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THE GREED ISSUE


MASTHEAD Editor-in-Chief. RACHEL ELEANOR SUTTON Managing Editor. EMILY MARUCCI Editorial Interns. MEGHAN FARNSWORTH, CARISSA GAN Contributing Editor & Digital Marketing Strategist. ROMY ERDOS Contributing Creative Director & Production Coordinator. LIZ VAP Business Director. DUNCAN STEELS Publisher. RALPH JOVINE Published by. NERVEWIRE INC. Digital Magazine Layout and Design: Creative Director. JOHN SEXTON Art Director. ELIZABETH SCHMIDT Designer. ADAM PAVLOFF & Print Designer. NICK CEGLIA Contributors. AKIKO KONDOH. ALBAN SMAJLI. ALEX ALMEIDA. ANDRES ALTAMIRANO. AUGUST THOMPSON. BEN BEAGENT. BETHANY O’GRADY. CLAIRE MARICE HOUSH. CODY SMYTH. COLLEEN NIKA. DEAN HOLTERMANN. FLYNN MAXWELL WARREN. HILLARY SPROUL. HOPE GRIFFIN. INNY TAYLOR. JAMES BRODRIBB. JEN. BLANCHARD. JERRY MRAZ. JOHNNY STUNTZ. JOSH REED. KELSEY BENNETT. MADDIE NORTH. MICK ROCK. NI’MA FORD. NICK CEGLIA. PATRICK BUTLER. PETE VOELKER. PILAR LAFARGUE. PRINCE FRANCO. ROB RUMSEY. SHIBON KENNEDY. SHIRLEY HANKO HAGEL. TAYLOR REED. TEENA KANG. THOMAS SWEENEY. UNGANO + AGRIODAMAS

ON THE COVER: Supplemental cover photographed by ANDRES ALTAMIRANO *Please note: this is a supplement edition of SHK Magazine. For the official, full-length magazine, please visit SHKMag.com.

36 East 23rd Street Suite 5F New York, NY 10010 646.922.7171 SHK / NERVEWIRE INC. © 2013. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The publisher, editors, authors and contributors of SHK reserve their rights in regards to copyright of their work. No part of this work covered by the copyright may be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written consent of the publisher. The publisher, editors, contributors and related parties shall have no responsibility for any action or omission by any other contributor, consultant, editor or related party. Reproduction or use in whole or in part of the contents and images of this magazine without written permission is prohibited. SHK Magazine makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of content published. Neither the publishers or advertisers will be held responsible for any errors found herein, and the publisher accepts no liability for the accuracy of the statements made by advertisers in advertising and promotional materials.


FROM THE EDITOR By definition, greed is “a selfish desire to have more of something,” so by nature, we’re all greedy. But are our instinctual feelings of greediness always bad? When people think about greed, if they think of it all, they’re most likely to conjure up recollections of those who rip others apart for personal gain. A “middle finger attitude,” if you will, directed towards various types of offenders — from the lady on the subway taking up two seats with her Whole Foods’ bags, to more serious miscreants, such the magician… The magical master of dizzying illusions, that says: “No Ma’am, I did not pull that coin from you purse. I pulled it from behind your ear!” And, *sigh, you actually believe him. One way or the other, be it world altering or an average day nuisance, we’ve all been a victim of greed. It’s nothing new. Consistent with the biblical saying that avarice is “the root of all evils,” Dante’s Inferno deemed greed the 4th circle, where being boiled alive in molten gold was the soul’s punishment. Then, there’s the infamous crashes responsible for fueling society’s lewdness: the original stock market crash in 1929, Black Monday in 1987, the NASDAQ crash in 2000, Enron in 2001, Charles Ponzi, Bernie Madoff … The idea of people punching others in the stomach and running away (with malevolent smiles spread across their faces) is as endless as schoolyard politics. One of my favorite things about New York City, a.k.a. the land of opportunity, is there’s always something shinier luring down the road — an “on to the next” mentality I’ve developed quite a kinship with. Even as I’m writing this letter, preparing to launch this issue of SHK, I’m already well into the development of our next issue. It’s a vigorously amusing vacuum, leaving little time for feelings of content. It would be silly, considering, if I believed greed void of any and all virtues. Despite cultured denotations, I think (when properly nurtured) there are components of greed worth giving into. Allowing the self to be driven by curiosity and passion, rather than wealth and notoriety, is when greed becomes valuable. Relating to yourself creatively pushes you to better balance your emotions, allowing enough tranquility to make smarter decisions. If we didn’t allow ourselves to give into those feelings, we’d be total duds. It’s those routed in obvious or subtle rebellion, which end up leaving trails of horrible subsequent consequences. You could have “everything,” but if you handed out glass flowers to get there, at some point, things will shatter. That’s what this edition of SHK is all about… Focusing on greed in terms of encouraging people not to be plagued by carelessness or being complacent, and thus sacrificing the pursuit of their own goals. Throughout these pages, we explore the idea of being self-focused vs. selfish. We ask our readers to think about being greedy in terms of growth, with the idea of material gains, notoriety, or rewards achieved by throwing others under the bus, pushed aside.

Until next time,

Rachel Eleanor Sutton Editor-in-Chief


TABLE OF CONTENTS


SEEN 12: 7 SINS 22: SOUL SURVIVOR 30: DESPERADOS UNDER THE EAVES 36: DEAR FASHION WEEK 46: IT DOESN’T MATTER

HEARD 54: DROWNERS NOT DOWNERS 58: BAD GIRLFRIEND

62: YOUNGER THAN YOU, PUNKER THAN YOU

KNOWN 68: SELF-INDULGENT BY NATURE 74: UNDISILLUSIONED YOUTH 82: THOSE NIGHTS 88: WILD THINGS 94: H.A.G.S.


SEEN


The fashion you need to see.


photographed by JAMES BRODRIBB styled by SHIBON KENNEDY hair SHIRLEY HANKO HAGEL makeup ALEX ALMEIDA prop stylist JERRY MRAZ photographer’s assistants BEN BEAGENT and THOMAS SWEENEY model EL GRACE for Re:Quest Model Management


Wrath. ACNE shirt SUZANNE RAE jacket


Pride. BELLEN BRAND top


Greed. stylist’s own earrings


Sloth. ONLY HEARTS bra RODEBJER pants


Envy. RICHARD CHAI LOVE top & pants JEFFREY CAMPBELL shoes


Gluttony. STELLA MCCARTNEY jacket & shorts


Lust. ONLY HEARTS bra HUE tights AESA gold ring stylist’s own silver ring


S S

Soul Survivor photographed by JOSH REED styled by TAYLOR SHERIDAN makeup MADDIE NORTH using M.A.C Cosmetics hair JEN BLANCHARD using SERGE NORMANT manicurist PILAR LAFARGUE stylist’s assistant HOPE GRIFFIN model HEATHER KEMESKY for VISION Los Angeles featured vintage pieces available at BUSTOWN MODERN


YOUNG SINNERS top & shorts ANNIE COSTELLO BROWN necklace


ANNIE COSTELLO BROWN necklace vintage top


CHARLOTTE RONSON skirt ANNIE COSTELLO BROWN necklace vintage shawl


BECCA vintage vest OLD GRINGO boots


JANESSA LEONE hat vintage top


WHITING & DAVIS vintage top LIV LOS ANGELES skirt ANNIE COSTELLO BROWN bracelet


DE S PER A DO S Under The Eaves

photographed by UNGANO + AGRIODIMAS styled by TEENA KANG hair JOHNNY STUNTZ for Crosby Carter Management makeup ROB RUMSEY of Crosby Carter Management art direction PRINCE FRANCO model BRENDA for Hollywood Model Management


BLK DNM jacket HERVE LEGER skirt CAST OF VICES necklace


MISSGUIDED top & flannel (worn as headpiece) BCBG MAX AZRIA shorts CAST OF VICES cuff AMBUSH necklace


MISSGUIDED crop top THVM jeans ERICKSON BEAMON rhinestone cuff AM EYEWEAR sunglasses


MISSGUIDED jumper CAST OF VICES hat


Dear Fashion Week A Spring/Summer 2014 photo documentary of New York, London, Paris & Milan. photographed by PATRICK BUTLER written by RACHEL ELEANOR SUTTON


When it comes to fashion, the “give me more, right now” mentality is nothing new. Still, in context with our present social web era, the industry is struggling with demands of new media, and being forced to question old traditions. In 1943, Eleanor Lambert organized New York Fashion Week, a “press week” to showcase the work of American designers. Paris, Milan and London followed suit, eventually leading the way for hundreds of fashion weeks around the world, from the likes of Atlanta, Georgia to Kuching City, Malaysia. (Too much? Yes.) And while various parts of the world have attempted to attract Fashion Week enthusiasts (likely for city $tatu$ rather than designer support), mainstream focus hasn’t strayed from the major four. What has strayed, however, is the major four’s focus on the world. It was like this… Invite fashion buyers to view wholesale collections and editors to promote them. Create exclusivity. Erect intrigue. Then, months later, translate the catwalk via magazine editorials, launch advertising campaigns and get pieces on the racks. Volia! An operational ready-to-wear system was in place, allowing the billion-dollar industry breathing room to prosper. Clearly, things have changed. Exclusivity? Gone. Intrigue? Forget it. Buyers and editors? Scoot over, there’s a new blogger of-the-moment in your seat. Once aimed at pleasing industry professionals, fashion week currently revolves around instant hype. More and more, buyers and press are scoping collections outside the shows, while designers are continuously taking steps to integrate presentations with technology’s delivery capabilities. But, if the runway’s focus has shifted towards pleasing consumers, then why hasn’t the calendar? If designers are going to spend all this money producing the shows and generating hype, why not coincide the event with consumer demand and insta’sales? P.S. “pre-order” doesn’t’ count. OK, now, this shouldn’t be considered a prequel for “Fashion Week, RIP.” With or without scheduling changes, an overall facelift or whatever, Fashion Week is a staple. It provides an atmosphere for competitive edge, new discoveries, inspiration and a sense of faction. Though many find runway shows have become an annoying, oversaturated hassle — and, who could blame them — it’s still lovely. Mockery aside.


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IT Doesn’t Matter photographed by MICK ROCK styled by NI’MA FORD written by RACHEL ELEANOR SUTTON makeup ALEX ALMEIDA hair SHIRLEY HANKO HAGEL photographer’s assistant CODY SMYTH & DEAN HOLTERMANN coordination FERAL CAT PRODUCTIONS

Cory Kennedy breezed into the SHK cover shoot… Unkempt, bleach blonde hair. An observable flair for vintage ’70s-esque style. An honestly refreshing “I’ll give it but I’ll take it, too” attitude. You see, Miss Kennedy is considered — sorry, please excuse this cringeworthy word — a Downtown It Girl. Within the industry, the term has morphed into defining socially apt gals in the scene that check off (at least) one of these boxes: Fashion Impresario / DJ / Host / Face of Blabla / Friends of Blabla / Muse of Blabla / Et cetera. I know, I know. Whatever. OK sure… Cory certainly checks off some of those boxes, but an It girl stamp has little to do with my interest in Cory as the cover personality for this edition of SHK. When I asked Cory about her thoughts on the epithet, she casually laughed. “It’s silly to me. No one knows that the expression came from an older silent film It starring Clara Bow,” said Cory. “Now it’s all about socialites and fortunate kids of famous parents. It’s hard to find ‘real deal’ It girls since the term has been blown to pieces. But they are out there. You just need to look.”

As a member of the first generation of teenagers forced to mold from N2 pencils to keyboards, I remember a time before high-heeled bloggers lined front rows and the power of the Internet still boggled minds. Enter: Cory Kennedy. It was 2005. The 16-year-old hit up the El Ray Theatre for a Blood Brothers show. So did Mark Hunter (The Cobrasnake). Taken aback by Cory’s unposed nature and interesting, leisure-oriented style, Mark flashed his lens and thus marked the beginning of this Californiaborn girl’s upswing into the international fashion world’s consciousness. In lieu of persona modification management and famous parental guidance, Cory gained insta’fame. Let’s not forget, this was fucking weird at the time. Seemingly overnight, a suburban, teenage girl was being awed, questioned and requested from around the world. Side note: Google “Internet It Girl,” and Cory still pops up — maybe, she’s the only one that ever will? (Obviously, the web quickly became an implied notion rather than a notable point of description.)


For Cory, it doesn’t really matter what outsider labels she’s acquired or how much hype has come and gone. Miss Kennedy isn’t the type of person to do things because it might get her somewhere. Rather, she gets where she is because of the things she does. She’s unashamedly fought personal battles, but never grappled with identity. She’s symbolic of a cultural shift, but is refreshingly aware of the fact that acclaim doesn’t equal integrity. She’s worked for what she has. She’s interesting, but relatable. And those, my friends, are just a few of the reasons we’re psyched to feature Cory Kennedy as our current cover girl. (Oh, and Cory’s also extremely fun to be around, even if you’re drinking water). Lately, the newly blonde, NYC-based perpetrator is busy honing her crafts, which range from photography to DJing to writing and then some. We hung out with Cory on set in Williamsburg with photographer Mick Rock and chatted about fashion (duh), growing up and how to keep calm despite the speed at which this insane industry moves.

ABOVE ___________ ROSARIO suite SPECIES BY THE THOUSANDS rings PSYCHE JEWELRY cuff LEAH BALL cuff ELIZABETH KNIGHT JEWELRY ring (left hand) RILA JEWELRY bracelet (left hand) jewelry worn throughout vintage T-shirt


HERE BIG PARK pants Talent’s own T-shirt & boots

SHK: FROM ONE FASHION WRITER TO ANOTHER, DO YOU HAVE A REALLY ANNOYING FASHION QUESTION YOU DON’T ENJOY GETTING ASKED DURING INTERVIEWS? YOU KNOW, SUCH AS… SAY, “WHAT ERA WOULD YOU LIVE IN IF YOU DIDN’T LIVE IN THIS ONE?”

about to get a call sheet for the next day… You never know.

CORY KENNEDY: Yes! “So what are you doing next?” It’s just like, “Well, next I’m going to get some water and eat a sandwich.” Obviously, I know what they’re asking, but being in this business for something, like, eight years now, I’ve learned a lot through mistakes and what this business is really like. You could have a huge ad campaign one day, and then the next, you don’t — because they changed their minds and went with someone else. I take everyday “one day at a time” now. Expectations are very low because this happens constantly, and mentally you can’t handle all of the ups and downs. Keeping it nonchalant in your brain is what you need to do, especially in New York City, regardless if you’re

My uniform has never really changed, ever. I never went through a gothic or preppy phase; growing up I was always just me — jeans and a T-shirt with high top Converse, all about comfort. Getting older I’ve decided yes, of course still comfort, but I’ve had a lot of fun experimenting with clothing and my personality, which I still do, regardless of all the fashion magazines I’ve studied. Obviously, what has happened to me, growing up and being in the business I’m in, is getting to wear looks off the runway. Tons of clothes. All of the perks. But I’ve never let the clothing wear me. I’ve been in positions where I would have to go to a gala straight from work and they picked the dress, and I was not

DO YOU CURRENTLY HAVE A PARTICULAR LOOK OR “UNIFORM” OF THE MOMENT YOU FIND YOURSELF CONSTANTLY DRAWN TO?


about to go do a step and repeat in a tight sequin dress and a standard handbag. So, there I am in some garden in the middle of winter pulling flowers to make a broach or something in my hair, and making it my own, being comfortable in my shoes (no heels ever, but I still have to wear them). Also, knowing what’s best for me and ignoring a friends opinion. WHAT GRABS YOUR ATTENTION WHEN IT COMES TO DISCOVERING NEW DESIGNERS, BRANDS, OR JUST AWESOME SHIT? Now, it’s about detail and shape. I find anyone can make a chiffon printed dress. Yes, it’s pretty, but is it new and creative? Absolutely not. That’s why I’ve narrowed down shows to go to during fashion week because some will always be the same things every season in a new color or fabric.

I also love weird pieces and making them look cool. There’s a French designer I’ve always looked up to for her ballsy pieces, I’m pretty sure she stopped designing her line, Burfitt by Lovisa Burfitt. We need more of that! There are some very talented small designers in London, but need support. Unfortunately, in this financial crisis we’ve been going through, there really isn’t money for the creative (not just in fashion, but everywhere) anymore. People want to know their money is going to some designer that will do the job, taking no risks. I haven’t seen anything new on a runway in years aside from Isabel Marant and her wedge sneakers. That was completely new and never been done before in fashion. Now you see every designer has ripped her off and the people buying the shoes don’t even know the history of them. And, Chinatown is awesome! I go into the 99-cent stores and find incredible weird things that I end up wearing and you’d never know.


GOALS FOR 2014? Kill it with my professional new wave and having everything in order. I think this year will rock my socks off. WHAT ARE YOU HAPPY DOING ON YOUR DAYS OFF? My cat, Seamless delivery and Netflix. SINCE YOU FIRST SHOT TO FAME BACK IN THE COBRASNAKE DAYS, YOU’VE ACCOMPLISHED SO MUCH ON YOUR OWN TERMS AS A FASHION INFLUENCER, WRITER, DJ, HOST, MODEL… DO YOU FEEL LIKE YOUR ORIGINAL ADVOCATES/FANS FROM THE VERY BEGINNING HAVE GROWN WITH YOU TO THIS POINT IN YOUR LIFE TODAY? Yes, I know some still support me because I see their comments on Instagram or Twitter or my blog. Then some people rant about how much cooler I was and how I dressed better and had a different personality. I don’t think they’ve considered that I’ve grown up and I’m not a partying teenager anymore — change of lifestyle, a way at looking at the world, my career, and all of that fun stuff that grows along with time. I do dress more sophisticated however, because I want to and feel like doing that in my own way (which you can see my personality still shines through). I also changed my hair to platinum blonde; a lot of people hated that. But I’m that same girl they saw with The Cobrasnake, it’s just called growing up. A part of me does feel like I’m letting them down, but changing is what life is all about. I’m sure if they read this they would look at their opinion much more differently. WHAT DO YOU HOPE PEOPLE TAKE AWAY FROM YOU, CORY KENNEDY, A FASHION/STYLE INFLUENCER WHO HAS BEEN IN THE MEDIA’S EYE FOR OVER A DECADE? WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO STAY INVOLVED IN THE LIFESTYLE? People have been messaging me for years about how I’ve changed their life in so many ways, which I’m still getting used to. I’m 23 and I’ve been changing people’s lives already? It’s a crazy position to be in, but I’m thankful I’ve helped and touched people whichever way they take it in. People also message me constantly on how to wear this or how to wear that… And I always say go with what you feel is comfortable, and when I say comfortable, I mean it mentally as well. I am not you. You are you. What do YOU like?

LAST PAGE MANDARIN & GENERAL gold coat RAY-BAN sunglasses talent’s own under garments & necklace

THIS PAGE MESKITA white dress ALON LIVNE white lace dress PSYCHE JEWELRY pendant necklace talent’s own necklace


HEARD


THE RAD STUFF YOU NEED TO HEAR.


DROW NERS N O T D O W NERS photographed by PETE VOELKER written by RACHEL ELEANOR SUTTON


New York City’s Post-Punk/Britpop quadrant, Drowners, met incidentally… The way people meet when they move to New York and travel through inextricably linked social circles. In late 2011, the band’s devastatingly charming frontman, Matt Hitt (singer/guitar), moved to NYC via rural Wales. Spurred by the city’s ardent movement and cursory attitude, Hitt found himself writing material that played into the vibes of his newfound home. No stranger to the Downtown scene, Hitt eventually found himself bandmated with musician friends Jack Ridley III (guitar), Erik Snyder (bass) and Lakis Paylou (drums). “It was super organic,” explains Hitt. “No one made a flyer saying, ‘Trendy Lower East Side Punk Band Seeking Members!’ We all came to know each other from friends of friends, and from hanging out at the same spots and talking about music.” When it came to honing Drowners’ stupendously catchy sound and earning street cred as a worthy NYC outfit, the guys opted for the DIY, sans publicist approach, but did so under the thrust of Manhattan’s tentacles instead of, say, hording up East Bushwick-style — working various gigs around the city a la bartending or DJing. “Not to sound too cliché, but it’s almost a Manhattan vs. Brooklyn thing… The reason we like Manhattan more, why I like Manhattan more, is because there’s such an urgency to do stuff,” says Hitt. “It’s almost desperation, in that it’s pretty much unaffordable. That’s something people may not understand… Unless you are Kings of Leon, you can’t afford to live in the city just doing music. I think that desperation comes out in the sound.” During those budding stages, Drowners’ played a shit ton of shows and released the well acclaimed 3-track EP Between Us Girls, featuring the popular “Long Hair” track. (Side note: for


“When you’re first starting out, no one claps when you come on stage. They’ll clap after the first couple of songs. But on this tour, at one point, they started clapping for us as we went up on stage, which kind of felt like a big thing.” — Matt Hitt any house party with good friends, “Long Hair” is playlist worthy.) “For Between Us Girls, I wrote a batch of songs and we recorded demos of them over at Erik’s house,” says Hitt. “It got retweeted by someone and caught the attention of Nick Hodgson, former drummer of Kaiser Chiefs, who was looking to start his own label. Then, those demos got re-mastered, and that’s what became Between Us Girls.” So, like six months into it, the fashionably conscious Drowners’ found themselves signing an ink deal with Frenchkiss Records, recording a debut full-length (alongside producers Gus Oberg and Johnny T) and opening for another Britpop-influenced act: Arctic Monkeys. “I was a little skeptical at first, because all the shows were sold out before we got on the bill. But as we were loading in — because Arctic Monkey fans will wait outside from like mid-afternoon — we saw some of them wearing Drowners shirts,” says Hitt. “Actually, I was just talking about this with someone, there was a switch that happened at those shows. You know, as a band, when you’re first starting out, no one claps when you come on stage… Then, they’ll clap after the first couple of songs. But on this tour, at one point, they started clapping for us as we went up on stage, which kind of felt like a big thing.” The band recently let out “Luv, hold me down,” the first single from the aforementioned debut album, showcasing the inevitable fusion that occurs when four dudes bring individual elements of Punk Rock to the forefront. Of course, we’d never dare an attempt of defining anyone’s music beyond the scope of how it makes us feel (go listen for yourselves)… However, what we will say is that Drowners’ bring about a seemingly romanticized ruse of youthfulness, an emphasis on good times and an accessible, congealed sound of Garage/Post-Punk/Britpop/Rock and Roll. Deemed by their label’s head honcho, Syd Butler, as “ready to take over the world,” Drowners’ are hitting the road in the name of promotion, allowing their killer live show to seep into the Rock world’s consciousness. “The main thing now is a lot of touring... We have a good time,” says Hitt. “We wake up and then have some food, then go play a gig, which is what we do in NYC anyway… It’s like a traveling friendship.” (interview by ADAM LAGRECA)


THERE’S BAD.

AND THEN THERE’S BAD GIRLFRIEND. photographed by PETE VOELKER interviewed by HILLARY SPROUL wardrobe REFORMATION & VEDA


When I initially met Brianna Lance of the band, Bad Girlfriend (not to be confused with Theory of a Dead Man’s track “Bad Girlfriend”), I was shopping downtown in a little boutique called Reformation, where Brianna was the head designer. The shop was a teeny-tiny haven full of revamped vintage pieces with a small production studio in the back. While perusing its merchandise for the first time, I found this amazing skirt, but it was just a little too big around the waist for me. Luckily Brianna, the tall, willowy babe and super cool chick that she is, was there to rescue me from a fashion disaster as she adjusted my new find so that it fit oh-so-perfectly. A year later, I started working at Reformation, and I began to see Brianna in a new light. I came to learn that, aside from her amazing skills as a designer, how fantastic her taste is music was. As she was designing awesome pieces for Reformation, she was also creating amazing playlists to set the store’s vibe just right. Wire, Essential Logic, ESG, OMD...Damn. Essentially, I encountered the rare experience of finding the perfect soundtrack to encapsulate my life in which I am eternally grateful. Luckily, I witnessed Brianna’s musical genius in those playlists right before she established Bad Girlfriend, a perfect package featuring Brianna’s musical finesse via guitar and vocals along with the talents of her musician friends, Christian Owens (singer/guitar), Lyla Vander (bass), and Savannah King (drummer/singer). It’s obvious that these four girls have been friends for a great length of time because the proof exists in their tunes, which are the tightest mixture of surfer rock vocals, guitar effects, and killer bass drum beats. Think California in the ‘50s, or any Quentin Tarantino soundtrack, especially the track “Woo Hoo” from Kill Bill Vol. 1. With their first full length album in the works (unnamed still. Oh the suspense), which also features the work of producer Aaron Pfenner from Chairlift and Rewards as well Benjamin Curtis of School of Seven Bells, I had to sit down with the badass ladies over mimosas in order to get the latest details on their musical escapades while fighting a terrible hangover and the interference of an unruly East Village frat-boy who took issue with the concept of an interview. — HILLARY SPROUL


SHK: OKAY, SO HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME BAD GIRLFRIEND? BRIANNA LANCE: Oh, it’s actually named after the girlfriend of one of our friends whose name we can’t say, but he had a really shitty girlfriend. Christian and I were specifically talking about this guy’s girlfriend one night, and I was like, “She’s so sweet!,” and Christian was like, “Yeah, but she’s such a bad girlfriend.” HOW DID YOU GUYS START?

Christian said, “Here, just play on the bass keyboard!” BL: So we did that for a while. However, that was a different band then with a different name. We even had a different drummer until we found Lyla. It was after finding her that we changed our band name to Bad Girlfriend, officially. HOW DID YOU FIND LYLA? BL: Oh, she got poached. CO: We poached her.

BL: Well, we met a long time ago playing in a different band. Christian played bass, and I was “the tambourine girl.” When we met back then, we essentially fell in love. Then I learned the guitar, and Christian suggested, “Let’s start playing together.”

[TO LYLA] WHAT’S YOUR BACKGROUND?

CHRISTIAN OWENS: Yeah, Brianna was basically like, “Let’s jam.” When she came over over to my place, we would record songs on this rigged Pro Tools set-up I had at that time. Then, I was like, “Let’s really write some songs.” After that, we started jamming and writing more songs together. Then we ran into this random weirdo who said to us, “Hey, I have a record release party in a couple of months or so. Do you and one of your other bands want to play?” Of course when I heard that, I though that maybe Brianna and I could actually perform some of our songs.

LV: Around the age of 12

WELL, ONCE YOU BOOKED THE GIG…

BL: When I met Christian, she was pretty much the bass player for like every band in New York. She was one of those people who played for everybody.

CO: We basically booked a show in order to make the music come together. BL: And during that time, we had also been playing with our friend Paula, who was new to the drums. Basically, Paula was enthusiastically like, “Yeah, let’s do the show.” So it was just the three of us at first. And then Paula got Savannah to start playing with us. SO THAT’S HOW SAVANNAH GOT THROW IN? SAVANNAH KING: Yeah, I was a last minute decision...I didn’t play any instrument at the time. BL: Well, she got peer pressured. SK: I’d heard about these girls, randomly. We were sort of theoretically dancing around each other for a long time, but when Paula insisted, “I really need a bass player, ”I responded, “I don’t know, man.” But she continued to pressure me, so... DID YOU HAVE A BASS? SK: Well, the first show happened, and then afterwards, I came to band practice, where Christian handed me a microKorg keyboard with all of the notes taped on it.

BL: She’s been drumming for forever. BUT WHEN DID YOU START PLAYING DRUMS?

CO: I was in a Riotgrrl band in high school. OH REALLY?! WHAT DID YOU DO IN THAT BAND? CO: Bass. I’ve always been a bass player even when I played in other people’s bands and when I was in my high school Riotgrrl band. Then in college, I actually played guitar, but that was nothing much — just one-note stuff.

AND NOW HERE YOU ARE… IN THE BIG CITY BUT FROM A SMALL TOWN. YOU’VE KNOWN MUSIC PRODUCER AARON PFENNING FOR A LONG TIME? BL: Yeah. SK: Aaron did a remix of one of our songs, “Feelings,” which started our relationship with him. After all, we a really positive, good time with him. We all love Aaron. YOU ALSO RECORD WITH BENJAMIN CURTIS OF SCHOOL OF SEVEN BELLS — WHAT A DREAM TEAM. BL: He produced and engineered a lot of our album. AS A GROUP, ARE YOU INFLUENCED BY SIMILAR MUSIC? BL: We all listen to every type of music, I feel like. LV: That’s why it’s hard. Most people will be like, “How would you describe your music?” But I think it’s difficult to answer that question. Answering a question like that is almost deceptive because there are so many crazy things going on in our music. I think that most of what we write and perform stems from the various things in which we listen.


YOUNGER THAN YOU. PUNKER THAN YOU. photographed by MICK ROCK written by AUGUST THOMPSON


Sitting down with Mikaiah and Anaiah Lei, the brothers behind Punk outfit The Bots, quickly turns from a semi-formal interview into an uproarious hangout. We go from talking about influences — Villagers, Classic Soul, Led Zep and Bad Brains, collecting vinyl and more — to making fun of Southern California “bro dudes,” each of us excitedly speaking over the next, trying to land the best punchline. Anaiah, the younger of the two, wins the bro topic. “I never want to go to Coachella again. It’s sobad. Brochella,” notes Anaiah. “It’s all frat boys. I hate ’em. I was about to see Dinosaur Jr. and there were just massive bros... Trucker

hat to the side, popped collar.” He takes his phone out and furiously searches for a secretly snapped photo he’d taken of one such bro. At just 16-years-old, Anaiah seems less verbose than the older Mikaiah, 20, yet, he throws dices of cool insight intermediately thoughout our conversation. He sports a massive fro above his small-ish frame, wears braces and, in an effort to keep The Bots routinely touring, Anaiah is currently completing high school online. His catchy intuition on life and dedicated work ethic initially feels unexpected — I mean, he is 16. However, it makes total sense when you realize he’s intelligent, wry, funny and, not to mention, a complete demon on the drums.


Mikaiah has an excitable energy about him... He slightly writhes in his seat, generates gestures over words on the philosophy of music, performances and the creation of art. He’s the frontman, the singer, and the persona matches. But other than that, the brothers are equals, or as close to equals as two males would ever admit. When it comes to the Lei duo, there’s an upfront, free of bitterness and endearing kinship/hand-medown relationship. Anaiah got into drums after playing guitar because, he says shrugging, Mikaiah already played guitar and bass. “We’d do guitar and bass melodies, and it sounded good, but then he picked up the drums and we were like, yeah...” says Mikaiah, on the epiphany of the two-man crunch that began molding itself around 2007. “He’s just more ruthless than I am.” The Bots boast a classical approach to the bass/guitar and drums makeup (The White Stripes, Death From Above 1979, The Black Keys), blended amongst their own play on Frankenstein Punk, Blues, frustration and fun.

Getting some filming in, recording for an upcoming full-length via FADER Label (which is still untitled, since album titles come last, I’m told) and playing a series of CMJ showcases for acts like Schoolboy Q and Vince Staples. Playing live is something the two have done for most of their adolescent lives. “When we perform for months at a time, it’s like ‘what stupid stuff can we do on stage to keep it fun?’ You don’t want a jaded experience. That’s why we’re always writing new songs, making music we like to hear... That’s what we do,” says Mikaiah. Nodding in agreement, Anaiah succinctly sums it up, “It’s fun. You can be angry writing music, but it’s fun playing it.” The Bots are appealing as both people and musicians, because at the core, what is valued most is making sure to have fun while creating. How? By marrying the purpose and function of music, with general artistry. “Film is a big part of the inspiration for me. Good visuals, art... It’s good tobe able to be inspired by things that aren’t just music,” says Mikaiah. “I love to draw and paint. I’m not incredible, but I don’t let that discourage me. It’s just good to be part of the art community.

“We’re blessed to be at this point we’re at now. It’s making my dreams come true. I keep saying that, but it’s true. It’s lovely.”

The Bots’ greatest success — aside from the literal success of a European tour with Blur, being featured in this year’s CMJ series and releasing a rousing and invigorating EP entitled Sincerely Sorry last fall — is a total enthusiasm for giving music a real chance. No ego, no chin raising and no annoying name-dropping included. Since presenting as an official outfit, Mikaiah and Anaiah have been steadily checking off accomplishments from any Rock & Roll band’s dream bucket list: feature in Rolling Stone, check. Playing with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Damon Albarn and Tenacious D. Check. A spotlight photographed by Mick Rock in SHK Magazine... Check. Check. Oh, and the duo has destroyed shows that dwarf the population of small cities. “74,000 people, I couldn’t see the end of it. It was nuts. We were on the mainstage. I’m like 20 feet away from Anaiah and I’m like dude,” says Mikaiah. The most recent feat is being signed to New York’s FADER Label, which makes the boys official. Legitimate professionals. “It’s nice to have proper backing, to have more than just me and Anaiah,” notes Mikaiah. “At one point I was like, ‘I don’t know, we gotta’ do something...’ But we’re blessed to be at this point we’re at now. It’s making my dreams come true. I keep saying that, but it’s true. It’s lovely.” During a recent stint in New York, the boys were non-stop working...

”The Bots are only making music because they love it, and this exuberance glimmers throughout the songs on the albums. Sincerely Sorry, which the brothers described as a “gateway” record into the world of The Bots, is a blast — combining Motorhead-esque riffs with Punk grime and furious drum-work. It’s such a confident label debut because it sounds exactly like what was intended from the beginning. Something that came organically and not forced. With this yet-to-be-named upcoming LP, The Bots promise continued success and independence by working with producers who are described as, “third band members that don’t play any instruments”. Music, for them, as with any enthusiast, isn’t about consistency. Stagnancy is a form of dying, and boredom is the antithesis of everything musicians and fans desire. Mikaiah closes our convo, before we delve into another round of jokes (this time, about how fat kids are the best vert skaters because they’ve got inertia on their side), with these words: “What we’re going to put out is like The Bots 2.0... The expression is terrible, but you get the point. It’s like, if you’re not getting better, what are you doing?”


KNOWN


The awesome stuff you should know.


SELF-INDULGENT BY NATURE photographed by ANDRES ALTAMIRANO model FLO DRON


UNDISILLUSIONED YOUTH At home with artist Langley Fox. photographed by JOSH REED written by EMILY MARUCCI interviewed by INNY TAYLOR


If someone ever had an opportunity to be greedy, it would be artist Langley Fox. Yet, as evident through her talent and alluring personality, it’s clear such thoughts don’t cross her beautiful, brunette-laden mind. Langley Fox is built like a collapsible easel. Long, lean, compact, ornamented with colors and ideas. Totally down to earth. With every glimpse of the earthy babe, we’re left fawning over her effortless style… A bangle on her sculpted arm just slightly above her elbow, daisies strung from her windows, a collection of silver rings adorning her every finger attached to a simple, three tiered tattoo. Fox erupts quite a history; it’s in her every follicle. Daughter of actress Mariel Hemingway, sister to model Dree Hemingway and, of course, granddaughter of the Ernest Hemingway… Fox was inheritably a certified It-girl, yet when we meet her — polka dot frock, shaggy bangs and all — we were already awestruck. Then we were introduced to her work… A drawing of two girls entitled “Sweet Death,” with a delicate arrow through their heads, holding lollypops in their hands, followed by a bull skull with flowers dancing between its horns… This status she holds is natural and organic. Solely deserved. Langley is like a patchwork of pictures, nuggets of fashion, genius and art, paired with the keen understanding of a suffering artist. SHK hung out with Fox in her Los Angeles home, and below she trudges through the surface of a mind complete with depth and quirkiness.


SHK: WHEN DID YOU FIRST START DRAWING? AND THEN, WHEN DID YOU DECIDE IT WOULD BECOME YOUR CAREER PATH? LANGELY FOX: I’ve been drawing since I was a small kid. Ever since I can remember, I’ve always wanted to be an artist. In kindergarten, my best friend asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up and I casually said, an artist slash comedian.

monster is either evil or scary, but actually stems from an innocence that you relate to and feel compassion for. WHAT IS YOUR TAKE ON ART AND FLAWS? Well, this is human life and nothing is perfect. There are flaws within everything; so all art certainly has flaws. I think it’s important to own your flaws and almost admire them. That goes both for your work and your life.

WHY USE THE MEDIUMS FOUND PREDOMINATELY IN YOUR WORK?

HOW DID THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MODELING AND ILLUSTRATION COME TO BE?

I use mainly graphite in my work because I seem to have the most control over it, and I can really get into the small details of a picture. I’m also drawn to the black and white effect. It has an old-fashioned look to it, which I admire.

I always knew I wanted to draw, no matter what. It’s what I get the most joy out of and how I function best — by allowing myself to explore the creative side of my brain and accomplishing my goals. Modeling, on the other hand, just kind of crept up on me. I feel I’m approaching the two careers in a way that is benefiting both of them — such as modeling and illustrating for a brand, which allows me to feel more involved with the end result.

WHAT WOULD SAY TRANSLATES IN YOUR MIND AS STUFF THAT MAKES YOU WANT TO CREATE? Images of classic characters, old and weird photography, nature, animals, other people’s drawings and films... I’m drawn to things that are somewhat dark and eerie, but it’s not in a devilish or scary sense, more in an unknown mysterious way. I like something to have those dark elements, but then to tell more of a story the longer you admire it. It’s like a classic Tim Burton film where the

AS FAR AS EVOKING EMOTION, WHAT ARE THE SIMILARITIES BETWEEN MODELING AND ART? There are so many incredible photoshoots that really bring about deep emotions from within. I find that I get inspired by a lot of fashion photography that gets a little


corky or outside of the box. Even just creating that certain “look” to accomplish the “character” your embodying for the photo… It’s like acting, in a sense, within a single image and allowing the person on the other side to write the story within their own imagination. That within itself is the most fascinating and beautiful thing about photography. HOW HAS FASHION PLAYED A ROLE IN YOUR WORK? WHETHER IT BE THROUGH WORKING WITH DESIGNERS OR THROUGH YOUR OWN PERSONAL INTEREST… I went to school for fashion design originally, which I very much enjoyed. I learned how to make clothes and patterns, along with fashion illustrations and designs. I’ve always been drawn to fashion. I decided on illustrating because I have more artistic say in what I create and can do it alone in the space I choose, but that doesn’t mean I could never see myself back in the fashion design world. Fashion is such a fun thing, and it doesn’t need to be about the high fashion brand names or how expensive something is, but more about creating on overall image to embody. You have the ability to create a certain character and show it off to the world. Same as with photography and art... You’re just writing another visual story. WHAT’S AN INTERESTING PROJECT YOU’VE BEEN COMMISSIONED FOR THUS FAR? I generally take every project seriously, and I want them all to be the best, which means I get really inspired with the concept and ideals of the brand or person I’m working for and mixing it with my views. Each one comes out with a new look, so I can’t really put a hierarchy to which one I liked most. Although, I do have to say that my personal favorites are generally the ones I do for myself… Where I’m just exploring my weird mind and putting everything I like into the picture, such as the children that I killed with an arrow. HOW’S LIFE IN L.A.? I currently live in Los Angeles and I’m a huge fan of it. I think the California lifestyle is a healthy one. You get a perfect mix of city life and home life, you can afford a place bigger than a closet, and you get beautiful sunshine and nature. I’m definitely affected by weather. The sunnier it is, the happier I am, which leads to working harder and accomplishing more. I also love to hike and be outside, and here, that’s an easy option. ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON ANY PROJECTS? I’m working on a couple different projects. I have a few of my illustrations going on T-shirts — one with a brand called Elkin with a “Banana Ribcage,” and another with a brand called Wren, for a charity Tee with a cat! Then I’m working with some other brands for website backgrounds and different portraits. I also have my “draw me anytime you get time” list building up.

“Well, this is human life and nothing is perfect. There are flaws within everything… I think it’s important to own your flaws and almost admire them.”


AS IF YOU HAVEN’T HEARD THIS QUESTION BEFORE, BUT WHAT’S IT LIKE HAVING ERNEST HEMINGWAY AS A GREAT GRANDFATHER? It’s certainly a question I get asked many times, but never one that I’m not pleased to answer. It’s such an honor to be related to such an iconic and genius figure in our history. It’s also an intimidating relation to have, especially being that I’m in the artistic world myself. I would never claim to have any of his genius or want to be viewed differently just upon the connection. I can only hope that I have some of his DNA running through my veins, but would never put my work anywhere near his. “AND HOW MUCH BETTER TO DIE IN ALL THE HAPPY PERIOD OF UNDISILLUSIONED YOUTH, TO GO OUT IN A BLAZE OF LIGHT, THAN TO HAVE YOUR BODY WORN OUT AND OLD AND ILLUSIONS SHATTERED.” CAN YOU EXPLAIN HOW THIS QUOTE MAKES YOU FEEL? I think this quote has a lot to do with youth and aging and feeling fresh out of inspiration. When you’re young, you have so much to look forward to, so much to imagine, and your goals can be as high as you want them to be, without having the weight of the world crushing them. Then as age takes its toll, you live and learn, have ups and downs, you become familiar with pain and suffering… The dreams that were so vivid as a young adult seem to diminish if you allow them to. It’s almost saying go out before all the pain and suffering comes, leave the world while you still get excited by the simplest things, before the negativity of experience kicks in. I think it has to do a lot with Hemingway’s suffering as an artist, being so inspired and productive one day and not being able to do anything the next. For an artist, having an artistic block can be the hardest thing to deal with, worse than physical pain would ever cause. FAVORITE ALBUM THESE DAYS? Well, I still listen to mostly old Blues, Classic Rock, and the occasional childhood favorite. But if I had to pick something that is “current” — and I’m so unaware of any current tunes — I would say that I’ve seen Lou Doillon play twice recently and her music, voice and presence is something everyone should experience. TELL US SOMETHING WE SHOULD… SEE: Ketchum, Idaho during the month of June... The most beautiful place on the planet. HEAR: The silence that most people avoid at all costs. Or, snow falling all around you. KNOW: Anything you want to do is most likely achievable with hard work and dedication, so don’t give up on yourself.


THOSE


NIGHTS photographed by NICK CEGLIA


It’s a thing to stay away from that’s easier said than done. It allows room in our conscious for selfpity. It has this amazing ability to seep guilt and sadness into our veins, often when we’re paying the least attention. In a city where dark bars are new adventures, and new adventures make the best stories, it’s hard not to give in. But what happens when a night out doesn’t result in the fun and glam, or lust, capacity you’d expected? What happens when loneliness kicks in? When every canoodling couple atop surrounding barstools makes you feel jealous, small, smaller and just as bitter as a dash of bitters? Well, you could just go home... Or, you could order another round.


WILD THINGS From streets to parks, despite countless rubrics and perils, skateboarding culture thrives. photographed by PATRICK BUTLER


H.A. G.S. photographed by KELSEY BENNETT


SHK has teamed up with photographer Kelsey Bennett in this ongoing portrait series, which will be featured in each issue of SHK with continuous features on the blog, capturing the coolest, most creative influencers roaming NYC this year.

“The acronym of Have A Good Summer, H.A.G.S — a sentiment scrawled across the pages of yearbooks — is the title of my ongoing series of portraits, resembling what the kids of my dream High School would look like. They’re the artists, musicians, writers, outcasts, rebels, or just members of a rad gang.” — Kelsey Bennett


ALEX BURT Alex, head chef at The Smile (on Bond Street in Manhattan), has been gallivanting around NYC for the past seven years — a la, Las Vegas and Salt Lake City. A love of bread started Alex’s initial affair with cooking, leading him to study his craft at the French Culinary Institute… But these days, he’s a Pisces that likes cooking fish. During the day, one’s most likely to find Alex out and about toting his miniature greyhound, Cilantro.

“Life Rülz!”

AMBER DOYLE Amber is the designer and co-owner of custom suit shops Doyle Mueser (West Village) and Against Nature (Lower East Side). A graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology, Amber’s work has been featured by the likes of Vogue, FLATT, Interview, and The New York Times, and worn by various noteworthy NYC personalities, such as Janelle Monáe, Alec Baldwin and Adam Driver.

“Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn.” — Orson Welles

ANNA DEL GAIZO I’m a writer — which means I procrastinate, a lot. I’m an editor for a new social website called Archetypes.com, but I think of myself as a semi-professional hedonist. Disheveled glamour appeals to me, and I’d choose vulgar over boring any day.

“The rock’s easy, but the roll is another thing…” — Keith Richards


ARIA MCMANUS Originally from Minnesota. Aira describes herself as a humorous inventor. Her art is concerned with objects that have more than one function. She recently made a teddy bear out of bubble wrap.

“Here’s a good thing to do if you go to a party and you don’t know anybody: first take out the garbage. Then go around and collect any extra garbage that people might have, like a crumpled napkin, and take that out too. Pretty soon people will want to meet the busy garbage guy.” — Jack Handey

B.THOM STEVENSON I’m a visual artist living and working in Brooklyn. I can’t sleep at night if I haven’t made something that day. Most nights, I sleep like a baby. I never grew up, but since I’m from the future, I technically haven’t been born yet, so no pressure.

“Chill is the new Punk.”

HALEY LOUISE DEKLE Haley has been playing music all her life. Her family was obsessed with Karaoke, and to this day, she still takes it very seriously. Currently, Haley sings in the Brooklyn-based group Dirty Projects, while working on an upcoming project written and produced alongside Jarrett Wetherell.

“Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, ‘I’m possible!’” — Audrey Hepburn


HEATHER MORGAN Heather Morgan: painter, bon vivant and chanteuse with a sable brush. Epitaph reads: “It was worth it.”

“The beautiful is always bizarre.” — Baudelaire

JAMES CONCANNON Visual artist James Concannon is a New Orleans based Folk artist / bone hoarder. Founder of several sub-sect cults based on humanities destruction and failure, including a new experiment based on mind control utilizing soup in collaboration with Kyle Washam and Shiro Kiro, called “Baptized by Beet.” James sources all of his artistic materials in dumpsters and abandoned buildings throughout the south.

“As Dada marches it continuously destroys, not in extension but in itself.” — Tristan Tzara “Dadaist Manifesto,” 1918.

JAMIE FALKOWSKI Jamie, a resident of New York for over eight years now, is the Marketing Director at Alldayeveryday, and a founder of The Newsstand — where enjoys spending time underground/disconnected from social media and being surrounding by zines, books and various local projects. He describes the space as “a physical Tumblr.”

“Always be doing. Prove it with action.”


JERRETT WETHERELL Jerrett, NYC-based musician and producer, grew up in a music home with his father playing the piano in a spiritual manner. Currently, he can be found collaborating on an upcoming project with Haley Louise Dekle.

“The pitcher needs a still cup.” — Hafiz, Persian poet

JULIAN GILBERT Artist and zine maker, Julian photographs people, places and things around New York City. His favorite zine to date is one he made of people giving the middle finger, on Christmas.

“Bawitdaba da bang a dang diggy diggy diggy said the boogy said up jump the boogy.” — Kid Rock

KEVIN KEARNY Kevin, Managing Director of Allday, carries the torch for company’s integrated approaches. As a mastermind of branding and communications, his unique outlook on media, content and programming subsequently follow from his career as the CEO of Anna Sheffield where he oversaw fashion collaborations with the likes of Phillip Lim, Marc Jacobs, Cole Haan and Target. Oh, and he ended up leading the label to a CFDA nomination in 2007. Not too shabby.

“You gotta fish where the fish are.”


KEVIN STEVENSON I summer in Ptown and winter in Bushwick. I take sneaky pictures of my friends.

“YOLO” — JFK

LELE SAVERI Born in Rome, Lele moved to London during his early 20’s, where he photographed graffiti around city while working at Pizza Hut for extra money. From there, Lele never stopped taking photos. Inundated with jobs via Milan — many of them fashion-related — the Italian stallion decamped to New York to focus side projects and his fine art photography. Atop solo shows throughout America and Europe, a stint as photo editor for Italian Vice, Lele also released a hardcover of his work, Incubi et Succubi (2011). Most recently, he ran The Newsstand located within the Lorimer Stop (L and G trains), and he also curates 8 Ball, an independent art book faire, which he started in 2012, and holds twice a year at Billiards Halls (thus far, mostly in the city’s Korea Town area).

“More zinning, less blogging.”

MONROE ROBERTSON Burmese Royalty, a descendant of Genghis Khan and raised in the Shakespearian shire of Stratford-upon-Avon, Monroe Robertson has fled the streets of London for the shores of NYC. A partner in men’s British shoeline, Jeffery West, Monroe runs the company’s U.S. flagship. He also makes movies and spreads the gospel of Roxy Music and Michael J. Fox.

“Love and Glory is a Pantomime.” — Roxy Music


NATALIE SUAREZ Originally from L.A., Natalie is a model and fashion blogger living residing in Manhattan, posting daily to her Natalie Off Duty page. When she’s not styling and writing, Natalie designs shoes for Modern Vice and plays her own music.

“Another year to Rock & Roll.”

PATRICK MCCARTHY Pat makes zines with a literary bent. His series, “Born to Kill,” documented his travels via moped, rigged Coleman stove (to make grilled cheese sandwiches), and adorned with the pigeons he’s raised, among other things... He studied at Werner Herzog’s film school and runs a porn magazine called skirts.

“O public road! I say back, I’m not afraid to leave you… Yet I love you. You express me better than I can express myself.” — Walt Whitman

PAULY JACOB LINGERFELT I was born and raised in New Orleans, and she has been my most passionate love affair yet. I live for long drawn out molasses, slow days in the South... The fading rituals and religious practices of the indigenous peoples inspire me.

“Give me a dive bar and a good jukebox.”


RACHEL TRACHTENBURG Musician, animal rights activists and model. Currently Rachel drums for Larry & the Babes, The Prettiots, and her family band, Trachtenburg Family Slideshow Players. She’s also the lead singer of SUPERCUTE!

‘’I wish I could talk in Technicolor.”

DAN BURKE / DANO Dan plays bass for NYC-based band, SKATERS.

“I dropped out of football and started listening to rap. Now life is one big orgy.”

JOSH HUBBARD / JJ HUB Josh is a guitarist for NYC-based band, SKATERS. Could have been a world-class athlete, but drugs are fun.

“What would Joe Strummer do?”


MICHAEL CUMMINGS/ MIC

NOAH RUBIN / NoNo

Michael is the lead singer for NYCbased band, SKATERS.

Noah is the drummer of NYC-based band, SKATERS.

“I’m so thankful for the education I’ve received and that I’m going to major in philosophy… Not major in drugs like my brother Dave.”

“People think I’m just a drummer, but I also play the bongos.”

UZOAMAKA MADUKA

ZACH HYMAN

Max, as her friends call her, was born in Virginia to Nigerian parents. She started The American Reader fresh out of college. Even as a young, twenty-something, she’s already developed a big presence within New York’s literary scene. Max grew up next to a Vietnam vet who took flashlight tag very seriously.

Zach Hyman is an artist currently living and working in Brooklyn, but he still wants to be a Spaceman. Zach loves his mom, dad, brother, lady, cat and dog.

“I don’t believe that anybody feels the way I do about you now.” — Oasis

“I ain’t no billboard.”


PERSONAL PANDOR

When it comes to pleasure seeking, sex is definitely the ultimate go to… And, as it turns out, shopping doesn’t fall far behind. Apparently, shopping triggers the same parts of the brain that experience stimulation during a good shag. Think about it. Makes perfect sense, no? Both sex and shopping revolve around interaction, self-expression and self-indulgence. The people we sleep with reflect our attraction preferences (well, most of the time), while the clothes we choose to wear showcase tidbits of our personality. Just like with sex, it’s essential to be mindful of our shopping behavior — carelessly filling empty holes is no means to happiness. Yes, life is fucking stressful… So, spoiling yourself with well-deserved fashion pieces (that classic Chanel handbag, Tiffany’s diamonds, a Hermès scarf, a Wes Gordon gown or a Dolce & Gabbana coat, whatever) helps level off that constant struggle between aspirational goals versus reality. It’s when fashion becomes a means of validation, as opposed to a representation of validation, that things become avaricious. (Hence: cold-hearted bitches with 100 pairs of Manolos per one friend.) Clearly, having spent too much time browsing Bergdorf’s, those truly greedy fail to understand the golden concept behind appropriate decadence: “You never get enough of what you don’t really want.” — written by RACHEL ELEANOR SUTTON (photograph by FLYNN MAXWELL WARREN featuring GEORGE FROST jewelry for the SHKN4 digital edition available at SHKmag.com)


STOCKIST ACNE

LEVI’S

ADIDAS

LIV LOS ANGELES

AESA

MANDARIN & GENERAL

ALON LIVNE

MANGO

ANNIE COSTELLO BROWN

MESKITA

ARMS AND ARMORY

MICHAEL KORS

BECCA

NIKE

BELLEN BRAND

OBEY

BETSY JOHNSON

OLD GRINGO

CARHARTT

ONLY HEARTS

CHARLOTTE RONSON

PATRICIA FIELD

COBRA SOCIETY

PAUL SMITH

CRI DE COEUR

REFORMATION

CURRENT/ELLIOTT

RICHARD CHAI LOVE

DOC MARTEN

RODEBJER

ELEMENT

SEPHORA

ELIE TAHARI

THE SHINY SQUIRREL

EMPORIO ARMANI

STELLA MCCARTNEY

FAITH CONNEXION

STEVE MADDEN

FREDDY DICO

SUZANNE RAE

GEORGE FROST

TARTE

H&M

TOPMAN

HARDWARE LDN

VALENTINO

HUE

VEDA

IT’S OKAY MY DEAR

WHITING & DAVIS

JANESSA LEONE

WON HUNDRED

JEFFREY CAMPBELL

YOUNG SINNERS

JOHNNY WAS

YVES SAINT LAURENT

LEILA SHAMS

ZARA


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N4 x the greed issue  

a supplement of SHK Magazine issue N4, The GREED issue. To read the full edition, please visit seenheardknown.com.

N4 x the greed issue  

a supplement of SHK Magazine issue N4, The GREED issue. To read the full edition, please visit seenheardknown.com.

Profile for shkmag
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