five Buddha families, the five senses, the five elements, the five figures on each hand and toes on each foot and the secret symbol of the Golden Mean, the pentagram. When the internal coordinates of the Sri Yantra are used to plot the course of a pentagram, the apex of the fifth trine [Ü], ends up being


positioned directly between its out stretched legs. (Figure 14) Once the Ü trine assumes its place in the Sri, the peripheral micro-trines increase from ten to twelve, (Figure 15). The total number of defined places in the Sri Yantra becomes thirty three, including ten squares, rectangular figures and twenty three triangles, (Figure 15). This arrangement is significant when we consider the Mahesvarä Sutra states that when: “mixed with aspirants or in combination, these twelve types of consonants produce thirty-three distinct articulations.” 70 The twelve micro-trines share a correspondence with; the twelve constellations in the Zodiac, the “successive series of twelve fifths”69, t he t welve i sotope s of carbon, the twelve primary consonant sounds, and 4 5 all other scales of twelve. 3 23 16 24 The significance of twelve 6 2 17 15 22 25 31 is explored more fully in 7 14 1 18 21 the section on the New 26 30 32 33 Jerusalem Magnesia. 12 8 13 19 The dental Ü, corresponds to the French u. “It is pronounced as lri by modern Indians because l is the consonant pronounced at the same place. These vowels are still used in some Indian languages. In these cases one refers to the god Keushna rather than Krishna.” 71

11

29

28

27

9

20 10

Figure 15 With the addition of the Ü trine, the number of peripheral micro trines increase to twelve. This brings the total number of internal spaces to thirty three the number of Vedic Gods.

As indicated in the above extract, the [Ü] resembling the french [u], is like the Sanskrit vowel [lri], pronounced with the tongue against the dental rim, the slight ridge just behind the upper front teeth. The short [lri] in Sanskrit is pronounced like {le}, in litt{le}. The long vowel {Lri} is the same, yet sustained for twice the duration of the short one. When pronouncing the [Ü], the tongue vibrates the frontal portion of the brain, stimulating the third eye region. This in turn inspires telling dreams and visions. When continuously repeated this sound leads to heightened sensitivity and a euphoric state of mind. In the Raga-raja Tantra-raja, the short [lri] is described as—


“the voidness of the undeniable” 72 and the long [lri] is considered— “the voidness of ultimate nature.”73 As ‘consciousness existent’ the [Ü] corresponds to what’s undeniable, and of the ultimate nature. The non verbalized formative [Ü] is the non-verbal mantra used in conjunction with “The White Conch of Dharma”, the ninth symbol in the Golden Age. The verbalized [Ü] sound, situated in the apex of the corresponding formative trine (Figure 15), is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Supreme Illumination of A Star”, the fifth symbol in the Golden

4 3

Ü

Ë U

1

A

I

2 5

Ü

Figure 16 The spoken s ound [ Ü ] corresponds to the Particularized Micro Trine at the apex of its formative and silent partner.


Age of “Oracle of Revelation”.

2.5 The Third Vowel Group— É-Ó-N “É-Ó-N “The two vowels of this group are hybrids and not consequential ones like U. They are A + I = É and A + U = Ó.74

2.5.1 The Sixth Vowel É É represents the non manifested principle (A) when it is combined with its energy (I). A is the immovable and indestructible principle (akshara). I is illusion, active intelligence, stemming from indivisible, inactive intelligence.

4

Ë

3

U

1 6

A

É

I

2 5

Ü

“In É (that is, A in I) the motionless principle becomes Figure 17 The sixth triangle [É] in blue identified with its energy; the is nestled in the body of the fifth trine non manifest is present in its [Ü]. The [É] trine exhibits no external powers of action. We meet this appendages. fundamental identity of the creative principle and its powers of illusion in everything that exists” (Kashika 13) ” 75 The [É] represents the Principle, ‘object of consciousness’ and its Power, ‘the subject of consciousness’, combined upon a new stage in manifestation. An internalization, a brief return or reconciliation towards the centre occurs in the [É]. The sixth trine [É] is positioned within the fifth trine, [Ü]. Its baseline spans the width of [Ü], divides the sides of [Ü] into two equal parts, and its apex rises to the base line of [Ü], (Figure 17). As between the [É] and [Ü] trines, an interesting play occurs between the numbers that they represent, the five and six. Five is the sum of two plus three (2+3= 5), and six is the product of two multiplied by three (2x3= 6). Five times six is thirty (5x6= 30). Thirty when reduced to a single digit is three (3+0= 3). Six plus five equals eleven (6+5= 11), when reduced to a single digit eleven becomes two (1+1=2), thus we have


the two and three (2:3) that make up the five— [Ü] and six—[É]. “Six, the hexad, is the first evenly-odd number... Nicomachas called it the marriage number because it is the first product of an odd and even number (3 x 2)...The numbers 6 and 12 frame the proportions of the heavenly bodies, divide up the circle and measure the periods of solar time.” 76

4

Ë

3

U

1 6

A

É

I

2 5

É

Ü

F i g u re 18 T h e s p o k e n s o u n d [É]

The [É] trine represents the corresponds to the Particularized Micro Triangle at the apex of its formative and realization of the potential silent partner. that resides at the centre of the fifth trine, [Ü]. The principle five sounds become reintegrated in the sixth. The [É] sound like the personal understanding of an experience represents an inner sense of knowing. With the addition of the sixth trine [É] the Sri Yantra comes to a place of balance. (Figure 17) At this point in its development four descending trines are contrasted by two ascending ones—two to four is another expression of one to two, (2/4=1/2). The twelve peripheral micro-trines are unaffected by its appearance of the [É] trine. They remain the same in number because it exhibits no exterior appendages In the Sri-Raga-raja Tantra-raja the [É] sound is described as the— “voidness of all natures” 77— like the mind that sees itself in all things yet realizes them as being different. The [É] is pronounced like the {ey}, in h{ey}. It is a combination of a deep guttural outwards effort and a slightly vibrational tongue. The commencement of this vowel sound re-invokes the primordial sound [A], which dances forth from the tip of the tongue, cloaked by the sound [I]. The silent mantra [É] is used in conjunction with “Vajra Sarasvati”, the eleventh symbol in the Golden Age. Its verbal counterpart located at its apex (Figure 18), is used


in conjunction with “The Golden Wheel”, the sixth symbol of the Golden Age. The embodied initiation of wisdom strengthens the link with the omni-present source.

2.5.2 The Seventh Vowel Ó

4

Ë

3

U

1

“Ó represents the principle A present in its work U. “Having created the universe, he resides in it”

6

I

2 Ü

5 7

Ó (A in U), the vowel from which the syllable of adoration, AUM, is formed, represents the unity of macrocosm and microcosm, of the divine being and the living being; the iconographic form of this symbol is the god Ganesha, who is both man and elephant.

A

É

ó

Figure 19 The seventh triangle [Ó] in red is plotted across the intersections of [A] with [Ü] and [I] with [U]. With the addition of the [Ó] triangle the outer cycle of fourteen micro-trines is completed.

Ó thus declares the “unity of opposites” (nirasa) and reminds us that the total and the individual, the Sovereign Principle (Ishvara) and his power of illusion (Maya), are one. It is the Sovereign Principle which is consciousness (Mahat), which “ like a witness or spectator is the principle of unity present in the (multiplicity) of beings and elements (bhutas)” (Kashika 13)” 78 The [Ó] represents the part of the Creator that is present in creation. A Van Gogh painting is obviously not Van Gogh himself, yet an aspect of Van Gogh does remain in it. The seventh triangle in the Sri Yantra, corresponding to the [Ó] sound, quite literally illustrates the link between outer creation and the inner creator. The [Ó] trine stretches from the center to the outer periphery, (Figure 19). With the addition of the [É] trine, the Sri Yantra’s outer diamond comes to completion with fourteen microtrines in all, fourteen is the dual expression of the seven (7x2=14). The apex of [Ó] comes to rest on the base of [É] and forms the centre-most micro-trine that encases the Bindu. The sides of [Ó] are determined by the junction between [I]’s base and the sides of [U], and the intersection between the sides [A]


and the base line of [Ü]. The baseline of [Ó] rests on the apex of the [U] trine, (Figure 19). [Ó] pronounced like the {o}, in p{o}le brings roundness to mind. When sounding it, the lips form a circle and its clearest tone is achieved when the throat is in a likewise position. [Ó] represents a level of coherency between the inner and outer, the micro and the macro. The language of this inner and outer connectionism is of the nature of omens and the meaningful subtleties that generally go unnoticed. In the Sri-Raga-raja Tantra-raja, the [Ó] sound— “is the voidness of the unobserved.”79 The silent sound [Ó] is the non verbalized mantra used in conjunction with “Courageous Manjushri”, the seventh symbol of the Golden Age. It is through courageous discrimination that the jewels of wisdom are uncovered. (Figure 19) Its verbal counterpart, situated in the apex of the [Ó] trine (Figure

Ó

Figure 20 The spoken sound [Ó] corresponds to the Particularized Micro Triangle situated at the apex of its formative and silent partner.


20), is the mantra used in conjunction with “Kerb”, the first Bronze Age symbol in “Oracle of Revelation”.

2.6 The Fourth Vowel Group— È-Ò-CH È-Ò-CH “This group represents open vowels which are almost dipthongs (AÉ, AÓ) and which comprise three elements: A + É = È, and A + Ó = Ò.” 80

2.6.1 The Eighth Vowel È

4 3

U

1

“È is formed by adding a new A in front of É, which is already A + I. È is the retroactive effect of É (the power of manifestation) on A (the non manifest principle). È is therefore an image of the relationship between the Supreme Being and the universe contained within him. It is the non manifest principle marked by its power of illusion.” 81

Ë

6

É

8

È

A

I

2 Ü

5 7

ó

Figure 21 This diagram shows how the eighth triangle [È] is determined by three fundamental intersections that occur between the previous triangles.

The sound [È] brings us to a point of reverse reflection—when creation is contemplated by the created. It represents the effect or experience of consciousness in manifestation. It is interesting that the [È] trine is situated within the third trine (U) in the same way that the sixth trine [É] sits within the fifth trine [Ü]. The [È], the eighth trine in the Sri Yantra, is largely determined by three points of intersection. The first of which is between the base of [É] and the sides of [Ë]. The baseline of [È] extends across the width of the fifth trine [Ü] to intersect with the point of conjunction established between the sides of the sixth trine [É] and the seventh trine [Ó], (Figure 21). In the Sri-Raga-raja Tantra-raja, the corresponding Sanskrit vowel transliterated as [ai], is equated with— “the voidness of individual characteristics”.82


The significance that this ha s w ith the Ma ha sva ra Sutra’s sound [È], becomes more clear after considering the following extracts from Stella K ra mr isch’s, “ The Presence of Siva”: “It was Vratya wandering about who, in his illumination, saw this entire world extended toward the four directions and pervaded by his god: Rudra in the centre, Bhava, Sarva, Pasupati, and Ugra in the four directions, Mahadeva above and Isana in every direction. The eighth name of this god is the Sole Vratya of the Atharva Veda, a transfiguration of the visionary Vratya.” 83

È

Figure 22 The spoken sound [È] corresponds to the Particularized Micro Triangle at the apex of its formative and silent partner.

“The Sole Vratya now arises as lord of the space-time universe, himself the central pillar of a four-sided pyramid,” 84 “Each of (his) attendants is an archer...They are distinguishable by their names. Bhava means existence and also origin; Sarva is the essential archer; Pasupati the Lord of Animals; Ugra the ferocious; Rudra the Wild God; Mahadeva the Great God, and Isana the ruler or Lord. All of them together are the Sole Vratya, god in manifestation... a roving ascetic, a Vratya, realized the birth of his god and his own rebirth in that god. He caused and saw his god being born, he saw him in his majesty on earth and rarefied in his ascent, extending himself into a vanishing point in the beyond.” 85 [È] is pronounced as [ai] in p{ai}nt. When verbalized it is the sound used in conjunction with “The Lamp of Brightness”, the first


symbol in the Iron Age, (Figure 22). Its non verbalized causal form is the mantra used in conjunction w ith the “Eter na l K not ”, the eighth symbol in the Golden Age in the “Oracle of Revelation”.

2.5.2 The Ninth Vowel

Ò “Ò, which is A + Ó— that is, A + (A + U)— represents the non manifest principle in which the manifest world exists like an embryo within a womb. “The world is but an apparent form stemming from a formless principle in which it resides and which develops it or re-absorbs it as it chooses” (Kashika 14).

ò

Figure 23 This diagram shows how the base of the ninth triangle [Ò] is greatly determined by the intersection of the fourth trine [Ë] and the seventh trine [Ó].

The Ò “completes the series of vowels, which thus comprises nine sounds (seven principle and two subsidiary),...” 86 The ninth and last vowel sound [Ò] represents the ‘non manifest principle’ in the totality of manifestation. Once the desire for creation has found fulfillment through the nine stages of creation it seeks a return to the ultimate and pristine ‘reality’. In the virtual reality metaphor, the vowel sound [Ò] corresponds to the time when the subject is ready to return to the “real” world. The baseline of [Ò] spans the breadth of [É], passing through the intersection of the forth trine [Ë] and the seventh trine [ó], (Figure 23). The apex of [Ò] rests on the base of [A]. The [A] is the Alpha and the [Ò], Omega. The [A], the first trine, is great and spans the circle while the [Ò], the last trine, is the smallest trine and the closest to the center. The [Ò] trine is one-sixteenth of the area of the [A] trine. Sixteen or four squared, is considered to be the number of perfection. By being the smallest triangle in the Sri Yantra, having no exterior appendages and being the closest in proximity to the Bindu the [Ò] trine is like an ‘embryo placed in a womb’ (Man in the womb of the world). In the “Sri-Raga-raja Tantra-raja”, the Sanskrit equivalent of


t he vowel s ou nd [Ò ] , transliterated as { au}, is equated with— “the voidness of the nonexistent.” 87 ò The [Ò] sound is pronounced like the {ow}, in c { ow}. The verbalized [Ò] is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Golden Fish”, the twelfth symbol in the Golden Age. It is the particularized expression of Figure 24 The spoken sound [Ò] corresponds to the Particularized Micro the silent non-particularized Triangle at the apex of its formative [Ò] and is located in its apex, and silent partner. (Figure 24). The inner, silent mantra [Ò] is used in conjunction with “The High Victory Banner”, the ninth symbol in the Golden Age of the “Oracle of Revelation. The [Ò] is the last vowel in the series. The nine vowels given in four sets in the Mahesvarä Sutra are the causative principles of all other sounds. In much the same way the Sri Yantra’s nine principle trines are the generative matrix through which the forty three micro-trines are established. The non verbalized vowels represent the formative principles and are denoted by the Sri’s nine principle trines. The spoken vowels represent the particularized sphere and are situated in the apex of the corresponding formative trine. They itemize in a reflectory (vibratory) fragment, different magnitudes of the principle sound and triangle.

“Various elements, when added to the pronunciation of vowels, modify their meaning and allow the expression of multiple concepts. Each of the vowels can in effect be pronounced eighteen different ways, which are differentiated by the pitch of the sound (by raising or lowering the voice of a tone, or by keeping it level), or by its duration (short, long, or prolonged), or finally by exteriorizing or interiorizing it, that is, by making it natural or nasal. (We express a question by raising the voice on, for example, the word “Yes,” and express assent by lowering the sound of the same syllable)...” 88 The factors of pre-existence gathered in the nine, like a great orchestra abated in a steadied readiness, so to play the cosmic


Chapter 3 The Matrix of Conception

In Development 55%

3.0 The Consonants The constructors of existence

In Development 65%

3.1 Breaking the Code The Five Degrees of Manifestation

In Development 60%

3.2 The 5th Group: The Elements The Semi Vowels [H] [Y] [R] [L] [V]

In Development 60%

3.3 The 6th Group: Perception The Nasal Sounds [Ñ] [Ñ] [N] [N] [M]

In Development 65%

3.4 The 7th Group: Activation [Gh] [Jh] [Dh] [Dh] [Bh]

In Development 65%

3.5 The 8th Group: Perceptivity [G] [J] [D] [D] [B]

In Development 70%

3.6 The 9th Group: Vital Modes [Kh] [Ch] [Th] [Th] [Ph]

In Development 70%

3.7 The 10th Group: Capacities [C] [T] [T]

In Development 50%

3.8 The 11th Group: Nature in Man [K] [P]

In Development 50%

3.9 The 12 Group: Qualities [Sh] [Sh] [S]

In Development 50%

3.10 The 13th Group: Return 5.4.1 The Guttural Sound [H]


3.0 The Consonants Once the nine vowels have completed the work of creation the consonants arise as the steps or the ‘filling in’ of creation. It is through the consonants that a further focalization of the principles inherent within the vowels can occure. The following extracts will help to explain the relation between the consonants, vowels and the elements of existence (tattva). “Consonants are obstructions placed in the path of the utterance of vowels. Their differences depend upon the place of articulation together with the nature of the explosion and the effort, which can be directed either inwardly or outwardly. There are four categories of inner-directed effort (Antara-prayatna): a strong touch, a light touch, open or contracted. There are eleven sorts of outer-directed effort (Bahya-prayatna): expansion, contraction, and breath, to which are added (for syllables formed of a consonant and a vowel) the volume of the sound, its resonance or non resonance, light aspiration or strong aspiration, and the tone, which can be high, low or medium... In each place of articulation there exists an outward effort (K, C [tch], T, T, P) and an inward effort (hard G), J (dj), D, D, F, etc). Both can be either voiceless or aspirated. “The basic consonants are twelve in number: the gutturals K and G (hard); are pronounced in the back of the throat: the palatals C (tch) and J (dj); are pronounced with the tongue against the palate: the cerebrals T and D; are pronounced with the tongue curled back so that the tip of the tongue touches the roof of the mouth: the dentals T and D; are pronounced by the tip of the tongue connecting with the dental ridge behind the upper front teeth: the labials P and F; are pronounced by a joining of the lips: the fricative Sh (French ch); is pronounced by limiting the passage so that the flow of breath is made audible: and the semivowel L; like all the semivowels is pronounced by slightly touching the place of the corresponding vowel. “Mixed with the aspirates or in combination, these twelve types of consonants produce thirty-three distinct articulations. Their meaning is determined by the meaning of the vowels, the place from which they are articulated, combined with the effort of articulation. The complete alphabet comprises five groups of consonants, called Varga(s).89


3.1 The Five Varga Groups The Five Varga series below is where the great secret resides. This simple chart of sounds holds the golden key that unlocks the Maheshvarä Sutra’s hidden mysteries— its original message, value, and meaning. By following the map of the ancient seers I rediscovered how the Sri Yantra’s nine principle triangles and their forty three constituent micro-trines, graphically illustrate the relationship between the nine vowel sounds, the Varga categories that they engender, and the consonants. With the connection between the nine vowels and the principle trines in the Sri Yantra already established, we can now proceed into the area of the consonants. This is where each of the principle trines (vowel sounds) step down and are consolidated by the microtrines (consonants).

“THE FIVE VARGA(S) Gutturals: K, Kh, G, Gh, N, (H, H) Vowel A Palatals: C, Ch, J, Jh, N (Y, Sh) Vowel I Cerebrals: T, Th, D, Dh, N (R, Sh) Vowel Ë (ri) Dentals: T, Th, D, Dh, N (L, S) Vowel Ü (lri) Labials: P, Ph, B, Bh, M (V, W) Vowel U”90 “1. Five guttural include: K, Kh, G (hard), Gh and N (guttural-nasal); and also a guttural fricative H (as in Arabic) and an exhaled final H (Visarga). “2. Five palatals include: C (tch), Chh, J, Jh and Ñ nasal-palatal); and also a semivowel Y and a fricative Sh (French ch). “3. Five cerebrals (where the point of the tongue touches the palate) include: T, Th, D, Dh and N (nasal-cerebral) and also the semi-vowel R and the fricative Sh. “4. Five dentals include: T, Th, D, Dh, N (dental-nasal); and also the semivowel L and the sibilant S. “5. Five labials include: P, Ph, B, Bh, M; and the semivowel V and an exhaled final W (Upadmaniya). “There are thus five groups, each comprising seven consonants (five principle and two supplementary). Two exhalations, the final Visarga and Upadminaya, must be kept aside, since they cannot exist in the middle of words. This leaves thirty-three consonants, which, combined with the vowels,


form, with very slight variations in pronunciation, the roots and further the words of all languages. “In the Mahesvarä Sutra, the consonants are not presented in alphabetical order. We meet first of all the semivowels, followed by the nasals, which are the fifth letter in each group of consonants. Only then follow the fourth, third, second, and finally the first letter of each group...” 91 After approaching the Maheshvarä Sutra, and drawing its sounds into the Sri, in every conceivable way, backward-forwards, upside down and inside out, one evening close to the exact conjunction of Neptune and Uranus, around twelve midnight, I followed the Varga series chart and Nandikeshvara’s specific instructions. I noticed that the vowels given at the end of each of the categories in the Varga series were not in the same order as the Sutra. The vowel [A] defines the place of the first or guttural Vargas. The vowel [I] defines the place of the second series or palatal Vargas. However, the third group of Varga, the cerebrals, are not denoted by the third vowel [U]. The cerebral group is rightly denoted by the fourth vowel [Ë]. The fourth group of Varga, the dentals, are defined by the place of the fifth vowel [Ü]. It isn’t until the fifth and final Varga group, the labials, that the third vowel, the labial [U] appears. This order corresponds with the vocal passage of exteriorization, beginning from the guttural depths of the throat then to palate, to the cerebral, to the dental and finally given birth by the lip moving labial. This observation was the vital link. The order of construction and the constructed order are different. In the causative sphere the order of appearance adheres to the principle or pure basis, whereas in the material realm, order adheres to the rules of what’s already constructed. The mantra equivalents and practice revealed in this section, when used in conjunction with the “Oracle of Revelation” over time, cultivate a realization of the ‘Great Principles’. Those of you who persevere and develop a rapport with the “Temple of Paradise Trilogy” discover how its symbols relate to the ‘miracle stuff’ that composes our body/mind and the universe. It is by Grace that we have been given these age old keys. With them we are closer to becoming an ecstatic one-body society of realized beings. To respect the spirit of the ancient sages who wished that this information be held in initiated circles, and to be considerate of space, some of the more technical details have been


left out of the following.

3.2 The Fifth Group: The Elements The Semi Vowels: Ha-Ya-Va-Ra-La “HA-YA-VA-RA-T AND LA-N: The Elements (Bhutã) “The first four elements are considered to be part of the plan (Purushå, the male principle); the fifth, the solid or earth element, stemming from Prakriti, is considered to be feminine. Following the vowels in the Maheshvarä Sutra comes the semivowels, or slightly touched (ishprishtä) consonants, in the production of which the tongue comes close to the places of articulation but barely touches them. They are merely lightly articulated modifications of the corresponding vowels. They indicate the spheres of manifestation of the principles that the vowels represent; they correspond, in the order of appearance, to the five elements or degrees of manifestation of matter which are the spheres of perception of the five senses. First among the semivowels appears the guttural H, deriving from A, the formless, undifferentiated principle H corresponds to the element ether, whose properties are space and time... Ether is the primordial element on which depends the possibility (avakasha) for the manifestation of the other elements, which are vibratory modulations of it, in the same way that all articulated sounds are modifications of the non particularized sound A. The palatal Y, which derives from the I, introduces the first form for the organization of matter; the gaseous state of air. The labial V, deriving from U, corresponds to the liquid state of water. The cerebral R, from Ë (ri) corresponds to the state of fire.... LA-N “Lastly the solid state of matter, called earth, supports the other elements. This solid element corresponds to the dental L, (from Ü, lri), and hence to Maya identified with the Earth goddess and the feminine principle (Prakriti). “Earth is the basic element: it supports the others. It is the earth which provides food; from food comes the seed, and from the seed comes life.” (Karika 17)” 92


The semi-vowels appear in the Varga series (outlined on page fifty seven) as the last sounds in the chart. According to the Varga series the semi-vowels appear from guttural to labial in the order of H, Y, R, L, V. This is different to the order demonstrated in the group heading, which is Ha-Ya-Va-Ra-T and La-N. At the third sound a significant shift occurs. The third sound (V) corresponds to the labial, (U). The third vowel (U), if you recall, represents the first level of manifestation. However, the third sound in the Varga series is the cerebral (R), corresponding to the forth vowel, the cerebral (Ë). (Develop chart) This suggests a departure from pre-figurative and formative order. Initially, I focused on the placement of each group in the Sri Yantra and then the placement of the individual sounds. The semivowels are the great elements (Maha Bhutas) of causation. Being near to the formative vowels in pronunciation, the semi-vowels take a position in the Sri Yantra’s inner sanctum, close to the Bindu and within the range of the [A] triangle’s union with [I]. Whether they are placed on the left or right of the Bindu is determined by which type of Sri Yantra is constructed. In the five down and four upward pointing triangles of the Samhara Krama, the semi-vowels placement is to the left of the Bindu and in the Srstikrama, with its five upward and four downward triangles, they are placed to the right of the Bindu, (Figure 25). “The five elements (bhutä[s]) stem from the Sovereign Principle (Mahesvarä).

I

A

Ü

U

È

É

ò

Ë

ó

ó

Ë

ò

É

È

U

Ü

A

I

Srsti-krama

Samhara-krama

Figure 25 In this image we can see that the five sounds of the semi-vowel group are positioned in five micro trines near the center, the inner sanctuary of the Sri Yantra, and in between its two most important trines (A) and (I).


Ether, air, water, and fire are known as Ha, Ya, Va, and Ra. In the creation by the Word (vak), H is the name of ether, air is called Y, R is fire, and V is water” (Kashika 15-16)

3.2.1 The Semi Vowel [H] The [H] corresponding to its relation with the guttural, [A] is placed on the base line of [A], (Figure 26). In “The Oracle of Revelation” the sound {H} as in Arabic “{Ha}lla”, is the mantra for the Bronze Age symbol “Alamach”.

3.2.2 The Semi Vowel [Y] The [Y] corresponding to the [I] is placed on the base of [I]. The sound {Y} as in {y}onder, is the mantra used in conjunction with the symbol “Izaz” of the Bronze Age, (Figure 26).

3.2.3 The Semi Vowel [R] The [R] corresponding to the [Ë] is placed near the Bindu in the body of [Ë], (Figure 26). The {R} as in {r}aise, is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Castra” symbol of the Bronze Age.

3.2.4 The Semi Vowel [L] The [L] corresponding to [Ü] is placed near the Bindu in the body

Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I

Base of 3rd Triangle U

Ü

Base of 1st Triangle A

È

Base of 6th Triangle É

ò

Base of 9th Triangle Ò

ó

Base of 2nd Triangle I

Base of 8th Triangle È

Ë

Base of 5th Triangle Ü

É

Base of 7th Triangle Ó

Gutteral H, Ether

U

Cerebral R, Fire

A

Dental L, Earth

Palatal, Air

Labial V, Water

Figure 26 Each of the semi-vowels is positioned on the baseline of the triangle of their corresponding vowel. The semi-vowels are identified with the five great elements


of [Ü], (Figure 26). The {L} as in {l}ight, is the mantra used in conjunction with the symbol “Terre Bellum” of the Bronze Age.

3.2.5 The Semi Vowel [V] The [V] corresponding to [U] is placed near the Bindu in the body of [U], (Figure 26). The {V} as in {v}ase, is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Great Western Guard” symbol from the Iron Age.

3.3 The Sixth Group: Perception The Nasal Sounds: Ña-Ma-Na-Na-Na “Ña-Ma-Ña-NA-NA-M (NASALS): The Senses of Perception “The successive states of the condensation of energy, which appear to us as gaseous incandescent, liquid, or solid, are all formed from tiny (sukshma) entities, or atoms (anu). They resemble dispersed solar systems but are in fact no more than gravitational formations of ether. The states of matter are organized along different means of communication and are only differentiated as far as we are concerned by the perception we have of them; and our perceptions are linked to the duration of apparent time and to the relative dimension of space. Their appearance results from the limitations of our five senses... These forms of perception are represented, according to Nandikesvara, by the five nasals, which are to be found in the same places of articulation as the semivowels. (In practice, three of these nasals do not appear in the French or English alphabet; they can only be represented approximately.) “The five nasals are connected with the ‘perceptible qualities (guna[s]): hearing, touch, sight, taste and smell, corresponding to the five states of matter present in all things” (Kashika 18) Nandikesvara reminds us that from the point of view of experience or perceptibility, the world begins from the materialized energetic aspect represented by the I and not from the theoretical aspect (A) of the plan. “I, representing energy (Shakti), is thus deemed to be the principle of all the other letters” (Kashika 7) The nasals thus start with the palatal N, corresponding to an I, in other words, to Prakriti the plan realized in substance.


“The nasals which appear as the fifth consonant in each group, are as follows: the guttural-nasal N (now placed in the centre), representing hearing (ether); the palatal nasal N (as in Spanish), representing touch (air); the labial nasal M, representing taste (water); the cerebral nasal N, representing sight (fire); and the dental nasal N, representing smell (earth). The hierarchy of the senses reflects the hierarchy of the successive appearance of the different elements. Ether or pure vibration is perceived only by hearing or its analogous senses. The others follow in order: the gaseous state of air, perceived by hearing and touch; the state of fire, perceived by sight, touch and hearing; the liquid state, perceived by sight, touch, hearing and taste; and finally the solid element of earth, perceived by smell and all the other senses.” 93 As indicated in the above extract, the senses of perception are the fifth sound in the Varga series. Their order according to the Varga chart is, ı-Ñ-Ô-N-M, in contrast with the group heading which is, Ña-Ma-ıa-ÔA-NA-M. The reason for the difference between these arrangements has been touched on by the commentary. The nasal sounds are where the subtle elements evolve into perceptibility. They are pronounced from the same place as the corresponding semi-vowels (subtle elements). After the semi-vowels the nasal sounds are the closest to the vowels. The nasal sounds, the counterparts of the subtle elements, sit near the Bindu in the Sri Yantra and across from their respective

Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I Ü

Base of 1st Triangle A Base of 9th Triangle Ò Base of 2nd Triangle I

È ò ó

Base of 3rd Triangle U Base of 6th Triangle É Base of 8th Triangle È

Ë

Gutteral ı, Hearing

É

Base of 5th Triangle Ü

Cerebral Ô, Sight

U

Base of 7th Triangle Ó

Labial M, Taste

A

Dental N, Smell

Palatal Ñ, Touch

Figure 27 Each of the Nasal sounds, pictured in red, is positioned across from the semi vowel on the baseline of the corresponding vowel.


semi-vowels. These sounds are alternational reflections of their corresponding semi-vowels/subtle elements. (Figure 27)

3.3.1 The Guttural Nasal Sound [N] or [ı] [ı], hearing, corresponds to the guttural vowel [A], ideation, and [H], the ethers/space. The [ı] micro trine is befittingly situated across from the micro trine [H] on the baseline of the formative triangle [A]. (Figure 28) The [ı] sound is pronounced like the {ng} in {gn}awing, yet is more throaty, carrying with it a deep guttural resonance. [ı], is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Kubera” symbol in the Iron Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.3.2 The Nasal Sound [Ñ] [Ñ], touch, corresponds to the palatal vowel [I], the energetic principle and to the semi-vowel [Y], the element air. It sits across from the micro trine [Y] on the baseline of the formative triangle [I]. (Figure 28) [Ñ] is pronounced similar to the {ung} in yo{ung}, and is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Liquid of the East” symbol of the Iron Age.

3.3.3 The Nasal Sound [N] or [Ô] [Ô], sight, corresponds to cerebral vowel [Ë], intelligence, and to the semi-vowel [R], fire. It sits across from the micro trine [R] and is close to the Bindu in the body of the formative [Ë] triangle. (Figure 28) [Ô] is pronounced like the {n} in ear{n}est, with the tongue placed a little further back along the roof of the mouth. It is the mantra used in conjunction with the symbol “Tania Australis” of the Bronze age.

3.3.4 The Nasal Sound [N] [N], smell, corresponds to the dental vowel [Ü], mind, and semivowel [L], earth. It is situated across from the micro trine [L] near the Bindu in the body of the formative triangle [Ü]. (Figure 28) The [N] sound similar to the {n} in {n}oise is the mantra used in conjunction with “The South Wisdom Gaze” symbol of the Iron Age.


3.3.4 The Nasal Sound [M] [M], taste, corresponds to the labial vowel [U], identity, and to the semi-vowel [V], water. It is situated near the Bindu center in the body of the formative [U] triangle and across from the micro trine

Gutteral ı, Hearing

I

Gutteral H, Ether

Cerebral Ô, Sight

Ü

Cerebral R, Fire

È

Labial M, Taste

ò

Dental N, Smell

Ë

Palatal Ñ, Touch

ó

É U

Labial V, Water Dental L, Earth Palatal, Air

A

Figure 28 Each of the Nasal sounds, pictured in red, is positioned opposite to its corresponding semi-vowel, pictured in blue. This symmetrical alternation is also expressed between the tattva’s, for example the tattva of sight corresponds to the tattva of fire. Without the fire of light there could be no possibility of sight.


[V]. (Figure 28) The [M] sound is like the {m} in {m}other and is the mantra used in conjunction with “Beletrex” of the Bronze Age.

3.4 The Seventh Group: Activation The Sounds: Jh-Bh- [Ñ] & Gh-Dh-Dh-[Sh] “JHA-BHA-[Ñ] and GHA-DHA-DHA-[SH]: The Organs of Action ““The fourth letter (varna) of each group (varga) represents one of the senses of action which allows the formation of the body of the universe (virat) inhabited by consciousness (cit). They are present in all beings but are not perceptible in inanimate matter.” [Kashika 19] “Jh and Bh represent the organs of speech and touch. The tongue, organ of speech, corresponds to the element ether and is represented by the letter Jh. The hand (pani), the organ of touch which perceives the gaseous element of air, is represented by the letter Bh.” [Kashika 19-20] “Gh, Dh, and Dh introduce forms of action which correspond to the elements of fire, water, and earth and which are present in all living beings in the feet, the anus, and the sexual organs. [Kashika 20]” The earth derives from the sun, which is for man the centre of his universe. This is why it is represented by the guttural Gh (born of A, the principle). Then comes the liquid element, of which the organ of action in man is the genitals. It is represented by the cerebral Dh. The solid state represented by the dental Dh corresponds to smell and to the function of rejection, whose organ of action is the anus. In Nandikesvara’s text, the inversion of anus-sexual organs (Payu-Upastha) for sexual origins-anus seems to have come about for metrical reasons, although some have chosen to see an allusion to Tantric practises; the sexual organ was viewed as the producer of semen connected with the sense of smell and a means for sexual communication, while the anus was seen as the residence of Kundalini (coiled energy).” 94 The commentary suggests that the earth, deriving from the sun, is represented by the guttural sound [A]. This obviously a corruption because the commentary also states that the dental sound [Dh] represents the solid state, corresponding to smell and excretion and the dental vowel (Ü). The second paragraph above tells us that the sound [Jh]


representing speech, corresponds to the ethers/space. We know that this can not be because [Jh] is a palatal sound and not guttural like the semi vowel [H] which represents the ethers. There is a dynamic scheme of continuity established between the sound groups, the elements of “that’ness” (Tattva), and the triangular construction and constitution of the Sri Yantra, (Figure 29). Discovering this scheme and consistency is what has made it possible to clarify the confusion that has seeped in corrupted the text. The actual designation of the ‘organs of action’, according to the Mahesvara scheme can be understood as follows. The first sound of the group [Jh] relates to the palatal semi-vowel [Ya], air, and is thus the hands which like air, are prone to touch what they are near, (Figure 29). The second sound [Bh] is labial and relates to the semi-vowel [Va], water. It is thus the genitalia, the organ of action from which (sexual or life giving) fluid pours, (Figure 29). The third whole sound in the group [Gh] is guttural, corresponding to the semi-vowel [H], the ethers, and the guttural nasal sound [ıa], hearing. It is thus fitting that the [Gh] sound is designated by the tongue, the organ of speech, (Figure 29). The fourth sound, the cerebral [DH] corresponds with the semivowel [Ra], fire, and the nasal sound [Ô], sight. It is thus associated Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I

Base of 3rd Triangle U

Ü

Base of 1st Triangle A N

Base of 9th Triangle Ò Base of 2nd Triangle I Base of 5th Triangle Ü Base of 7th Triangle Ó

BH

È

H

ò

N

R DH

GH

ó M Ñ

Ë

É U A

Base of 8th Triangle È

V

L

N

JH

Y DH

Base of 6th Triangle É

Labial Bh, Genitialia Gutteral Gh, Speech Cerebral Dh, Feet Palatal Jh, Hand

Dental Dh, Anus Figure 29 The Seventh Group of sounds represent the modes of action. They take their position on a new row of greater magnitude. They are across from the Sixth Group and on the baseline of the respective triangle that represents the vowel to which they each individually correspond.


with the feet, the organ of movement, (Figure 29). The fifth sound in the group, the dental, [Dh] is related to the semi-vowel [La], earth and is thus rightfully associated with the anus, the organ of excretion. The first two sounds (tattva) in this groups are set apart from the remaining three by a phonetic punctuation mark [Ñ] This is a compound group that is completed by another phonetic punctuation mark [Sh]. I have yet to discover the reasoning behind this. The order of the letters in the group heading is:

JHA-BHA-[Ñ] and GHA-DHA-DHA-[Sh], The Varga series again presents us with a different order:

Gh-Jh-Dh-Dh-Bh. This group represents the evolution of the five sensations into five modes of action or act-ability. For example: air evolves into touch and touch into the hand or sight into motion, the feet. The element fire, including all forms of incandescence and radiation, lights the way for sight and sight lights the way for movement whose organ of action is naturally the feet. We generally look before we walk. At this stage a pattern begins to emerge. There is an observable flowering of the sounds unfolding in the Sri Yantra. Alternating from side to side, each group of sounds in the Maheshvarä Sutra mirrors the row of sounds on the other side and lends itself to the qualities of the micro trine (sound) that it is next to. With the addition of this group a certain symmetry of correlative alternation becomes evident. (Figure 29)

3.4.1 The Guttural Sound [Gh] The guttural [Gh], the tongue, corresponds to nasal sound [ı], hearing, the semi-vowel [H], space, and to the vowel [A], ideation. It rests on the base of the formative triangle [A] and next to the micro trine [H]. (Figure 29) [Gh] is pronounced like the first {g} in {g}arage. It is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Sand Mountain” symbol in the Iron Age.

3.4.2 The Palatal Sound [Jh] The palatal [Jh], the hands, corresponds to the nasal sound [Ñ],


touch, the semi-vowel [Y], air, and the vowel [I], energetics. It sits on the base of the formative triangle [I] and next to the micro trine [Y], (Figure 29). [Jh] is pronounced like the {J} in { j}asper, accompanied by an audible exhalation. It is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Melodious Banner” symbol in the Iron Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.4.3 The Cerebral Sound [Dh] The cerebral [Dh], the feet, corresponds to the nasal sound [Ô ], sight, the semi-vowel [R], fire, and the vowel [Ë]. It sits next to the micro trine [R] and opposite to the micro trine [Ô], (Figure 29) It is tangent with the formative triangle [Ë] and is situated closer to the Bindu than any other trine in the group. [Dh] is pronounced like the {d} in {d}owry with an emphasized aspiration. It is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Bare Tree” symbol of the Iron Age in the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.4.4 The Dental Sound [Dh] The dental [Dh], the anus, corresponds with the nasal sound [N], smell, the semi vowel [L], earth, and the vowel sound [Ü], the mind. It sits on the baseline of the formative triangle [Ü] and is tangent and angularly aligned with the micro trine [L], (Figure 29). The [Dh] sound is pronounced like the [D] in delight with a slight aspiration. This sound is the mantra used in conjunction with the Iron Age symbol, “The Serpents Tail Churns The Sea”.

3.4.5 The Labial Sound [Bh] The labial [Bh], the genitalia, corresponds with nasal sound [M], taste, the semi vowel [V], water, and vowel [U], identity. It sits on the baseline of the formative triangle [U] and is in a peculiar relation to [V], (Figure 29).


[Bh] pronounced like the {B} in {B}ali, is accompanied by a goatish aspiration. Its the mantra used in conjunction with the Iron Age symbol, “Skanda Mara” of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.5 The Eighth Group: Perceptivity Embodied Perception: Ja-Ba-Ga-Da-Da-[SH] “JA-BA-GA-DA-DA-SH: The Organs of Perception “In all living creatures the ear, the skin, the eyes, the nose, and the tongue are the five organs of perception. [They are oriented] toward the exterior and correspond to J-G-B-D-D ”(Kashika 21)”.95 Where the nasals represented the sensibilities as in sight, this group represents the senses that capture or embody the sensitivity. This group furthers the solidification of the sensible qualities into an organ of sensation. Nandikeshvara’s commentary, as quoted above, again lists a different order of sounds than that given by the heading. He has apparently switched the second sound with the third. Without knowing Nandikeshvara’s reason for the switch or if it occurred by simple mishap, it is difficult to ascertain what the real order is. However, I feel more confident with the order given in the heading, Ja-Ba-Ga-Da-Da. It mirrors the previous group and is likely to be the correct and original order of the Mahesvarä Sutra. This group is strikingly similar to the last. It is not a compound group but its sounds are only lighter, un-aspirated variants, of those appearing in the previous group. Another point of similarity is that the phonetic punctuation of this group, the fricative sound (Sh], is closely related to the ‘punctuation’ found in the previous group, [Sh]. According to the Varga series the order of the sounds is given as G-J-D-D and B. This arrangement represents the created order rather than the order of creation and is different than both the heading and Nandikeshvara’s commentary. Moving in a pattern of alternation we again cross the face of the Sri Yantra to position this group across from the preceding one. (Figure 30)

3.5.1 The Guttural Sound [G] The guttural [G], the ears, corresponds to the sound [Gh], the tongue, the nasal sound [ı], hearing, the semi-vowel [H], ether and


the vowel [A], ideation. It is situated on the base of the formative triangle [A] next to the micro trine [H] and across from [Gh]. (Figure 30) The sound [G] is pronounced like the {g} in {g}arfield and is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Golden House” symbol of the Silver Age, in the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.5.2 The Palatal Sound [J] The palatal [J], the skin, corresponds to the sound [Jh], the hands, the nasal sound [Ñ], touch, the semi-vowel [Y], air and the vowel [I], energetics. It appropriately sits on the base of the formative triangle [I], next to [Y] and directly across from the micro trine [Jh], (Figure 30). The sound [J] is pronounced like the {j} in {j}oy and is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Auspicious Umbrella” symbol in the Silver Age of the”Oracle of Revelation”.

3.5.3 The Cerebral Sound [D] The cerebral [D], the eyes, corresponds with the sound [Dh], the feet, the nasal sound [Ô ], sight, the semi-vowel [R], fire, and the vowel [Ë], intelligence. It sits across from the micro trine [Dh], [Ô ] and [R], (Figure 30). The [D] is pronounced like the {d} in {d}art, although when

Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I

Base of 3rd Triangle U

Ü B

Base of 1st Triangle A Base of 9th Triangle Ò Base of 2nd Triangle I Labial B, Tongue

N

G D

R DH

Ë

É U

Cerebral D, Eye

A

Base of 6th Triangle É Base of 8th Triangle È

V

L

N

Gutteral G, Ear Palatal J, Skin

GH

ó Ñ

D

H

ò

N

M J

BH

È

JH

Y DH

Base of 5th Triangle Ü Base of 7th Triangle Ó

Dental D, Nose

Figure 30 The Eighth Group of sounds in the Varga series represent the embodiment of perception. Its sounds are positioned across from the Seventh Group and on the baseline of the triangle/vowel, to which they each respectively correspond.


pronouncing [D] the tongue is placed further back and more force is employed. This is the mantra sound used in conjunction with “The Empty Mind” symbol in the Silver Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.5.4 The Dental Sound [D] The dental [D], the nose, corresponds with the sound [Dh], the anus, the nasal sound [N], smell, the semi-vowel [L], earth and the vowel [Ü], the mind. It sits on the base of the formative triangle [Ü] across from the micro trine [Dh]. (Figure 30) [D] is pronounced like the {d} in {d}ance and is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Golden Lotus” symbol in the Silver Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.5.5 The Labial Sound [B] The labial [B] represents the tongue, the only organ with a dual association, speech and taste. [B] corresponds with the sound [Bh], the genitalia, the nasal sound [M], taste, the semi-vowel [V], water, and the vowel [U], identity. It sits on the base line of formative triangle [U] and mirrors the position of the micro trine [Bh]. (Figure 30) It is pronounced like the {b} in {b}ad and is the mantra used in


conjunction with “The Lake Without A Source” in the Iron Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.6 The Ninth Group: Vital Modes The Vital Energies: Kh-Ph-Ch-Th-Th-[V] KHA-PHA-CHA-THA-THA-CHHA-TA-TA-V: The Vital Energies “The five vital energies (prana[s]) correspond to the second (aspirated) letters of each group: Kh, Ph, Ch, Th, Th. Kh is combustion (prana, respirationdigestion); Ph is elimination (apana); Ch (samana, distribution-circulation); Th (udana, reaction, force); Th (vyana, planning and specialization).” 96 A change occurs with the entrance of this group—its order no longer begins with a palatal sounds nor does it have a guttural sound at its center. I’m tempted to re-align the order of sounds to concur with the previous groups, par Nandikeshvara’s directions. In an earlier part of the text he stated that from the point of view of the Created, unlike that of the Creator, conception begins not with the guttural [A], ideation but with the palatal [I], energetics. The order would thus be Ch-Ph-Kh-Th-Th-V, which is similar to the order of the two previous groups. However, there may be another reason for the change and until I have a greater sense of certainty I have chosen for the moment at least, to let it be. There are eight sounds listed in the heading, the last three of which do not actually belong to this group but to the subsequent group, the internal faculties. The phonetic punctuation mark [V], apparently belongs to thins group because it is not listed in the next group, but may allude to the same punctuation closing both groups. This group, the “Vital Energies” is composed of the second letters of the Varga series. Keeping to the pattern alternatiion, we move back across the face of the Sri Yantra to position this group in its peripheral row of micro-trines. The order of this group according to the Varga is, Kh, Ch, Th, Th and Ph.

3.6.1 The Guttural Sound [Kh] The guttural [Kh], Prana, corresponds with the sound [G], the ears, the sound [Gh], the tongue, the nasal sound [ı], hearing, the semi-vowel [H], ether/space and with the vowel [A], ideation. It sits on the base of the formative triangle [A], in line with the micro


trines: [GH], [H], [Ñ], and [G]. (Figure 31) The [Kh] sound is pronounced like the {k} in {K}it. It is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Ko Ph Ra” symbol in the Bronze Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.6.2 The Palatal Sound [Ch] The palatal [Ch], Samana (Circulation), corresponds to the sound [J] the skin, the sound [Jh], the hands, the nasal sound [Ñ], touch, the semi-vowel [Y], air, and the vowel [I], energetics. It rests on the base of the formative triangle [I] and is in line with, [J], [Jh], [Y] and [Ñ]. (Figure 31) The sound [Ch] is pronounced like the {ch} in {ch}oice, with an emphasis on aspiration. It is the mantra used in conjunction with the symbol “Canopus” of the Bronze Age.

3.6.3 The Cerebral Sound [TH] The cerebral [Th], Udana (force), corresponds with the sound [D], the eyes, the sound [Dh], the feet, the nasal sound [Ô ], sight, the semi-vowel [R], fire, and with the fourth vowel [Ë], intelligence . It sits on the base of the formative triangle [Ë] and has a peculiar type of spacial relation to the other cerebral micro trines, (Figure 31). [Th] is pronounced like the {t} in {t}ale and is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Glorious Hayagriva” symbol in the Silver Age Cerebral Th, Udana—Force

Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I

Base of 3rd Triangle U B

Base of 1st Triangle A Base of 9th Triangle Ò Base of 2nd Triangle I Base of 5th Triangle Ü Base of 7th Triangle Ó

TH

Ü

D

GH

KH

Ë

É U

CH

JH

Y DH

Base of 6th Triangle É Base of 8th Triangle È

V

L

N

Ñ D

R DH

Gutteral Kh, Prana—Energy/Chi

ó

M J

H

ò

N

PH

BH

È

N

G

Labial Ph, Vayana—Specialization

TH

Palatal Ch, Samana—Circulation

Dental Th, Apana—Elimination

A

Figure 31 The Ninth Group of sounds take their position on a new level. Their micro trines are on the peripheral of the Sri Yantra. They are positioned on the baseline of their correlative vowel/trine. True to the pattern of alternation they are also across from the previous grouping.


of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.6.4 The Dental Sound [Th] At first glance this sound would appear to be in keeping with the scheme of things but it is not. There is nothing inherently wrong with the sound the problem is with its attribute, the Vayana Tattva. The Vayana (specialization) Tattva is in a family of interrelated Tattvas that are represented by the Labial sounds. It is represented by the following sound (Ph). The Apana Tattva (the power of elimination) is related to the dental Tattva family. The dental [Th] is a fitting sound for the Apana Tattva. It shares a correspondence with the sounds [D], the nose, and [Dh], anus, with the nasal sound [N], smell, the semi-vowel [L], earth, and with the fifth vowel [Ü], mind. It sits on the base of the formative triangle [Ü], in line with the micro trines [Dh] and [D], (Figure 31). [Th] is pronounced {t} as in {t}ender. It is the mantra sound used in conjunction with the Iron Age symbol, the “Deva Putra Mara”.

3.6.5 The Labial Sound [Ph] As mentioned in the preceding sound the labial [Ph], is now associated with the Vayana (specialization). The [Ph] sound is also related to the sound [B], the tongue, the sound [Bh], the genitalia, the nasal sound [M], taste, the semi-vowel [V], water, and with the vowel [U], identity. It is situated on the base of the formative trine [U] and in line with the micro trines [B] and [Bh], (Figure 31). [Ph] is pronounced like the {p} in party with a inclination towards a fricative [f], as in far. The explosive [Ph] sound is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Nusukan” symbol in the Bronze Age of the


“Oracle of Revelation”.

3.7 The Tenth Group: Internal Capacities The Sounds: Ch-Th-Th-[V] “CHHA-TA-TA: The Internal Faculties “Ch-T-T follows. These are the first consonants of the three middle groups of the Varga series; and it is these which symbolize the internal faculties (antahkarana)” (Nandiskeshvara Kashika 22-23). “There are three of these faculties: the mind (manas), which discusses; the intellect (buddhi, including the memory), which decides; and the Ego (ahamkara), which acts. The fourth of these faculties, the consciousness (cit), is treated separately, for it is an omnipresent principle. The palatal C represents the mind, the cerebral T the intellect, and the dental T the feeling of autonomy, the Ego. “There is a connection between Chh (samana, circulation) and C (manas, the mind); between Th (udana, force) and T (buddhi, the intellect); and between Th (vyana, specialization) and T (ahamkara, the Ego).” 97 The textual corruption that has characterized the last few groups bleeds over into this one. Anomalies in the three remaining groups also imply that a change has taken place. It appears that other philosophic systems have been used to fill in some missing or simply misinterpreted gaps in the Mahasvara Sutra. This could easily have occurred especially if one was unaware of the underlying formula or of the Mahasvara Sutra’s relation to the Sri Yantra This group of sounds has been double listed, firstly in the previous heading and now in this one. The commentary gives some hint as to why this may have occurred, stating that there is a connection between the previous group of the vital energies and this group, the internal faculties. This is not a very strong argument though as a relationship exists between each and every group in the Mahasvara Sutra. One thing stands out as odd, while the heading of the last group of sounds is—(KHA-PHA-CHA-THA-THA-[CHHA-TA-TA]-V): including the (CHA-TA-TA) sounds of this group, the sounds (CHA-TA-TA) when added to the next group (Ka-Pa) form—(Ka-Pa + CHA-TA-TA )


which is a reflection of the actual previous group— (KHA-PHA-CHA-THA-THA). This group has some serious wrinkles that need ironing out. First off, the four lettered symbol [Chha] is very strange especially since it signifies the un-aspirated sound of {ch} in {ch}urch which is normally transliterated as a single [C]. The group has several other inaccuracies. The cerebral [Th] is mistakenly used to both denote Udana (force) and Vyana (specialization). I clarified this discrepancy with Danielou who agreed with my findings. The [Th] sound actually represents Udana (force) while the dental [Th] represents Vyana (specialization). According to Nandikeshvara this group is composed of the three middle consonants in the first row of the Varga series which are [C], [T] and [T]. The connection these three sounds have with the previous group of vital energies is explained by the quote but with incorrect designations. To be correct the quote should read— There is a connection between [Ch] (samana, circulation) and [C] (manas, the mind); between [Th] (udana, force) and [T] (buddhi, the intellect); and between Th (apana, elimination) and T (ahamkara, the Ego). You may have noticed that these three tattva and the two in the following group are designated by terms that were previously described and associated with the first five vowel sounds. The labial [U], the third trine, is the cosmic identity that was born through the union of [A], ideation and [I], energy. The forth vowel, the sound [E] was described as intelligence and the fifth vowel sound [U], as the mind. It would seem that the very similar designations are embodied by this group of consonants, where the [C] represents, the mind, [T], the intellect, and the dental [T], identity. The “internal faculties” represent another order of being, a step removed from the prime vowels that evoke creation. The vowels are the pure principles, the ideals that are in themselves, universal. The consonants are part of the created order and partake of the individual realm. At this stage the Sri Yantra approaches completion as does the living being in a living world. The vowel sounds are the principles of a different order: they are prime and universal while the ‘internal faculties’ are derivatives and particularizations of the individual.


The three sounds in this group are the second, third and forth letters in the first row of the Varga series; they are related to the second, third and forth vowels. The two sounds in the following group are the first and fifth sound of the first row of the Varga series and are related to the first and fifth vowel. The tattva order in this group, of mind, intelligence and identity is opposite to the order of unfoldment that is found in the Samkhyä which is identity, intelligence and mind. The indication is of a change in direction. A turning within. In the vowel groups we witnessed the flowering of consciousness and creation, in these last few groups of the Mahesvarä Sutra, we see a crystallization of the individual and a return to the source. Keeping with the Sri Yantra’s pattern of alternation the “Inner Faculties” take their position in the micro-trines are across from the previous group and across from their respective correlatives, the vital energies. Figure 32

3.7.1 The Palatal Sound [C] The palatal [C], Mind, (Manas) corresponds with the sounds [Ch], circulation (Samana), [J] skin, [Jh], hands; with the nasal sound [Ñ], touch, the semi-vowel [Y], air, and the vowel [I], energetics. The [C] trine, rests on the baseline of the formative triangle [I] and in

Cerebral T, Buddhi Intellect/Decides

T

Base of 6th Triangle É

D

Base of 8th Triangle È

Dental T, Ahamkara Ego/Acts

J T

GH

KH

JH

CH

Base of 9th Triangle Ò

V

L

N

Ñ D

R DH

Base of 1st Triangle A

ó

M C

H

ò

N

PH

BH

È N

G

Base of 3rd Triangle U

TH

Ü B

Palatal C, Manas Mind/Discusses

Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I

Ë

É U

Y DH

TH

Base of 2nd Triangle I Base of 5th Triangle Ü

Base of 7th Triangle Ó

A

Figure 32 The Tenth Group of three sounds, the middle sounds from the first row in the Varga series represents the Internal Faculties. They are positioned across from the Ninth Group and on the baseline of the formative triangle of the vowel, to which t y individually correspond.


line with the palatal micro trines: [J], [Ñ], [Y], [Jh], and [Ch]. All the letters in the palatal series of Varga are thus arranged on the base line of the vowel sound that generates them. (Figure 32) The sound [C] is pronounced like the {ch} in {ch}arm. It is the mantra used in conjunction with the Silver Age symbol, “The Ocean of Nectar”.

3.7.2 The Cerebral Sound [T] The cerebral [T] represents Buddhi and corresponds with the sound [Th], Udana (force), the sounds [D], the eyes and [Dh], the feet, with the nasal sound [Ô], sight, the semi-vowel [R], fire, and with the fourth vowel [Ë], prime intelligence. The cerebral [T] takes its position across from the Udana micro trine [Th], on the base of the formative triangle [Ë]. It also has a peculiar spacial relation with the micro trines of the cerebral Varga, (Figure 32). The [T] sound pronounced like the {t} in {t}enacious is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Kornephorus” symbol in the Bronze Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.7.3 The Dental Sound [T] The dental [T], represents Ahamkara. It corresponds with the sound [Th], Apana (elimination), the sound [D], nose and [Dh], anus, with the nasal sound [N], smell, the semi-vowel [L], earth, and with the fifth vowel [Ü], mind. [T] sits on the baseline of the formative triangle [Ü] opposite the micro trine [Th] and in line with [Dh] and [D] micro trines. (Figure 32). The sound of [T] is similar to the {t} in {t}ight, and is the mantra


used in conjunction with “The Golden Basin” symbol of the Silver Age.

3.8 The Eleventh Group: Purusha-Prakriti The Sounds: K-P-[Y] KA-PA-Y: Prakriti-Purusha “Universal Nature (Prakriti) and Universal Man (Purusha) are represented by the initial consonants of the first and last group: K and P” (Kashika 24) “Now that we have defined in man (the microcosm) the elements that correspond to the constituents of the universe in the creative principle, we shall return to the First Cause, to the origin of all forms of existence; to the fundamental dualism. “K (the first letter of the first group) evokes nature, Prakriti, the substance of the universe, which is considered to be a feminine principle; P (the first letter of the last group) represents Purusha, the plan of the universe, considered to be a masculine principle. [Kashika 24]” 98 According to the commentary this group of two sounds is formed by the first and last letters of the first row of sounds in the Varga Series. The commentary is unambiguous yet again it doesn’t follow the underlying scheme of the Mahasvara Sutra. The name Kali, the feminine personification of great time begins with the guttural [K] and the name Pasupati, the masculine personification of the great hunter begins with the labial [P] . Purushä (universal man) is an evolute of ideation and should be associated with a guttural sound. Prakriti (universal nature) is an evolute of the energetic principle as represented by the vowel sound [I]. What this group needs is a palatal consonant, an offspring of the vowel [I]. [I] representing the principle of energy is more closely associated with Prakriti (nature) than any evolute of the vowel [U]. However the vowel {U} representing the created sphere does in some ways relate to the natural realm, Prakriti. Considering that the MS has suffered a certain degree of corruption it is possible that the last group of three sounds represent, not, as the commentary states, the middle letters of the first row in the Varga series, but the last three sounds in the first row. The first two sounds, the guttural [K] and the palatal [C], would thus carry over to this group where their association to the principles of Purushä (man) and Prakriti


(nature) would be crystal clear. At a later date I may be convinced to make such a change but at present, the only switch that I’m impelled to make is between the attributes of the sounds [K] and [P], instead of [K] representing Prakriti and [P] Purushä, [K] according to the scheme is more suitably designated as Purushä and [P] as Prakriti.

5.2.1 The Guttural Sound [K] The guttural [K], Purushä, corresponds with the sounds [Kh], Prana, [G], the ears, the sound [Gh], the tongue, the nasal sound [ı], hearing, the semi-vowel [H], ether/space and with the vowel [A], ideation. It sits on the base of the formative triangle [A], in line with the micro trines: [Kh], [G], [Gh], [Ñ], [H] and [A], representing all the sounds in the guttural Varga group. (Figure 32) The sound [K] is pronounced like the {c} in {c}art, and is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Empowered Prosperity” symbol in the Silver Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

5.2.2 The Labial Sound [P] The labial [P], Prakriti, corresponds with the sound [Ph], Vayana (specialization), the sound [B], tongue, the sound [Bh], genitalia, the nasal sound [M], taste, the semi-vowel [V], water, and, with the vowel [U], identity. It is situated on the base of the formative triangle [U] and in line with the micro trines [B] and [Bh] and [Ph], (Figure 32). Labial P Prakriti T

D

Base of 8th Triangle È J T

KH

GH

Base of 9th Triangle Ò

V

L

N

Ñ D

R DH

Base of 1st Triangle A

ó

M C

H

ò

N

PH

BH

È N

G

K

Base of 3rd Triangle U

TH

Ü B

P

Base of 6th Triangle É

Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I

Guttural K, Purusha

Ë

É U

JH

Y DH

CH TH

Base of 2nd Triangle I Base of 5th Triangle Ü

Base of 7th Triangle Ó

A

Figure 33 The Eleventh Group of two sounds, the first and last letters of the first row in the Varga series, represents the divine couple, Purusha and Prakriti. They are positioned across from the Ninth Group and within the same row as the Tenth Group. They sit on the baseline of the formative triangles, [A] and [U], to which they respectively correspond.


The sound {p} as in {p}ath is the mantra used in conjunction with “The Golden Mountain” symbol in the Silver Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.9 The Twelfth Group: The Three Qualities The Sounds: S-Sh-Sh-[R} This Group is SHA-SHA-SA-R: The Three Guna “Sattvä, Rajas, and Tamas are the three fundamental tendencies that form the nature of the world. They are represented by Sh, Sh, and S. The Great God (Maheshvarä) can act (create the world) by becoming incarnate in these three tendencies” (Kashika 24). “The palatal Sh represents Rajas, the tendency toward gravitation (and toward equilibrium between the contrary forces which permit the formation of atoms and worlds). The cerebral Sh is Tamas, the centrifugal force (which animates and creates but also disperses and destroys). The dental S is Sattvä, the centripetal force of attraction (which concentrates, conserves, and protects). These three tendencies are characterized by the colours red, black, and white. They are personified in the three divine aspects of Brahma, Shiva, and Vishnu. Shiva is the ultimate principle: the principle of expansion, from which all else stems and to which everything returns at the end.” 99 These three sibilants or fricatives are related to the three middle groups in the Varga series, the palatal, cerebral and dental. They indicate the Strands or Gunas that make up the threads of existence. The order they are given in the Varga is Sh, Sh, and S.

3.9.1 The Palatal Sibilant Sound [Sh] The [Sh], Rajas, is related to all the letters in the palatal Varga series, the sounds: [C], Mind (Manas), [Ch], Circulation (Samana), [J] skin, [Jh], hands; with the nasal sound [Ñ], touch, the semi-vowel [Y], air, and with the vowel [I], energetics. The [Sh trine rests on the base of the formative triangle [Ó], the seventh vowel, and its lower point touches the dental micro-trines [Th] and [Dh], aptly forming a trisectional star, (Figure 34).


It is pronounced like the [sh] in shining, and is the mantra used in conjunction with “The King of Power”, the first symbol in the Silver Age of the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.9.2 The Cerebral Sound [Sh] The [Sh], Tamas, is related to all of the letters in the cerebral Varga, the cerebral [T], Buddhi, [Th], Udana (force), the sounds [D], the eyes and [Dh], the feet, with the nasal sound [Ô], sight, the semivowel [R], fire, and with the fourth vowel [Ë], prime intelligence. It sits in between the micro trines [R] (fire) and [L] (earth), on the side of the formative triangle [Ë] close to the central the Bindu, (Figure 34). The sound [Sh] is similar to the {sh} in {sh}adow. However the tongue is further back with more of a cerebral inclination. [Sh] is the sound used in conjunction with “The Honour of Death” symbol of the Silver Age.

3.9.3 The Dental Sound [S] The [S], Sattva, is related to all letters of the dental Varga: the [T], Ahamkara, [Th], Apana (elimination), the sound [D], nose and [Dh], anus, with the nasal sound [N], smell, the semi vowel [L], earth, and with the fifth vowel [Ü], mind. It sits opposite the palatal [Sh] on the baseline of the formative triangle [Ë], where it forms a tri-portional star with the dental micro trine [D] and [T], (Figure 34). Base of 4th Triangle Ë

I

Base of 3rd Triangle U

T P

Base of 6th Triangle É

B

D

Base of 8th Triangle È Tri Portional Star

J T SA

Dental S, Sattvä

Ë

É U A

Base of 1st Triangle A

GH

KH

JH

CH

SH

V

L

N

Ñ D

R DH

ó

M C

H

ò

N

Cerebral Sh, Tamas PH

BH

È N

G

K

TH

Ü

Y DH

TH SH

Base of 9th Triangle Ò Base of 2nd Triangle I Base of 5th Triangle Ü

Base of 7th Triangle Ó Palatal Sh, Rajas

Figure 34 The Twelfth Group of three sounds, the fricative sibilants, represent the three categories, the Guna— the palatal Sh represents Rajas equilibrium, the cerebral Sh is Tamas, the centrifugal force, the dental S is Sattvä, the centripetal force.


The [S] sound is pronounced like the {s} in smile. It is the mantra used in conjunction with the “Triple Nectar” symbol of the Silver Age in the “Oracle of Revelation”.

3.10 The Thirteenth Group: The Return The Sounds: H-[L]

HA-L

“The last formula of the Maheshvarä Sutra represents a return to the principle, the beginning and end of all existence, to the Being who stands motionless outside and beyond the world. According to the Shiva Agama, “the letter H represents Shiva in his aspect as the ultimate principle.” “Beyond the creation, beyond all that which can be defined, I am H, the Supreme Witness, the sum of all mercy. Having said that, the peacegiver (Shambhu) disappeared” (Nandikeshvara Kashika 27). “With this, Nandikeshvara’s analysis of the Maheshvarä Sutra comes to an end. His commentator adds: “The letter A, the first of all the letters, represents light and the supreme deity. The I (aham) is formed by the union of the beginning (A) and the end (H ).” “The Ego, the centre of all individualized consciousness, allows the living being, like universal man, to be the witnesses through whom the divine dream becomes apparent reality; the Gnostic Christians interpreted this formula as Alpha and Omega, the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet.” 100

3.10.1 The Guttural (inhaled) Sound: [H] The [H], the inhalation, is related to the guttural sounds in the Varga series: the [K], Purusha and [Kh], prana, the [G], ears and [Gh], tongue, the nasal sound [ı], hearing, the semi-vowel [H], ether/space and with the vowel [A], ideation. It sits close to the Bindu, on the base of the ninth formative triangle [Ò] and is directly across from the sound [Sh], Tamas, (Figure 35). The sound [H] is produced when inhaling the breath and shaping the throat as it would be in the pronunciation of the {Ha} in {ha}lla. The inhaled [H] is the sound used in conjunction with “Azel Fif Age”, the last symbol in the Bronze Age of the “Oracle of Revelation.

The Code of Creation  

Whats in a word but the world itself. The linguistic field is intimately connected with experience. The world we know is the world that we d...

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