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Thirteen Original Colonies

SHELBY TICKFER, HAYLEE CLARK, KELSEY KILMER


C HAPTER 1

Introduction to the Original Thirteen Colonies Ms. Clark, Ms. Kilmer and Ms. Tickfer collaboratively composed an eBook in order for you to better understand the origin of the first 13 colonies in America. Throughout this book you will learn about the start of these colonies and the important roles they played in contributing to the formation of the United States of America. This eBook covers Standard: SS.5.1.7 2007 Colonization and Settlements: 1607 to 1763. Identify and locate the 13 British colonies that became the United States and describe daily life (political, social, and economic organization and structure).


C HAPTER 2

Delaware

M OVIE 2.1 DELAWARE COLONY

Delaware was originally founded by the Dutch in 1631. All of the original settlers of Delaware were killed in a dispute with a local Indian tribe, but seven years later Sweden set up a colony in the northern part of Delaware. In 1664, the British removed the Dutch from the East Coast and for a time the colony was split. Delaware became the first state to ratify the U.S. constitution and joined the union in 1787.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umfqGevfs4c


S ECTION 1

Daily Life The most prosperous and popular industry in Delaware was the tobacco industry. Many men provided for their families by growing the cash crop- tobacco. Most men in the Delaware colony were tobacco farmers or farmed another type of crop. Like in most colonies, women in Delaware were in charge of maintaing their homes. They spent their days attending to household chores and preparing meals for their families, as well as raising their children. Most boys would be trained in the trade of their fathers, so in Delaware the sons would help their fathers with farm work. The girls were responsible for helping their mothers with housework and raising their younger siblings. Families in the Delaware colony were secluded from other families because the large tobacco crops required a lot of room and therefore the houses were spaced out. The entire family was expected to help with the farm in order for the family to prosper.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure Delaware’s main industries included agriculture, fishing, manufacturing and lumber. Delaware had thriving soil which provided the perfect conditions for growing crops such as tobacco. The colony was full of large forests and soon a demand for Delaware lumber was created in the lumber business. Delaware had a very diverse economy due to the amount of diverse industries that were located in the colony. It was also a popular location for trade.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events

Delaware was involved with a lengthy battle between Maryland and Pennsylvania over the borders of Delaware. After new borderlines were put into place, Delaware began to distance itself from Pennsylvania. Delaware began holding their own legislative assemblies; however, they were still considered subjects of Pennsylvania In 1776 Delaware became their own colony when they declared their independence from Pennsylvania rule. Delaware was also the first colony to ratify the U.S. Constitution and became the first state admitted to the union on December 7, 1787.

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C HAPTER 3

Pennsylvania M OVIE 3.1 The Colony of Pennsylvania Founded in 1681

The colony of Pennsylvania was originally claimed by Sweden in 1638. Shortly after the Dutch attacked the Swedes and took over the land they had colonized on the East Coast. The British then seized control of Dutch colonies on the East Coast and William Penn officially founded Pennsylvania colony in 1681. Pennsylvania ratified the U.S. Constitution and became a state on December 12, 1787.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rKYT8Voefg


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Pennsylvania was home to some of the most interesting cities in colonial America. Philadelphia was home to immigration and an essence of multiculturalism. Pennsylvania had a growing foreign and domestic volume of trade. It was home to many merchants, artisans and shopkeepers. The market was always growing in Pennsylvania and many craftsman were quickly attracted to the colony. Like most other colonies sons were expected to learn the trades of their fathers. Since most colonists in Pennsylvania were shopkeepers or merchants instead of farmers who provided their own food, it was necessary for the people of Pennsylvania to trade for their everyday goods and services. Like other colonies women and girls were in charge of household chores and taking care of the children. Pennsylvania was home to a much more urban feel than some of its fellow farming colonies.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

Pennsylvania was popular for its trade industry as well as it’s various industries of skilled craftsmen. Many cities in the colony attracted immigrants, shopkeepers, merchants and artisans. Among the most common craftsmen were carpenters, sawyers, bricklayers, plasterers, weavers, dyers, tailors, shoemakers, bakers, brewers, maltsters, butchers, potters, clockmakers, cabinetmakers, barbers, physicians, tavern keepers, and carters. Trade was a large industry in Pennsylvania and a monopoly on trade called The Free Society for Traders was created in Philadelphia in 1682.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events M OVIE 3.2 William Penn Religious Revolutionary

The colony of Pennsylvania was established upon the idea of religious freedom primarily for the Quaker people. The freedom of religion policy attracted immigrants from all over Europe especially Germany and Scotland. It also promoted peaceful interactions and coexisting with neighboring Indian tribes. The government established in Pennsylvania made it one of the most prominent of the original colonies. Pennsylvania created a representative legislature that was made up of elected officials. This was a basis for the current American system of government and allowed the people of Pennsylvania to be somewhat equally represented in their government’s decisions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-TZ_Ovk76A

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C HAPTER 4

New Jersey M OVIE 4.1 New Jersey Colony

New Jersey was originally founded by the Dutch in 1613 and was named New Netherlands. The British drove out the Dutch from the colony in 1664 and renamed the colony New Jersey. New Jersey ratified the U.S. Constitution and became a state on December 17, 1787.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgqXX9j2dEY


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Family life in New Jersey revolved around the family businesslike in most colonies. Farming was a popular industry in New Jersey. The men and the boys were responsible for caring for the crops and farm animals while the women took care of the house and raised the children. It was common in New Jersey for wealthier families to have slaves and servants to help them with their everyday chores. Although New Jersey did not have large plantations like the South, they still had use for slaves as farm hands and for servants to help the women with household chores, cooking and raising the children.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

Major industries in New Jersey included agriculture, lumber and trade. The economy was mostly supported by the trade of fur and agricultural products. Much of the New Jersey industry was exported to other countries. Grain, corn and cattle were most commonly and rapidly produced on New Jersey farms. Most of these products were exported to New York or Pennsylvania where they were traded. New Jersey could have possibly became a major trading center if they had more ships and ports that were needed for trading across sea.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events

British colonists in New Jersey attracted settlers to the colony by offering plots of land and the promise of religious freedom. The settlers were required to pay a yearly tax for the land they acquired in New Jersey. New Jersey became separated for a period of time because of controversy over land sold to Quakers; however, the conflict was resolved and New Jersey was reunited in 1702.

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C HAPTER 5

Georgia Georgia was founded by England in 1732 as a buffer state between the wild Florida and it’s native inhabitants and as a refugee for English prisoners.

M OVIE 5.1 The Colony of Georgia Founded 1732

The debt prisons in England were overflowing with prisoners and so they were sent to Georgia in order to colonize the land and produce needed resources and crops. Georgia became a state on January 2, 1788.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6utWkHZvtIk


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Georgia was first occupied by settlers who were sent from the overcrowded debt prisons of Britain. The settlers conditions and health were not particularly concerning to those who oversaw them. Georgia was rough terrain that acted as a buffer between Indian infested Florida and the other colonies. Many first settlers fell victim to unknown diseases from insects. The settlers were responsible for growing cash crops such as tobacco, indigo and rice that could be exported.

An overview of a Georgian plantation

The men were in charge of growing the crops and tending to the farm, and the women oversaw all household chores and cared for the family.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

Georgia settlers were eager to acquire land grants so they quickly became lead exporters of cash crops such as rice and indigo. Georgia also lead exports in beef and pork. They primary industry in Georgia was agriculture. Most of the men in Georgia were farmers or merchants who traded the products that the farmers produced. Georgia was an important colony because it exported goods to other colonies as well as countries. Slave labor was very popular on all Georgian plantations.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events

M OVIE 5.2 Georgia on His Mind Georgia was first established as a buffer colony between Florida and other British colonies. The colony was given to a group of 21 trustees. The trustees inhabited Georgia with prisoners from the overcrowded English debt prisons. The trustees set up a successful government and created plantations where large amounts of cash crops, resources, and goods could be produced for export to other colonies and countries. Georgia quickly became the leading colony in raw materials and agriculture.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRr7VWp_UKU

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C HAPTER 6

Connecticut M OVIE 6.1 Connecticut One of the Thirteen Colonies

The colony of Connecticut was founded in the city of Hartford in 1636 by Thomas Hooker. The colony was named after an Algonquin tribal word that meant “beside the tidal river.” Connecticut became a state on February 6, 1788.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0IL58Nq_aNY


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Each member of a Colonial family had a well-defined role. Men were the head of the house. They conducted business and did most of the outdoor labor. Unless the family was wealthy and could buy such things, the man would likely have made or traded for furnishings and household implements. Women were responsible for making most of their family's clothes, food, candles and soap. They might also help with light farm work, perhaps in a kitchen garden. Children were put to work as soon as they were able. Boys helped outside, chopping wood, planting and harvesting crops, caring for livestock, and hunting or fishing. Girls usually helped inside the home, cooking, cleaning, sewing and spinning. Most, but not all, children in colonial Connecticut received at least some schooling. As of 1650, each town of 50 families or more had to provide an elementary school.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

The main industries in Connecticut included agriculture and fishing. Connecticut had very fertile soil and was an ideal place for growing crops such as wheat and corn. Since it was close to the coast, Connecticut also had a large fishing industry. Shipbuilding was also a popular industry in Connecticut due to its location. The most popular exports for Connecticut were wheat and corn.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events M OVIE 6.2 The Pequot War

Connecticut settlers fought in the Pequot War against the Pequot Indians from 1636-1637. The war began over conflict with the English fur trade. The colonists wiped out the entire Pequot tribe and ended the war. The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut were written in 1639. Many people believe that the U.S. Constitution was based of the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gXvUPqLEug

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C HAPTER 7

Massachusetts M OVIE 7.1 The Massachusetts Bay Colony Founded in 1629

Massachusetts was founded in 1630 by John Winthrop at Massachusetts Bay. The colony was named for the Massachusetts tribe which means "large hill place." Massachusetts became a state on February 6, 1788. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GI--Xw8hb1c


S ECTION 1

Daily Life Colonial life in Massachusetts revolved around work and religion. Farming,trading and fishing were the primary occupations, but many Colonials practiced other trades. Those trades included cooper (barrel maker), blacksmith, shipbuilder, weaver, seamstress, cabinet maker, herbalist, fur trader, logger and hunter.

Children had little time for play. They were expected to help with chores from a very young age. The few toys they had were handmade, usually of wood and cloth. Because religion was a major part of both the culture and the government, Sunday was an official day of rest. Entire families went to church together. Church services often lasted most of the day, but they were social as well as religious events. It was often the only time that neighbors saw each other.

Marriage was expected. Girls were generally married by the age of 20. Young men usually married for the first time in their mid-twenties. Women tended the home. All the cooking was done over open hearths, and later in brick ovens built into the wall of the house beside the fireplace. In addition to the daily tasks that we think of as housekeeping today, Colonial women were expected to make their own soap, dip their own candles, preserve and can whatever vegetables they could grow in small gardens and make and mend the clothing for their entire families.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

The major industries in Massachusetts included agriculture (fishing, corn, livestock) and manufacturing (lumbering, shipbuilding). Massachusetts depended greatly on imports from England at the beginning of its settlement. But colonists soon began establishing their own skills and trade. The fur trade was only a modest part of the Massachusetts Bay economy because the rivers in the colony did not connect the settlers with the Indians who trapped the furs. Massachusetts’ settlers relied heavily on trade because they did not have the soil for agriculture. Fishing and craftsmen were a large part of the Massachusetts’ economy and provided ample trade opportunities.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events Massachusetts was a popular colony that attracted thousands of Puritans from England. The migration of Puritans from England to the colony is known as the Great Migration. In the 1640’s the colonies economy greatly expanded as the fur trade created business for trading overseas and their ship business became high in demand.

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C HAPTER 8

Maryland M OVIE 8.1 The Colony of Maryland Founded in 1632

Maryland was founded in 1633 by Lord Baltimore at the city of Baltimore. The colony was named for Queen Henrietta Maria of England. Maryland ratified the U.S. Constitution and became a state on April 28, 1788.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RsxrJ0f91aU


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Colonial Maryland family life was very simple. Many of the people were farmers or worked in a skilled trade. Candle makers, blacksmiths and tavern owners were among the professions available in colonial Maryland.If you were a member of a family that owned a trade business, then you would have begun learning the trade from a very early age if you were a boy. Young girls helped their mothers with domestic chores instead of working with their father.Education was primarily for children in grades one through six. Boys would have completed 12th grade if their family approved, although many boys went to work on the family farm after sixth grade.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

Major industries in Maryland include manufacturing (shipbuilding, iron works) and agriculture (corn, wheat, rice, indigo). Maryland’s economy had a heavy reliance on the colonists’ ability to produce and trade tobacco. Maryland was a large part of the slave trade and used slaves in order to produce the optimal amount of tobacco on their large tobacco plantations.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events

Maryland was a proprietorship which means that the proprietor had executive authority over the colony and its exports and imports. A proprietorship was necessary for Maryland to receive the funding it needed to start the colony. Tobacco was very profitable for the colony. The colony relied heavily on the production and export of tobacco crops. They even used slaves from the slave trade in order to maximize their production of tobacco on larger plantations. Religious freedom was popular in Maryland, especially after the passage of the Act of Toleration in 1649 which allowed for toleration to all Christians. Maryland eventually became known as a 'haven for Catholics'.

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C HAPTER 9

South Carolina

M OVIE 9.1 The Colony of South Carolina Founded in 1663

South Carolina was founded in 1663 by English colonists. South Carolina was named after the Latin word for Charles in honor of Charles I of England. South Carolina ratified the U.S. Constitution on May 23, 1788 and became a state.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip8Dh7K0dzs


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

The way of life in the South Carolina was was that the men worked on the farms while the women took care of the home. Some of the wealthiest kids may have gone to school, but most of the children helped their parents with the daily chores.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

South Carolina was a plantation colony and it’s main industry was agriculture. But the colonists were not skilled in the area of shipbuilding and sailing. They relied on the merchants of Britain to export their products. They also greatly relied on imports from Great Britain for any manufactured goods. South Carolina was also very active in the slave trade and used slave labor to work their large plantations and maximize their yield from crops.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events

Although South Carolina did not have the necessary skills to trade their own goods. They were one of the wealthiest of the original colonies. Their large and wealthy plantations yielded amazing amounts of crops and they exported these crops to other colonies as well as all over the world. During the Revolutionary War, South Carolina was a popular battle ground. More battles were fought in South Carolina during the Revolutionary War than anywhere else.

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C HAPTER 10

Rhode Island Providence

M OVIE 10.1 The Rhode Island Colony

The Rhode Island Providence was also known as the New England Colony. This was the 5th colony to be established in Colonial America. The Rhode Island Providence was founded in 1636 by Roger Williams. However, this colony did not become an offi-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThNIkA4vRIA


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Much like the other colonies, daily life in the Rhode Island Providence consisted largely of work, family,and education. For male children, education was conducted in grammar schools where students would learn Christianity and how to read. Female children were also taught to read, but generally in much smaller schools. One of the most important things taught in schools were trade skills. Trade skills were the skills children would learn so that they could take over and continue on family businesses. For males, these skills often included craftsmanships such as blacksmith and shoemaking and for women it often meant domestic skills such as cooking and sewing.

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S ECTION 2

Economic Organization and Structure

Many of the colonies in Colonial America focused on the production and growth of one main crop or industry. However, the Rhode Island Providence had two major industries: agriculture and manufacturing. Much of the agriculture industry consisted of livestock, dairy, and fishing, while the manufacturing industry dealt solely with lumbering. The agriculture industry gave families the foods they needed to stay alive, as well as allowed trade become other colonies and villages of the time. The lumbering served as a way for the colony to not sell good and make money, but also a product the colony itself used in building homes and other community centers.

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S ECTION 3

Significant Events

In 1636 Roger Williams founded the Rhode Island Providence on his belief of the separation of church and state. The separation of church and state means that religion and the state will remain separate. The Rhode Island Providence was the first colony to guarantee all of its citizens freedom of worship. This colony was also the last to ratify or approve the U.S. constitution after the government had already been established.

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C HAPTER 11

North Carolina

M OVIE 11.1 The Colony of North Carolina

North Carolina, also known as the Southern Colony. North Carolina was the ninth colony established in Colonial America. North Carolina was originally settled as the “Lost Colony” by John White on July 22, 1587. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiSVvlQzM0A

However, it wasn’t until 1653 that the first English settlement was founded by a Virginia farmer, Nathaniel Batts.


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Most the North Carolina population was made up of a poor whites from Virginia. There was a large divide between two distinct settlements in the colony; one settlement near the coast and one settlement in the back countries. These two settlements were separated by the broad belt of forest between them. The conditions of life were very different between the two. The back country was non-slaveholding, and the economic conditions were similar to those of the northern colonies. Whereas the coast settlements were slaveholding and had all the characteristics of southern life except for the aristocratic feature.

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S ECTION 2

Political Activity During Colonial America, the essence of Monarchy was transported into the 13 colonies. Through this sort of political policy, the land of each colony was divided into counties. It was from each of these counties that the dispersion of authority and of land was made. One fifth of the land was owned by an earl (a British nobleman ranking above a viscount and below a marquess) and two barons (a member of the lowest order of the British nobility), one fifth of the remaining was owned by proprietors (the owner or a holder of property), and the remaining three fifths was reserved for the people or tenants. These tenants were ruled under serfdom (when a member of the lowest feudal class, attached to the land owned by a lord and required to perform labor in return for certain legal or customary rights) and denied the right to self-government. The settlers of North Carolina were granted and guaranteed religious freedom. However, even with the freedom of religion, the people felt the government was too oppressive which caused migration to the back countries in hopes of larger amounts of freedom.

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S ECTION 3

Economic Organization and Structure

The economy of North Carolina changed drastically after the revolutionary war developed. After the war, an extensive slave plantation system was adopted by the coast settlements. However, the entire colony became a major exporter of two products in high demand of the time: cotton and tobacco. The entire economy of North Carolina relied heavily on the production and exportation of cotton and tobacco.

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C HAPTER 12

New York M OVIE 12.1 New York Colony

New York was also known as the Middle Colony, and originally it was called/ named the “New Netherlands”. New York was the second colony established in Colonial America. In 1626 it was founded by the Duke of York. It wasn’t until 1776 that New York had officially become a state.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AaZCAt9nA58


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Families got their food, clothes, and shelter by raising crops such as wheat, barley oats, and beans. They also traded with the Native Americans for pelts or clothing. Children went to school for a few years. The girls got a less formal education than the boys because the girls usually just became housewives and/or mothers.

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S ECTION 2

Political Activity

New York was a part of the Royal Colonies government. A Royal Colony was ruled or administered by officials appointed by the current King/Queen of Great Britain. The Royal Colony was run by a royal governor and council that was appointed by the King/Queen. Each of the Royal Colonies had a representative assembly that was elected by the people. New York’s Representative Assembly passed an important "charter of liberties," which was approved by the governor. This charter placed the supreme legislative power in the governor, council and people met in general assembly, gave every freeman full right to vote for representatives, established trial by jury, required that no tax should be assessed without the consent of the Assembly, and that no professing Christian should be questioned concerning his religion.

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S ECTION 3

Economic Organization and Structure

New York was often referred to as the “breadbasket� colony because it grew so many crops, especially wheat. The New York colony was also abundant in several natural resources including fertile farmland, timber, furs, and coal. Iron ore was the one of the most important resources found in the colony.Wheat and iron ore products (plows, tools, kettles, locks, nails, and large blocks of iron) were among the main good exported to England accounting for the economics of New York.

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C HAPTER 13

Virginia M OVIE 13.1 The Colony of Virginia Founded in 1607

Virginia, also known as the Southern Colony, was named after Queen Elizabeth I of England who was known as the “Virgin Queen�. Virginia was founded by John Smith and other colonists backed by the London Company, including John Rolfe, in 1607.. Virginia was the first of all the colonies to be established in Colonial America. On June 25, 1788 New York officially became state.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGi2ukFCzrs


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

Virginia was the first to settle in America, making it the first colony to fully interact with the Native American settlements throughout the land. Because of lack of exposure, the Native Americans had no resistance to many of diseases brought with the English to the colonies. This result in many Native American fatalities. Although equipped with the immunity to many diseases, the English settlers were not prepared to survive the summer droughts and scarce food sources in the winter. Starvation was a common occurrence during the winter and summer months among the colonists.

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S ECTION 2

Political Activity

Virginia was also a part of the Royal Colonies. As discussed previously, the Royal Colony government was run by a royal governor appointed by the King/Queen. However, a representative assembly was elected by the people and held the power to change and make new laws as long as the governor approved. Similar to most colonies of Colonial America, the men controlled the government, and women often had little to any say in their daily lives and duties both inside and outside of the home.

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S ECTION 3

Economic Organization and Structure

The economy of Virginia was dominated by a handful of elite families. These elite families often lived and owned isolated plantations. The tobacco industry was the main crop that fueled the Virginia economy. Like other southern colonies, Virginia was a slave society in which the slaves mainly worked in the tobacco fields and/or for the elite families. Having slaves increased the economy of Virginia because it allowed for more workers in the production of tobacco, while paying less for the labor; in other words, the economy was making more money on the crop than it was spending on the labor.

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C HAPTER 14

New Hampshire

M OVIE 14.1 Colonial New Hampshire

New Hampshire, the New England Colony, was the seventh colony established in Colonial America. Originally, New Hampshire was named the New Virginia colony. Captain John Mason and John Wheelwright founded the colony in 1623. In 1788 Virginia was officially recognized as state.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUPIwMONFTY


S ECTION 1

Daily Life

New Hampshire was split on views of Slavery. Some of the state supported slaveholding, was some were completely against it. Living in New Hampshire colony, would have been a mix between southern colonial life and northern colonial life. For plantation owners and those that lived on the this land would have been involved in slavery; the divide between African Americans and Whites. However, for those that did not support slavery and were not a part of plantations, life would have been characterized as basic colonial living. This sort of life includes women in the home, men working, and typically home-grown food and clothing. Differences in religion resulted in a great diversity amongst the population.

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S ECTION 2

Political Activity

New Hampshire was also part of the Royal Colonies government. The entire colony was ruled by an appointed governor from the King/Queen of Great Britain. The representative assembly also held power but was elected by the people. The assembly’s was supposed to be the voice of the people, encouraging laws and regulations that the people favored. New laws and changed could be proposed by the assembly, but the ultimate passing of such things laid in the hands of the appointed governor.

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S ECTION 3

Economic Organization and Structure

The New Hampshire colony was mostly comprised of a small number of communities along the Piscataqua River. The economy was dominated by fishing and timber. Therefore, the placement of the communities was most beneficial in the transportation/exportation of goods between the colony. The colony was also rich in many minerals due to the abundance of mountains throughout. Granite was specifically and especially rich throughout New Hampshire.

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C HAPTER 15

Review and Key Ideas

M OVIE 15.1 Schoolhouse Rock- No More Kings

The video, “Schoolhouse Rock- No More Kings,” will review the content that was discussed in this eBook. If you are unable to play the video click on the link attached. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAZ8QJgFHOg


S ECTION 1

Summarizing Videos M OVIE 15.2 The Thirteen Original Colonies

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHYERlGDOio

M OVIE 15.3 The Making of a Nation The Thirteen Colonies

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAn27giJgEc

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S ECTION 2

The Importance The Thirteen Original Colonies were important to the growth and establishment of the U.S. because they are were it all started. The colonies gave English settlers a place to live outside of Europe. Without the founding of the 13 colonies, the United States would not be the country that it is today.

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S ECTION 3

Games and Further Review M AP M ATCHING 1. Click on this link, http:// www.softschools.com/social_studies/ 13_colonies_map/ to access the 13 colonies map.

N AME THE C OLONY 1. Click on this link, http://www.sporcle.com/ games/g/13_colonies to access the name the colony game. 2. Follow the directions on the site and match the name of the original colony with the date it was founded.

2. Follow the directions on the site and match the name of the original colony with its location

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Works Cited Intro Media 13 Colonies: America the Story of Us. YouTube.Com. 11 July 2011. Web.

Chapters 1-5 "A Historical Overview of Pennsylvania© 2004 Rickie Lazzerini." Living in the Co lonial Period of Pennsylvania. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Dec. 2013. “The 13 American Colonies: Georgia.” The 13 American Colonies: Georgia. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2013. “Colonial Governments of the Thirteen Colonies.” About.Com American History. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2013. "13 Colonies – Delaware Colony." MrNussbaumcom FREE Math Games Spell ing Games Teacher Tools Printables and Much more 13 Colonies Delaware Colony Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2013. "13 Colonies "13 Colonies – Georgia Colony." MrNussbaumcom FREE Math Games Spelling Games Teacher Tools Printables and Much more 13 Colonies Georgia Colony Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2013. “New Jersey Colony for Kids." MrNussbaumcom FREE Math Games Spelling Games Teacher Tools Printables and Much more 13 Colonies New Jersey Colony for Kids Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2013. "13 Colonies – Pennsylvania Colony and the Quakers." MrNussbaumcom FREE Math Games Spelling Games Teacher Tools Printables and Much more 13 Colonies Pennsylvania Colony and the Quakers Com ments. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2013.

Chapters 6-9 "The 13 American Colonies: Connecticut." The 13 American Colonies: Connecticut. N.p., n.d. Web. Nov. 2013. "The 13 American Colonies: Massachusetts." The 13 American Colonies: Massa chusetts. N.p., n.d. Web. Nov. 2013.

Gibbs, Melanie. "Colonial Connecticut Family Life." EHow. Demand Media, 15 Dec. 2008. Web. Nov. 2013. Powers, Deb. "Colonial Life in Massachusetts." EHow. Demand Media, 20 July 2010. Web. Dec. 2013. "The 13 American Colonies: Maryland." The 13 American Colonies: Maryland. N.p., n.d. Web. Nov. 2013. Writer, Contributing. "Colonial Maryland Family Life." EHow. Demand Media, 24 Aug. 2010. Web. Dec. 2013. "The 13 American Colonies: South Carolina." The 13 American Colonies: South Carolina. N.p., n.d. Web. Nov. 2013. "What Was Life like in the Colony of South Carolina?" WikiAnswers. Answers, n.d. Web. Dec. 2013.

Chapters 10-15 Alchin, Linda. "Royal Colonies." Royal Colonies. Land of the Brave, Mar. 2012. Web. 11 Nov. 2013. Elson, Henry W., and Kathy Leigh. "History of the United States of America." 1904. MS. New York. History of the USA. MacMillan Company, 2012. Web. 12 Nov. 2013. Kelly, Martin. "Chart of the Thirteen Original Colonies." - Basic Information on the Founding of the 13 Colonies. About.com, n.d. Web. 11 Nov. 2013. Mckee. "Rhode Island Colony." : Government. Blogger.com, 16 Nov. 2011. Web. 11 Nov. 2013. "New Hampshire Almanac - History." NH.gov - New Hampshire Almanac - His tory. New Hampshire Department of State, 2011. Web. 11 Nov. 2013. "New Hampshire." Infoplease.com. Infoplease, 2012. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. "North Carolina: Facts, Map and State Symbols - EnchantedLearning.com." North Carolina: Facts, Map and State Symbols - EnchantedLearning.com. EnchantedLearning, 2010. Web. 11 Nov. 2013. "North Carolina." History.com. A&E Television Networks, 2013. Web. 12 Nov. 2013. Nussbaum. "13 Colonies – North Carolina Colony for Kids." 13 Colonies- for Kids. N.p., 17 May 2013. Web. 11 Nov. 2013. White, David. "13 Colonies." 13 Colonies. David White, 2009. Web. 11 Nov. 2013. Wolfe, Brendan. "Colonial Virginia." Encyclopedia Virginia:. Library of Virginia, 16 May 2013. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.

Thirteen Original Colonies  

An eBook about the thirteen original colonies in the United States of America. This book tells the basic facts about each of the thirteen or...

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