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urban design & architecture portfolio

shreya malu


‘A strategic development framework belongs to the territory and its people. If they lead in its conception and development they are more likely to appropriate and implement it. This is just common sense and as Urbanists we are pragmatic. Our task as facilitators is to ensure an excellent and high quality end result which will be realized. Or intervention covers a brief moment in time. A territory is, in human terms, eternal.’ Excerpt from an article by Alan Hennessy, Chairman of Groupe-6 France


With Halcrow, I got the chance to work closely on large scale planning projects also. As part of my ‘Individual Development Program’ of the firm, I studied various plans developed for Indian as well as global cities. I got opportunity to apply advanced GIS Analysis and come up with forward looking planning strategies but grounded in data.


Development Plan for Nagpur Metropolitan Area Nagpur is Tier 2 city of India with excellent location and growth prospects 148

The Nagpur Metropolitan Area (NMA) is a vast area of spreading across 3570 sq. km, exhibiting areas with diverse characters across the rural-urban transect. This enables to clearly recognize certain areas where future development is suitable and intended while preserving the natural or rural character of other areas as is. The long term vision for the NMA is that of a vibrant place that provides a platform for healthy economic growth across the cross section of the urban rural transect.

Nagpur Improvement Trust

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Nagpur City Hingna MIDC Kapsi (Kh) Industrial area Butibori MIDC Gondkhairy Industrial & Logistics area MIHAN Khaparkheda power plant Koradi power plant NHPC Pench Reserved Forest Pench Reservoir Bor Reserved Forest Wadgaon lake Gorewada Zoo

10

11

Fundamentally, there are three working components of the above vision statement which are explained below. 7

8 14

9 1 5

3

2

6

12

4

13 160

Nagpur Improvement Trust

Building the Web of Connectivity

The Plan recognizes the conflicts generated by the intertwining of regional and local connections. Much of these conflicts come about because there are not enough local streets to serve the range of land uses that are currently in place. So, while areas undergo land use transformation through the development process, it will be equally important to develop, build and manage a network of roads that allows building connectivity for local people.

Figure 10.4

Local roads: (18 to 12m wide)

Figure 9.6

Effective functioning of regional routes warrants support of local connections. It is equally important to ensure that the regional connections do not divide places. The Plan recognizes the conflicts generated by the intertwining of regional and local connections. Much of these conflicts come about because there are not enough local streets to serve the range of land uses that are currently in place. So, while areas undergo land use transformation through the development process, it will be equally important to develop, build and manage a network of roads that allows building connectivity for local people. This will be vital to ensure that the conflict between regional routes and local routes is minimized. A network of arterial and collectors integrates with the regional corridors to provide enhanced connectivity. In several instances connectivity across these regional corridors is planned through at-grade or grade-separated junctions.

High density residential Medium density residential Low density residential Commercial Public & Semi Public uses Industrial Power Plants Logistics Defense Area

The Structure Plan

HCPDPM HCPDPM

Collectors roads: Radials (30 to 24m wide)

HCPDPM

HCPDPM

Arterial roads and rings (60m to 36m wide)

Land uses

Web of connectivity - regional and local roads and their relationship with land uses

HCPDPM

Part of core team. Responsible for planning public amenities for the development plan, GIS analysis, generation of representative drawings and report writing. HCPDPM

HCPDPM

HCPDPM

Reserved Forest Protected Forest Double cropping area Agricultural land Water bodies with green buffers Rural Centres Main roads Rail line


PLANNING

• Safe: The aspect of safety in any public space is sustainable when active policing and security measures are not absolutely essential for keeping out incidents of crime. In other words factors such as its location, nature of surrounding activities, presence of people work together to make a space inherently safe. • Accessible: Great public spaces can be accessed by a variety of transportation modes other than private vehicles – on foot, by bicycles, through transit. Such places are located within walking distances of transit stops and residential areas. • Engaging: Through the nature of activities generated, the most successful public spaces engage people of different age groups – children, retirees, joggers, executives, dog walkers, business owners, students and so on. • Imageable: Imageability is the quality of a place which makes it distinct and memorable. Landscape design, public art installations in public places are some of the tools for enhancing imageability. • Community involvement: Key to the process for creating successful public places is community ownership. Active involvement of local communities in the conception and design of the spaces which serve them is an essential aspect of building cohesive and socially integrated communities.

With Halcrow/ CH2M HILL, Mumbai, India

While the creation of public spaces begins with allocation of areas for social amenities, that by itself is not sufficient to create quality public spaces. Presence of people and the variety of activities they engage in is a key indicator of successful public spaces. Places where public activities thrive need to be designed to be successful – by being safe, accessible, engaging and imageable.

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

Utilizing Social Amenity Allocations to Create Successful Public Spaces


Betma Hills Environmental Regeneration and Development (BHERD), Indore

As Pre-feasibility study under Pithampur- Dhar- Mhow Investment Region, DMIC.

Pithampur-Dhar-Mhow Investment Region (IR) is envisaged as one of the Investment Nodes under Madhya Pradesh sub region of Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC). The IR is delineated around the existing industrial area of Pithampur and covers an area of 372.4 sq.km. BHERD Project is one of the eight short-listed projects for the purpose of prefeasibility study. It is envisaged that the project would be crucial for initiating the development process of IR and help support achieving recreational and tourism infrastructure, along with green image for the IR. The project thus can act as an inspirational contributor to sustainable urban development in terms of improving the quality of life and environment for current urban populations, in an economically sustainable manner.

Responsible for master plan design development, drawings generation and report writing.


PLANNING

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

With Lea Associates (LASA), New Delhi, India


DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES • Environmentally responsive activities: The main intent of the development of this area is to regenerate and protect the natural features of the site. Adoption of rain water harvesting measures, renewable energy and other such methods in the wake of water scarcity and possible energy shortages in the region. • A multifunctional urban green: The preservation and expansion of vegetated areas or green spaces can improve the quality of life by creating natural settings for leisure and recreation, and safeguard ecological sensitivity of the area. It is envisioned that the hills become the green lung of the investment region. • Socially inclusive Uses: Good connectivity by road and public transport makes the site accessible to people from all economic and social backgrounds. Hence the program components should not be biased towards any single group. There has to be uses which are open to all, have low fees as well as uses which are more market friendly. • Maximizing financial viability by Private Investment Led Development: Such environmental regeneration programmes succeed only when they are environmentally sustainable, socially acceptable, financially viable and economically feasible. The cost of the plantation and such activities has to be offset by revenue generating uses. Hence it is proposed that the structure of the project would be oriented such that it can be promoted and made successful through a PPP model along with necessary incentives from the government, if needed. The flexibility of development of the project as a whole or in parts through various private sector investors is kept in mind • Open space ratio: This measure will help controlling the volume of built on the site. Taking in account the reserved and protected forest areas as part of the green areas in the site, the percentage of developable parcels is kept at maximum of 20%. This implies that only 20% of the entire site can be used for any built intervention.


Pre-feasibility study under Pithampur- Dhar- Mhow Investment Region, DMIC. The Gambhir river course cuts through the Investment Region from south to north in the east of Betma Hills and majorly traverses through proposed residential landuse. Accordingly it is perceived as having the potential to fulfil multiple objectives : • Groundwater Recharge through the river bed • Providing a city level public green as a social, recreational and cultural space with potential for a rich mix of varied activities and themes • Provide a balance to built areas and industry and promote green image of the integrated region

With Lea Associates (LASA), New Delhi, India

Gambhir Riverfront Development Project, Indore

This project can also act as the lead project/image project that would be instrumental in developing the environmental consciousness in IR along with Betma Hills Environmental Regeneration project and also act as an inspirational project with environmentally sound practices.

Responsible for master plan design development, drawings generation and report writing.

PLANNING

The water harvesting and recharge can be combined with the creation of environmental assets in the form of a city park along the river, within the IR, on both banks. This proposal is already incorporated in the landuse plan of IR and a strip of approximately 300m wide, which includes the river course has been identified as the project area. [The width on either side of the river course is variable and as depicted in the project plan].

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

The development of the area is bound to bring about increased proportion of hard surfaces thereby decreasing the natural recharge. In order to compensate for this certain eventuality artificial water recharge through detention of storm water runoff at suitable locations would be required. There is, therefore, need to examine the Gambhir river course and drainage system in the IR for groundwater recharge potential.


‘The principle task of an urban designer – through centuries – has been creating a sense of place by helping discover, define, determine and develop the identity of the place. This is more than ever important, in this age of globalization, due to all pervasive communication. The uniqueness and authenticity of places is being lost, flattened by the steamroller of an international culture. The important task in this is to develop a strategy for the execution of a design over a long term which requires flexibility in the design over a long period.’ Excerpt from BDP publication, ‘Time Place Identity’


Continuing from my growth as an urban designer at Columbia University, my design process got further defined after working at BDP India. I found a match in my design ideologies of looking at the context in depth, stressing on the quality of public realm and eventually creating a sense of place. After relocation to Mumbai, I worked with Halcrow/ CH2M HILL. I have always believed that its utmost important to have an implementable design strategy. Through projects like master plans for industrial regions, I strived to design development plans and Urban Design Guidelines which follow best design practices but are feasible for the private developer as well.


Master plan for SEZ, Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh Design of Special Economic Zone for GMR

Kakinada SEZ (KSEZ) is a multi- product Special Economic Zone in Kakinada, East Godavari District, Andhra Pradesh being developed by GMR. The Phase 1 site covers 1140 acres and covers the south-eastern part of the entire site. The concept development plan is based on a three tiered road structure. The carriage way remains equal throughout the plan as they are all doubly loaded roads and there are no bottlenecks for traffic. But the roads differ in character to establish hierarchy throughout the plan. 1 INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE

2 DESIGN PROCESS FOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

8 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT PLAN (VASTU COMPLIANT OPTIONS)

9.1.6

3 EXISTING CONDITIONS

9 FINAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Access Points

A. Controlled SEZ entry points to Processing Areas (PA) with custom check points.

Overa

ll KSE

3 EXISTING CONDITIONS

9 FINAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

T PLAN (VASTU COMPLIANT OPTIONS)

4 AREA PROGRAM

5 PRECEDENTS AND CASE EXAMPLES

6 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT PLAN DESIGN PROGRESSION

entry points to Processing Areas (PA) ck points.

Overa

ll KSE

R R Colony

of Plots as Dimensions ach plot sizing The Noper key to efficient industrial development planningBeis Green Buffer Ro Program ad D. Use of river edge for non industrial uses. 10 acres 2 130m X 300m and street-grid / block configuration. After a rigorous designRoads River Jammeru Custom Check Po 5 acres 87 100m X 200m; 125m X 160m 3 development acres 42 70m Xprocess, 160m; 100m X 120m road grid dimensions derived are most 2 acres 18 66m9.7 X 100m Figure PA/ NPA Demarcation adaptable and flexible, considering that the program has a number of to 5 acre range. 9.2 Grid Configuration plot sized in the 3 acre Jammeru Cree k osed Coastal Plot Size

ndary

uram

Demarcation

Road

plan is divided into PA and NPA wing factors:

area contiguous as it is an SEZ. R R Colony

ad frontage for NPA development for efits.

ach

e for non industrial uses.

River Jammeru

PA/ NPA Demarcation

ad

Green Buffer

ll KSE

Z Bo

unda

As per the givenRoads area program, there are 4 main sizes of Custom Check PointTable 9.2). The utility plots plots for industrial uses (See vary from 0.25 to 5 acre as per the area needed for the machinery and equipment.

ry

Road

Figure 9.7

Ro

70 m

Overa

m pura

Be

Prop IR Corridor by PCP

The key to efficient industrial development planning 500 is m plot sizing and street-grid / block configuration. After the rigorous design development process (See Chapter 6), road grid dimensions derived are most adaptable and flexible, considering that the program has a number of plot PA sized in the 3 acre to 5 acre range. NPA

Pitha

oad frontage for NPA development.

PA NPA

Plot sizes and dimensions for PA

C. Utilise Coastal Road frontage for NPA development.

k

Z Bou

Pithap

Non Processing Areas (NPA).

Table 9.2

Jammeru Cree

Proposed Coastal Corridor by PCPIR

ry

7 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT PLAN

160 m

ints

unda

A. Keeping the PA area contiguous as it is an SEZ.

10 CONCEPT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

B. Utilise Beach road frontage for NPA development for commercial benefits.

nt has two types of entrances.

k

ad

The development plan is divided into PA and NPA considering the following factors: 2 DESIGN PROCESS FOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

7

m Ro

PA/ NPA Demarcation

6 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT PLAN DESIGN PROGRESSION

Jammeru Cree

Z Bo

pura Pitha

B. Free entry to the Non Processing Areas (NPA).

PE

5 PRECEDENTS AND CASE EXAMPLES

Proposed Coastal Corridor by PCPIR

Phase 1 development has two types of entrances.

9.1.7

4 AREA PROGRAM

10 CONCEPT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

500 m

DEVELOPMENT DESIGN PROCESS PLAN FOR 3DEVELOPMENT PLAN EXISTING CONDITIONS 3 EXISTING 4 AREA PROGRAM CONDITIONS 5 PRECEDENTS 4 AREA PROGRAM AND CASE 5 PRECEDENTS EXAMPLES AND 6 CONCEPT CASE EXAMPLES DEVELOPMENT 6 CONCEPT PLAN DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PROGRESSION PLAN DESIGN 7 CONCEPT PROGRESSION DEVELOPMENT 7 CONCEPT PLAN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

nfiguration

As per the industrial standard, the plots are preferred in 1:2 ratio. (Length is twice the width). This preference 66.7 m was duly considered while determining the sizes for the various plot types. Figure 9.8B demonstrates the plot sizes derived in 1:2 ratio which can fit in the same grid size thereby making the road grid truly adaptable and flexible.

ll KSE

Z Bou

Road

Be

Table 9.2

The road grid follows these grid sizes resulting in the one Jammeru of the possible Cre plotekconfiguration as shown in Figure 9.8A. 500 m

ll KSE

unda

ry

Z Bo

unda

ry

KSEZ Draft Concept Plan Report

5 Acre Plots 3 Acre Plots

July 2013

Ro

ad

Dimensions 10 acre plots

10 acres

210 acres

July 2013 5 acres

875 acres

3 acres

423 acres

70m X 42 160m; 100m X70m 120m X 160m; 100m X 120m

2 acres 125 m

182 acres

18 66m X 100m

ad

ad

KSEZ Draft Concept Plan Report

No of Plots Dimensions as per Program

ach

5 acre plots 130m 2 X 300m 130m X 300m 3 acre plots 100m X87 200m; 125m100m X 160m X 200m; 125m X2 160m acre plots

PA s divided and NPA into PA and NPA Figure 9.8A Plot Configuration Figure 9.8B Grid Configuration actors: Part of the core team. Responsible for master plan design development, drawings generation and report submission.

ontiguous n SEZ. as it is an SEZ.

River Jammeru

Plot Size

m Ro

pura

m Ro

pura

ach relationship with each To understand the complex land uses within the SEZ and their Ro ad scation these grid sizes resulting in the one 2 Acre Plots River Jammeru other, adjacency onfiguration as shown in Figure 9.8A. diagrams were generated 10 Acre Plots Be

Plot sizes Table and9.2 dimensions Plot sizes forand PA dimensions for PA

No of Plot PlotsSize as per Program Figure 9.8A Plot Configuration

160 m

76

Overa

Z Bo

Pitha

Pitha

oad grid truly adaptable and flexible.

Jammeru Creek

R R Colony

d while determining the sizes for the Ove Figure 9.8B demonstrates the plot rall KSE

atio which can fit in the same grid size Processing NPA). Areas (NPA).

100 m

160 m

points ng Areas to (PA) Areas standard, theProcessing plots are preferred in 1:2 (PA) ngth nts.is twice the width). This preference

ndary

Proposed Coastal Corridor by PCPIR

uram

Coastal ea program, there are 4 main sizesProposed of Corridor by PCPIR uses (See Table 9.2). The utility plots nces. two of area entrances. acre types as per the needed for the pment.

R R Colony

200 m

Overa Pithap

ONS) VASTU t industrial development planning is et-grid / block configuration. After the velopment process (See Chapter 6), ns derived are most adaptable and that the program has a number of plot 5 acre range.

120 m

Jammeru Cree k Proposed Coastal or by PCPIR dimension Corrid 10 CONCEPT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN DEVELOPMENT PLAN 9 FINAL DEVELOPMENT 9 FINAL PLANDEVELOPMENT PLAN 10 CONCEPT COMPLIANT OPTIONS)

500 m

500 m

66m X 100m

5 Acre Plo 3 Acre Plo

2 Acre Plo

10 Acre Pl


As part of the scope, detailed urban design guidelines were developed for the project.

With Halcrow/ CH2M HILL, Mumbai, India

There are readily accessible greens which can be used as active or passive open spaces to allow for use during lunch or evening breaks within the industrial set up. They have also been developed to provide a degree of softness in the urban environment represented by the industrial uses.

Sample urban design guidelines Private Realm: Base Case Scenario (3 Acre Plot) For a typical 3 acre plot: 80m X 160m (12800 sqm‐ 3 acres): FSI applicable: 0.75 Maximum permissible built up: 9600 sqm (A) Buildable area left after setbacks: 10400 sqm (B) From (B): • Maximum Ground Coverage utilized: 4480 sqm (C) • Area for Parking: 1920 sqm • Compulsory Green: 640 sqm • Area under FTP (Approx): 1880 sqm • Area left: 1480 sqm

URBAN DESIGN

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

Massing Achieved (Considering utilizing  complete ground coverage): (A)/ (C): G+2


Master plan for SIR, Hosur, Karnataka Design of Special Industrial Region for GMR, Cluster 2 1 INTRODUCTION

2 EXISTING CONDITIONS

3 PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

4 DRAFT DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC

5 KEY COMPONENTS OF THE MASTER PLAN

6 DRAFT INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC

7 NEXT STEPS

4.1.2

4 4.1

Figure 4.1

4 DRAFT DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC

5 KEY COMPONENTS OF THE MASTER PLAN

6 DRAFT INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC

7 NEXT STEPS

3 PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

4 DRAFT DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC

5 KEY COMPONENTS OF THE MASTER PLAN

6 DRAFT INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC

7 NEXT STEPS

SH 85

SH 85

1

SH 85

SH 85

SH 85

SH 85

1 1

2 150m

2

1

The site conditions are analysed under two heads. • Context • Topography

4.1.1

3 PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

2 EXISTING CONDITIONS

SH 85 to site topography and natural features Diagrams to understand land use suitability with respect

SH 85 4.2 Figure

Diagrams to understand land use suitability with respect to site context

land use suitability

Land use suitability analysis helps optimise usage of land. It helps in taking design decisions, in congruence with existing conditions, which will cause least disruption to existing natural systems. The EMC site presents a challenging topography and ecological features (As detailed in Chapter 2). Thus for optimising land usage, it is essential to understand the suitability of the various parcels within the site for different type of uses.

2 EXISTING CONDITIONS

1 INTRODUCTION

4.1.2 site topography The site topography, natural drainage, and minimizing the impact to the existing natural systems are driving forces in The site topography, natural drainage, and minimizing the determining the land use suitability. impact to the existing natural systems are driving forces in determining the land use suitability. Figure 4.2 Diagrams to understand land use suitability with respect to site topography and natural features

Draft Development plan for Hosur electronics manufacturing Cluster (emC)

The 527 acres Electronic Manufacturing Cluster (EMC) proposed by GMR Group will be located within this Special Investment Region. The project envisages creating an alternate node in Hosur Area with industrial standards that would compare with Bengaluru city, a larger magnet located nearby in Karnataka.

1 INTRODUCTION

site topography

1 400m

2

1

Context

1 3

1

Site delineation, access, current development of the road and grading carried out on the site, the natural landscape, land ownership issues, prior development commitments and intrinsic characteristics of the land uses drive master planning and design decisions. These decisions are described in the following diagrams.

1 INTRODUCTION

2 EXISTING CONDITIONS

Basic geometry of site: • The horizontal and vertical linearity (1) is a compelling factor for having perpendicular spine roads (2) as the main access network. • The spine roads help maximise land usage as they provide access to a large part of site area.(3)

4 DRAFT DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC

Suitability for various land uses: Workers’ housing: • The location (1) is separated from the rest of the industrial uses which presents a better environment suitable for residential uses. Commercial: • Location at (2) gives ready access and visibility from highway. • The people within and the visitors to the EMC will pass through this area as it is the primary entrance to the cluster. The increased visibility of the commercial area will ensure high footfalls necessary for commercial development. Cluster Innovation Centre (CIC) • Central location (3) makes it easily accessible to the industrial uses and visitors coming via spine road. • Topography and site feature associated with a large rocky formation allows the CIC to be associated with a natural landmark within the overall development.

The key components of the development plan are mentioned below. They are further explained in Chapter 5.

The Cluster Innovation Centre (CIC) & Visitor Centre Electronics System Design (ESD) Electronics System Design & Manufacturing (ESDM) Electronics Manufacturing (EM) HOSUR ELECTRONIC MANUFACTURING CLUSTER Manufacturing Support Skill Development Center Logistics Area Worker Housing and Social Amenities Area Adventure Sports Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises (MSME)

Considering the linearity of the site and the limiting dimensions, the idea of ‘development along a spine’ has been adopted for structuring the site. The spine becomes the main thoroughfare, providing and maximizing access to various parts of the development. It allows the development of a secondary road network that hinges off of the spine. GMR - EMC Draft Development Plan

September 2013

2

5 KEY COMPONENTS OF THE MASTER PLAN

4.3

Access & Logistics: • The main access points are from (1) and (2) where the SH85 directly touches the site. • The site has peculiar geometry at (2) because of the rocky formation in the north and the delineation of site boundary. It is difficult to mitigate the geometry to have smooth entry/exit in that area and hence, it is planned as secondary access point into the site. • The presence of railway line adjacent to the site at (4) presents a potential opportunity of building a freight station here allowing the area around it to be considered for an extended logistics area of regional importance. To cater to the logistics based use, the north-south spine road will need to be strengthened as there will be increased traffic related to logistics on that road.

2

2

2 EXISTING CONDITIONS

3 P

7 N

3

1 3 PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

4

4.3 analysis site plan Site suitability

2

1

3

220m

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

1 INTRODUCTION

6 DRAFT INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN FOR HOSUR EMC 3

1

3

Site Boundary Configuration: • The edges of the site boundary are irregularly shaped Siteand Boundary create Configuration: several pockets of undevelopable land • when The edges of theinto siteplotted boundary are irregularly shaped converted industrial uses. create several pockets of undevelopable land • and Potential green spaces are planned along the edges as when converted intonot plotted uses. shown at (1) which only industrial provide an opportunity to • create Potential greensite spaces arebut planned along the edges as regular edges also help provide a buffer shown atthe (1) neighbouring which not only provide anthe opportunity to between villages and industrial or createtypes regular site edges butwithin also help providesite. a buffer other of development the project between the neighbouring villages and the industrial or other types of development within the project site.

Existing Drainage Channels: • The drainage channels are very essential and hence Existing Channels: needDrainage to be maintained. • These The drainage channels are very essential andspaces hence • areas will potentially become green need besite. maintained. withinto the • These These green areas spaces will potentially become within greenthe spaces • will be integrated open within the site. such as residential, commercial etc. space for uses • These green spaces will be integrated within the open space for uses such as residential, commercial etc.

Rocky Terrain: • There are smaller rocky outcrops within the site which Rocky Terrain: make those areas difficult to build on. • The There are smaller rocky outcrops within which • region as shown at (1) is relatively flatthe andsite buildable make thosemodifications areas difficulttototerrain. build on. with minor • There The region as considerable shown at (1) ismodifications relatively flat and buildable • will be to the natural with minor modifications terrain in region as showntoatterrain. (2). • To There will be the considerable to the the natural natural • minimise extent of modifications modification of terrain in region at (2). lay of the land, itasisshown intended that smaller size of plots • are To minimise the(2) extent modification of the grading natural planned in whichofwill thereby reduce lay of the land, it islong intended that smaller size of plots requirements over stretches. are planned in (2) which will thereby reduce grading requirements over long stretches.

September 2013

GMR - EMC Draft Development Plan

September 2013

Open Space Reservation (OSR) Location Suitability: • The main considerations in locating OSR is:

Reservation Suitability: Existing public road for(OSR) accessLocation to the open space. The key components• Open ofSpace the development plan are • It The main be considerations locating OSR is: the space • should of minimum in 3m width to make Existing public road for access to thein open space. mentioned below. They• are further explained Chapter 5. useful.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

20 GMR - EMC Draft Development Plan

site plan

• It should be be preferably of minimum 3medge widthoftothe make the space • It should at the site boundary. useful. on these factors and also considering areas which • Based • It should be preferably at the edge of the site boundary.

are not fit to be built on due to the rocky formations, The Cluster Innovation Centre (CIC) & Visitor Centre • certain Based on these factors and also areas locations were seen fit toconsidering be developed aswhich OSR. are three not fitlocations to be built on due to the rocky formations, All have access to village road from Electronics System • Design (ESD) certain locations were seen fit to be developed OSR. outside the site and are at the periphery of the as site. All three locations have access to village road from Electronics System • Design & Manufacturing (ESDM) outside the site and are at the periphery of the site. Electronics Manufacturing (EM) Manufacturing Support Skill Development Center Logistics Area Worker Housing and Social Amenities Area Adventure Sports 21 HOSUR ELECTRONIC MANUFACTURING CLUSTER Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises (MSME) 21 HOSUR ELECTRONIC MANUFACTURING CLUSTER

8

The spine and its branches fundamentally offer flexibility of development to form spurs, loops or parallel streets that support the spine. Whilst the spine achieves certain permanence in the development, the branches can often be adjusted in later stages of development to suit plot area and unique development requirements. This secondary layer can be adjusted and redesigned to accommodate the modified requirements without hampering the basic traffic movement along the spine.

8 7 1

7

4

6

2

3

2

2 5

10 4

4 7

Landscape Strategy for Open Spaces Road Facing OS GMR - EMC Draft Development Plan

GMR - EMC Draft Development Plan

Rocky terrain

September 2013

HOSUR ELECTRONIC MANUFACTURING CLUSTER

Steep slopes Formal Garden Organised Planting Original Condition Typology

Location

Design Typology

Paths/ Street Furniture

Plantation Type

Formal Garden

Along road – maximum visibility

Designed spaces, built structures allowed

Paths and extensive street furniture

Trees, shrubs, Manicured grass

Organised Planting

Along plot boundaries – acting as buffers

Planned planting, maintenance of existing vegetation (as applicable)

Paths primarily for maintenance, Minimal street furniture

Trees, shrubs

Original Condition

Tough terrain like rocky areas

No intervention

No street furniture or paths, Existing trails maybe maintained

As on site

Part of the core team. Responsible for master plan design development, drawings generation and report submission. Illustrative is done by the team

Septemb


Design of Special Industrial Region for GMR, Cluster 1&3 The 1700 acre project is envisaged as an industrial development with all the support uses such as residential and commercial. In addition to these, due to proximity to state highway, large scale commercial is also planned to make most use of the frontage.

6 2 1

4

2

1

3

With Halcrow/ CH2M HILL, Mumbai, India

Master plan for SIR, Hosur, Karnataka

5

5

2

3. 4. 5. 6.

Main water bodies clusters The three main access points: Need to have a legible road network which gives enough choice to end-user but is efficient HT line cutting across the site View of the hill Connecting the west-most entrance to the main entrances The industrial precinct (the location being fixed)

The secondary road network gives access to development parcels. It distributes traffic better over various access options by providing multiple routes for entry/ exit to/from the site. The green areas around protected water bodies are enhanced and structured in response to adjoining road alignment.

Industrial R&D Logistics Residential Office/ Retail Utilities

Part of the core team. Responsible for master plan design development, drawings generation and report submission.

URBAN DESIGN

1. 2.

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

The Basic premise is that the water bodies need to be protected with minimum 15m buffer around them. The 4-lane spine road forms the loop around the hill and is purposely taken along the long water-body. Roads to main access points off-shoot from the loop road.


Arihant Anandi, Near Mumbai, India Hospitality project nestled in forest area

Arihant Anandi is a hospitality project with the premise drawn out from the unique location and the topography of the site. The client visualizes Arihant Anandi as a project where people can interact with nature in a safeguarded environment that also provides a diversity of experiences. There is opportunity to develop mix of uses that makes this place a “wholesome destination”.The site provides the unique context of a “hill station” nestled within a lush forest. The natural environment forms the most important context for the site. Thus, it is imperative to study and qualitative analyze the physical characteristics of the site on different parameters. This study helped to establish constraints, opportunities or natural components which need to be preserved on site. Moreover, it gave the understanding of regional importance of the site’s natural systems. This factor is very important to ascertain the effects of any scale of development on the site to a larger context around the site. The product mix for the site includes variety of the activities including holiday homes, resorts, boarding school and F&B. The site will have various other USP’s such as the rope-way and cliff view park to enhance the tourism potential of the site.

Deputy Project Manager, Responsible for master plan design development , drawings generation, report submission.


The landscaping interventions have been envisaged to not only improve the quality of the public space but also to improve the ecological attributes of the site. The design aspects intervene with the existing conditions at different degrees. In certain park spaces the landscape interventions have completely transformed existing site conditions and in other it has merely added some native vegetation or has maintained parts of the site as is.

With Halcrow/ CH2M HILL, Mumbai, India

Arihant Anandi is planned as a ‘Pedestrian Oriented Development’. The entire street network is designed with components like shared surfaces, wide paths, ample street furniture, gentle ramps to give preference to safe pedestrian and cyclist movement.

The master plan for Arihant Anandi can be broadly classified into three zones:

URBAN DESIGN

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

‘Live’: The enclave of Holiday homes, resettlement village and school ‘Play’: The activity hub with ropeway station at the centre with commercial, adventure and entertainment uses around it ‘Relax & Rejuvenate’: The exclusive zone with two resorts


Indian Institute of Technology Campus, Mandi, India 500 acres campus for premier educational institution in India in foothills of Himalayas The approach to develop the master plan for IIT Mandi campus seeks to create a number of human scale territories in developable parcels of land consisting of a rich mix of activities, from living, learning, working and play; connected by a well defined pedestrian and cycling network. Our master plan vision has been centred around 5- 10 min. walking times within each zone to ensure activities are cohesively linked and that the buildings and spaces form a coherent whole. We have consciously avoided an over diagrammatic and mechanistic layout and set a clear hierarchy of spaces to improve legibility and orientation and user comfort. The campus plan is broken down into distinct yet interrelated zones. This approach is consistent with the vernacular pattern of development in hill settlements. Traditional settlements in the area are typically compact in nature and arranged along the contours. Varying topography gives pockets of lands or ‘hamlets’ for development with an organic mosaic of buildings of varying size and shapes. Design principles governing the master plan

Part of the winning design team. Responsible for master plan design development and drawings generation. 3D view renderings done by external consultant


Our thinking goes beyond the immediate campus environs and foster links with the wider community to secure social and economic benefits and local employment through new agriculture, education and training. It is our intention that in developing a new campus for IIT in Kamand, Mandi, the campus provides opportunities for employment for the surrounding rural population within the rural areas itself. We propose that IIT Mandi can act as a Living Laboratory - a demonstration project by generating employment as well as organizing research and development projects for encouraging sustainable ways of farming and increasing agricultural produce.

IIT MANDI - MASTERPLAN FRAMEWORK STRATEGY Level One

Level Two

Level Three

REDUCE Harm

IDENTIFY Potential INTEGRATE Existing resources with design

REGENERATE through development

ANTICIPATE CHANGES in the local community and help local LOW IMPACT SETTLEMENT- planning for a new community which will bodies to develop policies to effectively manage the develop along the main airport road. Active participation in community functions development process with optimum control. • The site being ecologically sensitive. care to be taken to • Identify best practices and initiatives in the region and integrate them to prevent harm to natural surroundings from human interference – IIT Mandi’s Master Plan. within and outside the site. (eg. sewage, plastic waste • Develop a strong community visioning process by joining hands with generating outside the campus) stakeholders, community members, local bodies, NGOs and educational • Appropriate guidelines to be developed to minimize the impact institutions such as schools and colleges. Develop bridges between of surrounding community developments – formal/informal. different agencies. • New road network sensitive to existing settlements- create • Encourage local development projects by organizing workshops, self provision of buffer -help camps, fairs, etc. Building Strong Neighbourhoods to help people address ways to strengthen their sense of community and build better neighbourhoods.

INCLUSION AND PARTICIPATION - Area training and employment plan – this is a possible approach to local inclusion and participation by a range of learning opportunities and employment pathways that could be developed. • Retain local methods of construction. • Increased community awareness about sustainability, importance of conservation of natural resources, etc. • Build strong partnerships within local communities with lasting social benefits. • Growth of local enterprise with new technologies. • Rewarding initiatives and research done in sustainability.

ECOLOGY- LANDFORM

WORKING WITH CONTOURS minimising cut and fill

MINIMAL FOUNDATIONSlightweight structures being considered

LIVE (habitat/ settlement) • smaller footprints

STABILISING HILL SLOPES effective erosion control plan. Maximize the use of stones and plantation for erosion control. Optimize the use of wire mesh. Tree roots are the essential framework for preventing soil erosion. Roots from many trees can grow together into a single enormous network that stabilises slopes.

RETAINING WALLS & ADDITIONAL PLANTATION Crescent-shaped landscaped holding areas on a slope.

WORK (Academic and administration areas) • Use of flat land

AWARENESS OF EXISTING VEGETATION Minimize cutting of existing trees.

PLANT indigenous species. Integrate mature trees into the Master Planning scheme. Develop activities around them.

CURTAIL ANIMAL TO AND FROM WILD ANIMALS. Create effective boundaries to prevent interaction between humans and wild animals. Discourage keeping pets – dogs and cats – as this might attract leopards onto the site. Cats could be detrimental to native birds – destroying nests, eggs, etc.

PLANTING BUFFER VEGETATION CREATING SOURCES OF DRINKING WATER at higher levels to restrict animal movement - Work out alternative paths, water bodies, shelter, etc. outside the site to minimize the impact of the project on their lifestyle.

PROTECTION FROM FOREST FIRE by preventing the spread of fire from the site. However, naturally occurring fires, at times, regulate growth and could be an important part of the ecosystem. Provide effective protection from fire to other forest values, such as water and watersheds, fisheries, wildlife, recreation, aesthetics, soil productivity and soil stability.

CREATING FIRELINES and also planting appropriate vegetation to elevate moisture levels • Provide a cost effective system of fire protection that is well coordinated with local fire districts across the state and with federal and tribal wildland fire protection agencies. • Carry out extensive survey of the site and identify the possibilities of forest fire. Create physical boundaries separating the site and forest – fire breaks, stone walls, level differences, water bodies (also used for fire extinguishing), regular clearing of forest areas, etc. • One of the more controversial techniques is controlled burning: permitting or even igniting smaller fires to minimize the amount of flammable material available for a potential wildfire. Fuel can be removed by handcrews, prevent fuel build-up and create access to forest areas. • Develop regional strategies.

- ANIMALS

- WATER

WATER - developing around natural drainage channels preserve natural run off

PLAY (Open areas, Sport fields, riverfront, public edges) • edge treatment / ensure drainage PLANT three times the trees cut during the entire construction process – all indigenous species. FOOD SELF SUFFICIENCY - provide for vegetable/ organic farming/ dairy farms - grow as much locally as possible. Our master plan demonstrates the care that has been taken to make full use of external spaces for living and learning and raising awareness of environmental issues. This is best illustrated by the biomass woodland, orchards and gardens. These spaces will trigger a wide range of education and IIT community initiatives.

EDUCATE forest landowners and forest homeowners about the value of fire hazard and risk reduction measures and take positive action to minimize the threat. Economic incentives for reducing dependence of forest resources for daily activities.

CREATING SWALES integrated with Landscape

WATER MANAGEMENT • Collection from hill slopes through check dams, ponds and percolation tanks. • Roof water harvesting • Gravity based irrigation system

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY v

REDUCE HARDWARE - provide for wireless transmitters and routers

INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY possibilities of creating open and flexible learning spaces

FLEXIBLE SPACES, MAXIMUM USE

TRANSPORT & TRAVEL

PEDESTRIAN DEVELOPMENT- extensive cycle and pedestrian movement network

Prepare an accessible structured and HUMAN SCALE MASTERPLAN

SUSTAINABLE PUBLIC TRANSPORT between facilitiesbattery power mini bus for community, electric scooters for staff, battery powered bicycles for stduents

PURCHASING & WASTE

SITE WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS with the aim to minimise the waste produced onsite and maximise the re-use of materials No waste to be directly sent to Landfills. BUILDING MATERIALS We will use materials in our specifications which fulfil IITs requirements and involve the least adverse environmental and social impact

WATER

Man made Environment Expansion

ENERGY FOR BUILDINGS/ SERVICES

UTILISE EXISTING ROAD NETWORK - within the site as much as LIMITED MOTORISED VEHICULAR Pushing vehicular uses to possible, integrate with new development edges- less pollution and energy consumption within site

Buildings designed to be lean, green and clean incorporating cost effective features to reduce energy usage and co2 production. THERMOSTATS/ MOTION SENSORS for cooling/ heating and lighting PASSIVE COOLING/ HEATING Orientation of built to maximise natural solar gain thereby reducing heat loads. Eliminate air-conditioning requirements during summer. use of insulation, thermal mass, passive air movement, etc. SAVINGS in water consumptions with LOW FLOW fixtures/ reducing building run off/ provision of terraces

BIOGAS - anaerobic digestors - zero waste offsite. SEGREGRATION of waste Develop recycling facilities for organic and inorganic wastes.Provide colour coded waste collection bins at strategic locations. VERMICOMPOST PV parabolic solar array for water heating BIOMASS Energy for heating SOLAR STREET LIGHTS/ PHONE BOXES LOCALISED WIND TURBINE FARMS to be explored

RAIN WATER HARVESTING - Create network of water bodies to store rainwater for water supply throughout the year. Rain water collection pond at at various locations on site’s upper levels to enable use of use gravity for water supply - reducing energy requirement for pumping.

HYDRO POWER GENERATION - channelise water flow at higher level- utilise level differences across site Efficient Waste water treatment system.

URBAN DESIGN

ECOLOGY - VEGETATION

SIZE & ORIENTATION carefully considered for all structures

Man made Environment Expansion

LOCAL WELLBEING

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

LIVING LABORATORY

With Building Design Partnership (BDP), New Delhi, India

Creating a Low Impact Settlement


Our existing urban areas are reeling under the pressure to provide places to park cars. At the neighborhood level, it is observed that patterns of pedestrian movement are being compromised to facilitate the needs of the car. The aim is to understand the issue of ‘omnipresent’ car parking spaces, its effect on pedestrian movement and its resulting impact on the configuration of open space. Incremental measures such as realignment of car parking spaces, reconfiguration of pedestrian and car routes, bringing amenities closer to the residents are suggested and tested on this residential development. Open areas which are rendered unused due to lack of safe access and hence neglected are also made part of the desired pedestrian network. The project was finally presented as a presentation and as a public interactive display at the Urban Mobility India Conference 2010.

Responsible for the entire study working under guidance of BDP India Chairman, Mr. Shyam Khandekar

URBAN DESIGN

One of the most important markers of a successful city is how it treats its pedestrians. Better the walkability of our cities at all scales of roads and space the more livable they are and more sustainable they become. Traditionally, our cities were havens for pedestrians but with increasing modernization, even the planning process has become blind to their needs.

With Building Design Partnership (BDP), New Delhi, India

A study for incremental measures to be taken to reclaim public realm for the pedestrian in a residential colony

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

Livability, Walkability, Sustainability in Indian cities


“I don’t think sustainability is a design aesthetic, any more than having electricity in your building, or telephones, or anything else. It’s an ethic, a basic consideration that we have to have as architects designing buildings. In 10 years we’re not going to talk about sustainability anymore, because it’s going to be built into the core processes of architecture. Advertising sustainability will be like an architect getting up in front of a room to proudly proclaim how his buildings didn’t fall down.” Robert A M Stern, Dean of Yale School of Architecture


During my undergraduate course in architecture I got deeply interested in sustainable architecture. My dissertation studied long term benefits of energy efficient architecture versus the cost implications as Indian market is very sensitive to up front costs. I intended to develop cost and technique models which were balanced and hence much more feasible to apply. After my graduation I worked with one of the premier thinkers in sustainable and vernacular architecture of India, Prof. Ashok B. Lall. I worked on developing innovative construction details to implement passive energy saving techniques.


5MW Solar Power Plant at the Presidential Estate, Delhi, India

Visionary project proposed by then President of India, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam The strategy for the architectural design of the Convention Centre and offices integrates three objectives while providing for these functions: • An array of photovoltaic panels at the tree-top level for the desired generation of electricity from solar energy. • Organization of the built and open spaces so as to maintain and reinforce the original architectural and landscape structure of the Bungalows Entrance Zone and Mother Teresa Crescent. • Use of building systems to minimize environmental impact and conserve energy. To ensure this, a system of “photovoltaic trees” which raises the arrays to the level of the height of existing mature tree is proposed. This grid of “trees” coincides with and doubles-up as the structural system of the building to which the tree grid gives “shelter”. Photovoltaic “trees” are omitted where natural existing valuable trees are preserved.


I attended a lecture given by Bernard Tschumi at Columbia University where he spoke about his book “Event-Cities 3: Concept Vs. Context Vs. Content” which had a lasting impact on structuring of my projects. Excerpt from the book: ‘Bernard Tschumi explores the complex and productive triangulation of architectural concept, context, and content. There is no architecture without a concept, an overriding idea that gives coherence and identity to a building. But there is also no architecture without context -- historical, geographical, cultural -- or content (what happens inside). Concept, context, and content may be in unison or purposely discordant’.


After working as an architect for two years, I was drawn towards understanding the ‘mechanics’ of the urban issues, the complexity of a large scale context, developing holistic solutions to grounded problems. Urban design program in Columbia University gave me the opportunity to do that and moreover, get experience in working in multicultural teams and global design perspectives. My academic projects represent clear understanding of context, grounded holistic approach to an issue and definitive strategy of implementation.


Emerging Vienna

A hybrid interface between the existing and the anticipated, thereby imparting an identity to area beyond city limits Vienna is in the process of re-positioning itself as a new political, economic, and geographic center, the newly branded Centrope. The City of Vienna is actively promoting several developmental projects around the city to cater to future population. Aspern has increasingly been branded as a symbol of the transformed periphery- possibly providing a concerted identity to the larger region. Our design proposal critiques this plan, in particular the proposed highway, connecting Vienna city center to the ring road lying just outside the city periphery. The inclusion of this highway would lead to an undesired pattern of development. The close proximity to the city edge (and associated rebates outside city limits) and a high speed road network would push investment and development outside city limits. This drainage of investment could lead to a limited development of Aspern and other planned areas. Furthermore, the Highway along with other allied infrastructure would fracture an already loose periphery into segmented pockets of development. The resultant pattern of development would be distanced from mass transit and could turn car dependant. It can jeopardize the investment in infrastructure made by the city of Vienna (the need for sustainable densities translating into ridership being tantamount for its success).

1_YEAR 0

2_YEAR 2

3_YEAR 4

4_YEAR 6

GREEN CORRIDOR: to redefine the infrastructural corridors, not as divides between communities, but rather as bridges between them.

5_YEAR 8

B

A

Landscape link to overcome infrastructure barrier Pattern 1: Pattern 2: Interstitial “Selbsterne� farms & zones between green green houses. & built.

U2 stops become hubs of activity.

D

C

B

D

Pattern 3: Small grain Pattern 4: Large fabric grain fabric around public activity.

A

The corridor joins Aspern green buffer to activate it. C

The corridor extends from existing green areas.

Intensity of activities: Pause for self harvest farms.

Activity hub Leads to activities.

further

Inter-modal nodes


Group members: Amardeep, Habiba, Shruti

This incremental development of the road would keep pace with densification along infrastructure to ensure optimum utilization of land inside city limits before it spills out onto the periphery.

4

1

3 2

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

6 5

GSAPP, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NYC

IDENTITY: The interactive “Green� is the mediator between different built scales, infrastructure barriers . It no longer remains just green landscape but becomes the site for or the activity itself. This imparts an image of development which is not fragmented but part of the whole.


DHARAVI: OWN_GROW_WORK_LIVE Preserving and reinforcing the identity of Dharavi

Our proposal attempts to preserve the rich social capital of a threatened community. While we do acknowledge the need to urgently upgrade the dilapidated building stock and the poor infrastructure, our intent is to address these concerns in a way that causes the least amount of disturbance in the ongoing activities of Dharavi. Our strategy thus addresses the task of redevelopment in a phased manner that retains the work-live relationship that is the core of the community. Seeing the enormity of the practical problems (old housing stock and ailing infrastructure), piecemeal developments was disregarded in favor of a larger, all encompassing scheme. We seek to address the present and anticipate the future by creating practical guidelines that are open ended enough to create an alternative to the top down master-planning scheme. We move down in scale from the long term relocation planning of Dharavi to localized phasing for individual nagars and then onto the development of suitable models of development at the architectural scale. Deriving spatial conditions from the existing built fabric and incorporating higher densities we propose open ended nagar based guideline for desirable interstitial spaces, physical infrastructure layout, multiusage groundscape, pedestrian accessible roofscape and regulated building heights. Roofscape – the stepped up terraces and varying building height and an alternative pedestrian connection at g+1 level act as spill over communal spaces for day to day activities.

TO ANDHERI

TO BANDRA & WESTERN EXPRESS HWY

SION STATION

TE RN

S

EA

TO MAHIM SION LINK ROAD

EX PR ES SH IGH WA Y

MAHIM STATION

85 NAGARS IN DHARAVI

Dharavi: Kuti Nagar

LEATHER PRODUCT SOLD LOCALLY IN MUMBAI

15% %

TEMPORARY TE TEM T EM RA RARY AR A R RY JOB JOB

SELLING FLOWER IN FRONT OF TEMPLE

WORKS RKS OUTS OUTSIDE SID DE D

MAKING FLOWER GARLAND AT HOME

SELLING PAPAD IN RESTAURANT

EMPLOYEED M MP YEED YE DW WITHIN DHA D DHARAVI

PRO

DUC

O PR

SELLING AT A

LOCAL MARKET

T COM

ING

FRO

M

CT S DU

DR

PRODUCTS

AS R PRO

THE LEA DU

MAKING PAPAD AT HOME

LIVE+WORK

DIS ION

BUT TRI

WO D

RL DE

WI

T ARA

FROM

GUJ

POTTERY MAKING

PERCENTAGE OF WORK

Temple

LEATHER PRODUCTS SOLD IN THE CITY

FLOWER GARLANDS MADE AT HOME

GARLANDS SOLD AT TEMPLES

LEATHER PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED

Amenities PAPADS SOLD IN LOCAL RESTAURANTS

Industry HIDES FROM CHENNAI

PAPADS MADE IN BACKYARD

CLAY FROM GUJARAT

Mosque

LEATHER PRODUCTS DISTRIBUTION KUMBHARWADA

PRODUCED WORKSHOP

SELLING POTTERY & ARTIFACT

CT

LEATHER PROCESSING

CLAY

ST OR E

(RENTED)

35% 3 5% 5%

SELF-EMPLOYEED LF F-EMP FEM E MP PL LOYEE ED ED WITHIN IT THIIN N DHARAVI D DH DHA HARA AV

SOLD @ LOCAL

LIVE

MAKING LEATHER

MA

10 3 ALTERING THE SECTION 7

2.25 2.25

Kuti Nagar: Existing Layout

Kuti Nagar- 20% 20% 20 0% Proposed 330% Layout %

Each living unit is built on a frame work which breaks down the 30 sq.m living unit area with a 12 sq.m loft space and can be use for the family’s need for extra work space/privacy requirement. Multiple combinations are possible with these 4 section types.

POTTERY AND ARTIFACTS SOLD IN MUMBAI

LIVE

STORE

STORE

SELL

3

Interstitial space – along with primary multi-purpose spine, placing secondary connecting voids creates shaded/sunny courts with windows of work-live units facing into them. Groundscape – the debris of the existing building stock could be compressed to form the new plinth and ground surface. This breaks down the typical hierarchy of roads and facilitates multiple activities. Infrastructure a series of sunken courts by raised platforms forms an alternating storm water drainage path which also could be used for public activities.

KUTI NAGAR: SECTIONAL VARIANTS

KUTI NAGAR_BUILDING UP

• To preserve the rich social capital of a threatened community. • To urgently upgrade the dilapidated building stock and the poor infrastructure. • Causing least amount of disturbance in the ongoing activities of Dharavi. • Redevelopment in a phased manner that retains the work-live relationship that is the core of the community.


Group members: Amardeep, Habiba, Shruti Road front commercial spaces Work and live condition

Open bazaar

Shaded internal pedestrian streets

GSAPP, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NYC

Commercial -social interaction space

Roofscape part of day to day activities

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

Recreational activities along residential street space


REACHING

ZERO S

POWER STUDIO: E3: Economy+Ecology+Energy COHOESZero State = Reaching Efficiency Reaching ZONING MAP

Effi Wh ach mo

STRATEGY FINANCING THE 100 MW PROJECT

NEED FOR ECONOMIC TRIGGER POPULATION 1970: 18,600 2007: 15,083

Investment Collaborators “plan to construct a new

Empire State Funds

“building server farms in the

“One 50.000 sq feet

Server Farms and Call Centres

INCREASED SPENDING POWER OF GOVERNMENT

+ The project responds to the ‘shrinking’ character of Cohoes and the resultant decaying of its downtown area and the dispersal of the city to its extents. It aims to reverse the donut pattern that has been created and create a more efficient way for the city to grow by creating a development pattern based on opportunities in the downtown area. Deploying an initial economic trigger of a 100MW hydro power plant which will make further development possible, we foresee the city recovering from its economic stagnation. We propose the use of the existing + wealth of vacant buildings and the huge amount of unused vacant open space (like+redundant parking, space left between built, left over greens) to create a network of efficient indoor and outdoor uses of the spaces. -25%

dam of capacity 100 MW of electricity ,

UNEMPLOYMENT

1990: 13.8%

2000: 19.7%

+6%

VACANCY RATE

Green Island Power Authority

increase water flows over Cohoes Falls and provide low cost power for local economic development.

2000: 10.3% of Total built

US Court of appeals, under request of GIPA, is going to re-examine FERC actions and decision

Green Island Power Authority

In state of economic stagnation. Present demographics do not support economic revival without a boost.

data center consumes around 5 MW of power “

INCENTIVES/CHANGES IN POLICIES

Medium Sized industries/small scale business

opening up possibility for the new plant.

POVERTY

2000: 15% below the poverty level.

Pacific Northwest, near Hydroelectric power plants selling cheap energy “

Renewed license for existing 38.8 mw power station.

Empire State Funds

Green Island Power Authority

NYS Grants

“...operating huge data centersis looking for place to build

another facility in North America “

“supporting applications like web server farms to high- performance supercomputing systems to call centers “

jobs opportunity Potential

Revenue from sale of surplus cheap electricity.

CREATION OF JOBS LEAD TO MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE AND FINANCES WITHIN AND INTO COHOES.

City of Cohoes

MEANS

NETWORKS of Continuous Productive ‘Urbanscapes’: Connecting the disjunct layers of paths, open space, public facilities, green areas. RESIDENTIAL MIXED USE

INDUSTRIAL SERVICES

RECREATIONAL OPEN AREA PUBLIC SPACE URBAN AGRICULTURE CONSOLIDATED GREEN BLOTS

Streetscape and proposed railroad station: Pedestrian and bike friendly street sections.

ENDS

DEVELOPMENT PARCELS FOR FUTURE USE: Vacant land kept unutilized presently for future development.

“Urbanscape” Network Public Plaza

PROPOSED PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPE AREAS: Use of unutilized asphalt for community gardens to grow food.

Energy self sufficiency with clean energy which will give long term returns. Harnessing untapped potential of renewable source of energy.

Waterfront Park

PROPOSED OPEN AREAS: More defined public spaces between existing and proposed public uses

CO

C

PROPOSED GREENS: Use of redundant parking areas, vacant land.

NEW HYD PLA

EXISTING OPEN GREENS

PROPOSED BUILT: Use of vacant buildings to bring new commercial and new built for public services.

$ Pedestrian and bike friendly streets.

EXISTI

EXISTING BUILT: including active commercial and public services

Streetscape and Proposed Railroad Station

PATH/ROADS AS CONNECTORS between ‘uncontinuous’ spaces. They are bike-bus paths/pedestrian friendly roads/commercial streets

POTEN HYDR

CO

Commercial Street and Housing

Better bus connections making city more accessible both from within and from outside the city.

BUS LI

Regional railroad connection promotes less use of cars

Server Farm

HIGH

$

NETWORKS of Continuous Productive ‘Urbanscapes’: Connecting the disjunct layers of paths, open space, public facilities, green areas.

Removal of stigma attached to vacant downtown.

COHOES DOWNTOWN MASTERPLAN

CO


Group members: Olimpia, Nuo, Maria

GSAPP, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NYC

View of Main Street, Cohoes

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

Combination of greens, urban agriculture and water collection system create a ‘performing’ park and an accessible waterfront edge for the people.


STUDY OF CITY FABRIC: MUMBAI

Fabrics and Typologies: New York / Global Comparative Analysis The area under study- Null Bazaar is in the northern part of the ‘island city’ and is characterized by modest mixed land use as opposed to high income housing in the southern port area. It has population density of around 113,605 people per sq.km, five times of that of Mumbai itself. Because of such high density of people, intensity of activities is extremely high. In case of Null Bazaar, thin types of housing evolved that are 3m wide and 20m deep. This was to maximize the number of shop fronts. Houses were located on the rear of the buildings away from the road and on higher floors. These buildings are generally two to four storied. Presently, this area faces twin problems – of highly dilapidated buildings and over burdened infrastructure. Even then, the place commands very high real estate price. On account of such demand, walk-up tenements are being demolished and tall towers are coming up in their places. While these new types promise luxurious internal spaces, the questions on overburdened infrastructure remains unanswered. The mixed used typology: shop / residences is retained. Shops are lined along the street faces with the residences on the above floors. The access to the residential units / tenements is along streets which have been introduced in between the existing road grid. This street leads to green courts lined with tenements. In addition to a better approach, the size of the tenements has been increased from 150 sq. ft. to 250 sq. ft. space for two wheeler parking has been left along these streets. The corners of blocks abutting major roads have been converted to high rise apartment blocks with anchor stores on the first and the second levels. This new commercially viable (and much in demand) development would ideally offset the cost of new construction for the redevelopment of the old tenements. Additional parking has been proposed in the basement level to decongest the already narrow main roads.


INFRASTRUCTURAL LANDSCAPES

West 8 Architects

The designs help you acknowledge deeper meanings and the potentially broader effects of dialogue between site, program and context. Through their projects, in fast changing outdoor space, purposeful acts of landscape design are appearing in places never before considered like the airports etc. To conclude as food for thought for a designer, ‘contemporary life is a continuous escape. Point of departure (for design) is human intelligence.’

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

The characteristic of infrastructural landscapes as mentioned earlier of having a dialogue beyond the site dimension comes out very strongly in the projects. As Geuze says, ‘The site is a problem of edges, borders or limits’ Especially after understanding the roots of the principal architect- the Dutch manmade landscape, comes true appreciation about their concept of the relationship between man and nature. Most of their projects strive to promote a progressive dialogue on behalf of man and nature. Also, this helps realize the amalgamation of ecology, art, architecture and landscape and their mutual dependency reflected in various projects. In this respect, Adriaan’s concept goes opposite to that of Le Corbusier that there should be contrast- clear and crisp buildings with the disorder of nature. There is always a relation, juxtaposition between the two.

GSAPP, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NYC

As Adriaan Geuze self proclaims that ‘I believe that west 8 has made an important contribution to the Dutch landscape as we have given landscape a contemporary definition’, we couldn’t agree less. “If people of different times and places have had very different ideas of the way a garden should be organized, it is largely because of they have made very different assumptions, strongly affecting their aesthetic preferences, as to the relationship between man and nature.”


“CITY� FOR STUDENTS

Create a thriving community with uses centred around students which would complement the neighboring Delhi University campus Design Objective : After understanding the nature of this location in the context of the city, the components of the area program were derived from the demands the surrounding areas generated. The University has a serious dearth of boarding for students and also recreational facilities for the students. So, it is envisaged that the site would be developed as a community for students. Design Concept: A major cultural hub is proposed within the development which otherwise lacks in this part of Delhi. The cultural center will consist of open air theatres, exhibition space and various such related amenities. This will appropriately serve the Delhi University students and would also attract general public. Presently, there is a dearth of hostel for the students. These students are mostly accommodated in the residences of surrounding localities as tenants or paying guests thereby increasing the pressure on the infrastructure of these areas. So a hostel complex for students with allied amenities is proposed. Catering to the basic needs of these students, a market will be provided as a part of this complex. Furthermore, to make this area more economically more viable, a commercial center catering to people other than the students will also be provided. This will also subsidize the hostel complex as it generates less income.

The site has main public zones as the two anchors on the two edges. One being the recreational/ commercial center in the front which is the most visible part of the center. The other is the open air theatre which is directly accessible from the hostels.


Group Members: Ashi, Neha, Saguna, Aditi

6

5

Central spine

2

1

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Recreational And Commercial Center Library And Museum Shops/ Food courts Shops/ Offices Amphitheater Residential Block Residential block

SCHOOL OF PLANNING & ARCHITECTURE, DELHI

4

ACADEMIC PROJECTS

3


Contact details: (310) 498 9076 malushreya@gmail.com

Shreya Malu Portfolio  
Shreya Malu Portfolio  
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