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Shoot me /ĘƒuË?t

mi/

1. hit me with a bullet 2. take my picture 3. throw me out of a canon, hit me with your arrows and help me discover a new side of me (an artistic side)

4. kill my old self, revive me.


Art revolving /ɑːt

rɪˈvɒlvɪŋ/

1. swirling art 2. the ever-rotating art. rotating around itself, around me, across the universe.

3. the art that never seizes. <<<<<<


2014, ATHENS / GREECE info@shootmemag.com publisher_artdirector

ISAVELLA MAVROYIANNI creative@shootmemag.com publisher_webadmin

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www.shootmemag.com CONTACT info@shootmemag.com SUBMISSIONS submissions@shootmemag.com

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#15 MAY_014 cover

MELINA MERCOURI PHOTO fROM THE EXHIbITION

MELINA MERCOURI STREET featured artists

RObERT MACNEIL MATT LOUGHREY WIOLETTA GOLEbIEWSKA JULIJA GOYD  VITALIY & ELENA VASILIEVA featured project

SHOOT ME TWICE

in collaboration with

SHOOT ME WARSAW PART#01 featured tribute

MELINA MERCOURI STREET in collaboration with

MELINA MERCOURI fOUNDATION

www.melinamercourifoundation.org.gr

OT BE USED WITHOUT THEIR WRITTEN PERMISSION |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||


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At this current issue, Shoot Me magazine initiates its journey at the A/forArt festival in Thessaloniki, Greece, through “Melina Mercouri Street”, to Cuba, then Tohoku, Japan, to the beautiful characters and sceneries of Ireland, to Apocalypse of Art, along with “White Trashes Uncut”.

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This month, project Shoot Me Twice sets off in association with http://shootme.pl/ accompanied by the dazzling melodies of Bird Flies High! Hop on board! enjoy our #15th


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Robert MacNeil www.robmacneil.com photo by Š


12 Cover of Robert Heinecken: Object Matter, published by The Museum of Modern Art, 2014.


ROBERT HEINECKEN

OBJECT MATTER

BREAKING PHOTOGRAPHY’S BOUNDARIES

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The Museum of Modern Art presents, from March 15 to September 7, the first retrospective of Robert Heinecken’s work, entitled ‘Robert Heinecken: Object Matter’, the most complete survey of the artist’s oeuvre, covering four decades, from the early 1960s through the late 1990s.

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It has never been easy to describe Heinecken’s work, to call him a ‘photographer’ in the strict sense of the word, because he rarely used a camera to make his pictures. Heinecken referred to himself as ‘paraphotographer’, because his work was a combination of mediums, including photography, sculpture, printmaking, and collage. He worked in the margins of so called acceptable subject matter and he is considered an artist who used photography only as a means to an artistic end. Heinecken’s oeuvre reminds us of photography’s pervasiveness and its significance as a medium of transformation. His work changed the photography’s boundaries, by creating intersections with montage, lithography, collage, photobased painting, sculpture, installation and conceptual art. He incorporated photographs and other images into his art as a way to renegotiate the nature and the meaning of contemporary art. Cutting images from magazines, newspapers, pornography and television,

Heinecken transformed them through collage, assemblage and rephotography. His work explores themes of commercialism, kitsch, sex, the body and the gender, with a humorous and most of the times provocative way. Inspired by these themes and the new approaches, the artist transformed a medium of modernism into one intertwined with popular culture. This exhibition reveals Heinecken’s obsession with popular culture and its effects on society, as well as the relationship between the original and the copy in art and in culture. Robert Heinecken was born in Denver in 1931, the only child of a Lutheran minister. In 1942 he attended public high school and then community college in Riverside, earning an Associate’s Degree in Art in 1951. He studied at the University of California for two years but he dropped out in 1953 to enlist in the US Navy. In 1954 he joined the Marine Corps as a fighter pilot. After he was discharged in 1957, he completed his bachelor's and master's degrees in art at UCLA, where he studied printmaking and photography. While in UCLA, Heinecken concentrated mostly on printmaking, by the end of his graduate study, he was inspired by the photography and the pre-Pop art ideas of Robert Rauschenberg and other artists who were using photographic imagery.

Heinecken began making photographs in the early 1960s, dedicating his life to making art and teaching. He established the photography program at UCLA in 1964, where he taught until 1991. In the mid-1960s he began combining and sequencing disparate pictures, as in ‘Visual Poem/About the Sexual Education of a Young Girl’ (1965), which comprises seven black-and-white photographs of dolls with a portrait of his then-five-year-old daughter Karol at the center. In ‘Are You Rea’ series (19641968) Heinecken focused on expressing the multiplicity of meanings inherent in existing images and situations. Cutting pages from more than 2000 magazines, from publications like ‘Life’, ‘Time’, and ‘Woman’s Day’, he created a portfolio of images filled with unexpected and sometimes surreal juxtapositions by placing a single magazine page on a light table, so that the resulting contact print picks up imagery from both sides of the page. Heinecken interpreted these pages ‘as social documents of certain co-existent words and images, locked by chance into that piece of paper—that content which very much reflects the false idealization of American goals and ideas of the 1960s time period.’


Robert Heinecken. Figure Horizon #1. 1971. Ten canvas panels with photographic emulsion, 11 13/16x11” (30x30 cm) each. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Shirley C. Burden, by exchange. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust

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Robert Heinecken. Are You Rea #1. 1964–68. Gelatin silver print, 10 13/16 x 7 7/8″ (27.4 x 20cm). Collection Jeffrey Leifer, Los Angeles. © 2013 The Robert Heinecken Trust


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Robert Heinecken. Recto/Verso #2. 1988. Silver dye bleach print, 8 5/8 x 7 7/8″ (21.9 x 20 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Clark Winter Fund. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust


Robert Heinecken. Child Guidance Toys. 1965. Black-and-white film transparency, 5 x 18 1/16″ (12.7 x 45.8 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago. Gift of Boardroom, Inc. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust

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In 1965 Heinecken concentrated his interest in the female nude as a recurring motif, by creating ‘Refractive Hexagon’, a photo puzzle composed of photographs of female body parts mounted onto 24 individual puzzle pieces. In 1967 he created ‘Fractured Figure Sections’ where the female body was truncated and not contiguous, the female figure was not resolved as a single image. On the contrary, in 1965, in ‘Transitional Figure Sculpture’, the artist had created a complete female figure, a towering 26-layer octagon composed from photographs of a nude that have been altered using various printing techniques. In 1969 Heinecken began altering magazines with a series of 120 periodicals, titled ‘MANSMAG: Homage to Werkman and Cavalcade’. He used the erotic men’s magazine ‘Cavalcade’

as source material, making plates of every page, and randomly printing them on pages that were then reassembled into a magazine, now scrambled. In the same year, he disassembled numerous ‘Time’ magazines, imprinting pornographic images taken from ‘Cavalcade’ on every page and reassembled them with the original ‘Time’ covers. He circulated these reconstituted magazines by leaving them in waiting rooms or slipping them onto newsstands, allowing the work to come full circle—the source material returning to its point of origin after modification. He reprised this technique in 1989 with an altered issue of ‘Time’, titled ‘150 Years of Photojournalism’, a greatest hits of historical events seen through the lens of photography. Transparent film is also used in many of Heinecken’s works to explore different kinds of juxtapositions. In ‘Kodak Safety Film/Christmas Mistake’

(1971), pornographic images are superimposed on a Christmas snapshot of the artist’s children with the suggestion in the title that somehow two rolls of film were mixed up at the photo lab. ‘Kodak Safety Film/Taos Church’ (1972) takes photography itself as a subject, picturing an adobe church in New Mexico that was photographed by Ansel Adams and Paul Strand, and painted by Georgia O’Keeffe and John Marin. Presented as a negative, Heinecken’s version transforms an icon of modernism into a murky structure flanked by a pickup truck, telephone wires, and other modern-day debris. In ‘Figure Horizon #1’ (1971), Heinecken reprised the cut-and-reassemble techniques from his puzzles and photo-sculptures, sequencing images of sections of the nude female body, to create impossible undulating landscapes.

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Robert Heinecken. Typographic Nude. 1965. Gelatin silver print, 14 1/2 × 7″ (36.8 × 17.8 cm). Collection Geofrey and Laura Wyatt, Montecito, California. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust


Robert Heinecken. The S.S. Copyright Project: “On Photography.” 1978. Two collages of black-and-white instant prints attached to Homasote board with staples; approximately 47 15/16 x 47 15/16″ (121.8 x121.8 cm) each. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchased as the partial gift of Celeste Bartos. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust

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Robert Heinecken. Periodical #5. 1971. Offset lithography on found magazine , 12 1/4 x 9″ (31.1x 22.9 cm). Collection Philip Aarons, New York. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust

In the mid-1970s, Heinecken experimented with new materials introduced by Polaroid -specifically the SX-70 camera (which required no darkroom or technical know-how) - to produce the series ‘He/She’ (1975–1980) and, later, ‘Lessons in Posing Subjects’ (1981–82). He experimented with different types of instant prints, including the impressive twopanel S.S.

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‘Copyright Project: On Photography’ (1978), made the year after the publication of Susan Sontag’s collection of essays ‘On Photography’ (1977). The S.S. Copyright Project consists of a magnified and doubled picture of Sontag, derived from the book’s dustcover portrait. From afar the portraits appear to be grainy enlargements from a negative, but at close range, it is apparent that the panels are composed of hundreds small photographic scraps stapled together. The portrait on the left is composed of

photographs of Sontag’s text; the right features random images taken around Heinecken’s studio by his assistant. Heinecken’s first large-scale sculptural installation, ‘TV/Time Environment’ (1970), is the earliest in a series of works that address the increasingly dominant presence of television in American culture. In the installation, a positive film transparency of a female nude is placed in front of a functioning television set in an environment that evokes a living room, complete with recliner chair, plastic plant, and rug. Continuing his work with television, Heinecken created videograms-direct captures from the television that were produced by pressing Cibachrome paper onto the screen to expose the sensitized paper. Inaugural ‘Excerpt Videograms’ (1981) features a composite from the live television broadcast of Ronald Reagan’s inauguration speech

and the surrounding celebrations. The work, originally in 27 parts, now in 24, includes randomly chosen excerpts of the oration and news reports of it. Surrealism on TV (1986) explores the idea of transparency and layering using found media images to produce new readings. It features a slide show comprised of more than 200 images loaded into three slide projectors and projected in random order. The images generally fit into broad categories, which include newscasters, animals, TV evangelists, aerobics, and explosions. The exhibition ‘Robert Heinecken: Object Matter’ presents over 150 works from the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York. It is organized by Eva Respini, curator, with Drew Sawyer, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall, curatorial fellow, Department of Photography and The Museum of Modern Art.


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Robert Heinecken. MANSMAG: Homage to Werkman and Cavalcade. 1969. Offset lithography on bound paper, 8 3/4 x 6 5/8″ (22.2 x 16.8 cm). Courtesy The Robert Heinecken Trust, Chicago. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust


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Robert Heinecken. Cybill Shepherd/Phone Sex. 1992. Dye bleach print on foamcore, 63 x 17” (160 × 43.2 cm). The Robert Heinecken Trust, Chicago; courtesy Petzel Gallery, New York. © 2014 The Robert Heinecken Trust


The photograph... is not a picture of something, but is an object about something.

-Robert Heinecken

RObERT HEINECKEN: ObJECT MATTER Duration 15 March – 7 September 2014 Location The Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53 Street, New York The Michael H. Dunn Galleries, second floor www.moma.org

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Tohoku

Hans-Christian Schink

The brute force of nature, horror & sublimeness

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Hans-Christian Schink, Tanogashira, Utatsu Miyagi Prefecture, 2012, Š Hans-Christian Schink


Hans-Chris Rikuzentogura Miyagi Pref © Hans-Ch

Hans-Christian Schink, Ōtsuchi, Iwate Prefecture, 2012, © Hans-Christian Schink

The Alfred Ehrhardt Foundation in Berlin presents, from May 3 to June 29, the exhibition of Hans-Christian Schink, ‘Tōhoku’, a series made in the Tōhoku region located in northeastern Japan, one year after the disastrous tsunami.

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Specializing in landscapes transformed by human intervention, the German photographer is an important representative of modern landscape photography. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, Schink began to deal with German issues, as in the series ‘Traffic Projects’. He photographed the change of the area he grew up –he was born in

Erfurt, East Germany then - the new traffic infrastructure and highways, which would connect eastern Germany with the rest of the world. He then decided to broaden his horizons by making landscape photography in reference to civilization. He started to deal with the contrast between nature and culture, the traces of human intervention in nature, which is never seen at first sight, but the marks they leave behind are real. A ‘battle’ between nature and man, where man seems to be more powerful than nature. With the ‘Tōhoku’ series, Schink made a turn, showing that it can also be the other way around. In comparison with his

earlier work, where the absence of people was a result of selection and perspective, the ‘Tōhoku’ series shows that human life is obliterated by the brute force of nature. Hans-Christian Schink was born in Erfurt in 1961. He studied photography at the Academy of Visual Arts in Leipzig from 1986 to 1991 and then proceeded with graduate studies from 1991 to 1993. Since his graduation he won several awards, while in 2008 he received the distinguished REAL Photography Award for his ‘1h’ series, for which he is mostly known. In that series, Schink turned his camera to the sun during one hour-long

exposure, creating a ‘solarization’ effect/technique (photographic effect on a negative film where a chemical inversion takes place and the darkest points in the negative become light again). The artist started working on the process in 1999, but it took several years - and various refinements - to arrive at the final set-up. The images in the book cover the years 20052010 in both hemispheres, each including photographs taken even beyond the Arctic Circle. In 2011, the fifth most powerful earthquake in the world hit Tōhoku in northeastern Japan. The earthquake


stian Schink, , Nakashiba (1), ecture, 2012, ristian Schink

triggered powerful tsunami waves that reached heights of up to 40.5 meters, while an accident at the nuclear reactor in Fukushima exacerbated a catastrophe of unimaginable scale. One year later, Schink spent several weeks traveling through the region, on a grant from the Villa Kamogawa Kyoto. ­‘Tōhoku’ combines photographs of landscapes, in which the destructive power of the waves is only subtly apparent - a thin layer of snow covers the traces of the catastrophe - with images that viscerally translate the full force of the disaster. Houses piled on

Hans-Christian Schink, Kesennuma, Hajikamiiwaisaki (1), Miyagi Prefecture, 2012, © Hans-Christian Schink

top of each other like toys, industrial buildings reduced to steel skeletons, boats perched on dry land, the concrete walls of quays with deep cracks, a red wooden Buddhist temple ripped from its foundation and left at the edge of a forest in one piece, testify the unimaginable strength of the impact. Through the unfathomable stillness, the unreality and reverie that Schink’s images express, the catastrophe can be felt almost physically. The artist’s imagery blends the horror of natural drama with an aesthetic pictorial composition and a vibrant expression of the sublime.

HANS-CHRISTIAN SCHINK  TOHOKU  Opening Friday, May 2, 7 pm. Duration 3 May – 29 June 2014 Location Alfred Ehrhardt Stiftung Auguststr. 75 10117 Berlin

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WHITE TRASH UNCUT By

Christopher Makos Preface by Andrew Crispo Foreword by Peter Wise

Glitterati Incorporated announces the publication of a deluxe edition, entitled ‘White Trash Uncut’, by a highly respected photographer, Christopher Makos.

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Christopher Makos’ ‘White Trash’ was published for the first time in 1977 and it established him as the pioneer in capturing the emerging punk scene in New York. Now, the highly respected photographer is releasing a new version, under the name ‘White Trash Uncut’. Within its pages, the reader will find the portraits of important personalities, such as Andy Warhol, Man Ray, Tennessee Williams, Halston, John Paul Getty III, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Grace Jones, Patti Smith, Richard Hell, Tom Verlaine, Alice Cooper, Iggy Pop, Zandra Rhodes, Divine, Lance Loud, and Marilyn Chambers, among others. The book features 25 new photographs of Christopher Makos that were not included in the original book, with essays by Andrew Crispo and Peter Wise.

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Christopher Makos was born 1948, in Lowell, Massachusetts. He grew up in California before moving to Paris to study architecture and later, to work as an apprentice with photographer Man Ray. He collaborated with Andy Warhol, whom he showed how to use his first camera. Makos is globally recognized for his work in portraiture, while his photographs have been in the permanent collections of more than 100 museums and major private collections, including those of Malcolm Forbes, Pedro Almodóvar and Gianni Versace. He has contributed to numerous international magazine publications, as well as 16 books, including Glitterati titles ‘Tattoos Hornets Fire’, ‘Lance Out Loud’ and ‘Exhibitionism’. He lives in New York City.

Andrew Crispo is a wellknown New York art gallery dealer who symbolized the excesses of the 70’s and 80s through his exuberant and widely reviewed lifestyle. He lives in New York City. Peter Wise was born in Boston and educated at Amherst College, the New York Studio School, where he studied under Mercedes Matter and Paul Georges. His work is found in various public and private collections. He Lives in New York City.

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published b


From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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David Croland and Grace Jones wearing a Le Jardin shirt. New York.


From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

Earring by Gillette.

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Gigi Williams. Montauk.

From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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Hustler in professional pose. Jeans by Fiorruci. Milan.

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Divine and John Waters.

From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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Man Ray’s passport. From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, © 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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David Bowie, rock star. L o s A n g e l e s . From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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Punk Rock fans. New York.

From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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David Johansen of the now defunct New York Dolls Richard Hell of Television backstage at CBGBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. New

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and w York.

From White Trash Uncut by Christopher Makos, Š 2014, published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glitteratiincorporated.com

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From White Trash Uncut by Christop published by Glitterati Incorporated - www.glittera


WHITE TRASH UNCUT bY CHRISTOPHER MAKOS PUbLISHED bY  GLITTERATI  INCORPORATED Photography II Spring 2014 Release II $50 112 pages, 8 x 12 inches, hardcover, 66 b/w photographs, ISBN 978-0-9891704-6-8 For further information, please contact Sara Rosen,

srosen@glitteratiincorporated.com

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Debbie Harry Stand-up A.

pher Makos, © 2014, atiincorporated.com


www.facebook.com/viewmastersgr

www.viewmasters.gr


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LA ISLA BONITA

©

Robert

CUBA © www.robmacneil.com https://twitter.com/mycamerahatesme www.facebook.com/Robertmacneilphoto

MacNeil

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characters &

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© Matt

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Loughrey

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& sceneries

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*

your image goes here!


submit yout work and be a part of SHOOT ME submissions@shootmemag.com

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p a r k s

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Wioletta Golebiewska

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www.wiolettagolebiewska.com

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P o w ą z k i  a n d o t h e r  E n g l i s h 111

l a n d s c a p e g a r d e n s


The pictures of this series were taken in three Warsaw cemeteries (Stare Powązki, Jewish Cemetery, Evangelical Cemetery of the Augsburg Confession) and three Warsaw parks (Łazienki, Park Skaryszewski, Pola Mokotowskie).

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The cemeteries were chosen in view of their confessional diversity and the parks – because of a different character of each of them: elegant for Łazienki, approachable for Park Skaryszewski and definitely recreational for Pola Mokotowskie.


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Scenes cut out of these six places were mixed up as if they belonged to the same space. Then, they were joined together in order to form diptychs based on analogies between elements found in these different but still so similar places. Therefore a diptych can consist of two pictures coming from the same place, from two different cemeteries, from two different parks or one picture from a park and another one from a cemetery.

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I decided not to put names of the places below the pictures and not to follow a uniform rule in joining them (like: a park on the left and a cemetery on the right) in order to create a situation in which itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to guess if an image comes from a park or a cemetery, which park, which cemetery. In doing so, I wanted to show the existence of some features common to these apparently different places.


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Both parks and cemeteries are places of unceasing confrontation of man and nature, life and death. Man acts like an animal marking its territory. He tries to arrange nature and to dominate over it. This is particularly evident in parks, and it is in spite of their apparent wilderness, which turns to be planned too.

In these places marked by human presence, nature, however, gets out of manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s control and, in a gesture of revenge, starts to destroy slowly his artefacts. Also nature in the form of time, leaving its mark on man's life and products of his activity. The struggle between man and nature becomes then a fight for immortality.

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At first glance it could seem that if a cemetery is a place of triumph of nature over man, a park is the one of triumph of man over nature. But his victory is only temporary because at the end of the day, it is nature with its immutable laws that stands indifferent to disappearing of man and things he leaves behind.

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www.wiolettagolebiewska.com Š Although this is a series of self-portraits, it refers to a state of mind rather than a specific person. Still life in English or Stillleben in German becomes nature morte in French or natura morta in Italian. These photographs deal with a situation on the borderline between life and death, when one is alive but feeling immobilize and frozen as in a still life image.

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AisYellow © Julija

Goyd

in collaboration with “Who Is He?” designers

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collaboration project with designers

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anabstract flowofcolor

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inve sti ga tion of phe no me non of be auty, sexu ality and eroti cism Š Julija

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Eva fromseries Themselves

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Impossible is nothing fromseries Themselves


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Work is love made visible fromseries Themselves


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Multicellular on digital fromseries Themselves


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Amazons of the pen fromseries Themselves


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It is difficult to escape the feeling that “Apocalypse in Art” really shows the world, standing on the edge, barren, falling in decay like a story line of a picture that is braking into fragments. People can not postpone the crash, they’ve lost an ability to create – all they can really do is to seek and fix. We are trying to find a refuge from the impending chaos in the rules of etiquette, explaining how to behave at the funeral ceremonies, that only accenting the feeling of fatality, similar to art, emotions turn into mindless imitation. Today we are witnessing the collapse of the basic cultural patterns and mechanisms that determine a spiritual and material civilization over the last century. Perhaps, desperation and pessimism, overwhelming majority of our society Of course, I have questioned myself if me being engaged in this semi-intellectual apocalypse hysteria and doubt concerning future of contemporary art, is related to transformation of art system where not everyone can find place to be. I have always been an artist, even when I refused to produce art projects and motions. I couldn’t and still can’t think about destiny of the art as an isolated part of my own fate. So how art is going to exist now? In what way it will be expressed? We have to be objective and accept that old institutes and cultural models are being destroyed by new, still not quite clear, but obviously other worlds.

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Dynamics of inertial movement in public space clearly indicates the rapid disintegration of society , its members and the atomization of marginalization of public institutions . If this crisis is projected onto the sphere of art, and there we see the same process , except that difference is even greater convexity .If we refer to uneven rises in history of contemporary art it’s easy to see dynamic blurring of distinctions between different cultural models. World had already faced it in 20th in Russia and Germany, in 60th – in America and France, at the end in 80th in already downfallen Soviet Empire. In contrast, crisis of modern art ideology is clearly exposed by gratuitous self-isolation of artists, who pathetically try to define boundaries of their own language. And here they lose a battle again – today we can not consider art scope as homogeneous object, and art system itself trying to hold on from split to numerous elements and modules. How to reveal insight and sense of Modern Art Museum that turned into enormous art supermarket? How to exceed the bounds of total consumption, if art almost became a symbol of this massive process? Do we have answers to these questions? The paradox of our time is that two genius variations of future – progressive and apocalyptic – suddenly start to assimilate and duplicate each other. Followers of the theory about upcoming end of the world admit fascinating technological progress, yet believe that this is exact reason of Armageddon to-be.

Spirit of apocalypses holds sway over modern culture and slowly infecting everything around. How will this virus affect art? Will there still be a place for an art in society? Those are the questions that bother me more and more. It feels like we are about to reconsider meaning of the art. Today is the time of fast living, but the process of switching from old to new culture format can be really sustained. This procedure is decelerated by society, people feel related to slowly dying cultural models, traditional relations. Recent conditions can cause genesis of art meaning and role, that would be completely different from one we have got on the edge of XX century. Back there art was an innovative and progressive symbol, and now it started to loose positions. I believe that art is key to renewal, button that will slow the progress – just exactly what we do really need. But where will the art reincarnate? Museums and government institutions both commercial and not, would speculate on the process and give fake feeling that art and progress is something equal. Each time latest social stereotype imposes new goods, shops, commercial centers, independent radio stations, advertising networks. Thus, we can hardly claim that the emergence of new areas of creative life , regardless of whether they will be able to position themselves as an artistic reality or not - can dramatically affect the current situation . As 2012 years ago, we are faced with the need to justify a new universalism that can take us beyond the personal little worlds and beyond capitalist totality.


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"AUTO  fIRE" is a cycle of Paweł fabjański’s photos that treat – among others – about uncertainty, indecisiveness, ones habits, ones anger. Its universal protagonist is someone about 30 years old and at this point he looks back at his life.

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The state of ‘in-between’ is the strongest linkage between the characters in the photos. Many oppositions demand a final resolution. Fabjański correctly picks up everyday absurdity. He takes out its context of routine and shows it in form of an action snapshot that is, at the same time, both documental and abstract.

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The title "AUTO FIRE" brings the need of defining ones private emotions and feelings (or, sometimes, lack of those). This symbolic 30s’ birthday is defined as a moment when one takes the opportunity to reconstruct heretofore life’s episodes into the most secure and safe for its own psyche form of narrative.

The protagonists of the photos are suspended-like, since they are accompanied by an accumulated tension at an edge of blowing up in a second. Impression of a recently captured snapshot is heighten by its filmographic scenography. But will it twitch, will something happen? Isn’t it that it has already happened and now we’re just left here to analyse and understand it? Magda Grancarek

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M E l i n a M E r c o u r i S

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The Melina Mercouri Foundation, for the 20th anniversary of Melina Mercouri’s passing, pays a tribute to her by presenting a special album edition, entitled ‘Melina’. Following the release of this album, the Foundation -in collaboration with the Benaki Museum- present from March 6 to May 25, a photographic exhibition dedicated to one of the greatest female figures of Greece in the 20th century, under the title ‘Melina Mercouri Street’. Amalia-Maria Mercouri was born in Athens in 1920. She came from a family of politicians, as her father, Stamatis Mercouris, was a member of the Greek parliament and the former Minister of Public Order & Public Works, while her grandfather, Spiros Mercouris, was mayor of the capital of Greece, Athens for more than 30 years.

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When she completed her secondary education, she attended the National Theatre's Drama School, where she studied with Dimitris Rondiris, and she graduated in 1944. She joined the National Theatre, but her first big success was in 1949 in Karolos Koun’s Art Theatre, where she interpreted Blanche Dubois in Tennessee William’s ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’. In 1950 she went to Paris and appeared in boulevard plays by Jacques Deval and Marcel Achard. While in Paris she met Jean Cocteau, Jean-Paul Sartre, Colette, Francoise Sagan. It was then that her metamorphosis began. Melina Mercouri started her cinema career in 1955 with the film ‘Stella’, directed by Michalis Cacoyannis. The film received special praise at the Cannes Film Festival in 1956. In Cannes she met the American filmmaker Jules Dassin with whom she would share her life and career.

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In 1960 she received the best actress award in Cannes for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Never on Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, a Jules Dassinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movie. The film also won five Oscar nominations. Mercouri worked with famous directors like Vittorio de Sica, Ronald Neame, Carl Forman, Norman Jewison and others. She starred in about 60 plays in Athens and in 19 movies by renowned directors. Melina Mercouri was able to combine the magic of the performing arts with the realism of politics. She was actively involved in many aspects of social and political life, first during the struggle against the dictatorship (1967-1974), later on as member of the Greek Parliament (1977) and, finally, as Minister of Culture (from 1981 to 1989 and from 1993 until her death).

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During the seven years of the Greek dictatorship Melina Mercouri was known for her antijunta activity. The dictators took away her Greek citizenship and confiscated her property, while there were terrorist attacks against her and an assassination attempt in Genoa. Nevertheless, she continued to fight until the fall of the junta with speeches, interviews, recordings, marches, concerts, hunger strikes. Melinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s international fame and appeal brought her in contact with the great European leaders; she never missed the opportunity to promote Greece and to struggle for the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights, like the big campaign that she started - as Minister of Culture - for the return of the Parthenon Marbles, which where and still are, displayed in the British Museum.

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Both the photographic exhibition and the edition highlight a unique personality who left her mark on some of the most significant moments of Modern Greek History. They trace Melina’s trajectory through cinema, theater and politics, as well as her personal moments. Melina didn’t die, she will never die! She will always live in our hearts, in all the Greeks’ hearts, reminding us to fight for our visions…

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You must understand what the Parthenon Marbles mean to us. They are our p r i d e. . They are our s a c r i f i c e s . They are noblest s y m b o l of e x c e l l e n c e . They are a tribute to the d e m o c r a t i c p h i l o s o p h y . They are our a s p i r a t i o n s and our n a m e . They are the e s s e n c e of G r e e k n e s s . MELINAMERCOURI'SSPEECHTOTHEOXFORDUNION June 12, 1986

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www.melinamercourifoundation.org.gr www.benaki.gr

MELINA MERCOURI STREET All the photographs of the exhibition are from the personal archives of Melina Mercouri and Jules Dassin, donated to Melina Mercouri Foundation. Manouela Pavlidou, Melinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close friend for many years and Chairman of the Foundation, is the exhibition curator.

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SHOOT ME Magazine ISSUE #15_MAY_014