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CHAPEL HILL • CARRBORO • HILLSBOROUGH • ORANGE COUNT Y

the

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

our readers’ favorites, revealed PAGE 38


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CHAPELHILL     J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

C H A P E L H I L L M AG A Z I N E .CO M

EDITOR

Jessica Stringer EDITORIAL E X E C U T I V E M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

Amanda MacLaren

M A N AG I N G E D I TO R / B U S I N E S S E D I TO R

Michael McElroy

E X E C U T I V E E D I T O R , C H AT H A M M AG A Z I N E

Matt White

A S S I S TA N T E D I T O R

Hannah Lee

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Adam Phan, CC Kallam, Jamey Cross, Elizabeth Holmes CONTRIBUTORS

Jessica Berkowitz, Morgan Cartier Weston, James Dupree, Jishnu Nair, Moreton Neal, Matthew Poindexter, Virginia Robinson, James Stefiuk, UNC’s Media Hub, Molly Weybright ART

Kim Palladino

Cody Jeffcoat, CFP , AAMS ®

Thomas Miller, CRPC

Tonja Womble

Vice President Vice President Sr. Vice President Investment Associate Financial Consultant Financial Consultant Private Financial Advisor SunTrust Investment Services, Inc. SunTrust Investment Services, Inc. SunTrust Investment Services, Inc. SunTrust Investment Services, Inc. tonja.womble@suntrust.com kim.palladino@suntrust.com cody.jeffcoat@suntrust.com thomas.miller@suntrust.com 919.918.2473 919.932.2737 919.932.4229 919.918.2425

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

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SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Hunter McCumber Keith Warther

PHOTOGRAPHER

Beth Mann

With more than 40 years combined experience, the MillerPalladino Group has been helping clients leverage financial opportunities. That experience, paired with the broad range of solutions offered by SunTrust Investment Services, enables them to develop and implement a personalized investment strategy to help clients achieve financial confidence. Call today to find out how they can do the same for you.

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Investment and Insurance Products: Are not FDIC or any other Government Agency Insured • Are not Bank Guaranteed • May Lose Value SunTrust Private Wealth Management is a marketing name used by SunTrust Bank, SunTrust Banks Trust Company (Cayman) Limited, SunTrust Delaware Trust Company, SunTrust Investment Services, Inc., SunTrust Advisory Services, Inc., and GFO Advisory Services, LLC which are each affiliates of SunTrust Banks, Inc. Banking and trust products and services, including investment management products and services, are provided by SunTrust Bank and SunTrust Delaware Trust Company. Securities and insurance (including annuities) are offered by SunTrust Investment Services, Inc., a SEC registered broker-dealer, member FINRA, SIPC, and a licensed insurance agency. Investment advisory services are offered by SunTrust Advisory Services, Inc., a SEC registered investment adviser. GFO Advisory Services, LLC is a SEC registered investment adviser that provides investment advisory services to a group of private investment funds and other non-investment advisory services to affiliates. ©2018 SunTrust Banks, Inc. SUNTRUST and the SunTrust logo are trademarks of SunTrust Banks, Inc. All rights reserved. CN2018-1677-EXP 08/18 DGD519802-8/18

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Lizzie Jones

C O R P O R AT E

Rory Kelly Gillis Chief Operating Officer Dan Shannon Founder Ellen Shannon Vice President of Planning & Development Amy Bell Vice President of Finance & Administration Brittany Judy Administrative Assistant Charlotte White Marketing Manager McKenzie Reinhold Project & Events Coordinator Scott Schopler Distribution/Events Delivery Driver Chapel Hill Magazine is published 8 times per year by Shannon Media, Inc. 1777 Fordham Blvd., Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 tel 919.933.1551 fax 919.933.1557 Subscriptions $38 for 2 years – subscribe at chapelhillmagazine.com


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JULY/AUGUST

CO N T EN TS CHAPELHILLMAGAZINE.COM

38

VOLUME 14 NUMBER 5

The Best of Chapel Hill

FEATURES 12

Local Lit

14

All the World’s a Stage

108

112

We didn’t have to look far to find our favorite reads for the summer A theatrical company of puppets has provided both entertainment and perceptive contemplation for our community for two decades

Yes, And

The Echoes improv troupe provides an outlet for those who may have ‘forgotten how to play’

Retirement Guide

SPONSORED CONTENT 90

Our Top Dentists

IN EVERY ISSUE 6

Letter From the Editor

8

About Town

16

Carolina on Our Mind

28

What We’re Eating

29

Chef’s Table

32 Wellness A running group helps a neighbor with cerebral palsy recover from an illness and get back into the race

35 Noted 126

What We Love About Living In … The new Hillsborough

141

Dining Guide

143

Joyous Cooking: Paella Mixta

151 Engagement Helen Antipov & Thomas Whitney 152 Wedding Farrell Wiggins & Daniel Lercher BUSINESS SECTION 100

The Fight for a Living Wage Orange County Living Wage has made progress by focusing on one business at a time

104

Biz Briefs

106 Networking The Downtown Partnership’s Annual Meeting; Club Nova 2019 InNOVAtion Breakfast PEOPLE & PLACES 18

Share the Love Sunday Supper

20

Women of Achievement 2019

22

Ronald McDonald House Carolina Love Gala

23

Dining for Others

24

The ArtsCenter Always Inspiring Gala

26

Howard Lee Day

27

Science Is Awesome Day

PAGE

40 Photo by Beth Mann


L ET TE R F R O M TH E E DI TO R

Best of the Best

PHOTO BY FABRICUT

Creating Inspiring Interiors FULL SERVICE INTERIOR DESIGN Draperies and Valances Shutters, Blinds and Shades Wallpapers • Area Rugs Custom Bedding Furniture and Accessories Kitchen and Bath Design

know you’re eager to find out which local businesses were named our readers’ favorites so I’ll keep this short. (Turn to page 71 if you can’t wait any longer.) Our thanks go out to the thousands of you who shared your opinions on categories like favorite place for a date night, favorite food truck, favorite salon and favorite pet boarding. (Your picks for that last one are going to help guide me as I head off for vacation without my pup!) After you look over the list, read more about some of the businesses and organizations you picked, like Carrboro Yoga Company and Caffe Driade, starting on page 38. And a special shoutout to the Carrboro Farmers’ Market, The ArtsCenter and The Shrunken Head celebrating 40, 45 and 50 years, respectively, this year. Speaking of anniversaries, Assistant Editor Hannah Lee has been with us for a year now, and this issue wouldn’t look the same without her – that’s Hannah behind the bouquet on the cover. From her thoughtful writing to her strong work ethic, she’s made herself an indispensable part of our team and we’re so glad she’s here. CHM

 jessica@chapelhillmagazine.com

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T HE COVER P h o to g ra p hy by B et h M a nn I l l u strati o n by H u nter M c Cum ber Th a n ks to s ome of our B e st O f wi nners feat ured To p o f th e H i l l ’s G re at Ro o m for loc at ion; U n i ve r s i ty F l o r i st fo r t he bouquet ; Ave d a I n sti tu te C h a p e l H ill for m a nic ure a n d s h o p p i n g b a g s f ro m Whilden, The P i n k Pe a r l , S o f i a ’s B o ut ique, SO UT H, S a l l y Ma c k L i fe F u r n i s h i ngs a nd J ulia n’s


A TR ADI T I ON OF E XC ELLENC E

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A B OUT TOW N E VE N TS NOT TO MISS

JULY

14

5th Annual Pick-a-ton FUNdraiser Visit Cedar Grove Blueberry Farm and pick as many berries as you can for charity. For every 25 pounds of blueberries picked, a pound of fresh berries will be donated to TABLE. The event also includes a pig pickin’ with farm-fresh fixings, wine and cider from Botanist and Barrel Tasting Room, which will also donate five percent of sales to TABLE, and live music from Asheville-based artists Brooke & Nick. shop.botanistandbarrel. com/events „

PHOTO BY DONN YOUNG

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GREAT NEW LOCATION. GREAT NEW PARTNERSHIPS.

that we have relocated, “ Now we are thrilled to be involved with both the Durham & Chapel Hill communities. From this, we have also partnered with Meals on Wheels. We were able to donate the New 2019 Kia Soul to the program and we even had it custom vinyl wrapped so that it would stand out when people see it on the street. We are hoping that this raises awareness for the good that Meals on Wheels is doing for the Chapel Hill and Carrboro communities.

- Aric Swanger EXCEPTIONAL

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Give us a call at:

Durham, NC 27707

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(919) 572-1700


ABOUT TOWN

“No Fear and Blues Long Gone: Nina Simone”

AUGUST

21-25

National Ice Cream Day Celebrate one of the best days of the year at Maple View Farm with live music, face painting, games and ice cream. A portion of sales will benefit Sam’s Wish Fund at Kids Path of Hospice and the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke. mapleviewfarm.com

JULY

21

American Ballet Theatre’s first SEPTEMBER African-American principal dancer Misty Copeland will take part in a moderated discussion at UNC’s Memorial Hall, where she will talk about her path to ABT, overcoming barriers and the challenges she faces in the world of ballet and performing arts. Susan Jaffe, dean of dance at the UNC School of the Arts, will moderate. Tickets are $27. carolinaperformingarts.org

6

Clockwise from left Nina Simone photo by HuthPhoto; Southern Village photo by Beth Mann; Tarwheels BikeFest photo courtesy of Carolina Tarwheels Bicycle Club; Misty Copeland photo courtesy of Under Armour

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July/August 2019

Want to keep up with what’s going on in town? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter, The Weekender, for your best bets for events Thursday through Sunday.

Movies Under the Moon The Carolina Inn is

VARIOUS DAYS

JULY & AUGUST

hosting its first series of free movies on the first Sunday of the month from July through October. Food and drinks will be available. Also, catch movies at Southern Village (see above) every Saturday in July and downtown in McCorkle Place on select Thursday nights. carolinainn.com; downtownchapelhill.com; southernvillage.com

Carolina Tarwheels BikeFest

Misty Copeland in Conversation

10

Learn more about the life of Nina Simone, North Carolina native and ‘High Priestess of Soul,’ in PlayMakers Repertory Company’s newest play. The production kicks off the PRC’s 2019-2020 season, Legacy | Now. playmakersrep.org

Enjoy views and history during a ride AUGUST through downtown Hillsborough and rural Orange County in this year’s BikeFest Rural Heritage Tour. The tour offers 35-mile, 62-mile and 100-mile routes. The Carolina Tarwheels Bicycle Club promotes cycling safety and advocacy for bike-friendly communities. tarwheels.net

10

18+ Crafter Dark: Upside Down Edition Crafter Dark’s “Stranger Things” event at Kidzu Children’s Museum will allow fans of the Netflix series to revel in the wake of the July 4 premiere of the show’s third season. There will be trivia, crafts and an “Escape from the Upside Down” escape room. Ages 18 and up. kidzuchildrensmuseum.com CHM

JULY

19

Compiled by Elizabeth Holmes


Dr. David Lee Hill, Jr. Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon 77 Vilcom Center Circle, Suite 120 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919-238-9961

Are you in need of oral surgery? If your dentist has recommended oral surgery, whether it’s to remove one or more

Meet Dr. David Lee Hill, Jr.

teeth, implants, or something more involved, you probably have a lot of questions

People who meet Dr. Hill are quickly won over by his knowledge and easy-going

and concerns. What are my options? What about cost? What can I expect? Will I be

style. He is a stickler for detail and in his profession, every little detail matters.

in pain? How long will it take? What kind of surgical safeguards are used?

His commitment to patient safety protocols and surgical precision as well as

It’s normal to be apprehensive about a surgical procedure and at Chapel Hill

his uncompromising philosophy toward care is reflected in the state-of-the-art

Implant and Oral Surgery Center, they understand. That is why Dr. Hill has created

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a top notch facility and a team of professionals whose one goal is to help you

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the caring staff, focused on the patient’s well being.

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If your case calls for implant or oral surgery, let Dr. Hill and his capable team

Center different. Call them for a personal consultation and case review. They will

welcome you for a tour and a discussion about your unique needs.

welcome you with a guided tour of their state-of-the-art surgical facility and take the time to answer all of your questions.

W W W.C H A P E L H I L LO R A L S U R G E R Y.C O M


LO C A L L I T WE DIDN’T HAVE TO LOOK FAR TO FIND OUR FAVORITE READS FOR THE SUMMER – HERE ARE JUST A FEW RECENT RELEASES BY LOCAL AUTHORS THAT SHOULD FIND THEIR WAY INTO YOUR BEACH BAG P h o to by Beth M an n

The Hotel Neversink Adam O’Fallon Price’s second novel unfolds over a century, through one family’s hotel of secrets. Considering that Daniel Wallace praises this mystery novel as both a “tragic family saga” and a “comic love story,” it’s a summer read that checks all the boxes.

12

The Rest of the Story Sarah Dessen, the widely acclaimed powerhouse of young adult fiction whose talent has landed her a Netflix deal, puts a shine on summer with her newest novel. Set on a lake, it’s the coming-ofage tale of a motherless girl discovering herself and her family. Swirl in a summer romance – what more could you want?

chapelhillmagazine.com

July/August 2019

Every True Pleasure: LGBTQ Tales of North Carolina Next to each other in this rich collection, David Sedaris’ “Hejira” and Eric Tran’s “Let Me Tell You About the Fireworks” resist the clichés of rejection and acceptance, respectively, to reveal some of what editor Wilton Barnhardt believes: that “people with ‘a special tenderness’ will seek each other out, whatever the travails.”

The Never Game For a thriller that bobs and weaves from a gripping beginning to an unforeseeable end, crack open bestselling author Jeffery Deaver’s newest novel. When a Silicon Valley teen goes missing, amateur tracker Colter Shaw decides he’s going to find her, and what unfolds is a masterful tale of murder in an increasingly tech-obsessed world.

Mothers and Strangers: Essays on Motherhood from the New South Is there literary territory more vast than motherhood? This collection of essays, edited by Samia Serageldin and Lee Smith, delivers such varied portraits within its broad scope, with titles like Jaki Shelton Green’s “i want to undie you” and Melody Moezzi’s “The Persian Mom Mafia.” – Virginia Robinson CHM


CORNER OF ROSEMARY AND HENDERSON STREETS MONDAY-SUNDAY 11-10


PHOTO BY MOLLY WEYBRIGHT; INSET PHOTO BY LEE CAPPS

productions at the Forest Theatre feature handmade puppets on a grand scale and stories that are meant to challenge and criticize the human condition. This year they will celebrate this milestone anniversary with a coffee table book and a puppetry festival in addition to their annual show. When artistic directors Donovan and Jan Burger cofounded Paperhand Puppet, their mission was to bring people together and create art experiences centered around community. The evidence that they’ve met and exceeded that goal is seen in the dedicated audiences they’ve drawn to their shows, which have become a tradition for many local families. Donovan often hears stories from people who have grown up with A theatrical company of puppets has provided both entertainment Paperhand Puppet, who saw their and perceptive contemplation for our community for two decades first show at 7 or 8 years old and who are now starting to bring their own children to the events. By M o lly Wey b r i g h t Jesse Wright, on the other hand, has never seen a Paperhand Puppet show. He is visiting the United States for the first time t’s Saturday morning, and from Australia to intern with the Donovan Zimmerman is papiertheater company. After stumbling mâchéing what will eventually across their website while living become a puppet in an open-air in Spain, he knew he had to get studio in Saxapahaw. The work involved. depicts a giant tree, but this one “I’m just getting to play and has eyes bigger than Donovan’s pick the brains of the genius guys hands and an impressive amount behind this,” Jesse says. “I’ve seen of detail. Nearby, about 20 Donovan do a few enactments volunteers, interns and employees ABOVE A scene from 2018’s summer show at the Forest Theatre. TOP Donovan Zimmerman works on a puppet. with some of the masks, and he is are working on different projects, so talented. It just brings a smile all in preparation for Paperhand to my face.” Puppet Intervention’s upcoming The smiles are significant, but Paperhand Puppet is also about 20th anniversary show, “We Are Here.” enacting change in the world. “We are here to question, challenge and These Saturday community days began in May and are meant to get dismantle the status quo,” he says reflecting on this year’s theme for the public more involved with Paperhand Puppet’s annual productions. “We Are Here.” “It allows people to be more engaged, and we want our art to be Donovan has many hopes for the future, like bringing his puppets to engaging,” Donovan says. “We have bigger ideas than we can pull off on underserved communities across the state, nation and the world that our own at this point, so we need folks to come, otherwise we’d have to otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity to experience this kind of art. shrink back down.” But for now, Donovan plans to celebrate and revel in this anniversary, Over the past two decades, Paperhand Puppet has become a summertime staple for many families in and around Orange County. Its and continue to challenge audiences to ask why we are here. CHM

all the world’s a stage

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CA RO L INA ON OU R M IN D Tar Heel Travel program provides unforgettable experiences for UNC alumni and friends through GAA membership

J

oe and Claudia Templeton

hiked, snorkeled and explored the unique geology of the Galápagos Islands in May. The archipelago has some of the most extraordinary biology in the world, and the Chapel Hill couple spent five days observing the islands’ many animals. A true Tar Heel, Claudia’s favorite animals were the blue-footed boobies – birds with Carolina blue feet. Joe, a chemistry professor at UNC, and Claudia, a retired teacher, agreed that the trip was “memorable for anyone who enjoys nature.” Trips like these are offered through the UNC General Chapel Hillians Claudia and Joe Templeton have been on three trips with the UNC General Alumni Association, including one in May to the Galápagos Islands. Alumni Association’s OPPOSITE Wildlife, including a blue-footed booby, and a scene from the trip. (GAA) Tar Heel Travel program, which started with a handful of tours The couple also enjoyed meeting another in the 1970s and now offers more than 40 trips annually to varying UNC faculty member on the trip, Kevin locations. The expeditions are intimate, hosting an average of 15 to 20 Stewart , professor of structural geology. GAA members, and offer exclusive events, regional experts and awardThey say that his lectures about the geological winning UNC faculty guides. Joe and Claudia, among many others, features of the archipelago added context to describe the tours as once-in-a-lifetime experiences. their experience. The couple has now taken three trips through the Tar Heel Travel Kevin has been a part of other GAA program, visiting Machu Picchu in Peru and Tuscany before traveling trips, but this was his first time venturing to the Galápagos. to the Galápagos Islands. He echoed the “The alumni association pays attention to the details, and in every Templetons, saying that just about every day case, we’ve had somebody who is amazing,” Joe says, praising the tour on these excursions is amazing. guides on the trips. 16

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAUDIA TEMPLETON; OPPOSITE PAGE: PHOTOS BY KEVIN STEWART

SAVE THE DATE Learn how Egypt, Greece and Rome’s social practices and cultural legacies influence our understanding of space and time in a seminar hosted by Carolina Public Humanities July 13. Watch a Southern tale of love and redemption in the Tony Awardnominated musical “Bright Star” performed by PlayMakers’ Summer Youth Conservatory July 17-28 at PlayMakers Repertory Company. Get a refresher course in French by joining UNC faculty discussion leaders for a lunch spoken entirely in French at Weathervane Restaurant & Patio Aug. 5. Go behind the scenes on a backstage tour, meet actors and participate in interactive activities at PlayMakers Repertory Company’s annual open house Aug. 17. – Adam Phan


“These trips are going to allow you to do things that you would never do if you were trying to travel to these places on your own,” he says. One of his favorite parts is getting to meet a diverse group of people, all of whom are “lifelong learners.” The Tar Heel Travel program is not just for UNC grads. Anyone can join UNC’s GAA, regardless of their relationship with the university. By joining as a “friend of Carolina,” individuals who did not graduate from UNC can gain access to all of the incredible programs and benefits offered through the GAA, all while supporting the university. Both Kevin and the Tempeltons say that anyone on the fence about taking a trip through Tar Heel Travel should just go for it. “Some people may be averse to the idea of being on a tour,” Kevin says, “but these [tours] are spectacular experiences, and I have only seen very, very happy participants.” – Molly Weybright CHM

For your next adventure in town, across the country, or around the world

GRETCHEN CASTORINA

919.951.5566 gretchen.castor ina@hodgekittrellsir.com

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July/August 2019

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PEOP LE & P LACES

Share the Love Sunday Supper Guests gathered in May at the Carrboro Century Center to celebrate Mildred “Mama Dip” Council and enjoy a Sunday supper like Mama used to prepare for her family to eat after church service. The Mama Dip Share the Love Fund through the Triangle Community Foundation makes grants in a range of causes important to her legacy, and funds raised at the event provided aid to TABLE. Photography by Melissa Crane

2 1 Barry Saunders, Jacqueline Beatty Smith, Congressman David Price and Spring Council. 2 Liz Carver, Alderwoman Barbara Foushee and Alderwoman Randee Haven-O’Donnell.

1

CHAPEL HILL’S FRIENDLIEST 55+ LIFESTYLE NEIGHBORHOOD

David Weekley Homeowners John Quijada with grandchildren Kinley, Kamden & Trista

Discover Encore at Briar Chapel, where you’ll find all the joys and comforts of 55+ living in an open, welldesigned Encore by David Weekley home that feels tailor-made for your active lifestyle. Enjoy exclusive, resort-style amenities and the company of neighbors who share your interests. And, it’s all right here at Briar Chapel, one of Chapel Hill’s most desirable communities. DavidWeekleyHomes.com

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c

o

nn

ec

t

PRIMETIME Business Expo 2019:

The Grand Experience

Thurs, Aug 29 4:00-7:00 p.m. University Place Chapel Hill

Orange County’s largest business showcase – experience the local business community all in one place, meet new people and new businesses, and try new things. PRIMETIME is free and open to the public.

Learn more at carolinachamber.org/primetime 919.967.7075 104 S. Estes Drive Chapel Hill

Presenting Sponsor

Official Media Sponsor

In Partnership With

Contributing Event Sponsor


PEOP LE & P LACES

Women of Achievement 2019 Chapel Hill Magazine, Durham Magazine and Chatham Magazine honored the 2019 Women of Achievement at The Carolina Inn in May. Guests enjoyed cocktails from Durham Distillery before lunch, with an hour of networking afterward. Shannon Media Inc.’s Rory Kelly Gillis and Ellen Shannon emceed the program, which featured two speakers, Katie Loovis of The Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce and Jes Averhart of Leadership Triangle. Katie spoke about how “riding waves” of focus and confidence had taken her to the White House and beyond while Jes discussed the value of “crucible moments” in shaping her own life. The event was made possible by Johnson Lexus, The Carolina Inn, Wake Radiology, Aesthetic Solutions, Bull City Smiles, US Foods, Trinity Partners, Merrill Lynch and Great Big Canvas. Photography by Beth Mann

HONORING

1

OUR 2019

PRESENTED

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R SPONSORS U O O T ! U O THANK Y

C

chievementN

#WomenOfA

BY

July/August 2019

magazine


P EO PLE & PLACES

2

3 1 Marie Baker, Jenny Levy, Katie Loovis and Ebony Grissett-Delgado. 2 Sara Stephens, Brenda Stephens, Susan Brown, Lorie Clark and Mayor Lydia Lavelle. 3 Andrea Lopez, Chapel Hill Magazine’s Kem Johnson and Brisson Norris. 4 Chapel Hill Magazine editor Jessica Stringer and Nancie McDermott.

4

5

5 Rebecca Dickenson and Shannon Media Inc.’s Rory Kelly Gillis. 6 Chapel Hill Magazine’s Melissa Crane, Sandra Sather and Megan Farrell. 7 Stephany Connelly and Amal Zonca.

6

7

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PEOP LE & P LACES

Ronald McDonald House Carolina Love Gala The Ronald McDonald House (RMH) of Chapel Hill raised over $140,000 at its annual Carolina Love Gala in April. Proceeds from the gala’s three-course dinner, silent auction and Kendra Scott jewelry pull, hosted at The Barn of Chapel Hill, will go toward making the RMH a “home-away-from-home” for 1,600 families of seriously ill or injured children who receive treatment in area hospitals each year. Photography by Assorted Poppies 1

2

1 Meaghun and Jonathan Darab, Kate and Michael Carroll and Brian and Wyndham Wood. 2 Caroline Catlin and her dad, Jim Catlin. 3 Bill Mazur and his wife, Kerry Lane, a RMH volunteer. 4 RMH Vice President Heather Shanahan and Director of Philanthropy Elizabeth Hullender.

3

4

Dedicated to Extraordinary Client Service and Exceptional Results

SHANNON KENNEDY 919.448.6664 shannon.kennedy@hodgekittrellsir.com

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P EO PLE & PLACES

Dining for Others In May, attendees of the sixth annual Dining for Others at the Southern Village Green bid on silent auction items and raised funds for Chapel Hill-Carrboro Meals on Wheels. Guests ate dinner from Mediterranean Deli and enjoyed Carolina Brewery beer while listening to Big Fat Gap. Photography by Kem Johnson

2 1 Tina Cunningham, Lee Wollman, Leigh Anderson, Yvonne Knutson, Sally Brown and Sue Anna. 2 Sarah Johnston, Beth Deacon and Leigh Kemp.

1

3 CHCMOW Executive Director Rachel Bearman and Chapel Hill Magazine’s Chris Elkins.

3

live, love, ride

2O19/2O SEASON OF CELEBRATION MEMORIAL HALL, CHAPEL HILL

Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3

OPENING NIGHT

Enigma Variations

THUR, SEPT 26 | 7:30PM

Barber Violin Concerto

THUR, OCT 24 | 7:30PM

William Hagen, violin

New World Symphony

THUR, FEB 27 | 7:30PM

David Danzmayr, conductor Natasha Paremski, piano

The Planets

SUN, JAN 12 | 7:30PM

Gemma New, conductor Women of the NC Master Chorale

THURS, NOV 14 | 7:30PM

André de Ridder, conductor

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Michał Nesterowicz, conductor Lukáš Vondráček, piano

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PEOP LE & P LACES

Always Inspiring Gala The ArtsCenter’s Always Inspiring Gala raised more than $63,000 in April for youth education programs and scholarships. Held at the North Carolina Botanical Garden, the evening included dinner, drinks and a silent auction for local art, culinary experiences and weekend trips around the state. Photography by Katie Hanzalik

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1 Bill Hayes, Diane Hayes, Erin Cuevas and Frank Cuevas. 2 Dawn Osborne-Adams, Dr. Olga Otter, Johanna Foster and Dr. Wendy Brewster. 3 Steven Ray Miller, Mariana Fiorentino, Denise Lisdahl, Bernadette Pelissier and Laurie Paolicelli. 4 Wendy Smith, Andy Smith and Charlotte Walton. 5 Whitney Bulbrook, James Bulbrook, Hana Elliott and Ryan Huckabee.

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P EO PLE & PLACES

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PEOP LE & P LACES

Howard Lee Day On May 1, Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger and the Chapel Hill Town Council honored Howard Lee on the 50th anniversary of his election as mayor. Howard was the first African American elected in a predominantly white southern town since Reconstruction and would win two more elections, serving for six years as mayor. The council also proclaimed it “Howard Lee Day� and gave Howard and his wife, Lillian Lee, a key to the town.

1 Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger and Howard Lee.

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2 Rev. Robert Seymour and Lillian Lee.

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P EO PLE & PLACES

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Science Is Awesome Day In May, UNC’s Department of Physics and Astronomy hosted fourth-grade classes from four schools in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district for Science is Awesome Outreach Day. Students from Mary Scroggs Elementary School, Estes Hills Elementary School, Frank Porter Graham Bilingüe School and Northside Elementary School watched a demonstration of different physics concepts, participated in handson activities and judged presentations in a reverse science fair. Photography courtesy of UNC’s Department of Physics and Astronomy

We Know

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JAYE KRELLER

Locally, we are known as THE SPECIALIST

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1 Dennise Carmona Flores, Suleima Briones Udave, Yasmin Carapia Delgado and Valeria Salinas Garcia. 2 Annie Koehler, Lilah Margolis, Rachel Leyva, Madilene Tunnel, Josie Buckley and Mariana Hoffman.

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WHAT WE’RE E AT I N G ➾ NEWS BITES YOU BUTTER BELIEVE IT! The Sheraton Chapel Hill Hotel named Robert Reynaud as its new executive chef in April. In his role, Robert will oversee all culinary operations, including banquets, catering and in-room dining experiences, as well as the Carolina 1663 restaurant located at the hotel.

PHOTO BY JISHNU NAIR

COMING SOON ...

A

s temperatures soar this summer, it might be time to cool off with Blue Spoon Microcreamery’s Key lime ice cream. Co-owner Cindy Somasunderam doesn’t hold back on the cold either, using liquid nitrogen to quickly freeze the ice cream at -320 degrees Fahrenheit to create a creamy texture. Cindy, who has been making ice cream for more than 40 years with her husband, Dave, previously owned a shop in California and used liquid nitrogen at that location. “Conventional ice cream freezes in about 40 to 45 minutes,” she says. “With liquid nitrogen, the ice cream freezes instantly so no ice crystals are formed.” And there’s no such thing as too much cream – this dish is topped off with a healthy helping of whipped cream and garnished with crumbled Biscoff cookies to balance the tart, fruity flavor. Key lime not your favorite? Blue Spoon, which opened in April, offers an assortment of flavors – from brown sugar banana to dark chocolate – in waffle cones and cups. Medium scoop, $4.95 – Jishnu Nair BLUE SPOON MICROCREAMERY 140 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill

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SAVOR THE DATE ACME Tomato Festival July 11-14 Acme goes through a few hundred pounds of tomatoes during its 18th year of showcasing some of Carrboro Farmers’ Market’s best produce. acmecarrboro.com Local Beer, Carolina Seafood July 25, 7 p.m. Join Hawthorne & Wood for a four-course seafood dinner paired with signature beers from Carrboro’s Steel String Brewery. $60/person hawthorneandwood.com

The owners of Al’s Burger Shack and Italian Pizzeria III plan to open Yellow House Tacos at 104 N. Graham St., next to the Tin Cup Joe coffee camper, by the end of summer. Carraway Village is adding a Chick-fil-A and a Starbucks to its mixed-use development project off Eubanks Road. Due to open in early 2020, Starbucks will be among its first commercial tenants, while a freestanding Chickfil-A is planned for an adjacent 1.5-acre lot. The owners of Carrboro restaurants Napoli and Glasshalfull will partner to open a new restaurant in the former Mystery Brewing Public House location on South Nash Street this fall. The new restaurant will carry the Napoli name, but will venture beyond the pizza and gelato it currently serves from its East Main Street restaurant and popular food truck. BJ Patel of Viceroy in Durham has teamed up with his cousin Sejal Patel to open a tapasstyle bistro, at 124 W. King St. this fall. The menu will focus on international dishes and offer a wide range of beers and craft cocktails. FOND FAREWELLS Carrboro gastropub Milltown closed on Memorial Day after 15 years of service. CrossTies Bistro & Beer Garden, located down the street from Milltown, closed two weeks earlier. OPENINGS Longtime Hillsborough food truck, Los Altos Tacos, opened a brick and mortar restaurant at 126 W. King St. with the same name in May. Kombucha makers Boro Beverage opened a brick and mortar, Boro Beverage Kombucha Bar, on West Rosemary Street in May. King Street Bar closed June 2 and reopened under new owners, Eryk Pruitt and Lana Pierce, as Yonder: Southern Cocktails & Brew on June 11. Peño Mediterranean Grill opened in June on East Franklin Street. CHM


C H EF ’S TA B L E

A two-week trip to Italy.

As someone who finds themselves cooking with heavy Italian influence, I have not yet had the opportunity to travel to the country itself. I would most likely start in the North with a couple of days in the region of Veneto to experience the seafood and cicchetti (similar to Spanish tapas). Then [I would] move south to Campania and see Napoli, experience the pizza culture and also amazing espresso. With my last days, [I would] stop in Calabria for more seafood, anchovy-stuffed peppers and the like before heading to Sicily. I’ve always wanted to experience its seafood pastas, incredibly fresh sardines and anchovies, all the while taking time to appreciate the hugely contrasting wine styles as I move from north to south.

Gabe Barker Pizzeria Mercato

A DREAM SUMMER VACATION OF EATING WOULD INCLUDE …

I’ve always wanted

A food tour of the

to go to Sicily in the summertime to eat. I love the wines there so much. I love the food of the sea. It’s such an interesting place because there’s Italian food, but it’s also got all these other tiers of cultural, continental food as well. And it’s gorgeous, and we’ve been trying to get to Sicily forever.

the Basque area [of Spain], like San Sebastián, and sitting at the tapas bars and eating at a couple of those restaurants in northern Spain and then top it off with the running of the bulls.

American South, sampling the dishes unique to each state, from the famous fare in big cities to the homecooked specialties in tiny towns. I would love the opportunity to explore the ingredients of our region and learn the history and hands-on preparation directly from the locals themselves. CHM

Bret Jennings Elaine’s on Franklin

Christy Graves Chapel Hill Toffee

Charlie Deal Jujube

Probably tasting through

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A running group helps a neighbor with cerebral palsy recover from an illness and get back into the race By J acq u e l y n M e l in ek | P h o to g rap hy by Alice H udson Pu b lis h e d i n p ar t ner sh ip w ith UNC ’s S c h o o l o f M e d ia a n d Jo u r n alism’s M ed ia H u b

O

n Valentine’s Day, Stuart Harrison and Margarita Escaler looped through the winding roads of their Lake Hogan community and saw that their neighbors – both friends and strangers – had pinned pink ribbons on their mailboxes in honor of the couple’s daughter, Maddie. More than 180 families were rooting for Maddie to make it back home. And that night, she finally did. “The biggest smiles we get from Maddie are when we are driving home,” Stuart says. “She loves her family and being with us in our community.” Maddie, 11, has spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy and a seizure disorder. She is non-verbal and unable to sit, stand or walk on her own. This has not kept her from joining her parents, big brother and little sister on excursions like biking, skiing and tubing, Stuart and Margarita say, but it does make her more susceptible to illness. Over the Christmas holiday, the family was far from their Chapel Hill home. They celebrated Maddie’s birthday in Manila, Philippines, where Margarita was born, at a beach close to her grandmother’s home. 32

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MARGARITA ESCALER

te a m M a d di e

After spending three days playing in the sand, Maddie began to sound congested, and she developed a fever. She started wheezing and breathing heavily, her parents say. And she was less responsive than normal. They took Maddie to an emergency room in Makati, Philippines, on New Year’s Eve. Her 60-pound body went into respiratory distress, and she developed pneumonia and sepsis. Two days after her birthday, she was put on a ventilator. Her condition worsened, and she developed acute respiratory distress syndrome. “Each time we saw her, we continued to whisper words of encouragement, hold her hand and tell her to continue fighting,” Margarita says. Margarita contacted her friends back home, providing u ​ pdates​ on Maddie’s health. Lindsay Bedford and Amy Drumheller, friends and neighbors of the family, say they felt an immediate need to help. “Margarita sent me and Amy a text message the first night they went to the hospital and said, ‘Please pray for us; we are heading to the ER,’” Lindsay says. “Everyone back here felt helpless and wanted to help.” Lindsay and Amy asked close friends to put large pink ribbons on their mailboxes. “Team Maddie”– a group of Lake Hogan community members who have rallied around Maddie before – went back to work. The team, along with Maddie’s family, has helped to push her in an adaptive racing wheelchair through various races and events. The neighbors have grown close, and this was another moment to rally around her. Some neighbors s​ ent photos​of themselves to Maddie through her parents, smiling with posters of inspiring words. “Maddie, you’re a star, keep shining bright,” one read. “I’m rooting for Team Maddie,” read another. Others sent videos that Margarita played into Maddie’s ear, in hopes that she would hear the familiar voices and keep fighting. “That’s when they understood the magnitude of Team Maddie,” Lindsay says. “It’s not just the seven people that ran with Maddie for the marathon who care about them, it’s a whole neighborhood.” THE FIRST RACE Team Maddie began two years ago when Maddie’s brother, William, pushed, swam and biked with her in a children’s triathlon called JUST TRYAN IT. He pulled her on a raft as he swam, towed her behind


Margarita Escaler and her daughter Maddie at their Lake Hogan home. At left, Maddie’s neighbors and family pushed her in a “racing chariot” during the Marine Corps Marathon in October.

him as he biked and pushed her as he ran. At the time, William was 11 and Maddie was 9. “It feels good knowing that she’s finally able to run with us and have that experience,” William says. “It felt good to know that I’ve done this with her.” After the race, Team Maddie became popular in the community. Maddie has now completed 15 races, six in 2018 alone. Team Maddie joined with Ainsley’s Angels, a nonprofit that helps people with special needs participate in endurance events and other aspects of life. The group asked the family to run in the Marine Corps Marathon

in Washington, D.C., and they agreed. To qualify, they raised money for Ainsley’s Angels. The family was one of the top fundraisers, bringing in more than $11,000 for the organization. It was Maddie’s first marathon. Her father and six neighbors, Amy and Lindsay among them, trained to help push Maddie for the full 26.2 miles. “Several of us had zero desire to run a marathon, but we wanted to do it for Maddie,” Amy says. “I thought about it for three seconds and said, ‘I can’t ​not​do this.’ It became way more than running a marathon; [it was about] giving Maddie that experience that was most enticing.” „ July/August 2019

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W ELLN ESS

A few days before the race, Lynn Carswell, Maddie’s

Maddie’s parents say they won’t let her recent illness stop them from maintaining an active lifestyle. Within weeks of returning from abroad, they were taking her to compete in more races.

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speech and feeding therapist who teaches Maddie how to communicate by pointing to words and images with her eyes, asked Maddie how she was feeling. Maddie responded using a visual communication tablet called a Pragmatic Organization Dynamic Display (PODD).

“Very nervous. Scared,” she said. “It was a really powerful time when she expressed her concerns, and we were able to have some open conversations about her concerns and answer them,” Lynn says. On Oct. 28, 2018, race day, Team Maddie wore pink apparel from head to toe and pushed her in an adaptive, neon pink racing chair, or “chariot” as Ainsley’s Angels put it. When the team crossed the finish line together, Maddie’s face lit up with a smile. As cheers echoed around her, she eyed her PODD book and told everyone how she felt. “Proud and happy,” she said. B ACK AT IT After arriving home from the Philippines in February, her family decided they would not take any breaks. Within weeks they were taking Maddie to compete in races. “They didn’t think she was going to make it when she was on a life support machine,” Amy says. “But she has turned the corner and fought more than a marathon herself.” As for the Lake Hogan community? They still wave at Maddie when she is wheeled down the street. “​We will continue to cheer Maddie on as she continues to be a source of inspiration for us and so many others,” Lindsay says. “Any neighborhood is capable of this, but it takes work for a family and close friends to put in the effort to make it a truly inclusive neighborhood, which ultimately makes life that much richer.” CHM


N OT E D. Shared Learning Association of Chapel Hill celebrated its 40th anniversary at Christ United Methodist Church in Southern Village in April. The association offers

„

noncredit courses and social opportunities for adults in the area. Hyatt Place Chapel Hill at Southern Village

celebrated its second anniversary in May. The Shrunken Head Boutique, the oldest UNC shop in Chapel Hill, celebrates its 50th anniversary in August. Opened by Shelton and Mary Edna Henderson, four generations have worked at the store.

Music Maker Relief Foundation celebrates

its 25th anniversary this year. Founded by UNC graduate Timothy Duffy and Denise Duffy, the Hillsborough-based nonprofit organization strives to preserve the musical traditions of the South and has supported over 435 artists in achieving their goals. An exhibit featuring Timothy’s photography is on display at the New Orleans Museum of Art until July 28, and four Music Maker partner artists will perform at Telluride Blues & Brews Festival from Sept. 13-15.

GIVING BACK In April, Chapel Hill High School and East Chapel Hill

LEE PAVAO 1934-2019 Lee Pavao, advertising executive, Chapel Hill community leader and volunteer, advocate for seniors, father, grandfather and friend died at his Galloway Ridge home May 13.

Born Jan. 30, 1934 in Fall River, Massachusetts, Lee graduated from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in 1956. After graduation, he joined J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) in New York and was assigned to the Miami office before serving in the U.S. Army from 1956 to 1958. After his army service, Lee had a successful career with JWT in international advertising, moving from country to country while raising four children. Lee and his wife, Joan, retired to Chapel Hill in 1988. He threw himself and all of his energy into supporting his adopted home. He worked with the Parks and Recreation Commission, was elected to two terms on the Chapel Hill Town Council and served on the Chapel Hill/Orange County Visitors Bureau, to name just a few of his accomplishments. Lee’s passion helped cultivate the opening of the Robert and Pearl Seymour Center in 2007. The center has become an award-winning resource for seniors in the area, and in 2013, he was awarded the Order of the Long Leaf Pine by Gov. Bev Perdue.

High School (ECHHS)

lacrosse teams hosted the first King of the Hill Men’s Lacrosse Fundraiser and Game. The rival teams raised $5,829 for the Be Loud! Sophie Foundation, which supports adolescent and young adult cancer patients and their families at UNC Hospitals. ECHHS won the game, 12-6.

which works to improve the lives of children in Malawi in East Africa, raised $23,000. The money will go toward building a clinical laboratory and improving radiological services at the pediatric ward of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe.

Malawi Children’s Initiative

hosted its second annual Cocktails for Malawi event at Horace Williams House in May. The nonprofit organization,

„

ANNIVERSARY

WHAT WE’VE HEARD AROUND TOWN …

IN MEMORIAM Former Orange County Sheriff Albert “Lindy” Pendergrass died at Duke University Hospital on May 19. The Chapel Hill native

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NOTED

served in the Marines before joining the Chapel Hill Police Department, where he began as a patrol officer and rose to the rank of major. In 1982, Lindy was elected Sheriff of Orange County, a position he held until his retirement in 2014. The same year, he was awarded The Order of the Long Leaf Pine by Gov. Perdue for his years of hard work and dedication to protecting the community.

U.S. News & World Report released its 2019 Best High School Rankings, with four Chapel Hill/Carrboro schools placing within the top 25 in North Carolina. Carrboro High School ranked 21st, Chapel Hill High School ranked 18th, East Chapel Hill High School ranked 11th and Woods Charter School ranked 5th. Mary Patricia Peres-daSilva of McDougle Middle School was named Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

SCHOOL MATTERS

„

served as the judges. Seventeen students from grades two to five participated. Third-grader Milo Geier won the bee with “C-O-U-R-I-E-R-S.” Orange County Schools Superintendent Todd Wirt resigned from his

position on June 30. He served as superintendent since 2015 and has nearly 20 years of experience in K-12 education. McDougle Middle School student Alexandra Dye and Chapel Hill High School student Sabra Dye were among

64 students who advanced to the National History Day competition at the University of Maryland-College Park held June 9-13. The siblings competed against 448 other middle and high school students in the statewide History Day competition in April. The East Chapel Hill High School Science Olympiad team won fifth place in Division C at the state tournament at North Carolina State University in April. chapelhillmagazine.com July/August 2019

the school’s gifted education specialist, organized the event, while guidance counselor Aveni Patel Ghosh and Margaret Samuels, the former board vice chair of Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools,

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2019-2020 Teacher of the Year in May. She teaches math and has taught for more than 20 years. Mary Patricia received a $1,000 check from Pinnacle Financial Partners and gifts from other local businesses.

McDougle Elementary School held its first spelling bee on March 1. Lisa Myles,

Send us your noteworthy moments! From births to awards to new biz and more – noted@ chapelhill magazine.com

WHAT AN HONOR In April, Dr. Sarah Ruff ran in the Boston Marathon, finishing with a time of 3:47:28. She was selected to participate by Hyland’s, a sponsor of the marathon, as one of 18 health care professionals from over 500 applications. “Running Boston as part of Team Hyland’s was one of the best experiences of my life, and I can’t wait to try to qualify again to make it back,” Sarah says. On May 18, Polka Dot Mama Melanoma Foundation broke the Guinness World Records for the largest skin cancer screening in one day with 963 screenings. Dr. Chris Adigun (pictured third from left) of Dermatology & Laser Center of Chapel


NOT ED

Hill and Dr. Sue Ellen Cox of Aesthetic Solutions were two of 32 dermatologists

and 125 volunteers who teamed up with the organization, which raises money for melanoma research and awareness. “Hopefully this accomplishment will inspire others to get screened,” Chris says. Faith Connections on Mental Illness named Donna Olsen the 2019 Barbara and

Gove Elder Community Servant at the organization’s ninth annual conference at St. Thomas More Catholic Church in April.

The 1972 Chapel Hill High School men’s soccer team and five former star athletes were inducted into the Chapel Hill/Lincoln High School Hall of Fame in April. The five athletes are Monique Fearrington (women’s basketball 1994), Denzel Ingram (men’s basketball 2012), Sean Lucas (tennis 1998), Charles Nieves (football 2004) and Aaron Petersen (tennis 1998). In May, Dr. Harry Stafford received this year’s Christ Saves Hearts Humanitarian Award for his impact on local communities and student-athletes across North Carolina. He joined the UNC School of Medicine faculty in 2008. In April, Mary Alice Eckman received the 2019 Governor’s Volunteer Service Award for her service to Chapel Hill-Carrboro Meals on Wheels. She served as the organization’s board chair for over 30 years before retiring. Arielle Schechter was

named North Carolina’s 2019 Top Rated Local architect in May. She also received this year’s Best of Houzz Award in the Customer Service category, marking her fifth consecutive year winning this award.

Dr. Charles Perou

predominantly white southern town. Howard served three terms as mayor and went on to be elected to the State Senate.

was inducted into OncLive 2019 Class of Giants of Cancer Care at Adler Planetarium in Chicago in May. He is one of 15 health care professionals recognized for their contributions in research and clinical practice in the field of oncology. Charles is a member of UNC

The Town of Chapel Hill Division of Community Arts & Culture opened an art studio for four artists-in-residence at 109 E. Franklin St. in June. The public will be able to enter and engage with the artists during “Open Studio” hours through Aug. 12.

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

and a professor of genetics, pathology and laboratory medicine at the UNC School of Medicine. Fred Joiner and Jaki Shelton Green were

named 2019 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellows. The Orange County residents are among 13 poets selected to receive grants totaling more than $1 million. Fred serves as Carrboro Poet Laureate and an Orange County Arts Commission board member, while Jaki serves as North Carolina’s poet laureate.

IN OTHER NEWS The Alliance for Historic Hillsborough

unveiled it first bus wrap design, which depicts the town’s rich history from the Alexander Dickson House to the Riverwalk. The Alliance and Chapel Hill/Orange County Visitors Bureau worked closely on the design, which features the tagline, “No ordinary southern small town,” and could be seen on Chapel Hill Transit buses throughout Orange County. Phillip Fleischmann began work as the Chapel Hill Parks & Recreation director

in June. He previously served as Greensboro Parks & Recreation deputy director.

Habitat for Humanity of Orange County

wrapped up its 2019 Women Build program in May. The program, which took place over three weekends from October to May, recruits and inspires women to build and advocate for affordable housing. During the May weekend, 60 volunteers worked 220 hours in the community. In May, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded UNC and Music Maker Relief Foundation funds toward promoting art and creative endeavors in their communities. UNC received $20,000 to support a digital media lab for southern independent creators and local public television stations, while Music Maker received $10,000 to support an exhibit introducing the work of luthier Freeman Vines. – compiled by Adam Phan CHM

Chapel Hill Town Council proclaimed May 1 to be Howard Lee Day, marking 50

years since he became the first black person since Reconstruction to be elected mayor in a

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THE

BEST

OF CHAPEL HILL Thousands of votes were cast and these are our readers’ favorites I l lu st ratio n by H u n ter M c C u mb er | P hotography by B et h Mann | Ful l l i st of resul t s begi ns on page 7 1 „

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T

Healthy Skin Is Beautiful Skin We’re for healthy skin – and making sure yours stays that way. At Central Dermatology Center, our goal is to provide every patient with the education, guidance and care they need to achieve and maintain the healthiest skin possible, no matter what unique skin care challenges you may be facing. As the science of medicine continues to evolve, Central Dermatology Center is there to ensure you receive the very best treatments, medications and skin care products available. For 25 years, our team of board-certified dermatologists and highly trained staff have combined one-on-one, personal attention with professional expertise in a caring, warm environment – ensuring each patient feels safe and important at all times. To find out more about what we can do for you and your unique skin care needs, visit us at CentralDermatologyCenter.com.

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B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L

FAVORITE COFFEE SHOP

CAFE Caesar Gamboa Open Eye Cafe

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We asked four baristas from the winning coffee shops to show off their best latte art


B E ST O F CHAPEL HI LL

Leah Kallam

Thurmond Buckelew Caffe Driade

Coco Bean Coffee Shop & Cafe

Hannah James Gray Squirrel Coffee co. „

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B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L

FAVORITE FARMERS MARKET

THEN AND PHOTO BY JESSICA BERKOWITZ

The Carrboro Farmers’ Market has been a hub for community and straight-from-the-farm produce

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F

or four decades, the Carrboro Farmers’ Market has been a place to get locally grown products and crafts. Over time, the market has grown and expanded while some vendors have been there for years. Visitors look forward to annual events each year like the Strawberry Jamboree in the spring and the Tomato Day festivities in the summer. This year, the Carrboro Farmers’ Market celebrated 40 years on June 1 with birthday cake and trivia. 


Favorite Steakhouse & Favorite Upscale Restaurant Thank you, Chapel Hill!

UNIVERSIT Y PL ACE 201 S. ESTES DRIVE W W W. S T O N E Y R I V E R . C O M

91 9. 91 4 .6 6 8 8


B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L

THE

Marjorie Oakley and the Lloyds. Ken Dawson and Spring Dawson.

’80S

Carrboro Farmers’ Market included 68 farmers and artisans on opening day Saturday, June 2, 1979. In 1982, a midweek market was held at Eastgate in Chapel Hill. Discussions began in 1988 about moving the location. 

Thanks for making A Cleaner World Best in Chapel Hill.

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2017

READERS’ FAVORITE

UNLESS YOU

really like it, LET US DO IT.

That jumbled heap of clothing lies in wait. But you have more pressing matters. So, bring the load to us. We’ll bring order to the chaos. Right the first time or it’s free. www.acleanerworld.com

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The Place to Be! Thank You, Chapel Hill, For Voting Us

FAVORITE PIZZA! CHAPEL HILL FAVORITE FOR 39 YEARS BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK IN THE TRIANGLE

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B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L

THE

Louis Graham, Dan Graham and Henry Sparrow.

’90S

In 1995, the market reached capacity at 80 spaces and hired its first non-vendor manager. The next year, the market moved to the Carrboro Town Commons. The year 1997 was a big one, with the first Strawberry Jamboree and Tomato Day and with the mid-week market moving from Chapel Hill to Carrboro. 

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THE

’00S The ArtsCenter’s

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The market held cooking demonstrations to inspire customers to use their produce at home. Cooking instructor and author Sheri Castle was a popular host for her creative recipes and storytelling during the demos. In 2005, the market manager position became a full-time role. In 2008, the Saturday market became year-round. In 2012, the market held the inaugural Harvest Dinner as a fundraiser for the Town Commons renovation project. It’s now a popular tradition featuring dishes from local chefs and restaurants. 

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Photos courtesy of the Carrboro Farmers’ Market


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PHOTO BY BETH MANN

Ten things you should know about The ArtsCenter

Visitors to The ArtsCenter peruse the collection on display for 2nd Friday ArtWalk.

FAVORITE PERFORMING ARTS VENUE

1 2 3 4

It started on the second floor of present-day Armadillo Grill and was known as ArtsSchool. You can see truly great talent when soul singer Bettye LaVette drops by July 24 and country singer Rissi Palmer plays Aug. 22. You can learn a new skill through a multi-week summer course like Beginning Wheel-Throwing starting July 24.

Can’t commit to a full class? Take a crash course in stained glass July 13 and Aug. 10! Or a full-day introduction to medical illustration on July 20.

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They nurture young artists and care about the environment. Bring your usable cotton, rayon or flannel fabrics, and they’ll get them in the hands of beginners learning to knit and sew.

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Speaking of artists, the center is the single largest employer of artists in Orange County.

8 9

… to teen actors in “Urinetown: The Musical” staged by Chapel Hill School of Musical Arts (CHSMA) Aug. 9-11.

They play host to a number of local theater productions ranging from another year of OdysseyStage and Cary Playwrights’ Forum short plays during the NC 10by10 Festival running July 11-14 ...

The rotating exhibitions means there’s always something new to check out. Paperhand Puppet Intervention is July’s focus while in August, you can see a HERENCIA Juried Group Show in collaboration with Diamante Arts & Culture.

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The ArtsCenter celebrates 45 years of artistic excellence in 2019. 

IN SHOW 50

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STRENGTHENING

A favorite yoga studio that keeps students on their toes By Hannah Lee

FAVORITE BOUTIQUE FITNESS STUDIO

A

quiet and still room, perfect unmoved poses and students – that’s not Carrboro Yoga Studio. At this studio, imperfection is ideal and so is the laughter that comes with it. During a Pilates class on a recent Thursday, I picked up a yoga mat and headed across the hardwood floors toward the expansive windows. I lay down and received hellos from strangers and welcoming small talk before the hour-long class. Sage Rountree, the coowner and the teacher on this day, has a warm voice and smile that rallied together the 12 students in class, including some off-duty instructors. She

Sage Rountree emphasizes focusing on the core at a Thursday Pilates class on the second floor of Carr Mill Mall.

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and her 30 teacher colleagues are the reason that Carrboro Yoga, in Carr Mill Mall, was voted Favorite Boutique Fitness Studio – the only yoga studio in that category. Standing on our mats, while warming up our neck, shoulders and back, we breathed in and out. We followed with a series of mat exercises, while Sage instructed us on various poses and stretches that targeted our core. Sage, who is internationally recognized for teaching yoga to athletes, brings a different mindset to her classes. With a background in helping athletes recover from injuries, her approach to Pilates is gentler than most. “As we teach it here, it’s more shorthand for a mindful core practice,” Sage says. “There are elements that we’re pulling from

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yoga and from personal training, from other functional movement classes that make sense for our students but they’re not a part of the official canon of Pilates.” Working from our core to our back, we performed exercises like bridge pose, a chest and shoulder opener, and locust pose, a spinal extension where you lay on your belly and lift up off the floor. Poses that help those like me, who spend long hours in a chair. Or useful to those like my yoga neighbor, Caroline Green, who joined Carrboro Yoga nearly 6 ½ years ago after a running injury. She knows the schedule so well that she can name every class and its time. “It’s the teachers,” Caroline says. “You know Sage has a Ph.D. in comparative literature, so she’s

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really good with words. You could go to yoga for athletic balance or a Pilates class, where the teacher is basically telling you what to do and doesn’t have any personality, but for me, what keeps me going back to Carrboro Yoga is the people – that makes a huge difference.” I laughed along to silly comments from students across the room, to my left and right. Donnie Barnes, who lay on a creaky floor board, cracked jokes mid-pose. Yoga teacher Alexandra DeSiato quipped that if it were her class, they would be doing more planks. Everyone giggled. Everyone teased one another or themselves between poses “and during poses,” Caroline adds. “It’s a hoot. It’s a lot of fun. That was a very good representative class.” And after 15 years at Carr

Mill Mall, the studio is moving down the hill in August to a location at South Green, the newest development off South Greensboro Street. Expect a lot more space. “We’ve got some fun neighbors down there,” says Lies Sapp, the other Carrboro Yoga co-owner. “Oh yeah, we’re really excited,” Sage adds. “A wood-fired pizza kitchen with prosecco on tap and then a microbrewery and a nail salon,” Lies continues. “Some of my loyal students even made me a T-shirt that says ‘yoga and beer’ because they all go for a beer together after class,” Sage laughs. “So I told them, ‘You won’t even have to cross the street – just walk a few doors down to the brewery for beer.’” 

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THE COLOR OF A FITNESS OBSESSION The heart rate-monitoring workout that’s taken Chapel Hill by storm By Hannah Lee

Hannah pulls on one of 14 rowing machines during her first class at Orangetheory Fitness in Meadowmont Village.

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could barely sit down. It took me nine seconds to properly sit down in a chair the next morning. No, really, I counted. That’s what happens when you complete a 60-minute class at Orangetheory Fitness 24 hours earlier. It was worth it. More than 1,000 Chapel Hillians think so, too – orange is the color of their fitness obsession. They voted it this year’s reader’s favorite. So, of course, we had to see what all the fuss was about. At the Orangetheory at Meadowmont Village, the studio offers 70 classes a week, with a four- to five-hour break in the afternoon. With two types of classes – the 60-minute or 90-minute – each combines various modes of cardio with push-ups, plyometrics and free weights. “One of the cool things about our studio is that we’re one of the busiest studios,” says Liz Parenteau, the assistant studio manager. “We’re open seven days a week, and we have classes almost every hour on the hour.” But the studio and its brand is nothing new. Founded in 2010, the fitness franchise has more than 1,000 locations worldwide. It has 31 in North Carolina and two in Chapel Hill: Meadowmont and Timberlyne Shopping Center, which opened in December. What’s unique about this workout is it doesn’t focus on calories or distance or number of reps – it’s all about heart rate. Before I walked into the almost soundproof


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space filled with all orange equipment, I set up a heart-rate monitor on my arm, which is tracked through colored zones. The five different colors – gray, blue, green, orange and red – signify increasingly higher heart rate. Gray and blue signify time outside the studio or time walking between stations. The other colors indicate when the workout really begins. Screens posted all around the room display each person’s nickname and current zone, so you can monitor your progress and push yourself into a different zone. So as the 8 a.m. class on a recent Wednesday commenced, I went back and forth between rowing machines and treadmill running before ending with a weight routine under the direction of the very loud and eager teacher, Cristin Aldershof. I burned 572 calories in one hour and spent 16 minutes in the orange zone, which didn’t feel like much in the moment when you see people like “John W17” burning 912 calories in an hour. But boy, did I feel the outcome for the remainder of the week. How do people do this every day? Or even three times a week? “The science behind Orangetheory is if you spend those 12 to 20 minutes in the orange and red zone, you earn your afterburn,” Cristin says. “So for the next day and a half, you continue to burn 15 to 20%

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more calories than you normally would if you hadn’t worked out. “This is the best analogy that clicked for me: if you get in your car and take it for a drive, you come home and you park it in the garage and you leave it. You forget about it, but the engine is still hot. It takes a while for that engine to cool down. So when you walk out of the studio your workout is done. It’s behind you, but your engine is still hot. While your engine is going down, it’s burning calories that you normally wouldn’t burn.” As we finished the 60-minute class with a cool-down stretch, some people left early, satisfied with the morning’s work, while others stayed to catch their breath. “We have people in high school that work out with us all the way up to people in their 60s and 70s. I’d say that the wide variety of people we get to interact with is what makes this studio so unique,” says Tawny Orender, Orangetheory’s territory manager for eastern North Carolina. “It’s very fulfilling to be able to work for a company that allows us to interact with people and allow them to achieve their fitness goals.” And as our group exited the studio, there were already some 15 people clustered in the lobby looking through the glass – let the burning begin, again. 


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FAVORITE STORE FOR UNC GEAR

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Sisters and co-owners Genny Wrenn, left, and Lisa Floyd, second from left, in front of the shop their parents opened in 1969. Lisa’s daughter, Melissa Pate, is the store manager and Melissa’s son, Easton, 2, models on The Shrunken Head’s Instagram page.

FAN

enny Wrenn, the firstborn of Shelton and Mary Edna Henderson, spoke of her parents’ legacy in May as two customers entered The Shrunken Head on Franklin Street. An older man, dressed smartly but a bit unsteady on his feet, headed with his companion toward a rack of T-shirts in this mainstay of everything UNC. Before the door fully closed behind them, Genny, a store coowner, turned to a staff member. “Would you get this gentleman a chair?” she says. Within a moment, the chair was there and so was an attendant. Shelton and Mary Edna, Genny says, might as well have set such customer service into the store’s foundation; it was certainly in their DNA. The store was the first of its kind here and its most enduring. Shops popped up and disappeared around them over the years, and even a Gap that had moved in down the street couldn’t cut it. On Aug. 23, the Shrunken Head will be 50 years old. It will celebrate its golden anniversary with a weekend of free T-shirts, gift bags, temporary tattoos and even an appearance by UNC’s mascot, Rameses. But the reason the store, which offers UNC fanatics clothing, memorabilia, kitsch and

The Shrunken Head boutique celebrates its 50th anniversary

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By Mi chael Mc Elroy


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memories, is still here is because it also offers something bigger, something more according to Genny. Lisa Floyd, Genny’s sister, is the other owner, and her daughter, Melissa Pate, started working at the shop at about 10 years old. Melissa was responsible for affixing Tar Heel temporary tattoos to customers on game days. Now, Melissa is the store’s manager. It is the store’s familial lineage and its broader place in the community that sets it apart, she says. “It is a tradition to come to us,” Melissa says. Customers that came here as kids now stop in with kids of their own, she says, and they send in photos of their younger selves and of their children. The Shrunken Head framed them and put them up on the shelves. Customers feel welcomed, a part of something, she says. “They also realize [the store] is family-owned locally,” Genny adds. “And that’s a whole different ball game.” Here, family and business are inseparable. Some 15 family members have worked at Shrunken Head over the years, and Melissa rattles them off: “Grandma, Grandpa, Mom, Dad [Tim Floyd].” She counts The family is well known in the community, as were Shelton and Mary Edna Henderson, whose photo sits above the front desk to keep watch over the store.

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her brothers, Tyler, who models some of the clothing, and Daniel, who handles the finances. “Let’s see,” Melissa continues, “Natalie, Molly, Jack, Austin …” And then there is her son, Easton, 2, who serves as a store model on Instagram. “It is a tradition to shop here,” Genny says. “You might not buy something every time you come in, but you’ll never come in here when there’s not a family member [working] in here.” This sentiment is not new. The area knows what it has in the Shrunken Head and has written about it extensively. The consistency in message is a testament to the store’s adherence to principle. Two days after Christmas in 2004, the Triangle Business Journal wrote of the store’s willingness to scramble for a customer’s request for a unique last-minute gift. And it told of a “soft-spoken” man in the store who “never sits” because he “is constantly greeting customers.” “I do things the old-fashioned way here,” Shelton told the Journal. “Customers are greeted when they come in the door, and we do all we can to get what they want.” In May, as her customers shopped, Genny echoes her father. “We treat customers like family. I want them to feel like they’re in my home. Welcome to my home.” This sense of community has not changed, Melissa says. “People come in just to see Genny and ask how she is doing, and they always ask about

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Grandma and Grandpa. But unfortunately,” she says, “they are not here anymore.” Shelton died on Dec. 7, 2013, at 80. Mary Edna died in October of last year at 82. People swarmed in to pay their respects, Genny says, and the family stopped the funeral limos outside the store on the way to the cemetery. Strangers offered condolences. “The store is known worldwide,” Genny says. “Everybody thought the world of my Daddy.” And she adds, “Daddy loved Carolina.” The love was immediate, she says. The family opened the store in August 1969 as a head store, selling incense and rolling papers along with some clothing. “And then in ‘82 we won the championship,” Genny says. After Michael Jordan’s seemingly effortless game-winning shot in the final seconds that year, giving UNC its first championship in almost 30 years, “We had a family meeting,” Genny says. “Let’s just go all Carolina,” her father said. And they did, transitioning into the first all-apparel store in town. Shelton loved UNC sports, especially football, and the store very soon became the place to be on game days and nights. The bond between proprietor and customer, Genny says, strengthened every year.

Her parents so loved the community, Genny says, that they would sit on the rock wall across the street from the store, not to bark customers inside, but just to watch the foot traffic and say hello to their neighbors. Melissa says that both her mother and her grandmother “could sell ice to an eskimo,” and that everyone in the store “makes [customers] feel like they’re part of something, which makes them feel like they want to buy more from you.” As she spoke, the older gentleman, who never took use of the chair, walked to the register with a few items. As he left the store, Genny spoke to him again. “Thank you for coming in,” Genny says. “Our pleasure,” the man says. The exchange joins the 50-year-old echo filling this space, which now belongs to Genny, Lisa and Melissa as much as it ever did to Shelton and Mary Edna – echoes of community, of legacy, of how you treat the people who walk through your door. The front door of The Shrunken Head opens again and more customers walk through into a shop filled with photos of children now grown, four generations of memory and everything UNC. “Time flies,” Genny says, then turns her attention to her latest visitors. ““Hi guys,” she says, “how are y’all doing?” „

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Comic book aficionados would be thrilled to discover several of the items in Gallery 71 owner Lance Sawyers’s collection, including these rare Third Eye black light posters licensed by Marvel in 1971.

PUSHING OUTSIDE Gallery 71 is “taking framing places it’s never been before”

G

By Mat t h ew Poin dex ter

Since opening Gallery 71 in Churton Grove Center just northeast of downtown Hillsborough in 2017, Lance has transformed the space into a saturated world of color. He’ll happily deliver a traditional, skateboarder who describes himself as “noticeably tasteful oak or silver frame, but the tattooed,” he began purple walls suggest that his preference framing as a 19-year-old. is to get creative. Comic book-style pop And even after 25 years FAVORITE PICTURE FRAMING SERVICES art in neon pink and electric blue frames of framing and providing share space with a hole-filled, Swiss distribution for other cheese-like creations for a portrait of one customer’s pet rats. To small frame shop owners in the area, he’s still younger match a poster for the 1962 sci-fi film “The Brain That Wouldn’t than most of his competition. allery 71 isn’t the typical frame shop or gallery, and Lance Sawyers isn’t a typical shop owner. A former

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Die,” Lance crafted a frame with intricate woodworking resembling brain matter. “We’re taking framing places it’s never been before,” Lance says. Two of those places are the worlds of comic books and skateboarding. Lance’s Sk8 Box is a display case designed to let skaters show off their favorite boards. Similarly, his Geek Boxes display action figures, toys, trophies, awards and other collectibles. Lance and his team are fixtures at comic book conventions, where attendees trust them to create the perfect frame on the spot for their newly acquired or illustrator-signed items. But Lance and Gallery 71 have an even more notable connection to the comic book world. One of his early employees was Sam Hargrave, who has since become a stuntman in numerous comic book movies, including as Hugh Jackman’s stunt double in Wolverine and the stunt coordinator for “Avengers: Endgame.” When “The Avengers” finished filming in 2011, Sam wanted to give director Joss Whedon, a comic book enthusiast, a memorable gift. He turned to his old boss Lance, who designed a custom Geek Box for the director. The art on exhibit at Gallery 71 changes every 30 to 60 days, with five artists currently displaying work, including an installation of monster movie oil portraits by Raleigh’s Wes Flanary. Customers looking for new art or simply to sit and chat can enjoy one of the four local beers the shop keeps on tap, as well as a selection of wines and ciders. Just be ready to let Lance take you somewhere you’ve never been before. CHM

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DINING Overall Restaurant ACME elements Kitchen Lantern Overall Service ACME elements Governors Club Kitchen Place for a Date Night 411 West elements Kitchen Lantern Upscale Restaurant Elaine’s on Franklin Lantern Oakleaf Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill

The Purple Bowl.

New Restaurant Blue Dogwood Public Market CAVA Hops Burger Bar Lula’s

Place to Watch the Game Carolina Brewery Hickory Tavern Sup Dogs Top of the Hill

Vegetarians/Healthy Food Mediterranean Deli The Purple Bowl Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe Weaver Street Market

Breakfast/Brunch ACME Breakaway Cafe Elmo’s Diner The Root Cellar  July/August 2019

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Winners appear in alphabetical order

Sandwich Al’s Burger Shack Merritt’s Grill Neal’s Deli The Root Cellar TRU Deli

Outdoor Dining ACME bartaco Crook’s Corner Top of the Hill Kid-Friendly Restaurant bartaco Elmo’s Diner The Purple Bowl The Root Cellar

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Spot for a Business Lunch City Kitchen Crossroads Chapel Hill The Root Cellar Weathervane Restaurant & Patio

Fries Al’s Burger Shack Buns Hops Burger Bar Tyler’s Taproom Pizza Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Italian Pizzeria III Pizzeria Mercato Tarantini Italian Restaurant Italian Food 411 West Il Palio Pizzeria Mercato Tarantini Italian Restaurant Barbecue ACME Crook’s Corner Hillsborough BBQ Company The Pig Asian Food elements Jujube Lantern Lucha Tigre 

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May we May webe beProud Proud of of the Work wewe do, the Work do, the People wewe the People are,are, andand the the Difference Difference wewe Make. Make.

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Winners appear in alphabetical order

Sushi Akai Hana Japanese Restaurant elements Fusion Fish Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Indian Food CholaNad Mint Indian Cuisine Tandoor Indian Restaurant Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe Steakhouse Bin 54 The Farm House Restaurant Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill Mexican/Latin American Food Babalu Tapas & Tacos bartaco Carrburritos Monterrey Mexican Grill French Food Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Kitchen La Residence Provence Seafood elements Fusion Fish Glasshalfull Squid’s Comfort Food/ Southern Food ACME Crook’s Corner Mama Dip’s Merritt’s Grill 


Photography by Steve Clarke

Training dancers ages 3 to adult since 2003 and producing The Nutcracker for 25 years. Thank you!!! It thrills us to have such enthusiastic community support! It thrills us that this comes at a time when we are expanding. Come visit our third studio this fall. More Space • More Classes • More Teacher • More Fun

1708 A and B Franklin Street | Gateway Commons | Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919-932-2676 | triangleyouthballet.org A Proud member of Regional Dance America/Southeast since 2005 The Triangle Youth Ballet is a 501(c)(3) non-profit ballet repertory company with a school, training dancers from age three to adult.

Thank You

for voting US the beSt garden Store for 6 yearS in a row WINNER

WINNER

READERS’ FAVORITE

OF CHAPEL HILL

OF CHAPEL HILL

OF CHAPEL HILL

BEST BEST BEST 2015

2016

MAGAZINE

300 N. Greensboro St. • Carrboro, NC 27510 (919) 942-3857 56970_Carrboro2019BestofBestAd.indd 1

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5/21/19 2:58 PM

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B E ST O F C H A P E L H I LL

Winners appear in alphabetical order

governors club

Mediterranean CAVA City Kitchen Kipos Mediterranean Deli

Voted the Best of Chapel Hill for 6 consecutive years

Coffee Shop Caffe Driade Coco Bean Coffee Shop & Cafe Gray Squirrel Coffee Co. Open Eye Cafe Dessert/Pastries Coco Bean Coffee Shop & Cafe Guglhupf Bake Shop The Root Cellar Weaver Street Market

Chapel Hill’s premier gated community and private club, featuring a 27-hole Jack Nicklaus Signature Course and newly-renovated Clubhouse and Wellness Center. 12 unique neighborhood settings with homes from $400k-3M+.

VOTED BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2019 READERS FAVORITE

Favorite Neighborhood | Favorite Sports Club | Favorite Event Space Favorite Overall Service | Favorite Event Planner

Ice Cream/ Frozen Yogurt Ben & Jerry’s Maple View Farm Country Store Whit’s Frozen Custard Yogurt Pump (YoPo) Brewery Carolina Brewery Steel String Brewery Top of the Hill Brewery Vecino Brewing Co. Place for a Cocktail The Crunkleton Glasshalfull Lantern Top of the Hill 

governorsclubnc.com 11000 governors drive, chapel hill, nc 27517 | 919-933-7500

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B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L

Winners appear in alphabetical order

The Crunkleton.

Chapel Hill Eyecare OD, PLLC

Healthy Eyes for a Lifetime

SM

Wine, Beer and/ or Spirits Shop Beer Study Chapel Hill Wine Company Southern Season Weaver Street Market Catering Company The Catering Company of Chapel Hill Chapel Hill Restaurant Group (Squid’s, Lula’s, 411 West, Mez and Page Road Grill) Mediterranean Deli The Root Cellar

@cheyecare

Farmers Market Carrboro Farmers’ Market Chapel Hill Farmers’ Market Fearrington Farmers’ Market Hillsborough Farmers Market

Thank You For Voting Us Your

Favorite Place For Glasses &

Favorite Optometrist / Ophthalmologist

For 5 years in a row! WINNER

WINNER

READERS’ FAVORITE

OF CHAPEL HILL

OF CHAPEL HILL

OF CHAPEL HILL

BEST BEST BEST 2016

M A G A Z IN E

919.968.4774 235 S. Elliott Rd, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 chapelhilleyecare.com 78

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Local Food Product Carolina Brewery Sky Blue Kölsch Chapel Hill Creamery cheese Chapel Hill Toffee Maple View Farm milk Chef Kevin Callaghan, ACME Michael Chuong, elements Seth Kingsbury, Pazzo! Andrea Reusing, Lantern Host/Server Sue Barrows, Kitchen Paula Gilland, The Purple Bowl


BEST OF C HA P EL HI L L

Thank you for voting me

Favorite Chef! I appreciate your support over the 16 years, and look forward to many more.

Food Truck Chirba Chirba Merry Franksters Napoli Tacos El Niño ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Art Gallery Ackland Art Gallery Eno Gallery FRANK Gallery Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Museum Ackland Art Museum Carolina Basketball Museum Kidzu Children’s Museum Morehead Planetarium and Science Center Movie Theater The Chelsea Theater The Lumina Theater Silverspot Cinema The Varsity Theatre Place to Hear Live Music Cat’s Cradle The Kraken Memorial Hall/Carolina Performing Arts Southern Village Green Performing Arts Venue The ArtsCenter The Forest Theatre PlayMakers Repertory Company Memorial Hall/Carolina Performing Arts 

Best of Chapel Hill 2019 Readers' Favorite

Seth Kingsbury Favorite Chef

Fresh. Local. Italian Inspired.

open 7 days a week 919.929.9984 reservations 919.929.9991 pizzeria 700 Market Street, chapel hill

pazzo-restaurant.com

WE  OUR TEAM

Meet Kenneth Blacknell B efore I got into addiction, I was an ordinary person. I went to four years at Appalachian State. I had a minor career with the Dallas Cowboys football. That’s when I said notoriety, I was just trying to always stay in the limelight. The lowest point of my life was incarceration and drug addiction. Actually, I think [incarceration] saved my life. I was in drug addiction for 17 years. It gave me time to readjust my thinking, and put my priorities in order. And self examination and what I

wanted to do with my life. I had lost so much time — it took so much from me. I wanted to build a relationship with my daughter, I wanted to build a relationship with my

family, and I wanted to have a stronger bond with God. I have worked at the thrift shop for 10 years. I started here doing community service. I had just got released from prison, and it was part of my probation. They were impressed with the way that I [worked], so I put in an application, and they called me back and hired me. I’m more interested now in the ministry, helping people. Whether that be physically, spiritually, mentally, always trying to build them up. I encourage them.

Thank you readers for voting us favorite Consignment Resale Store CHAPEL HILL • CARRBORO

919.942.6565 PTATHRIFTSHOP.ORG

July/August 2019

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B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L

Winners appear in alphabetical order

Place to Host a Children’s Birthday 1870 Farm Kidzu Children’s Museum Maple View Farm Silverspot Cinema

Waxing Salon Aveda Institute Chapel Hill Monarch Brow & Facial Studio Wax Poetic Waxing the City

SERVICES Salon Ashlyn & Co. Ceremony Salon Citrine Salon Mina’s Studio The Parlour on King Salon & Spa

Fitness Facility Chapel Hill Training CrossFit Chapel Hill Planet Fitness UNC Wellness Center at Meadowmont

Spa Aveda Institute Chapel Hill Hand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa Monarch Brow & Facial Studio The Spa at Fearrington

BLUE DOGWOOD

Sports Club Chapel Hill Country Club The Farm Governors Club Orange County Sportsplex Boutique Fitness Studio barre3 Carrboro Yoga Company Orangetheory Fitness pūrvelo Dance Studio Ballet School of Chapel Hill Renner Dance Company To The Pointe Triangle Youth Ballet

Public market. Food hall. Community. We thank you for your friendship and support, today and every day. 30 6 W Fra nk lin S t, C ha pel Hill C lo sed M o nday and Tu esda y F ree pa rk ing lo t | 9 1 9 . 7 1 7 . 0 4 0 4 bluedogwood.com   

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Pharmacy 501 Pharmacy CVS Southern Village Pharmacy Walgreens Mechanic Auto Logic Chapel Hill Tire Car Care Center Sturdivant’s Tire Pros & Auto 


SPONSORED BY AUTO LOGIC

Car Talk For WOMEN AN INTERVIEW WITH MARIANNE JONES, CO-OWNER, AUTO LOGIC

Why do I often feel that, as a woman, I am being taken advantage of when I take my car to a shop? Women of all ages have far more negative auto repair experiences than men. In fact, I believe women are specifically targeted with aggressive sales tactics to sell us things we do not need. How can I keep this from happening? Number one, read your owner’s manual. You will find that the maintenance schedules are outlined there. When someone tries to sell a “needed service” that’s not in the manual, you probably don’t need it!

These sorts of services frequently take the form of unnecessary fluid flushes, premature replacement of wear items, or adjustments. What makes Auto Logic different? We employ some of the very best technicians in the industry. We commit to make all our customers feel comfortable, respected and valued when they do business with us. I am at the shop everyday. We gladly answer questions and provide second opinions. You will be treated fairly at Auto Logic, we will not sell you anything you do not need and we stand behind our work. It’s that straight forward. You have my word.

AUTO LOGIC • 200 WEST MAIN STREET, CARRBORO, NC • 919-933-6609 • AUTOLOGICONLINE.COM

Hours 7:45-6 M-F • Morning/Afternoon Shuttle • Quick Lube and Tire Service 6 ASE Certified Master Technicians WINNER

WINNER

BEST

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2016

2015

OF CHAPEL HILL M AGAZINE


B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L

Winners appear in alphabetical order

Bank Bank of America State Employees’ Credit Union Wells Fargo

Optometrist/Ophthalmologist Carrboro Family Vision Chapel Hill Eyecare Chapel Hill Ophthalmology UNC Kittner Eye Center

Dermatologist Central Dermatology Center Chapel Hill Dermatology Dermatology & Laser Center of Chapel Hill UNC Chapel Hill Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center

Pediatrician/Family Medicine Carrboro Family Medicine Carrboro Pediatrics & Internal Medicine Chapel Hill Children and Adolescents’ Clinic Chapel Hill Pediatrics UNC Family Medicine

Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon Aesthetic Solutions Finn Plastic Surgery Greg Ruff, MD UNC Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Veterinarian Carrboro Plaza Veterinary Clinic Cole Park Veterinary Hospital Dogwood Veterinary Hospital & Pet Resort Meadowmont Animal Hospital

Visit our new Chapel Hill location at Eastgate Crossing!

McPherson Cleaners Family-Owned for 3 Generations

Serving Orange County and Alamance County since 1953 Quality Workmanship and Customer Service Dry Cleaning • Wedding Dress • Dress Shirts • Cleaning & Preservation Monthly Billing • Leather and Fur • Christening Gowns • Wet Cleaning Smoke & Water Damage • Off-Season Storage • Drapery Take-down & Re-hang Visit us online at

mcphersondrycleaners.com

Thank You for Voting Us Favorite Cleaners! We are your local cleaning experts!

82

Winners of the Award of Excellence in Quality Garment Care & Customer Service since 2005

1800 East Franklin Street | Chapel Hill

100 Millstead Drive | Mebane

2469 S. Church Street | Burlington

919.929.4281

919.304.2074

336.570.0800

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B E ST O F CHAPEL HI LL

Pet Boarding Chapel Hill Pet Resort Cole Park Veterinary Hospital Dogwood Veterinary Hospital & Pet Resort Green Beagle Lodge

Governors Club.

Pet Sitting Daisybelle’s Dog Walking & Pet Sitting Happy Paws Pet Care Service Laughing Dog Pet Care Walk & Wag Cleaners A Cleaner World McPherson Cleaners Medlin-Davis Cleaners Perfect Image Cleaners Realtor or Realty Team Erika Buchholtz, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Jill Ehrenfeld, Governors Club Realty Jennifer Winkler, Chanticleer Properties Event Space The Carolina Inn Fearrington Village Governors Club Top of the Hill’s Great Room Event Planner Lisa Johnson, Governors Club Cheryl-Anne Kast, Kast Events & Co. Gilda McDaniel, Fearrington Village 

THANK YOU

for voting us Best of Chapel Hill year after year! • •

FAVORITE OPHTHALMOLOGIST FAVORITE PLACE FOR GLASSES

John H. Wood, MD & David R. Haas, MD

BOARD CERTIFIED OPHTHALMOLOGISTS, PHYSICIANS, AND SURGEONS

Comprehensive Eye Care • Dropless Cataract Surgery Bladeless Laser and Premium Lens Cataract Surgery Glaucoma Treatment and Surgery Lasik / Refractive Surgery • Full-service Optical Shop with Contact Lenses

110 Connor Dr. | Suite 2, Chapel Hill, NC 27514

919.942.8701

ChapelHillEye.com July/August 2019

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B EST OF CHA P EL HI L L SallyMack Life Furnishings.

Winners appear in alphabetical order

Hotel AC Hotel Chapel Hill Downtown The Carolina Inn The Fearrington House Inn The Franklin Hotel B&B Inn at Bingham School The Inn at Teardrops Ruby’s Place RETAIL New Business Ashlyn & Co. ivy & leo Paws and Claws, Etc. Pet Supplies Santosha Space

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2019 Thank you to all our patients and friends for voting DLC

FAVORITE DERMATOLOGIST for a 3rd year in a row!

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL

- Chris G. Adigun, MD, FAAD

Healthy, Beautiful Skin Starts at DLC! • MEDICAL DERMATOLOGY • COSMETIC DERMATOLOGY • BOTOX® • DYSPORT® • INJECTABLE FILLERS • HALO PRO LASER RESURFACING™ • BBL PHOTOFACIAL™ • PRP FOR HAIRLOSS • LEG VEIN TREATMENT • CHEMICAL PEELS • LASER HAIR REMOVAL • MICRONEEDLING • COOLSCULPTING® • MEDICAL GRADE SKINCARE

Located in The Veranda at Briar Chapel 58 Chapelton Court, Suite 120 | Chapel Hill, NC 919.942.2922 | www.dlcofchapelhill.com

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Gift Store SallyMack Life Furnishings SOUTH Southern Season This & That Gift Gallery WomanCraft Gifts Fine Jewelry Creative Metalsmiths Melissa Designer Jewelry Wentworth & Sloan William Travis Jewelry Fashion Jewelry Carlisle & Linny Vintage Jewelry Light Years SallyMack Life Furnishings Whilden WomanCraft Gifts Store for UNC Gear Johnny T-Shirt The Shrunken Head UNC Student Stores Underground Printing 


B E ST O F CHAPEL HI LL

The Frankllin Hotel.

FOUNDED PASSIONATE ABOUT ABOUT FOUNDED BYBY PEOPLE PEOPLE PASSIONATE GOOD, HONEST, HONEST, SOLID GOOD, SOLID FOOD FOOD e cookthe theold oldfashioned fashioned way, way, one WeWcook one shovelful shovelfulofoffresh freshoak oak

andhickory hickorycoals coals at at aa time. time. We and We believe believethat thatthis thisisiswhat what makes the difference between good and great BBQ…that, makes the difference between good and great BBQ…that, and the long hours! The team at HBBQ puts a lot of love and the long hours! The team at HBBQ puts a lot of love into preparing and serving all of our plates. into preparing and serving all of our plates.

wood cooked bbq, sides and desserts made in-house

wood cooked bbq, sides and desserts made in-house dine in, carry out, & catering for events of all sizes dine in, carry out, & catering for events of all sizes 236 S. Nash Street in Hillsborough 236 S. Nash www.hillsboroughbbq.com Street in Hillsborough 919-732-HOGS

919-732-HOGS www.hillsboroughbbq.com July/August 2019

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B E ST O F C H A P E L H I L L

“The Service You Deserve from the Neighbors You Trust” • Compounding for hormone replacement therapy, pain creams and veterinary medications • Free Delivery (within limits) • Adherence Packaging • Clinical Pharmacist on staff Han Su WINNER

THANK YOU!

BEST

for voting us Favorite Local Pharmacy again!

OF CHAPEL HILL

Call today to transfer your prescription to your friendly neighborhood pharmacy. 501 PHARMACY

98 Chapelton Court, Suite 300, Chapel Hill (984) 999-0501 | 501rx.com

Winners appear in alphabetical order

Women’s Boutique Night Gallery/Branching Out Sofia’s Boutique Uniquities Whilden Menswear Gentlemen’s Corner Julian’s Townsend Bertram & Company Children’s Store Glee Kids The Pink Pearl Puddle Baby Home Furnishings and Accessories SallyMack Life Furnishings SOUTH Southern Season WomanCraft Gifts Book Store Flyleaf Books McIntyre’s Books Purple Crow Books Place for Glasses Carrboro Family Vision Chapel Hill Eyecare Chapel Hill Ophthalmology UNC Kittner Eye Center Place for Beauty Products Aveda Institute Chapel Hill Ceremony Salon Mina’s Studio Ulta Beauty

VOTED BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2019 READERS FAVORITE SPA AND WAXING SALON Specializing in Semi-Permanent Eyebrow Design and Organic Facials

304 W WEAVER ST | CARRBORO, NC 27510 MONARCHBROWANDFACIALS.COM FEATURING EASY ONLINE BOOKING

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Consignment/Resale Store Habitat ReStore of Durham and Orange Counties My Secret Closet PTA Thrift Shop Rumors


BEST OF C H A P E L H I L L

Pet Store Paws at the Corner Petco Phydeaux Wild Bird Center Picture Framing Services The Frame & Print Shop of Chapel Hill Framemakers The Framers Corner Gallery 71

Way Out West:

Shopping Experience Carr Mill Mall Downtown Franklin Street Eastgate Crossing University Place

Celebrating the Gift of the Hugh A. McAllister Jr. Collection

HOME & GARDEN Interior Designer Ashley Clarke Designs Catherine French Design SOUTH Steel Roots Home Decor with Simply O Interiors

Way Out West: Celebrating the Gift of the Hugh A. McAllister Jr. Collection has been made possible by UNC Medicine in honor of Hugh A. McAllister Jr.

14 June 25 August 2019

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 101 S. Columbia St. at Franklin St. Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919.966.5736 | ackland.org Thomas Moran, American, born in England, 1837-1926: Virgin River, Utah (detail), 1908, oil on canvas, 20 x 30 in. Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Kitchen/Bath Designer emma delon kitchen & bath Ferguson Bath, Kitchen and Lighting Kitchen & Bath Galleries Will Johnson Building Company Architect Dail Dixon Shaw Design Associates Sophie Piesse Architect Szostak Design Construction Business/Builder Bold Construction Homes By Dickerson Will Johnson Building Company Zinn Design Build ď‚„

July/August 2019

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B E ST O F C H A P E L H I LL

Winners appear in alphabetical order

Landscaper Garden Gate O’Mara Landscaping and Lawn Care Precision Turfscape Wright Brothers’ Landscaping & Tree Service Garden Store Fifth Season Gardening Company Fitch Lumber & Hardware Niche Gardens Southern States

Favorite Picture Framing Services 919.732.5569 | www.gallery71nc.com 121 North Scotswood Boulevard | Hillsborough, NC

Florist Chapel Hill Florist Purple Puddle University Florist Victoria Park Florist Home Maintenance & Repair Bud Matthews Services Sparrow & Sons Plumbing & Heating Stone Services Walker Brown Roofing Home Painter CertaPro Painters Juarez Painting Co. Parks Painting Company Tar Heel Painters Neighborhood Briar Chapel Governors Club Meadowmont Southern Village CHM

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360

º

have it all living.

Inside. Outside. Everyside Living. Conveniently Located to Research Triangle Park | Adjacent to Picturesque Jordan Lake | Gated Entry | Large Fitness Center Short-Iron Golf Course | Resort-Style Pool | Clubhouse | Miles of Walking Trails | Spacious Home Sites

New homes by leading national builder M/I Homes First Floor Owner’s Suite Available Chapel Hill University of North Carolina

40

540

147 Research Triangle Park

Raleigh Durham Intl. Airport 70

501

440

40 Fearrington 540 Jordan Lake 64

Cary Raleigh 40

North Carolina State University

Apex 1

401

Starting in the high $300,000’s - $500,000’s TWO FURNISHED MODELS OPEN DAILY

919-230-1080

LegacyJordanLake.com

66 Legacy Club Dr., Chapel Hill, NC 27517 All information, plans, and pricing are subject to change without notice. This information does not represent a specific offer of sale or solicitation to purchase property within Legacy at Jordan Lake.


TOP DEN TISTS

F

top

or the 10th straight year, Chapel Hill Magazine commissioned a peer-to-peer survey of the local dental community – from endodontists to prosthodontists. The following rankings are the result. Dentists were asked the telling question: “If you had a patient in need of a dentist, which dentist would you refer them to, other than yourself?” The Chapel Hill area is well-served by the dental community: Hundreds of dentists, specialists and support professionals have made this town their home, and the overall quality of dental care in our communities is second to none. What good dentist wouldn’t want to practice here? „

A LITTLE BACKGROUND The topDentists list for Chapel Hill is the result of a rigorous evaluation process consisting of peer-topeer surveys of area dentists and professionals. This survey was conducted and managed by the nationally recognized third-party firm topDentists LLC of Augusta, Ga. The list is excerpted from the 2019 topDentistsTM list, a database that includes listings for dentists and specialists in the Chapel Hill area. The Chapel Hill list is based on detailed evaluations of dentists and professionals by their peers. The complete database is available at usatopdentists.com. topDentists management has more than 40 years experience compiling peer-review referral guides in the dental, medical and legal fields. Working from this experience, along with the input of several prominent dentists from throughout the United States, topDentists created a selection process that has earned the respect of the country’s leading dental professionals. For more information call 706-364-0853; write P.O. Box 970, Augusta, GA 30903; email info@usatopdentists.com or visit usatopdentists.com. The purchase of advertising has no impact on who is included in the topDentists list.

A. K. BOBBY MALLIK D.M.D. Practice limited to Endodontics and Endodontic Surgery

Our team realizes the importance of your dental health and strives to provide all your endodontic needs in a clean, comfortable and stress-free environment. We utilize state-of-the-art technology to ensure you are receiving the specialized care you deserve.

Using the most advanced knowledge and techniques available today, we can perform many different endodontic treatments with ultimate precision and comfort Root Canal Therapy | Retreatment | Apical Surgery | Traumatic Injuries | CBCT Imaging

PATTERSON PLACE | 5324 MCFARLAND DRIVE, STE. 120, DURHAM NC 27707 | DURHAMENDO.COM 90

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TOP DEN TISTS

ENDODONTICS Nona I. Breeland Breeland Endodontics 1506 E. Franklin St., Ste. 204, Chapel Hill 919-967-1776; breelandendodontics.com Alessandra L. Ritter Ritter Endodontics 501 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 155, Chapel Hill 919-403-5000; ritterendo.com Andrew L. Rudd Chapel Hill Endodontics 891 Willow Dr., Ste. 4, Chapel Hill 919-932-1616; chapelhillendo.com Peter Z. Tawil UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com

Triangle Restoration Dentistry A Prosthodontic Specialty Practice Mark S. Scurria, DDS | Rosanna Marquez, DDS 1920 East Hwy. 54 Suite 410 Durham | 919.544.8106 www.trianglerestorationdentistry.com

Doesn’t your smile deserve a specialist’s care? As prosthodontists, we specialize in restoring and replacing teeth using the best technology available. TRIOS scanning allows us to provide crowns, bridges, and partials without messy impressions. We’re also proud to offer AVADENT digital dentures, which provide the best fit possible with fewer appointments.

We are conveniently located off of I-40, at the intersection of 54 and 55. Meet Dr. Scurria, Dr. Marquez, and the rest of our caring team and discover your dental home.

TOP magazine

DENTISTS

Top Dentists for the 10th consecutive year

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GENERAL DENTISTRY Laura A. Collatz Enchanting Smiles Family Dentistry 360 West St., Ste. 100, Pittsboro 919-542-2712; enchantingsmilesdentistry.com Angela G. Ellis Ellis Family Dentistry 120 Conner Dr., Ste. 201, Chapel Hill 919-960-0155; ellisdentistry.com Dennis W. Ellis Ellis General Dentistry 88 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 190, Chapel Hill 919-968-9806; dennisellisdds.com James P. Furgurson Chapel Hill Family & Cosmetic Dentistry 501 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 150, Chapel Hill 919-213-9767; chapelhilldds.com Mandy Ghaffarpour Studio G Aesthetic & Family Dentistry 104 N. Elliott Rd., Ste. C, Chapel Hill 919-942-7163; studiogdentist.com Carol L. Haggerty UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com Credle A. Harris Chapel Hill Dental Group 1721 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-967-9291; teethpeople.com Steven M. Hart Studio G Aesthetic & Family Dentistry 104 N. Elliott Rd., Ste. C, Chapel Hill 919-942-7163; studiogdentist.com Susanne P. Jackson Susanne Jackson Dentistry 77 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 180, Chapel Hill 919-968-9874; susannejacksondds.com Jeffrey R. Kennedy Chapel Hill Dental Group 1721 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-967-9291; teethpeople.com 


James P. Furgurson, DDS, FAGD | Nathan O. White, DDS D E N TA L E X C E L L E N C E • C O M PA S S I O N AT E C A R E

Now Accepting New Patients!

General Dentistry Restorative & Cosmetic Dentistry Dental Implants

501 Eastowne Dr., Suite 150, Chapel Hill Conveniently located off 15-501 near I-40 and Durham

919.251.9313 • chapelhilldds.com @chapelhillcosmeticdentist

@chapelhilldds


TOP DEN TISTS

Jerre L. Kennedy Atkins Dentistry 50130 Governors Dr., Chapel Hill 919-537-8337; 1dentist-chapel-hill.com David E. McGlohon Studio G Aesthetic & Family Dentistry 104 N. Elliott Rd., Ste. C, Chapel Hill 919-942-7163; studiogdentist.com Andre V. Ritter UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com Bilal Saib Chapel Hill Advanced Dentistry 400 Market St., Ste. 220, Chapel Hill 919-933-3388; chapelhilladvanceddentistry.com

Allen D. Samuelson UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3866; uncdentists.com

Frederick H. Vohwinkel Jr. 143 Chatham Downs Dr., Ste. 301, Chapel Hill 919-933-9191

Tamara C. Samuelson Susanne Jackson Dentistry 77 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 180, Chapel Hill 919-968-9874; susannejacksondds.com

Andrew J. Wagoner 77 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-968-9697; wagonerdds.com

Laura D. Tawil Parkway Dental Center 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-636-9717; briarchapeldentist.com

Joel M. Wagoner 77 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-968-9697; wagonerdds.com HOSPITAL DENTISTRY Lauren L. Patton UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3866; uncdentists.com ď‚„

Keith A. Taylor 110 Banks Dr., Chapel Hill 919-942-5652; keithtaylordds.com

We have an even bigger reason to smile! We are excited to announce that we have added the SoleaÂŽ Dental Laser to our practice. We can now offer needle-free, drill-free dental care! Quality dental care for children of all ages. We love to see smiles, and that goes for parents too!

Dr. Amanda Lee

Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

310 Millstone Drive, Suite 1 | Hillsborough, NC | 919.296.5854 | hpdsmiles.com 94

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DENTAL IMPLANTS • BONE GRAFTING • WISDOM TEETH • FACIAL TRAUMA • CORRECTIVE JAW SURGERY • PRE-PROSTHETIC SURGERY • ORAL PATHOLOGY • SLEEP APNEA

FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS, the practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Associates has been trusted to provide specialized care in the Chapel Hill, Durham, and Sanford communities. Our five board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeons provide the highest quality of patient care with the latest diagnostic and treatment tools available to assure patient safety and comfort. Drs. Frost, Sacco, Vandersea, Ruvo and Serlo practice a full scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery with expertise ranging from corrective jaw surgery to wisdom tooth removal.

OMSANC.COM

DAVID E. FROST DDS, MS DEBRA M. SACCO DMD, MD BRIAN VANDERSEA DDS ANDREW T. RUVO DMD, MD ADAM D. SERLO DMD, MD

CHAPEL HILL 501 Eastowne Drive, Suite 110 Chapel Hill 27514 919.929.2196 DURHAM 2823 North Duke Street Durham 27704 919.479.0707 SANFORD 109 Dennis Drive Sanford 27330 919.775.1615


TOP DEN TISTS

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY David E. Frost Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates 501 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-929-2196; omsanc.com David L. Hill, Jr. Chapel Hill Implant and Oral Surgery Center 77 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 120, Chapel Hill 919-238-9961; chapelhilloralsurgery.com Glenn J. Reside UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3404; uncdentists.com

Andrew T. Ruvo Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates 501 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-929-2196; omsanc.com

Brian Vandersea Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates 501 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-929-2196; omsanc.com

Debra M. Sacco Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates 501 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-929-2196; omsanc.com

ORAL PATHOLOGY Valerie A. Murrah UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com

Adam D. Serlo Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates 501 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 110, Chapel Hill 919-929-2196; omsanc.com

Dr. Frederick G. Lehmann, DDS, PA 100 Europa Dr, Suite 310, Chapel Hill, NC 27517

The dental practice of Dr. Frederick G. Lehmann is conveniently located in the Europa Center offices, across from the Sheraton Hotel, at 100 Europa Drive in Chapel Hill. Dr. Lehmann has proudly served the community for 20 years in this location.

The quality of care is personal in a relaxed atmosphere, with the comfort of the patient as a priority.

TOP DENTISTS

919-967-9999 | chapelhillncdentistry.com 96

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Barbara T. Hershey Hershey Orthodontics 1525 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-493-7554 hersheyorthodontics.com

Julie H. Mol Mol Orthodontics 400 Market St., Ste. 220, Chapel Hill 919-260-4269 molorthodontics.com ď‚„

General Dentistry | Family Dentistry Crowns & Bridges | Dental Implants Dentures | Preventative Care

Dr. Lehmann fosters a collaborative relationship with many of the area dental specialists to further facilitate all of your dental needs.

ORTHODONTICS T. Lenise Clifton Clifton & Mauney Orthodontics & Pediatric Dentistry 77 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 310, Chapel Hill 919-933-1007; cliftonandmauney.com

Gavin C. Heymann Heymann Orthodontics – new Chapel Hill office coming soon 919-626-9494 heymannorthodontics.com

New patie are alwaysnts welcome.

The office is currently specializing in the latest CAD-CAM based Cerec Technology, allowing many dental restorations and individual crowns to be generated in a single visit.

Ricardo J. Padilla UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com


Breeland Endodontics has provided endodontic services for patients from Chapel Hill, Durham and the greater Triangle area for twenty-eight years. Dr. Nona Breeland received her DDS and specialty training in endodontics from the UNC School of Dentistry. Having held many dental leadership roles on the local, state and national levels, Dr. Breeland has dedicated her professional life to making a difference. She brings the same energy and excellence to her endodontic practice.

ENDODONTIC SERVICES

DR. NONA BREELAND

Diagnosis • Root Canal Therapy • Endodontic Retreatment Surgical Endodontics • Trauma Management • Internal Bleaching

1506 East Franklin Street, Suite 204 • Chapel Hill • 919-967-1776 office • www.breelandendo.com

DENTISTS

Dr. Gavin Heymann

is excited to continue providing excellent orthodontic care with Smith Orthodontics.

www.HeymannOrthodontics.com Contact us today to schedule your FREE consultation with Dr. Heymann at 919-626-9494 or by email at info@heymannorthodontics.com Durham Location Smith Orthodontics 2919 Colony Road Durham, NC

Chapel Hill Location Heymann Orthodontics *Coming Soon*

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TOP DEN TISTS

Tung Nguyen UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3933; uncdentists.com Tammy R. Severt Severt Smiles 101 Conner Dr., Ste. 401, Chapel Hill 919-929-2365; severtsmiles.com

PEDIATRIC AND ORTHODONTIC DENTISTRY Lorne D. Koroluk UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Alexandra Boudreau Chatham Pediatric Dentistry 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 120, Chapel Hill 919-391-3813; chathampediatricdentistry.com Kimon Divaris UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com Annelise C. Hardin Southern Village Pediatric Dentistry 410 Market St., Ste. 430; Chapel Hill 919-967-2773; svpediatricdentistry.com Jessica Y. Lee UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com

Where art, science & technology meet Come experience the gentle side of Dentistry Preventive, Restorative & Cosmetic Dentistry

Mandy Ghaffarpour, DDS, Steven M. Hart, DMD & David E McGlohon DDS Studio G is Now Welcoming New Patients!

DRS. GHAFFARPOUR, HART, AND MCGLOHON ARE PANKEY AFFILIATED DENTISTS

2010-2019

104 N. Elliott Rd, Chapel Hill, NC 27514

919.942.7163 | StudioGDentist.com

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Charles U. Mauney Jr. Clifton & Mauney Orthodontics & Pediatric Dentistry 77 Vilcom Center Dr., Ste. 310, Chapel Hill 919-933-1007; cliftonandmauney.com Rocio B. Quinonez UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com Avni C. Rampersaud Chapel Hill Pediatric Dentistry 205 Sage Rd., Ste. 202, Chapel Hill 919-929-0489; bigsmiles4kids.com Kevin Ricker Chatham Pediatric Dentistry 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 120, Chapel Hill 919-391-3813; chathampediatricdentistry.com


TO P D ENT I STS

J. Tim Wright UNC School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com PERIODONTICS Craig Dorion North Carolina Periodontics & Implant Center 920 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-636-3091; ncimplantcenter.com Timothy W. Godsey Chapel Hill Periodontics & Implants 150 Providence Rd., Ste. 200, Chapel Hill 919-968-1778; chapelhillperio.com

PROSTHODONTICS Ingeborg J. De Kok UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com

E. Leland Webb Chapel Hill Dental Group 1721 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-967-9291; teethpeople.com

Ibrahim S. Duqum UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com

Alexandra B. Yarborough UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com CHM

We go the extra smile.

Waka Kadoma North Carolina Periodontics & Implant Center 920 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-636-3091; ncimplantcenter.com

Antonio Moretti UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com Jonathan Reside UNC Adams School of Dentistry 919-537-3939; uncdentists.com Alice Wu NC Periodontics & Implant Center 920 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-636-3091; ncimplantcenter.com

Comprehensive pediatric dentistry and orthodontic care for your entire family. Get full service dental care at our modern, state-of-the-art practice located at 77 Vilcom Center Drive in Chapel Hill. Call 919-933-1007 to request an appointment. cliftonandmauney.com Celebrating 20 years of pediatric dentistry and orthodontic care in Chapel Hill.

& on

Maun

ey

Or tho don tics & Ped iatr ic De nti str y

Clif t

Arnold T. McClain 601 W. Rosemary St., Ste. 216, Chapel Hill 919-537-9774; gumsandimplants.org

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PHOTO BY BETH MANN

BUSINESS

Derek Wilson, Cole Brisson, Rob Noti, Jason Merrill, the owner, and Mark Overby of Back Alley Bikes in Carrboro.

THE FIGHT FOR A LIVING WAGE

Orange County Living Wage has made progress by focusing on one business at a time

T

BY MICHAEL McELROY

he North Carolina General Assembly is considering a bill to raise the minimum wage from the federal standard of $7.25, which has not moved for 10 years, to a living wage of $15 by 2024. The bill is in the crucial fight-it-out

stage and is far from certain to progress beyond it, much less to pass and become law. For advocates and lobbyists on both sides, it is time for all hands. But Susan Romaine, the chair of Orange County Living Wage (OCLW), is not among those casing the capitol looking for arms to twist. She’s got plenty to do right here. The fight over the minimum wage has several fronts,

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but the basics are relatively uncomplicated. The minimum wage has not moved since 2009, the longest time without an increase since Congress implemented it in 1938. The cost of living, however, increases every year, making the minimum wage a depreciating asset. It’s unclear, then, just what the minimum wage floor is meant to support – a single person cannot live on $7.25 an hour.

Therefore, advocates argue, there should be a living wage, the wage calculated so that a single person can meet rent, transportation and other necessary expenses without government assistance. Anti-minimum wage advocates, however, say, among other things, that the minimum wage is not meant to be a living wage, and that higher minimum wages are unaffordable to


Business

small businesses and would cause them to fail or to cut workforce. Bottom line, they say, government regulation of such a wide scale violates the Constitution and free-market principles. But OCLW avoids some of these arguments by thinking locally and by focusing on a voluntary system for living wages.

solve the problem of a $7.25 minimum wage, but we are going to take the first step in making change.’” She added,

the philosophy of paying higher wages and has a more affluent client base that can afford any corresponding higher prices. PHOTO BY BETH MANN

INSTEAD OF ASKING US WHY WE’RE PAYING A FAIR WAGE, YOU SHOULD BE ASKING EVERYONE ELSE WHY THEY AREN’T. – GAEL CHATELAIN, CO-OWNER OF NAPOLI

The group moves from business to business making economic and ethical arguments as to why the company should pay a living wage, which it calculates itself, adjusts every year and, based largely on Chapel Hill’s high rents, has set at $14.25 for 2019. Every two years, businesses have to recertify to the higher wage. As of June, the group had 185 members, ranging from dentist offices, realtors and law offices, to coffee houses, pizza places and bike shops. Shannon Media, Inc., the publisher of Chapel Hill Magazine, joined the group in November of 2018. Inspired by living wage groups in Asheville and Durham, Romaine said her group, which was formed in 2015 and has an annual budget of $30,000, was “really struck by the idea of a voluntary program, something that says ‘OK, we’re not going to

Derek Wilson of Back Alley Bikes, which joined Orange County Living Wage in 2015, the advocacy group’s first year. “That really excited us, that we could jump in right now and do something one business at a time.” OCLW’s success with living wages is driven primarily by the community’s clear desire to pay them. “We live in what I’d call a progressive community,” Romaine said. It lends itself to

Business owners here, Romaine said, likewise care “very passionately about a lot of these issues,” and are willing to do the hard work to put those passions into practice. It is not always an easy call, however. Like with all small businesses, Orange County enterprises “are stretched thin,” she said. The margins are

sometimes not about profits, but about mere survival. “So to get an owner who is willing to take on the added expense of [living wage and other initiatives] is a real credit to our small business community,” Romaine said. Gael Chatelain, who with his wife, Sonja, owns Napoli, a wood-fired pizza restaurant that opened in Carrboro in 2017, called it the “ethically right” thing to do. A living wage has been a part of the couple’s business philosophy from the beginning, he said. They started a couple of years before with one woodfired pizza food truck that he built himself. The couple worked with a small crew inside the cramped truck, next to a hot wood-burning oven, in the heat of North Carolina summers. When you build something with someone from scratch, he said, it’s unfathomable to pay them less than a living wage. When it was time to open the brick and mortar restaurant, Chatelain said, he knew he would use one of his two trucks to make the food, allowing them to choose a smaller place without a kitchen and to save substantially on rent. But even if they had those higher expenses, he said, they would still pay a living wage. “We would make it work,” he said, adding that the people who keep asking him about wages were missing the point. “Instead of asking us why we’re paying a fair wage” he said, “you should be asking everyone else why they aren’t.”

THE ECONOMICS Taylor Dansby, the general manager of Townsend Bertram & Co., the Carrboro outfitter store, said that the store

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PHOTO COURTESY OF NUGGET

ORANGE COUNTY LIVING WAGE

FOUNDED IN

2015

U.S. FEDERAL $ MINIMUM WAGE NORTH CAROLINA $ MINIMUM WAGE

7.25/hr

7.25/hr

Last time federal minimum wage was raised: July, 2009

LIVING WAGE FOR ORANGE COUNTY IN 2019

14.25/hr $ 12.75/ hr with employer-

PERCENTAGE OF CURRENT OCLW EMPLOYERS WHO HAVE RECERTIFIED

$

started looking into paying the wage in 2017, but it took a year to figure out how to implement a new wage structure. The benefits are real, however, he said. It allows a company to retain its best employees, helping to form a familiarity between staff and customers, something each business interviewed for this article said was of utmost importance. “We haven’t needed to hire anyone in months,” Dansby said, and “we have stability in staffing, which creates stability in the customer experience, which creates stability in the revenue stream. It’s just a good concept.” The formula makes employees more effective

provided insurance

29 + THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AVERAGE MINIMUM WAGE $ OF THOSE STATES

9.89/hr

PERCENTAGE OF OCLW EMPLOYERS WHO WERE ALREADY PAYING A LIVING WAGE WHEN THEY JOINED THE GROUP

THE REALITIES

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8,400

NUMBER OF STATES WITH MINIMUM WAGE HIGHER THAN THE FEDERAL WAGE

in the long run too, he said. “Human interaction is constant and we’re all batteries,” he said. “We get drained and need to be recharged. When you work 50 hours on the floor, and we have a high customer interaction expectation here, it’s a real open thing and it has a cost. Retail has a very high burnout rate, but paying a living wage helps us prevent that.” Whatever the benefits, they don’t come without costs.

Hannah Fussell and Ryan Cocca, two of the three heads of Nugget, the Hillsborough company that makes children’s play couches, said that the company joined the OCLW

87%

$

710,000

CUMULATIVE WAGE HIKE AMONG OCLW EMPLOYERS:

83% GRAPHIC BY KEITH WARTHER

LaDonna Wardlow of Nugget, the Hillsborough “play couch” maker. Nugget joined the living wage roster in June.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES AMONG THE LIVING WAGE EMPLOYERS


Business

Jason Merrill, the owner of Back Alley Bikes, said that he already paid his employees a living wage before joining the OCLW group. But, when he started the business he could not afford to. When he was able to start bringing on employees, he said, he paid them more than he paid himself. “My co-workers came first,” he said, “I made sure that if somebody got a raise it was them before me, because their work is every bit as important as my work. We’re all in it together. But by the time the living wage thing came around, the business had grown to a point where everyone could make a living.”

dragon that eats its own tail. “Sometimes, large corporations, headquartered in cities thousands of miles away, can afford rent in Chapel Hill and Carrboro in part because they pay less than our living wage,” Romaine said. “In fact, some highly profitable corporations in our community are paying much closer to a minimum wage of $7.25 than a living wage of $14.25. The $7 an

employers see hope, not just locally but beyond. “As we are making our really important next hires,” Fussell of Nugget said, “we want to make sure we write down our mission and values and have examples of what that looks like.” That example can prompt other companies to follow suit. “I don’t think old companies that have been running a long time will never change, I think

PHOTO COURTESY OF NUGGET

roster in June. The decision was one of values, they said, but it also took them some time to live up to them. “We’re quite young, and we were always in the same thought process that to be able to have a successful company in the Triangle, we wanted to do it right and wanted to be a leader,” Fussell said. But math can be cold, and they couldn’t afford to pay a living wage. “Things were extremely tight,” in those first years, Cocca said, and they had to take a more deliberate and patient view of their values. A fruitful holiday season last year, however, allowed them to “do things the way we always wanted to.” So for a business’s first few years, he said, a living wage might be more aspirational. “For many young businesses, it’s something you’d like to do and you have to figure out, ‘What are we going to have to do as a business, how many sales are we going to have to make during this period to allow ourselves to be able to pay that?’ I had another business [Thrill City, a clothing company] in Chapel Hill, and I was certainly not able to afford to pay people $15.” Romaine said that she understands this and tries to avoid any sense of shaming in her pitch to prospective employers. “We’re not in any way calling them out,” she said of the businesses that decline to join or that are unable to meet the recertification process. “We’re promoting and nurturing as much as possible along the way so that two years down the road they are able to make these adjustments.”

THE CHALLENGES Romaine, who is running for a spot on the Carrboro Board of Aldermen, said that some of the obstacles to scaling a living wage nationally also cause problems here. As Chapel Hill negotiates the presence of chain stores, for example, it faces the influence of larger companies that have Maurice Lea readies the Nugget for shipping. A living wage, huge numbers of employees the company said, is part of its mission statement. earning less than a living wage. As a result, these they will see value in [paying companies can afford to charge hour difference is often made up by the taxpayer, who foots a living wage.] It’s the type of less for their products. the bill for SNAP, subsidized thing that people in our age Additionally, Chapel Hill’s housing, Medicaid and other bracket are asking about. It’s residential and commercial rent governmental benefits that not stagnant,” Fussell, who is in prices are among the highest in some full-time workers need her mid-20s, said. the state. The rising retail rents just to eke by.” “The more we talk about it,” feed on a business’s ability to When prices push out a local Cocca agreed, “the more we’ll pay its employees, which eats business, she said, the question see a change.” into the employee’s ability to becomes, “Who moves in to As for OCLW, it continues pay residential rents, which replace these locally owned to take it a business at a time, makes it hard for people to live small businesses that feel and it is there, perhaps, that where they work, which makes personally connected to the the math is in its favor: There it harder for them to spend community?” are now 185 employers on the money in the community, a Despite the challenges, roster. Last year, Romaine said, cycle that exposes economics both Romaine and the OCLW there were 166. CHM as a form of ouroboros, the

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BUSINESS

BIZBRIEFS The Coalition NC, a selfdefense and fitness studio that offers Krav maga, yoga and other classes, opened in May on 1706 E. Franklin St.

„

NEW ON THE SCENE

In April, Gates Management & Realty and Interiors by Vickie McDaniel celebrated the opening of its new shared location at 236 Orange Grove St., its 25th anniversary in real estate and Vickie’s 30th anniversary in design with live jazz music.

Schoolkids Records, an indie record store on Franklin Street, launched a website in April that, among other things,

In April, UNC Health Care broke ground in Chapel Hill on a 150,000-square-foot Eastowne Medical Office Building, which will house specialty practices, including cardiology, endocrinology and hematology. It will also feature a urology clinic. This is one of seven projects that will add more than one-million square feet to the medical system’s already giant footprint.

WHAT AN HONOR

The Greater Chapel HillCarrboro Chamber of Commerce named 10 winners at the fifth annual Business Excellence Awards in May during a ceremony at the Paul Green Theatre. Kimberly Jeffs of NC Center for Resiliency won the Business Woman of the Year award; Elinor Landess of Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership won Young

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Professional of the Year; UNC Health Care won Large Business of the Year; Bold Construction won Mid-Size Business of the Year; Graphix Solution won Micro-Enterprise Business of the Year; School of Rock Chapel Hill won New Business of the Year; Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina won the Innovation Award; Dualogics won the University Born Business of the Year; Durham Technical Community College won the Community Impact Award; Chapel HillCarrboro Meals on Wheels won the Nonprofit of the Year.

landmark Franklin Street building with 118,517-squarefeet of office/retail space, the current site of CVS. The sale includes two adjacent buildings and a 276-space parking deck. Grubb Properties plans to take advantage of the investment and tax benefits from the area’s designation as an opportunity zone to turn the buildings into a hub for startups. The Subway on Jones Ferry Road celebrated its new ownership under Michael Rodriguez in May with free lunch.

MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS, PARTNERSHIPS, PROMOTIONS

In April, Orange County Department on Aging’s Dementia Friendly Orange County initiative added a new partner – The Downsizers, a move management company for seniors – as part of its commitment to increasing accommodation for people with dementia. Also in April, Grubb Properties purchased The Central, a

The Shark Tank-backed Chapel Hill startup, Sunscreenr, announced a partnership in May with the multi-billion-dollar eyewear company ZEISS Vision

„

Also in April, IndyCare, a retail health and wellness center that provides urgent care facilities at independently-owned pharmacies, opened its first walk-in clinic at 110 Boone Square St., Ste. 29A connected to the Hillsborough Pharmacy. IndyCare’s co-founder, Greg Vassie, and its president, Franklin Roye, plan to open other locations across North Carolina in collaboration with other independent pharmacies.

Mary Lopez Carter opened the first dedicated hemp store in Hillsborough, Carolina Hemp Hut, on May 30. This is the second location for Mary, who is also the founder of Hemp Oil Rockstar at The Streets at Southpoint mall in Durham.

„

allows users to purchase records directly and offers biographies of artists.


W H E R E L I VA B I L I T Y

FORECASTING

Hillsborough Young Professionals Group (part of the Hillsborough/Orange County Chamber of Commerce) is hosting its July Social event at Botanist & Barrel for a mead and cider tasting and a tour on July 10, 5:30-7 p.m. For information about membership, go to bit.ly/hboroypg. Dementia Friendly Orange County will lead a free training seminar on July 11, 8-9:30 a.m. for local small businesses to recognize and assist those with memory loss. The Orange County Public Library will host at the Hilsborough branch and provide a light breakfast before the training. business.hillsboroughchamber.com/events The Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce is hosting “Coffee with the Candidates,” where residents and guests can connect with future policy makers and unpack their proposed plans for the community at The Siena Hotel on Aug. 14, 8-10 a.m. carolinachamber.org/events

CHAPEL HILL M E E T S O P P O RT U N I T Y

EUROPA CENTER

100 Europa Drive SF Available: up to 47,000 SF Contact: Gary Hill – Avison Young (919) 913-1116 gary.hill@avisonyoung.com

The Kenan Institute and its affiliated centers are hosting an informational meet-and-greet at the Kenan Center with light bites and drinks on Aug. 28, 5-7 p.m. kenaninstitute.unc.edu

for a new tablet that tells users how much UV protection their eyeglasses provide. Sunscreenr’s current product is a UV camera that enables users to snap a photo of themselves to see if they are inadequately covered in sunscreen. In May, Boyd Watterson Asset Management of Chicago purchased the Orange County Social Services office at Hillsborough Commons shopping center for $8.75 million. Tricor International Corp. of Florida, the previous owner, still owns other parcels in the shopping center, according to county documents.

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

In March, Fifth Season Gardening Co. launched a Hemp Growers Wholesale Catalog and a full range of consulting services. The Carrboro business, with three other locations, launched this initiative to support licensed hemp farmers and growers in North Carolina’s industrial hemp pilot program.

In its 10th year, the 2019 UNCChapel Hill Innovation Showcase at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education drew a record number of attendees in April. Some 535 attendees and 50 presenters pitched and exhibited their businesses, social ventures and research.

$$$

SECU BUILDING

5901 Chapel Hill Blvd. SF Available: up to 210,000 SF on 4 floors Contact: John MacDonell, JLL (919) 424-8166 john.macdonell@am.jll.com

For Lease

In May, FeedStation, a platform that provides retailers access to multiple online marketplaces, was one of six North Carolina startups awarded $300,000 EXCHANGE AT MEADOWMONT in seed grants by the 1414 Raleigh Rd entrepreneurial development 5901 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. Space coming available within iconic building SF Available: up to 20,000 SF foundation, NC IDEA. – Approximately 210,000 RSF available over four floors Chapel Hill, NC 27514

Contact: Tripp Bradshaw, Capital Associates

– Completely renovated, state of the art lobby and amenities (919) 749-0004 Also in May, the Bill & Melinda – Brand new, high efficiency building systems: HVAC, Electrical, Fire, etc. tbradshaw@casso.com Gates Foundation donated $14 – Newly constructed outdoor patio with tree canopy, landscape million to UNC for global OB/ islands, tables, and amenities GYN research. The funding will go toward launching – Above market parking ratio: 5.2/1,000 RSF

John MacDonell +1 919 424 8166 john.macdonell@am.jll.com Ashley Lewis

+1 919 424 8462 YOUR PATH TO BUSINESS ashley.lewis@am.jll.com – Visibility from 15/501; 43,000 vehicles per day two projects: one to develop SUCCESS STARTS HERE wearable medical devices to– Located within walking distance of new Wegmans

monitor laboring mothers and their babies during childbirth, and another to develop an affordable ultrasound device that requires minimal operator expertise. CHM

Visit open2.biz for the resources you need to grow your business in Chapel Hill

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BUSINESS

NETWORKING DOWNTOWN PARTNERSHIP’S ANNUAL MEETING

1

Business and community leaders gathered at The Carolina Inn on April 26 for the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership’s Annual Meeting. Matt Gladdek, executive director of the Partnership, led a panel discussion “about forming a shared vision for downtown,” which included Emil Kang, the executive and artistic director of Carolina Performing Arts; Gordon Merklein, the associate vice chancellor of UNC’s University Real Estate Operations; Jay Patel, the president of Wintergreen Hospitality and the owner of The Franklin Hotel; and Andrea Reusing, the owner and head chef of Lantern.

2

1 Elizabeth Flake, Katie Loovis, Dan Jewell, Tim Dalton and Bennett Jethro. 2 Pat Evans, chair of Friends of the Downtown, Josh Gurlitz, Melanie Biese, Courtney Toledo and Rebecca Paul.

1

2

1 Carrboro Mayor Lydia Lavelle, Carrboro Alderwoman Barbara Foushee and Braxton Foushee. 2 Margaret Miller Growe and Karen Kincaid Dunn.

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INNOVATION BREAKFAST Club Nova held its 2019 “InNOVAtion Breakfast,” an event that allows club members to speak to the community about how Club Nova has changed their lives, on April 11 at the Carolina Club. The nonprofit, which assists adults with severe mental illnesses, raised close to $70,000 in the days around the event. The money will go toward the capital campaign to help build a new headquarters, Club Nova Executive Director Karen Kincaid Dunn said. CHM


conn

t c e

State of the Community Report & Conference Thurs, Sept 19 7:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. UNC Friday Center Chapel Hill

Join 400 other local influencers for a breakfast briefing on the state of our community. The Chamber President and CEO, Aaron Nelson, will report on social, environmental, and economic indicators that will help you make better decisions for your business and community. Breakfast/Report: 7:30-9:30 a.m. Conference: 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Register at carolinachamber.org/sotc 919.967.7075 104 S. Estes Drive Chapel Hill

Presenting Sponsor

Research by


and yes,

The Echoes troupe provides an outlet for those who may have ‘forgotten how to play’ By M i c h ae l M c E lroy | P h o to g rap hy by Beth Mann

I

n a video conference call a few weeks ago, an instructor told the Echoes that he’d been hoping to see creatures emerge from the cadaver they had made together. Soon after recounting this memory to her compatriots, one of the Echoes gnarled herself into a troll and pouted aloud that a baby was too ugly to eat. For the Echoes, improv is serious business. They are a six-member performance troupe that follows a style of improvisation called J.T.S. Brown, which was created by the actor Craig Cackowski in Chicago and relies on “dream logic,” “physical transformation” and “group mind.” The style fits them well. Many of the members have retired from successful and demanding careers and all but one are over 50. But this is no hobby for them. 

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The Echoes, an improvisational troupe: Anne Deloria, the group’s movement teacher, Von Hill, Jennifer Van Vickle, Kim Andrews, Carol Machuca, Barbara Grubb and Carolyn Cole, the founder.

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ABOVE Jennifer Van Vickle, Carolyn Cole and Barbara Grubb play trolls. BELOW Anne Deloria teaches the group the subtleties of movement. ABOVE RIGHT The Echoes work well and laugh easily together. After a recent performance, Carolyn says, audience members complimented them on their “group mind.”

Their rehearsals are focused and physical, and they have performed at The PIT Chapel Hill and across the state. Last month, they did a gig in Richmond, Virginia. Carolyn Cole, a retired educator and psychiatric social worker, founded the group in January of 2018, but had long found improv intriguing. She has taken classes at the Upright Citizens Brigade in New York and at The Second City in Chicago and teaches them through Duke adult education programs and at The PIT. But she started her own team to intensify her progress. The techniques and particulars of improv are “refreshing,” she says. And liberating. 110

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“I will always be an older woman in any scripted piece,” she says, “but in improv, I can be a child, I can be a man. It’s wide open. There is just a pleasure and joy to be in as many shoes as I want to be in. I can be ageless.” At the troll rehearsal in June, this free range is clear. The dreamscapes the team create are often funny – at one point multiple trolls joined the debate over whether the ugly baby was inedible until another walked up and rendered it moot, “It was delicious.” And it can be stripped bare and disturbing: Barbara Grubb, a former art curator with an expressive face, becomes a grandmother whispering her secret glee that the Earth is warming: “It’s a little scary what will happen to the grandkids,” she says, creeping around the stage. “But I like it warm – because my bones creak in the cold.” In every imagining, the Echoes fully commit to the moment and to each other. To do otherwise would be a betrayal. Kim Andrews, who in her career helped train corporate leaders in instructional design, joined the Echoes last year, but has been improvising for 11 years. She, like Carolyn, has taught improv classes at Duke’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The benefits, she says, have particular resonance for people 50 and older, whose experience lets them draw from a deep creative spring. “There’s no script in life either,” she says, “and we know these people,” she says of the characters they create on stage. “We’ve been these people,” and it is “fun to be able to laugh at them. As we get older we get so serious, we forget how to play.” Jennifer Van Vickle, who retired recently as a diagnostic radiologist, agreed, saying that improv freed her from the necessary restrictions of her profession. It “changed my sense of humor,” she says. “It made me realize how serious I am,” a metric understandable given that she often had to tell her patients that they had cancer. “The levity [on stage] gave a really nice contrast” to her life, she says. It’s a recurring theme among the members: Improv’s lessons extend beyond the stage. Von Hill, who works in communications for a nonprofit that helps teach boating skills, says that when she turned 50 a few years ago, she felt an urge “to do things that scared me.” A colleague

In improv, I can be a child, I can be a man. It’s wide open. There is just a pleasure and joy to be in as many shoes as I want to be in. – Carolyn Cole, founder of Echoes

told her about improv classes, and Von thought that certainly applied. “I had to push myself out the door every week for that first class,” she says, “but it was like I found my people.” The classes made her more confident. “Being on stage and being authentic scared me,” she says. “It sounds ridiculous to me now, but at the time, I was afraid to be vulnerable. We don’t ever show our real face to people,” she says. “Sometimes fiction is more true than reality.” Nearly all members expressed the art’s sustaining resonance, especially, “Yes, and …,” its sacred tenet. Whatever a partner throws at you, you accept it and build on it. “No,” is a curse on the improv stage. “Yes, and ...,” also serves life in general. “It makes you a much better listener,” Von says. “Saying ‘yes’ really just means you aren’t coming into a conversation with your own agenda. It means that you just surrender yourself to whatever is in the moment and accept whatever is there.” Kim agrees. “It’s about trusting the other team members,” she says, “and whatever happens, you just deal with it, try to make eye contact and just keep working together.” Near the end of the rehearsal in June, the group moved around the space and froze in a tight, multi-layered tableau like a human forest. Carol Machuca, the only Echo under 50 and with a focused but slightly reserved energy, bent down behind the group to start a scene. She began to push through the tangle of arms and legs like a child lost in woods acrawl with witches. “Let me out,” she says over and over, straining against the legs and arms and hands and bodies that, at least for the moment, had become thick vines and trees. “That’s beautiful,” Anne Deloria, the group’s movement coach, says when the scene is over. “It doesn’t have to be fancy,” she says. “You just want to think of dimensions you can hold. Because you don’t know how long the scene is going to last.” The Echoes mill around for a moment, laughing together, resetting their focus. “OK,” Carolyn says, “let’s do it again and see what happens.” CHM

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THE 2019 DIRECTORY OF CONTINUING CARE, ASSISTED LIVING, INDEPENDENT LIVING, 55+ LIVING AND COHOUSING RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITIES BROOKDALE CHAPEL HILL ASSISTED LIVING 2220 Farmington Dr., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee One-time community fee, call for pricing Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options Month-to-month Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Contact Information 919-933-1430; brookdale.com BROOKDALE CHAPEL HILL ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA CARE 2230 Farmington Dr., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee One-time community fee, call for pricing. Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options Month-to-month Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Contact Information 919-929-5850; brookdale.com CAMBRIDGE HILLS ASSISTED LIVING 140 Brookstone Ln., Pittsboro Entrance Fee Community fee of $1,000 Monthly Fee Range $3,900 – $6,000 Contract Options None. Requires 14day notice before moving out Refund Options Prorated for the first month from the move-in date Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Minimum Age 65 Contact Information Ronda Stubbs; 919-545-9573 or ronda@silver-thread. com; cambridgehillsal.com CAMBRIDGE HILLS ASSISTED LIVING 5660 Durham Rd., Roxboro Entrance Fee All-inclusive rates with no entry fees Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options None Refund Options Requires 14-day notice Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Minimum Age 55 112

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Contact Information Sandra H. Carden, scarden@cvsliving.com; 336-598-4697; cambridgehills.com CARILLON ASSISTED LIVING OF DURHAM 4713 Garrett Rd., Durham Entrance Fee Application fee required Monthly Fee Call for pricing Contract Options Monthly rate includes care, dining, activities, laundry and housekeeping Refund Options 14-day notice required Medicare Certified Not Applicable Long-Term Care Insurance Required No Minimum Age 60 Contact Information 919-401-1101; carillonassistedliving.com CARILLON ASSISTED LIVING OF HILLSBOROUGH 1911 Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough Entrance Fee Application fee required Monthly Fee Call for pricing Contract Options All-inclusive monthly rate includes care, dining, activities, laundry and housekeeping. Refund Options Requires 14-day notice Medicare Certified Not Applicable Long-Term Care Insurance Required No Minimum Age 60 Contact Information 919-732-9040; carillonassistedliving.com CHATHAM RIDGE ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE 114 Polks Village Ln., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee One month’s rent Monthly Fee Range See website Contract Options Month-to-month Refund Options Community fees within 30 days of move in Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-918-7872; ridgecare.com

July/August 2019

MEBANE RIDGE ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE 1999 S. NC Hwy. 119, Mebane Entrance Fee One month’s rent as deposit, 20% discount through June Monthly Fee Range $3,195 – $6,595 Contract Options Month-to-month Refund Options None Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted, not required Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-568-0083; mebaneridge.com CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES (CCRC) CAROL WOODS 750 Weaver Dairy Rd., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee Range $97,600 – $454,500 Monthly Fee Range $2,466 – $5,342 Contract Options Modified: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and some health-related services. Health-related services are provided at discounted rate. Refund Options Declining Refund: Pay entry fee; full refund in first 90 days; refund declines at rate of 2% each additional month; after 50 months, no refund. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required; could help pay for discounted per diems. Minimum Age 65 (co-applicant must be at least 55) Contact Information 919-968-4511; 800-518-9333; carolwoods.org THE CEDARS OF CHAPEL HILL 100 Cedar Club Circle (Meadowmont), Chapel Hill Entrance Fee Range $265,000 – $750,000* Monthly Fee Range $2,957 – $5,961 Contract Options *Equity: Actual real estate purchase, with transfer


of ownership of the unit. If resident moves to health center, no added amount except two meals per day. After 90 days, member pays discounted rate. Refund Options Not applicable because of ownership Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 50) Contact Information 919-259-7000; 877-433-3669; cedarsofchapelhill.com CAROLINA MEADOWS 100 Carolina Meadows, Chapel Hill A vibrant community where residents live a lifestyle of wellness and engagement. The 168-acre campus includes a nine-hole golf course, pristine walking trails, tennis courts, community gardens and more. Residents enjoy six distinctive dining venues, a state-of-the-art wellness center and an auditorium that offers many fascinating lectures and performances. Entrance Fee Range $129,700 – $602,900 Monthly Fee Range $2,852 – $4,410 Contract Options Fee for Service: Housing, residential services and guaranteed access to healthrelated services in exchange for entrance fee and monthly fee. Health-related services are provided at per-diem rates, which vary. Home Care services are also available. Equity: See below. Refund Options Fully Refundable Equity; Occupancy Right; upon departure, resident/estate receives refund based on Entry Fee calculation and, if applicable, additional 50% of equity in the residence; calculation is current Entry Fee minus remarketing and refurbishing fees compared to original Entry Fee, and then sharing in appreciation of unit if new balance exceeds original payment.

Medicare Certified Yes, Medicare Part B Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but welcome Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-942-4014; 800-458-6756; carolinameadows.org

month until 10% of fee is accrued; refund limited to 90%. Medicare Certified Yes; rehab on-site Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but welcome Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-384-2475; 800-960-7737; croasdailevillage.org

CROASDAILE VILLAGE 2600 Croasdaile Farm Pkwy., Durham Set on 110 acres in a pastoral setting, which provides a country feel fewer than six miles from downtown Durham and three miles from Duke University. Croasdaile is within the distinguished residential neighborhood of Croasdaile Farm. Residents enjoy numerous green spaces with yards, gardening and plenty of walking trails, a dog park, lakes and the security of a full continuum of care on-site. The central campus buildings are connected, with a state-of-the-art wellness center, large heated pool, auditorium, woodworking shop, art studio, multiple dining venues and a chapel. Entrance Fee Range $57,014 – $372,554 (includes new residences) Monthly Fee Range $1,936 – $4,428 (includes new residences) Contract Options Fee for Service: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and some health-related services. Advanced levels of health services are provided at per-diem rates. Utilities bundled. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1: Pay lower entry fee; refund declines at rate of 2% per month; after 50 months, no refund. Option 2: 50% Refund – pay higher entry fee; refund declines at a rate of 2% per month until 50% of residence fee is accrued; refund limited to 50%. Option 3: 90% Refund – pay higher entry fee; refund declines at a rate of 2% per

THE FOREST AT DUKE 2701 Pickett Rd., Durham Celebrating 27 years of community, The Forest at Duke is a vibrant continuing care retirement community located in the heart of Durham. Homes, cottages, apartments – each offer spacious, contemporary living with access to a range of amenities coupled with wellness. At The Forest, discover a retirement that is as varied, engaging and multi-faceted as you are. A leader in social responsibility and outreach, The Forest strives to strengthen the community and organizations that enrich the lives of Durham residents. Entrance Fee Range $92,345 – $561,705 Monthly Fee Range $3,110 – $7,240 Contract Options Modified: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping, and some health-related services. Healthrelated services are provided at a greatly discounted rate and are free for a specified number of days. Refund Options The Forest retains $10,000 of each person’s entry fee as a health care reserve. The remaining balance of the entry fee, the residence fee, is refundable based on the following plan: 2% of the Residence Fee accrues to The Forest at Duke each month. The refund decreases to zero over 50 months. 50% and 90% Entry Fee Plans are offered. Please contact

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A CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

the Sales & Marketing Team for current pricing and eligibility. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but welcome. Minimum Age 65 (co-applicant must be at least 62) Contact Information 919-490-8000; 800-474-0258; forestduke.org

LIVE MORE

Can your retirement home be your dream home?

M OR E COMFORT. “We have enjoyed

When it comes to retirement living, Carolina Meadows offers more. Here, you’ll find beautiful homes that are personally customized for you to your taste, vibrant surroundings, diverse dining options and endless opportunities for the mind, body and spirit.

living at Carolina Meadows from the first day we moved into our spacious villa. The open, custom layout suits our relaxed lifestyle.” —TAIMI

1-800-458-6756 www.carolinameadows.org Only Carolina Meadows offers the EQUITY ADVANTAGETM For more information about our vibrant, independent community in Chapel Hill, NC, book your tour today.

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GALLOWAY RIDGE AT FEARRINGTON 3000 Galloway Ridge Rd., Pittsboro Crafted with heart, soul and Southern charm, Galloway Ridge is more than retirement living – it’s a secure, health-conscious lifestyle destination. The 50-acre campus is just south of Chapel Hill and adjacent to Fearrington Village, an 1,100acre planned community, offering miles of trails and sidewalks. Jordan Lake and the Haw River are just a short distance away for our outdoor enthusiasts. Galloway Ridge’s main building includes 248 independent living apartments, library and business center, living room, Chapin Auditorium, Weathersfield Café, Bistro Dining Room, Camellia Fine Dining Room, Belties Lounge, billiards room, Players Lounge, a movie theater with stadium seating, art studio, woodworking shop, multiple meeting spaces and conference room. The Medicare-certified health care center, The Arbor, is connected to the main building and offers 91 private rooms for assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing. The residents of the 52 independent living villas have a short walk to all of the amenities of the main building. The Galloway Ridge WellPlex allows residents to maintain their optimal level of health and well-being. It includes the Duke Center for Living, a 20,000-square-foot fitness center, Duke Primary Care and the Center for Physical Rehabilitation. For on-campus primary care services, residents can choose between UNC Health Care within the main building or Duke Primary Care in the WellPlex. Residents and staff volunteer thousands of hours each year to local agencies and partnerships. The Charitable Fund and Community Grant Program supports Chatham County charities, governmental agencies and schools. Entrance Fee Range $222,000 – $1,479,000 Monthly Fee Range $3,077 – $7,160 Contract Options Extensive: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and unlimited assisted and skilled nursing. Little or no


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additional fees required as one moves from one level of care to another. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1: Time-Sensitive – Pay lower entry fee; refund declines at rate of 4% in first month; 2% each additional month; after 4 years, no refund. Option 2: 90% Refund, Not TimeSensitive – Pay higher entry fee; receive 90% of what you paid in. Option 3: 75% Refund, Not TimeSensitive – Pay higher entry fee; receive 75% of what you paid in. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required Minimum age 62 Contact Information 919-545-2647; gallowayridge.com

GLENAIRE 4000 Glenaire Circle, Cary Entrance Fee Range $65,000 – $367,000 Monthly Fee Range $2,445 – $4,454 Contract Options Modified: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and some health-related services. Health-related services are provided at subsidized rate or are free for specified number of days. Refund Options Option 1: Declining Refund – refund declines at rate of 2% per month for 48 months. Option 2: 50% refundable. Option 3: 90% refundable. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 58) Contact Information 919-460-8095; 800-225-9573; glenaire.org

SEARSTONE 17001 Searstone Dr., Cary Entrance Fee Range $360,000 – $840,500 Monthly Fee Range $3,000 – $6,700; Second Person Fee – $1,410 Contract Options Type A LifeCare contract. Residents pay a one-time LifeCare fee to cover costs of assisted living, skilled nurses and/or memory support. The LifeCare program has significant tax advantages and works well with long-term care policies. Refund Options Entrance fee 100% refundable Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Yes Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-234-0339; info@searstonerla.org; searstone.com SPRINGMOOR 1500 Sawmill Rd., Raleigh Entrance Fee Range Call for pricing. Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing. 

We can help guide you to quality senior care options ASSISTED LIVING • INDEPENDENT LIVING • MEMORY CARE • SKILLED NURSING • IN-HOME CARE

A COMMUNITY SERVICE AT

NO COST TO YOU

We can refer your family to a nationwide network of professionals CarePatrol works with a complete team of professionals so we can refer your family and make some of your challenges a little easier. From ElderLaw attorneys to hospices, we can connect you to the right people at the right time.

There’s no better way to find senior care options in your area Our local advisors prescreen every care community in our network. They also preview each of their care and violation histories to ensure that the facility provides safe, quality care. Not all communities have the necessary care history to be accepted as part of the CarePatrol network.

Safer Senior Living. Your Goal, Our Mission.

Jonathan Clark, Senior Care Consultant 919 338 2020 direct 919 338 2023 office

Durham.CarePatrol.com

Visit us on  at CarePatrol of Durham & Chapel Hill

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ADVERTISEMENT

At Galloway Ridge, we are people of all kinds. We are artists, writers, teachers, athletes, historians, activists and innovators, and that does not just apply to our residents. Our employees are dreamers and doers.

AT G A L LOWAY R ID G E W E A RE

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PASSION To apply for a position at Galloway Ridge visit gallowayridge.com/careers Galloway Ridge is an E.O.E, M/F/V/D and Drug and Tobacco free Environment.


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Contract Options Modified: Housing, residential services and some healthrelated services in exchange for entrance fee and monthly fee, which includes 30 days of free health care (with a maximum balance of 90 days), then is available at a discounted rate. Refund Options Option 1: Life Occupancy – Residence & Care refund declines at 4% per month for 25 months, then no refund. Option 2: 50% Life Equity – refund declines at 2% per month for 25 months. The remaining 50% is returned to the resident or estate after residency is terminated and within 30 days of re-occupancy of the residential unit. Option 3: 100% Life Equity – 100% of the Residence & Care fee is returned to the resident or estate after residency is terminated. The refund is available, once residency is terminated, six years after initial movein date, or 30 days after re-occupancy of the residential unit, if six years has passed.

Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Not required Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-848-7000; springmoor.org TWIN LAKES 3701 Wade Coble Dr., Burlington An intentional community where people move from throughout the country. But all residents have at least one thing in common: They want to have a well-rounded life surrounded by people who are engaged and living purposefully. More than 550 people in independent living enjoy the 218-acre community and all the amenities that create a lifestyle where people of all types thrive. In addition to the spacious campus, this is a unique

CCRC: there’s no mandatory meal plan; Twin Lakes offers comparably lower fees; and the neighborhoods are filled with people from diverse backgrounds and life experiences. Entrance Fee Range $55,000 – $395,000 Monthly Fee Range $1,533 – $2,914 Contract Options Fee-for-service contract only Refund Options Thirty-month declining refund and 50% refund available (50% available on Garden Home only). Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 62) Contact Information 336-5381572; twinlakescomm.org 

There’s a lot to love about our 100-acre community. Both beauty and activities abound, as does the warmth of a welcoming culture. Whether you immerse yourself in the serenity of our walking trails or stoke your intellect in a class at Duke, happiness is yours to pursue however you please. CroasdaileVillage.com Owned and operated by The United Methodist Retirement Homes, Inc.

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Live, learn and grow at a place where community comes first. Twin Lakes Community: It’s not summer camp or a cruise ship vacation. It’s an intentional community. Where independence is treasured. And, the transition isn’t about what you give up, but what you gain. With neighbors who understand where you are in life. And a staff who does, too. A community where people of all types thrive, living a life that matters. It’s all right here.

A division of Lutheran Retirement Ministries of Alamance County, North Carolina

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THE VILLAGE AT BROOKWOOD 1860 Brookwood Ave., Burlington Residents live in a community that feels like one big family. The Village at Brookwood’s intimate size allows the building of strong friendships. Residents can participate in a full array of physical activities that promote healthy living, feed their competitive spirit with fun games and mental challenges, de-stress with their favorite hobby or just relax. The community prides itself on its dining including two newly renovated options: the Edith Street Café and Lakeside Dining, plus a brand new bistro. What could be better than an engaging conversation with friends over a delicious meal prepared by the executive chef while the dining

staff tends to your every need? Entrance Fee Range $92,800 – $536,300 Monthly Fee Range $2,189 – $4,287 Contract Options Option 1: Extensive – LifeCare Residential Living: Garden Homes & Apartments, bundled services, campus amenities, maintenance and guaranteed future health care all covered by the entrance fee and monthly fee. When moving from one level of care to another, the monthly fee reflects a 58% reduction of the daily skilled nursing rate. Option 2: Fee for Service – Garden Homes & Apartments, limited bundled services, campus amenities, maintenance and guaranteed access to future health care are provided in exchange for entrance

fee and monthly fee. Health-related services are provided at the perdiem rate. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1: Extensive – Standard Refund is declining over 47 months. 50% and 90% Refund plans also available. Option 2: Fee for Service – Standard Refund declines over 47 months. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but can help with costs related to Assisted Living, Memory Care or Skilled Care for Fee-for-Service or LifeCare plans. Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 55) Contact Information 336570-8440; 800-282-2053; villageatbrookwood.org

KEEP GOING

Vibrant living. Continuing care. In the heart of Durham. 2701 Pickett Road / Durham, NC 27705 919-433-2365 / forestduke.org

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KEEP GROWING

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WINDSOR POINT 1221 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina Entrance Fee Range $58,000 – $233,000 Monthly Fee Range $2,276 – $3,284 for independent living; $3,642 – $6,014 with health-related services Contract Options Modified: Housing, residential services and specified amount of health-related services in exchange for the entrance fee and monthly fee. Health-related services are provided at subsidized rate or are free for a specified number of days. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1: Life occupancy entrance fee; pay up front and 2% taken out each month over 50-month period, after 50 months there is no refund; before then, pro-rated refund available. Option 2: 50% Refund; refund declines at a rate of 2% per month for 25 months until 50% of residence fee is accrued; refund received only after resident passes away or moves. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but helpful Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant no younger than 55) Contact Information 919-552-4580; 800-552-0213; windsorpoint.com INDEPENDENT SENIOR LIVING ATRIA 5705 Fayetteville Rd., Durham Entrance Fee $5,000 Monthly Fee Range Independent living: $4,300– $4,475/one bedroom; $4,600 – $5,000/two bedroom; cottages: $5,400 – $5,700 Contract Options Independent Living: No lease term, no buy-in, month-tomonth rental with 60-day move-out notice. Assisted Living: No lease term, no buy-in, month-to-month rental with 14-day move-out notice. Refund Options Sixty-day notice to terminate independent living lease. Medicare Certified No, except for therapy services. Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted if the resident meets the criteria of the policy. Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-401-0100; atriasouthpointwalk.com

BARTLETT RESERVE 300 Meredith Dr., Durham Entrance Fee $3,000 – First month’s rent Monthly Fee Range $3,550 – $3,950 Contract Options Sign a year lease, but can give 60-day notice to leave. Refund Options Non-refundable. Medicare Certified Therapy services are covered by Medicare. Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted for personal care and veterans benefits. Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-3611234; Laura Martin, Certified Senior Advisor, lmartin@bartlettreserve.com; bartlettreserve.com DURHAM REGENT 3007 Pickett Rd., Durham Entrance Fee Range $2,750 – $4,250 Monthly Fee Range $2,299–$3,999 on single occupancy, second-person fee. Contract Options Month-to-month leases. All independent living. Medicare Certified No medical services included

Long-Term Care Insurance N/A Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-490-6224; durhamregent.com EMERALD POND 205 Emerald Pond Ln., Durham Entrance Fee Range Community fee of $2,850 – $4,700 Monthly Fee Range $2,244 – $4,599 Contract Options Month-to-month leases. No buy-in fees. Refund Options A partial refund of community fee if resident stays less than three months Medicare Certified No medical services included Long-Term Care Insurance N/A Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-493-4713; emeraldpond.net TWIN RIVERS INDEPENDENT SENIOR LIVING 25 Rectory St., Pittsboro Entrance Fee $2,750 per person Monthly Fee Range $2,750/one bedroom, $3,500/two bedroom 

The local guidance you need for the care they deserve

Call Today!

919.241.3414

ALLISON SCHNEIDER-GULLEDGE SENIOR LIVING CARE ADVISOR

TRIANGLE.ASSISTEDLIVINGLOCATORS.COM

No-cost senior placement service Senior Apartments/Independent Living Assisted Living Homes & Communities Personal & Adult Care Homes Alzheimer’s & Memory Care Communities Nursing Homes or In-Home Care

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Second Person Fee $750 Contract Options None. Requires one month’s notice prior to moving out. Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Not accepted Minimum Age 65 Contact Information 919-545-0149 or 919-548-7538; kirby@silver-thread.com and silver-thread.com

POST-ACUTE CONTINUING CARE SYSTEMS HILLCREST CONVALESCENT CENTER 1417 W. Pettigrew St., Durham Entrance Fee No deposit or application fee required Monthly Fee Call for pricing Contract Options All-inclusive monthly rate for short-term, long-term, assisted living or respite stays Refund Options Pay only for the days spent, any unused daily rate refunded

2019-06-11 DS Ad - 4.9444x7.pdf 1 6/12/2019 6:53:45 PM

Minimum Age N/A Contact Information 919-286-7705; admissions@hillcrestnc.com HILLCREST RALEIGH AT CRABTREE VALLEY 3830 Blue Ridge Rd., Raleigh Entrance Fee No deposit or application fee required Monthly Fee Call for pricing Contract Options All-inclusive monthly rate for short-term, long-term or respite stays Refund Options Pay only for the days spent, any unused daily rate refunded Minimum Age N/A Contact Information 919-781-4900; admissions@hillcrestraleighnc.com HOME HEALTH HILLCREST HOME HEALTH OF THE TRIANGLE 1000 Bear Cat Way, Ste. 104, Morrisville Personal care, respite care in-home support and companionship Contact Information 919-468-1204 Outpatient Therapy & Wellness (New location) HILLCREST THERAPY & WELLNESS 4215 University Dr., Ste. B2, Durham Physical therapy, specialty treatments, wellness services Contact Information 919-627-6700

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SIGNATURE HEALTHCARE OF CHAPEL HILL 1602 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee None. No application or deposit fee. Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options All inclusive monthly rate for short-term, long-term, assisted living or respite stays Refund Options Refunds for any days not used Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but accepted Contact Information 919-967-1418; shcofchapelhill.com; admission.chapelhill@ signaturehealthcarellc.com

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55+ COMMUNITIES CAROLINA ARBORS BY DEL WEBB 3055 Del Webb Arbors Dr., Durham Price Range of Houses See website Number of Units 1,256 Resale Status New and resale Average Size of Houses 1,100 – 2,600 sq. ft. 122

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Amenities Included 37,000-squarefoot clubhouse, lifestyle director, fitness center, tennis courts, bocce ball courts, indoor pool, outdoor pool. Sales Contact 877-266-0297, carolinaarbors@delwebb.com; delwebb.com/carolinaarbors CAROLINA PRESERVE 115 Allforth Place, Cary Awarded the Community Excellence Award by the Community Association Institute. Price Range of Houses high-$200s – low-$500s Number of Units 1,360 Resale Status Resale only Average Size of Houses 1,200 – 3,500 sq. ft. Amenities Included Tennis courts, bocce ball courts, indoor pool, outdoor pool, fitness center, clubhouse, access to Town of Cary Greenway Contact 919-467-7837; cpamberly.net CORBINTON LIVING 680 Market House Way, Hillsborough Price Range of Houses low-$300s – mid-$400s Number of Units 70 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 1,600 – 2,100 sq. ft. Amenities Included Clubhouse, walking trail, dog park, community gardens, yard maintenance, exterior home maintenance Sales Contact Julie Amos, 919-260-6348; corbintonliving.com; info@corbintonliving.com THE COURTYARDS AT ANDREWS CHAPEL 1007 Havenwood Ln., Durham Price Range of Houses mid-$300s – low-$500s Number of Units 120 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 1,500 – 4,000 sq. ft. Amenities Included Large clubhouse, outdoor saltwater swimming pool, fitness center, walking trails, pavilion Sales Contact Kaylee Daum, 919-289-5784; epconcommunities.com THE COURTYARDS AT O’KELLY CHAPEL 1601 Vineyard Mist Dr., Cary Price Range of Houses high-$400s – low-$500s

Number of Units 149 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 2,000 sq. ft. Amenities Included Clubhouse, outdoor swimming pool, fitness center, walking trails, access to American Tobacco Trail Sales Contact Kaylee Daumm, 919-289-5759; epconcommunities.com CREEKSIDE AT BETHPAGE 36511 Crown Pkwy., Durham

Price Range of Houses mid-$200s – mid-$500s Number of Units 410 homes built, 665 total. Resale Status New only Avg. Size of Houses 1,300 – 2,500 sq. ft. Amenities Included Recreation/fitness center, yoga studio, art & pottery room, community garden, resort-style pool, tennis courts, bocce ball courts, dog park Sales Contact 919-551-3515; creeksideatbethpage.com 

Durham Prosthodontics

specialists in aesthetic oral restoration Geoffrey R. Cunningham, DDS, MS, FACP R. Kyle Gazdeck, DDS, MS, FACP

Only the best for your dental care.

national winner of the 2018 Prosthodontist Private Practice Award BOARD-CERTIFIED

Drs. Geoffrey Cunningham and Kyle Gazdeck are the only board-certified Prosthodontists in private practice in the Durham-Chapel Hill area. In addition, this achievment makes them two of approximately 1,100 board-certified Prosthodontists in the world!

PRESTIGIOUS AWARD Dr. Geoffrey Cunningham was awarded the 2018 Prosthodontist Private Practice Award by the American College of Prosthodontists. This honor, given to only five practices in the United States, recognizes his commitment to the specialty and the Durham community.

RARE SPECIALIST Dr. R. Kyle Gazdeck completed a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at the prestigious Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. This additional training allows him to treat complex cases involving head/neck cancers or trauma.

REAL PATIENT STORY

A patient tragically lost all of his upper teeth when his vehicle was hit head on by a drunk driver. Durham Prosthodontics was able to restore his mouth, giving the patient restored confidence with a brand-new smile.

(919) 489-8661 // www.mydurhamdentist.com 3709 University Drive, Durham, NC 27707 mydurhamdentist.com

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R ETIREMENT

ENCORE AT BRIAR CHAPEL 117 Boone St., Chapel Hill Play, mingle and live your way in Encore by David Weekley Homes. Exclusively for residents 55+, Encore offers main-story living plans with expanded outdoor living areas for entertaining, wellness-inspired design features and yard maintenance. Encore residents can enjoy the privacy of designated 55+ living amenities

including a private clubhouse, pool, firepits and fitness facility, along with Briar Chapel’s clubhouse, water park, sports courts, 20+ parks and 24 miles of trails. With social clubs, on-site festivals and events, your tribe is waiting to welcome you home. Price Range of Houses mid-$300s – high-$400s Number of Units 185 Resale Status New only

Providing Customized Dental Care for Home-Bound Patients at Their Residence

919.799.2770

SERVING ALAMANCE, CHATHAM, DURHAM, ORANGE AND WAKE COUNTIES, NC

www.TriangleMobileDentistry.com

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Average Size of Houses 1,600 – 3,200 sq. ft. Amenities Included Briar Chapel amenities, clubhouse with exclusive fitness center, outdoor pool, fire pits, bocce ball, yoga room and meeting area. Sales Contact 919-659-1562; davidweekleyhomes.com

FENDOL FARMS MANORS 1003 White Bark Ln., Durham Price Range of Houses low-$300s – low-$500s Number of Units 500 units Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 2,000 – 2,700 sq. ft. Amenities Included Clubhouse, fitness center, outdoor pool, bocce ball court, tennis courts, pickleball, community garden, dog park, walking trails Contact 919-337-9420; lennar.com/ new-homes/north-carolina/raleigh/ durham/fendol-farms COHOUSING ELDERBERRY 60 Elderberry Ln., Rougemont Price Range of Houses low to mid-$200s Number of Units 18 Resale Status Resale only Average Size of Houses 700 – 1200 sq. ft. Amenities Included Self-developed, community-oriented cohousing, hiking trails, community garden Sales Contact Mary Bennett, 919-482-4222, mbkbennett@gmail.com; elderberrycohousing.com VILLAGE HEARTH 1000 Infinity Rd., Durham Price Range of Houses high-$200s – low-$400s Number of Units 28 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 660 – 1,200 sq. ft. Amenities Included Self-developed, community-oriented, large common house, clustered accessible homes on 15 acres, walking trails, community garden Contact 561-714-8009; villagehearthcohousing.com CHM


See Yourself! for

Take another look at The Village at Brookwood, where you can enjoy a robust lifestyle in a down-to-earth retirement community. We invite you to…

✓ visit our newly refreshed and interactive website at VillageAtBrookwood.org

✓ meet lively and like-minded people when you join us for an event – learn more on Facebook or our website’s events page

✓ come for a campus tour and a

complimentary lunch (overnight on-campus accommodations may be available!) Proud to be a part of

1860 Brookwood Ave. | Burlington

800-282-2053 | NEW VillageAtBrookwood.org


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WHAT WE LOVE ABOUT LIVING IN ...

t h e n ew H i l l s bo roug h A historic town looks toward the future by Morgan Cart i er Weston Photography by B et h Mann

“T

his is a place where the past intersects the present with a creative spin,” Shannan Campbell says. She began working as Hillsborough’s Economic Development Planner in 2015 and cites the vibrancy of the historic downtown, the beautiful architecture and natural amenities, like the Riverwalk, as keys to the town’s authenticity. “I’m all about respecting and preserving our past while moving us forward to bigger and better things in our future,” she says. The town is certainly unique; visitors and residents can explore nearly 300 years of history, engage with local artists, interact with nature and enjoy craft food and beverages – all on foot. And

Jim Edney and Linda Logan are avid collectors of local art, like this Jane Filer piece in their condo at the new 515 Churton building.

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recent accolades such as “Coolest Small Town” and “America’s Little Literary Town” have cemented Hillsborough’s reputation, driving increases in tourism, residential development and small-business growth. “Potential business owners ask me about moving their operation to Hillsborough simply because they came for shopping or dinner one day and fell in love with it,” Shannan says. “We’re always looking for ways to make it easier to start, expand or relocate a business to Hillsborough.” AN E X PA N D IN G CO MMU N ITY New housing, including active retirement communities, is being developed north and southeast of downtown’s Churton Street to accommodate the town’s expanding footprint. Gibby and Buz Waitzkin moved to the Corbinton community a year ago. “At the time, we couldn’t find anything nearly as nice in the Triangle for the price,” says Buz. The couple primarily resides in the Virginia mountains and were looking for a simple design that could accommodate their grandchildren from time to time. “The floor plan is just perfect,” Gibby says, who appreciates their home’s cottage style and first-floor master bedroom. “It’s a great size and opens to a screened porch and small garden. You’d never know you were this close to a town.” Gibby also loves the versatility of the upstairs level. “We have an office for Buz that converts to a bedroom when the grandchildren come,” she says. Buz works at Duke University and says the commute is easy; Gibby, an artist, enjoys the vibrancy offered by Hillsborough’s downtown. “And we couldn’t ask for more wonderful neighbors,” she says. T RA N S ITIO N “Like many people, we swung through Hillsborough from time to time to eat, have a beer and stroll the shops and galleries,” Martha Barry says. On one such trip, she and husband Jamie, both of whom work in Greensboro, noticed something different: “When we came upon the modern structure at 515 Churton, we saw something that doesn’t

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NEI GHB O RHO O D

Fiori Hill homes are ideal for entertaining. Gathering here are Ben Gaspar, Kate Albrecht (who serves on the Hillsborough Parks and Recreation board), her 14-monthold daughter, Winry, and Fiori Hill residents Becky Butler and Emily Liebtag. July/August 2019

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exist in Greensboro; modern, maintenancefree living nestled in a 1700s historic setting.” The couple moved into a two-bedroom condo in the building in April and hasn’t looked back. Martha says the lifestyle it offered made perfect sense, as she and Jamie had spent 33 years in Greensboro and were ready for their next step. “Our weekends in Hillsborough feel like vacation and are reminiscent of time we have spent in Massachusetts, Jamie’s home state,” she says. “And what could be more lovely than the view of Town Hall from one’s patio or balcony?” Linda Logan and Jim Edney also fell in love with 515 Churton. They had lived in Durham’s Forest Hills neighborhood for 30 years, but like the Barrys, were frequent visitors to Hillsborough. “We were ready for a change of pace and wanted to get out from under the maintenance requirements of an old house,” Linda explains. “Something about Hillsborough spoke to us.” Linda and Jim, along with cats Waylon and Twyla, closed on their unit in February of this year. “During construction, we found the team really easy to work with from finish selection to access during construction to move in,” Linda says. “We had no sadness leaving our old house and decided it was because we had so much involvement along the way here. All our energy was here by the time we were ready to move in.” Linda and Jim most enjoy Hillsborough’s Last Fridays, the monthly art walk and concert series, the annual Candlelight Home Tour and restaurants like Saratoga Grill and Antonia’s.

Hillsborough offers a range of community-centered neighborhoods, including Corbinton, an active retirement development, above. At right, Winry Albrecht makes use of Fiori Hill’s outdoor space, even in the rain.

INTENTIONAL LI V I N G The town has also made way for new concepts that evoke traditional American lifestyles. “Many ‘pocket neighborhoods’ or cottage communities have quietly been built throughout the U.S. for generations unnoticed,” says Jeff Peloquin, developer of the Fiori Hill neighborhood. “It has been my intent to build a truly sustainable community using the concept, and felt that Hillsborough was a perfect candidate for it.” In pocket neighborhoods, neighbors are not closed off to one another, but instead linked by common outdoor living 130

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For your style brought to life

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© MMXIX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC.


NEIGHBORHOOD

Fiori Hill homes like Emily’s were designed around central community spaces, and residents say they love the friendly atmosphere. ABOVE RIGHT Ben gives Idris Butler, 6, a lesson in bead-making.

➾ Just the Facts

HILLSBOROUGH HISTORY Hillsborough, the Orange County seat, was founded in 1754 and served as the home of the North Carolina State Legislature and a military base for British General Charles Cornwallis during the Revolutionary War. The downtown is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and features more than 100 homes and buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries. SCHOOLS Students could attend Orange County Schools district schools such as Cameron Park Elementary School, Central Elementary School, Hillsborough Elementary School, C.W. Stanford Middle School and Orange High School. TAX RATE In 2018, the property tax rate for homes in the town of Hillsborough was $1.47 per $100 of assessed value. Of that total, $.062

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goes to Hillsborough City and $0.85 to Orange County. Properties outside Hillsborough’s town limits are subject to the full county rate but lower overall rates. RECENT LISTINGS FIORI HILL 106 S. Fiori Hill Dr. 3 bedroom/3 bath 1,827 square feet $329,000 515 CHURTON 515 N. Churton St., #207 3 bedroom/2 bath 1,429 square feet $442,900 CORBINTON 130 Bridge St. 2 bedroom/2.5 bath 1,692 square feet $339,850

July/August 2019

environments and shared activities. Fiori Hill’s plans include a neighborhood garden, open green spaces, walking trails and a community hall for special events. Jeff says the hall can accommodate anything from yoga classes to quilting, backgammon to Super Bowl parties. The idea of living in an engaged community is exactly what attracted Emily Liebtag to Fiori Hill. A longtime Triangle resident, she was searching for the right mix of outdoor space and accessibility to cultural experiences. “I like that in Hillsborough, everything is here. You have major hospitals, good schools, great people, lots of trails and outdoor space, art galleries and you’re minutes from Durham and Chapel Hill.” She especially appreciated the purposeful nature of Fiori Hill. “I wanted to know my neighbors and know that the people around me are equally invested as I am,” she says. “A lot of care and attention was given to how this neighborhood would be built and how the land would be used. Everything is intentional.” The best part? Emily says she feels connected to her neighbors. “Folks who choose to live here really want to be part of it, to sit outside on the porch and say hi. We’re all working together to build the community.” „


STYLE YOUR SPACE

Locally operated, GreatBigCanvas.com offers a vast selection of art, ranging from stunning photography to beautiful abstracts, and even classic masterpieces. With over 700,000 images to choose from we’re confident you’ll find something to complement your home or business. FIND ART THAT COMPLIMENTS YOUR UNIQUE STYLE AT Art shown: Item # 2076165 Ringpop I by Rikki Drotar

GreatBIGCanvas.com


NEIGHBORHOOD

The O’Connor family regularly eats at James Pharmacy in downtown Hillsborough, where the food and atmosphere are highlights.

If you haven’t seen

Carrboro’s redesigned website, you may be missing out!

Visit www.townofcarrboro.org for all of the latest news, information on projects, town meetings, and volunteer opportunities!

301 W. Main St. Carrboro, NC 27510

919-942-8541

You can also sign up for both emergency and nonemergency notifications, report concerns, or email staff from the page, and add events to the community calendar.

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M AKING ROOM FOR B USINESS Trang O’Connor is co-chair of the Hillsborough/Orange County Chamber Young Professionals Group. She and husband Chris, along with daughters Caitlin, 12, Anna, 10, and Claire-Nevlyn, 8, moved to Hillsborough from Pennsylvania in October 2016. “We immediately felt welcome,” Trang says. In her role as fitness and membership director at Orange County Sportsplex, Trang has been part of a major physical expansion called the Field House. “The addition houses two full-size basketball courts, an outdoor turf field, new classrooms for our KidPlex programs and an additional fitness center that is home to our new small-group training programs,” she says. She notes that the school system in Hillsborough has been especially wonderful for her daughters. Caitlin attends C.W. Stanford Middle, and Anna and Claire-Nevlyn attend Cameron Park Elementary. “The girls love their schools, and frankly so do we. The teachers and staff are truly amazing – so nurturing and supportive.” The family enjoys spending weekends walking along the Riverwalk, hiking the Occoneechee Mountain Trail, hanging out at the town’s many parks and enjoying a meal together at favorite spots like the newly opened James Pharmacy. CHM


REAL ESTATE GALLERY IN EVERY ISSUE

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Real Estate Gallery Homes • Condos • Apartments

Showcasing Realtors, Builders & Leasing Agents The O’Connor family walks up Churton Street before dinner.

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ELindquist@cbadvantage.com 919-656-3325 ELindquist.CBAdvantage.com Coldwell Banker Advantage 1130 Weaver Dairy Rd., Chapel Hill

SHANNON KENNEDY shannon.kennedy@hodgekittrellsir.com hodgekittrellsir.com 919.448.6664 Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.

viki pace-smith Your Triangle Real Estate Expert

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DOMICILEREALTY.COM 919.590.0266 July/August 2019 chapelhillmagazine.com 139


REAL ESTATE GALLERY

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6 0 2 N C h a N N e l D r i v e | $ 2 , 8 9 5 ,0 0 0 Designed by Scott Sullivan and built by Konrady & Sons in 2016, this 4-bed, 3-bath waterfront masterpiece on Banks Channel in Wrightsville Beach offers a modern, well-appointed escape. At the quiet cul-desac end of N Channel Drive, nestled in a cove of live oak and palm trees, sits the perfect balance of simplicity and luxury. No detail has been overlooked. From the eco-friendly features to the finest in luxury finishes, the perfectly balanced indoor and outdoor living spaces, and the breathtaking views—this home checks every imaginable box.

lYNNe GallOWaY Broker/REALTOR® | Mitchell-Lewis Group

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Direct: 910.233.5401 | Fax: 910.256.4248 chapelhillmagazine.com July/August 2019 lgalloway@intracoastalrealty.com |  www.lynnegalloway.com

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D I N I N G G UI DE IN C LU D ES R E STAU R A N TS , DE L I S A N D B I STR OS I N C H A P E L H I L L, CARRB O RO, HIL L SBORO U G H A N D N O RTH E R N C H ATH A M CO U N TY advertisers highlighted in boxes

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 159-1/2 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048; bandidoscafe.com Benny Cappella’s Pizza, by the slice or whole pie. 122 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-5286; bennysva.com Blue Spoon Microcreamery Homemade cryogenic ice cream and fresh brewed coffee and espresso drinks. 140 E. Franklin St.

Peño Meditteranean Grill Signature dishes like gyrö sandwiches, gyrö bowls, sandwiches and salads prepared fresh daily. 105 E. Franklin St.; 919-391-3706; penogrill.com Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566; supdogs.com

B. GOOD Seasonal, sustainably sourced burgers, salads and bowls that rotate with local harvests. 133 W. Franklin St.; 984-2551455; bgood.com

Carolina Coffee Shop The mainstay serves casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875; carolinacoffeeshop.com

Sutton’s Drug Store Old-fashioned diner known for its hot dogs, burgers and sandwiches like the “Dean Dome Deluxe” and “Roy’s Reuben.” 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161; suttonsdrugstore.com

Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955

Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425; timeout247.com

Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230; fourcornersgrille.com

Top of the Hill A Chapel Hill brewery that also offers American food, like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-9298676; thetopofthehill.com

Epilogue Independent bookstore and Spanish-style chocolatería. 109 E. Franklin St., Ste. 100; 919-913-5055; epiloguebookcafe.com Hibachi & Company Japanese fast-casual spot serving healthy hibachi- and teriyakistyle dishes. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-9038428; hibachicompany.com Imbibe Bottle shop and restaurant featuring pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469; imbibenc.com Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries, burgers. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663; lindas-bar.com

Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; 919240-5423; beerstudy.com

TRU Deli & Wine Sandwiches and wine. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755; trudeli.com Yaya Tea Japanese cafe with a variety of bubble teas, onigiri (rice balls) and imported Japanese snacks. 157 E. Franklin St.; 919-914-6302; yayatea.com/nc Ye Olde Waffle Shoppe Waffles, pancakes, eggs. 173 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-9192; yeoldewaffleshoppe.com West Franklin Street COR NE R O F R O S E M A R Y A N D H E N D E R S O N S T R E E T S MOND AY-S U N D A Y 11-10

Lula’s “Simple food made the hard way,” like fried chicken, homemade biscuits, farm-to-table veggies and more. Go upstairs for meals served familystyle. 101 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-2678; lulaschapelhill.com Ms. Mong Mongolian BBQ, banh mi, fusion burritos. 163 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-5277

Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries with local ingredients. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659; alsburgershack.com

411 West The menu – including fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas – is inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com

Blue Dogwood Public Market Food hall with individuallyBLUE DOGWOOD owned food stalls. Choices include traditional Persian, Southern soul food, Latin-inspired vegan, North Carolina barbecue, gluten-free Italian desserts, homemade ice cream, local beer and cider on draft. 306 W. Franklin St.; 919-717-0404; bluedogwood.com Market. Food hall. Community.

Boro Beverage Kombucha Bar Locally made kombucha and craft sodas on tap. 400 W. Rosemary St., Ste. 1005; 919-5378001; borobeverage.com Bread & Butter Bread, cinnamon rolls, scones, desserts. 503 W. Rosemary St.; 919-960-5998; chapelhillbakery.com Breadmen’s A variety of burgers, sandwiches, salads and grilled meat, with daily soup and specials. All-day breakfast; vegetarian options. Catering available. 324 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com BUNS Serves gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state featuring Carolina cuisine. 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800; carolinabrewery.com

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DINING GUIDE

Cat Tales Cat Cafe A two-story coffee/ beer/wine cafe home to 12 adoptable cats. 431 W. Franklin St.; cattalescatcafe.com CholaNad Restaurant & Bar Contemporary and traditional South Indian cuisine. Catering available. 308 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262; cholanad.com

Mama Dip’s Traditional Southern specialties, including a country breakfast and brunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com

Crook’s Corner Southern classics like shrimp and grits, Hoppin’ John and jalapeñocheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com

Mediterranean Deli Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com

Crossroads Chapel Hill at the Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com

Mellow Mushroom Classic Southern pizza with gluten-free pizza options. 310 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-1941; mellowmushroom.com/store/chapel-hill

Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with the freshest local ingredients; all ABC permits. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com

Might As Well Bar & Grill Bar favorites like cheese fries plus pizza, burgers, wings, salads and more. 206 W. Franklin St.; 984-234-3333; chapelhill. mightaswellbarandgrill.com

Frutta Bowls Serves bowls with bases of acai, pitaya, oatmeal or kale, in addition to smoothies. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 984-999-4427; fruttabowls.com

Mint North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188; mintunc.com

Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless) as well as vegan wings in more than 25 rubs and sauces. 407 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6717; heavenlybuffaloes.com Ice Lab Rolled ice cream and shaved ice. 405 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-5695

Moe’s Southwest Grill Made-to-order burritos, nachos, quesadillas and more. 110 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6217; moes.com The Northside District Specialty cocktails and international small plates. 403 W. Rosemary St.; 919-391-7044; thenorthsidedistrict.com Perennial Coffee and pastries; 403 W. Franklin St.; 919-869-7517; perennial.cafe

Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, calzones, subs. The “place to be” in Chapel Hill for 35+ years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com Kipos Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting; outdoor dining. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-425-0760; kiposchapelhill.com Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747; kuramasushinoodle.com La Résidence French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-2506; laresidencedining.com

Pho Happiness Pho noodle soup, rice plates, vermicelli plates and vegetarian/ gluten-free options. 508A W. Franklin St.; 919-942-8201; phohappiness.com The Pizza Press Build your own pizza with dozens of ingredient choices or choose a pre-designed signature pizza. Also enjoy salads and a large selection of craft beer. 133 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 984-234-0081; thepizzapress.com The Purple Bowl Acai bowls, toast, smoothies, coffee. 306-B W. Franklin St.; 919-9038511; purplebowlch.com

Lantern Pan-Asian cuisine. 423 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-8846; lanternrestaurant.com Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055; limeandbasil.com LOTSA Stone Fired Pizza Choose from a menu of signature pizzas or build your own with a variety of sauces, cheeses and toppings. 100 W. Franklin St.; 919-391-4100; lotsa.com

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Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine; all ABC permits. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177; talullas.com

July/August 2019

Trolly Stop - The Beach on Franklin Specialty hot dogs and burgers. 104 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206; trollystophotdogs.com Vimala’s Curryblossom Café Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-3833; curryblossom.com West End Wine Bar Pastries, light tapas, 100 wines. 450 W. Franklin St.; 919-9677599; westendwinebar.com Windows Restaurant at the Franklin Hotel New American breakfast cuisine. 311 W. Franklin St.; 919-442-9000 Yogurt Pump Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt treats and shakes with unique flavors. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Eastgate Crossing/Rams Plaza Babalu Tapas and Tacos Gourmet Mexican. Eastgate Crossing; 984-528-8030; chapelhill.eatbabalu.com Caffé Driade Carrboro Coffee, bowlsize lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215A E. Franklin St.; 919-942-2333; caffedriade.com CAVA Customizable Mediterranean bowls, salads, pitas and soups. 79 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-636-5828; cava.com Carolina 1663 Contemporary Southern fare at the Sheraton. 1 Europa Dr.; 919-969-2157 Cerritos Cantina Specialty dips, ceviche, street tacos, nachos, burritos and salads. 1502 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-6566; cerritoscantina.com Chopt Offers unique salads, grain, noodle and quinoa bowls. Eastgate Crossing; 919-240-7660; choptsalad.com Clean Juice Certified organic juices, smoothies, bowls and snacks. Eastgate Crossing; 919-590-5133; cleanjuice.com Don Rotisserie Chicken Rotisserie chicken and sides, chicken wings, soups and salads. 237 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-9002 Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market All-day breakfast, sushi and more. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983; wholefoodsmarket.com Guglhupf Bake Shop European-style breads, pastries and coffee. Eastgate Crossing; 919-914-6511; guglhupf.com/chapel-hill-bake-shop Haw River Grill Crisp salads, roasted sandwiches, handcrafted burgers and a customizable burger and sandwich bar. 261 S. Elliott Rd.; 984-234-0395; hawrivergrill.com


JOYO U S CO O KING MORETON NE AL IS AN AUTHOR AND INTERIOR DESIGNER WHO LIVES IN CHAPEL HILL. SHE IS A LIFELONG FOODIE, HAVING CO-FOUNDED LA RÉSIDENCE IN 1976.

When my cousin Pam had to cancel her dream cruise around South America, I promised to console her with a dinner. My knowledge of South American cuisine, though, was limited to just two venues in our area. A friend introduced us to Brasa Brazilian Steakhouse in Brier Creek a while back. My abiding memories of the evening are the taste of a tall glass of caipirinha and the sight of handsome gauchos carrying enormous slabs of meat. Mami Nora’s Peruvian chicken in Raleigh is on my regular beat. The smell of that aromatic chicken from a block away lures me in for takeout (a juicy char-roasted bird with chimichurri sauce, Mami’s salad with tangy cilantro dressing and yucca fries) every time I drive down Wake Forest Road. But I was eager to explore more food from the Southern hemisphere. As luck would have it, we were headed to Florida. In Miami, the trendy CVI.CHE 105 in South Beach introduced us to memorable Peruvian seafood dishes including at least a half-dozen variations of ceviche. The six of us tried every delicious one. Other specialties included tacus, canary bean purees topped with various meats and peppers. Tampa’s famous Columbia Restaurant, unchanged since 1905, offered countless tapas and several renditions of paella. So taken were we by this old-school eatery, we stopped by the gift shop, loading up on bomba rice and saffron. Paella appeared on just about every restaurant menu – whether South American, Caribbean or just plain Floridian – proving that it’s just as popular in the new world as it is in Spain. As soon as we landed back in Chapel Hill, we headed to Southern Season for a paella pan. Then I discovered more South American venues in our own neck of the woods, among them Sarah’s Empanadas and Guasaca Arepa & Salsa Grill, both in Durham. For Pam’s dinner, I’ll gather up some Bolivian empanadas, Venezuelan arepas, Chilean wine from Whole Foods, then put our new paella pan to work.

PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

SOUTH AMERICA ON THE TABLE

PAELLA MIXTA Making paella is an art, not a science, and takes some practice to get the timing down. The first time I made it, I used large bone-in chicken thighs, which didn’t cook all the way through. Now I play it safe with cut-up chicken pieces. The stock-rice ratio is hard to pin down, so you may need to add extra liquid to keep the rice from drying out on top. Watching videos of chefs making the dish can help you get a feel for it. I learned a great tip about making stock from shrimp shells. The chef cooked the shells in a bit of olive oil until golden, then added chicken stock and heated it for a few minutes, increasing the depth of flavor. 2 Tbsp. olive oil ½ lb. fresh or smoked chorizo, chopped 4 chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces 1 large onion, chopped coarsely 1 red or green bell pepper, chopped coarsely 6 large cloves garlic, minced 1 14 oz. can diced tomatoes ½ cup dry white wine or dry vermouth Salt and pepper to taste 16 or more mussels or clams (optional) 4 - 6 cups chicken stock (enhanced by shrimp shells) 2 cups short grain rice such as bomba or arborio ½ tsp. saffron threads 1 ½ tsp. smoked paprika 1 cup frozen artichoke hearts (optional) 1 cup frozen peas

1 lb. shrimp, peeled (shells saved for stock) 2 Tbsp. chopped parsley Lemon wedges Heat the oil in a large paella or large saute pan over medium heat. Saute chicken and chorizo until chicken is cooked. Remove from pan and set aside. In the same pan, saute onion, pepper and garlic until vegetables are soft. Add tomatoes with juice, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook for about 5 minutes. Add the wine and cook until it reduces by half. Add the rice, stirring until it is coated with the sauce. Pour 4 cups of stock into the rice mixture, and add saffron and paprika. Add the chicken, chorizo and artichokes, if using. Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, without stirring, until most of the liquid is absorbed into the rice, about 20 minutes. If more liquid is needed to cover the rice, add more stock or water. Halfway through the process, add the peas and clams or mussels, if using, tucking the shells into the rice. When the rice is tender, add the shrimp and cook a few minutes more until they turn pink. Cover with foil, let sit for a few minutes, then serve with lemon wedges and parsley sprinkled on top. Serves 6-8 CHM

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DINING GUIDE

Il Palio Ristorante at The Siena Hotel N.C.’s only AAA Four Diamond Italian restaurant. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545; ilpalio.com La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 1813 Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207; lahacienda2.eat24hour.com The Loop Pizza Grill Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Eastgate Crossing; 919-969-7112; looppizzagrill.com Luncheonette Salads, soups and pasta dishes house-made with local ingredients. 100 Europa Dr.; 984-234-0644; roseluncheonette.com Market Street Coffeehouse Coffee, pastries and more. 227 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-8993; marketstcoffee.com

University Place

Timberlyne/Chapel Hill North Area

Alfredo’s Pizza Villa Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts. 919-968-3424; alfredospizzanc.com

Farm House Restaurant Steaks, salads, potatoes. 6004 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-929-5727; farmhousesteakhouse.com

Bartaco Tacos of various styles like sesame ribeye and fried oyster, plus freshjuice cocktails, poke and mole options. 910-807-8226; bartaco.com

Joe Van Gogh Coffee and pastries. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-967-2002; joevangogh.com

City Kitchen Wholesome American fare with a sophisticated twist. 919-928-8200; citykitchenchapelhill.com

Magone Italian Grill & Pizza Neapolitanstyle pizza and Italian mains, plus wine and beer. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-904-7393

Maple View Mobile Ice cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 919-244-1949; mapleviewmobile.com

Margaret’s Cantina Mexican appetizers and entrees. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919942-4745; margaretscantina.com

Red Bowl Sushi, bento boxes. 919-918-7888; redbowlchapelhill.com

The Neighborhood Bar Classic cocktails, beer and wine and unexpected, creative bar food. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-240-4715; theneighborhoodbarnc.com

Min Ga Authentic Korean cuisine like bibimbap, bulgogi and variety of homemade kimchi. 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1773; min-ga.com Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. Rams Plaza; 919-969-8750; monterreychapelhill.com Mr. Tokyo Japanese Restaurant Unlimited sushi and hibachi. Rams Plaza; 919-240-4552; mrtokyojapanese.com/ chapel-hill Olio & Aceto Cafe Brunch and lunch options inspired by Blue Sky Oil and Vinegar products. 400 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-8958; olioandacetocafe.com Red Pepper Chinese restaurant offering traditional Szechuan dishes. 1704 E. Franklin St.; 919-968-3488; redpepperchapelhill.com Squid’s Fresh seafood options include woodgrilled fillets, Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-thru biscuits, sandwiches. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324; sunrisebiscuits.com Sutton’s at the Atrium A cafe version of Sutton’s Drug Store with menu options including its famous hot dogs, salads and more. 100 Europa Dr.; 919-240-4471; europacenterchapelhill.com Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622; tandoorindian.com Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Eastgate Crossing; 919-933-9933; twistednoodlesnc.com Zoës Kitchen Mediterranean soups, salads, sandwiches and kebabs. Eastgate Crossing; 919-883-9310; zoeskitchen.com

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Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill Southern favorites like deviled eggs meet steakhouse mainstays like the legendary 12 oz. filet. 919-914-6688; stoneyriver.com

New Hope Market Store and grill that uses local products and features breakfast and daily specials like burgers, soups and more. 6117 N.C. Hwy. 86 S.; 919-240-7851 Oishii Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-7002; oishiiroll.com

Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9888; trilogyrestaurant.com

The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133; thepigrestaurant.com

Village Burgers Gourmet burgers with sides like sweet potato fries and tater tots. 919-240-4008; villageburgerchapelhill.com

Pop’s Pizzeria Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040; pops-pizzeria.com

Weathervane Restaurant & Patio Shrimp & grits, sweet potato fries, chicken & waffles and other foods with a southern flair. 919929-9466; southernseason.com/restaurant/ chapel-hill

Queen of Pho Vietnamese offerings like banh mi, stir fried egg noodles and, of course, pho beef noodle soup. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-903-8280; queenofphochapelhill.com

Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Airport Road)

Rasa Indi-Chinese Indian and Chinese cuisine. 1826 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-929-2199; rasachapelhill.com

Hunam Chinese Restaurant Cantonese cuisine. 790 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-6133; hunamchapelhill.com Kitchen Bistrostyle dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake tequila bar. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-904-7326; luchatigre.com The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Beer and wine only; outdoor dining. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com

July/August 2019

Sage Vegetarian Cafe Vegetarian fare. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266 Sal’s Pizza & Ristorante Thin-crust and deep-dish pizzas plus an array of Italian comfort food in a bright, casual eatery. 2805 Homestead Rd.; 919-932-5125; salspizzaofchapelhill.com Special Treats Gourmet chocolates, cookies and biscotti made by people with disabilities. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-883-2151; specialtreatsnc.com YOPOP Chapel Hill Frozen yogurt shop featuring 14 flavors made daily and 36 toppings. Bubble tea and smoothies. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-537-8229; yopops.com N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 6209-B Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904; amantepizza.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything made in-house. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155; bin54chapelhill.com Brenz Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636; chapelhill.brenzpizzaco.com Coco Bean Coffee Shop Locally owned coffee shop offering Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and a vegan market. 1114 Environ Way, East 54; 919-883-9003; cocobeancoffeeshop.com Elements Cuisine combining classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-9600555; jujuberestaurant.com Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls and more. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077; nantucketgrill.com Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad Thai. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805; thaipalacenc.com The Egg & I French toast, pancakes and specialty omelets. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488; theeggandirestaurants. com Tobacco Road Sports Cafe Burgers, salads and sandwiches. 1118 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8404; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com/chapel-hill Meadowmont Village Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Specialty pizzas and salads. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942; brixxpizza.com Cafe Carolina & Bakery Salads, sandwiches, breakfast. 601 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-945-8811; cafecarolina.com Chronic Tacos Mexican grill utilizing authentic recipes. 504 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4803; eatchronictacos.com Fusion Fish Eclectic menu including tapas, family-style dinners and sushi. 100 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-903-8416; fusionfishcuisine.com Meet Fresh Taiwanese desserts and teas. 407 Meadowmont Village Circle; meetfresh.us/en Quickly Hot and cold tea drinks in addition to Asian street food. 503 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-234-0401; quicklych.com

Southern Village

Honeysuckle Cafe and Bar Coffee house serving smoothies, tea and meads in addition to breakfast, lunch and dinner fare. 601 W. Main St.; 919-967-9398; thehoneysuckle.org/cafe-bar Krave Kava Bar & Tea Lounge Offers a wide range of tea and herbal drinks, all made from kava, a type of plant root. The tea has an earthy flavor and is said to heal anxiety, pain and other ailments. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596; kravekava.com

Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries made with local ingredients. 708 Market St.; 919-914-6694; alsburgershack.com La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato. 610 Market St.; 919-968-1635; lavitadolcecafe.com

Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Coffee, ice cream and pastries. 100 E. Weaver St.; 919-960-6776; marketstcoffee.com

Pazzo! Italian cuisine, takeout pizza. 700 Market St.; 919-929-9984; pazzo-restaurant.com Rasa Malaysia Authentic Malaysian dishes. 410 Market St.; 984-234-0256; rasamalaysiach.com

Mel’s Luncheonette & Catering Open for lunch, Mel’s serves up a changing menu of comfort food. 109 W. Main St.; 919-240-7700; melscarrboro.com

Town Hall Grill Sandwiches, steak, seafood. 410 Market St.; 919-960-8696; thetownhallgrill.com

Napoli Cafe Wood-fired pizza, espresso, artisanal gelato made from scratch, teas and local craft beer and wines. 105 E. Main St.; 919-667-8288; napolicarrboro.com

Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009; weaverstreetmarket.coop

Neal’s Deli Buttermilk biscuits and traditional deli fare. 100-C E. Main St.; 919-967-2185; nealsdeli.com Oakleaf “Immediate” cuisine like pastas and seafood using ingredients from the chef’s own garden. 310 E. Main St.; 984-234-0054; oakleafnc.com

CARRBORO Downtown Acme Food & Beverage Co. Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St.; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com Akai Hana Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki. 206 W. Main St.; 919942-6848; akaihana.com Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, enchiladas, tacos, nachos. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669; armadillogrill.com Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226; carrburritos.com

Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.net Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222; thegourmetkingdom.com

Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer, wine and baked goods. 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919-968-9410; openeyecafe.com Pizzeria Mercato Pizza, antipasto, soups and fritti. 408 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-2277; pizzeriamercatonc.com Provence Southern French cuisine. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008; provenceofcarrboro.com Spotted Dog Vegetarian-friendly appetizers, soups, salads, entrees, desserts. 111 E. Main St.; 919-933-1117; thespotteddogrestaurant.com Tyler’s Restaurant and Taproom Specialty import beers on tap and traditional pub fare. 102 E. Main St.; 919-929-6881; tylerstaproom.com Wings Over Has 18 flavors of wings. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271; wingsoverchapelhill.com East Main Square Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330; amantepizza.com Gray Squirrel Coffee Co. Roastery and espresso bar. 360 E. Main St., Ste. 100; graysquirrelcoffee.com

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Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and buildyour-own salads. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417; thehickorytavern.com One Fish Two Fish Hawaiian poke restaurant offering the traditional raw fish over rice and salad bowls, as well as poke burritos, nachos and tacos. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 180; 919-240-5851; onefishtwofishpoke.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Biscuits, chicken and coffee. 310 E. Main St., Ste. 100; 919-929-5115; risebiscuitsdonuts.com Spike’s Hot Chicken N Dogs Nashville-style hot chicken and hot dogs. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 180; 919-240-5851; spikeshotchicken.com Vecino Brewing Company Dozens of craft beer choices plus dishes made with fresh, local ingredients. Flavorful small plates, salads and sandwiches. 300 E. Main St., Ste. C; 919-537-9591; vecinobrewing.com Carr Mill Mall B-Side Lounge Small plates like flatbread, bacon-wrapped dates and fondue. Plus, inspired cocktails. 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. 919-904-7336; carrboropizzaoven.com Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern and American classics. 919-929-2909; elmosdinercarrboro.com Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. 919-904-7343; oasisincarrmill.com Tandem Farm-to-table, modern American cuisine with full service bar. 919-240-7937; tandemcarrboro.com Venable Rotisserie Bistro Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on locally sourced and seasonal ingredients; all ABC permits. 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 919929-0010; weaverstreetmarket.coop N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Aidan’s Pizza Pizza, wings and salads. 602-D Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-903-8622; aidanspizza.com Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877; annamariasnc.wordpress.com

Wingman Wings and hot dogs. 104 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9200; bestwingman.net

Antonia’s Italian cuisine. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722; antoniashillsborough.com

Steve’s Garden Market & Butchery Local meat, produce, baked goods, plus Steve’s brand products like pimento cheese. 610 N. Churton St.; 919-732-4712; stevesgardenmarket.com

Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 122 S. Churton St.; 919732-8662; bandidoscafe.com

Village Diner Southern breakfast, lunch, brunch and dinner. 600 W. King St.; 919-245-8915

El Restaurante Ixtapa Authentic fromscratch Mexican dishes. 162 Exchange Park Ln.; 919-644-6944; ixtapa.homestead.com/ homepage.html

Vinny’s Italian Grill and Pizzeria Italian favorites like spaghetti carbonara and chicken piccata. 133 N. Scottswood Blvd.; 919-732-9219; vinnyshillsborough.com

HILLSBOROUGH

Hillsborough BBQ Company Barbecue plates and sandwiches, sides and desserts. 236 S. Nash St.; 919-732-4647; hillsboroughbbq.com The House at Gatewood Chop house and oyster bar with dishes like signature cracker-crusted pork chop with grits and greens. 300 U.S. 70; 919-241-4083; houseatgatewood.com Hot Tin Roof Games and specialty cocktails. 115 W. Margaret Ln.; 919-296-9113; hottinroofbar.com James Pharmacy Fresh North Carolina seafood with improved outdoor seating and an expanded beer and wine menu. 111 N. Churton St.; 919-932-0134 Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N. Churton St.; 919732-3591; jayschickenshack.com Los Altos Serving Mexican dishes, like tacos and chiles rellenos, for breakfast and lunch seven days a week and dinner on weekends. 126 W. King St.; 919-241-4177 Maple View Farm Country Store Homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535; mapleviewfarm.com Matthew’s Chocolates Gourmet chocolates, frozen treats and baked goods. 104 N. Churton St.; 919-732-0900 Panciuto Southern Italian cuisine. 110 S. Churton St.; 919-732-6261; panciuto.com Pueblo Viejo Traditional Mexican food. 370 S. Churton St.; 919-732-3480

Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. 3307 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9002; fiestagrill.us Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-903-9919; monterreychapelhill.com

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Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine. 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214; saratogagrill.com

July/August 2019

Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net

Weaver Street Market Hot bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050; weaverstreetmarket. coop Whit’s Frozen Custard Ice cream and frozen treats. 240 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8123; whitscustard.com Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare like wings, sandwiches, tots and rotating drafts and specials. 113 N. Churton St.; 919-643-2223; thewnp.com Yonder: Southern Cocktails & Brew Beer, wine and specialty cocktails. 114 W. King St.

CHATHAM COUNTY Governors Club

Al’s Burger Shack Classic gourmet burger and fries joint, featuring an expanded menu with sandwiches, seafood, soups and salads along with a full bar. 50050 Governors Dr.; 919-904-7659 Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Frenchinfluenced food, coffee and Sunday brunch. 50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990; flairforfoodrestaurant.com Ciao Bella Pizzeria Pizzas, pastas, sandwiches. 1716 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440 Tarantini Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr. (Governors Village); 919-942-4240; tarantinirestaurant.com Veranda (Briar Chapel) 501 Pharmacy Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300; 984-9990501; 501rx.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

Breakaway Cafe A casual cafe serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with coffee and Maple View Farm ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; 984-234-3010; breakawaync.co Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Traditional Italian cuisine including fresh pastas, pizzas, salads, sandwiches and more. 79 Falling Springs Dr.; cappspizzeria.com Sadie’s Southern Classic Southern comfort food. 72 Chapelton Ct.; 984-234-3017; sadiessouthern.com Town Hall Burger & Beer Gourmet burgers plus shared plates, tacos, wings and salads. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 140; 984-234-3504; townhallburgerandbeer.com

PITTSBORO Allen & Son Bar-B-Que N.C. barbecue. 5650 U.S. 15-501; 919-542-2294; stubbsandsonbbq.com Angelina’s Kitchen Greek and Southwestern dishes including gyros and rice bowls. 23 Rectory St.; 919-545-5505; angelinaskitchenonline.com

A modernist approach to Vietnamese food with traditional integrity.

The Belted Goat Lunch, dinner and wine shop, offering salads and sandwiches. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/belted-goat

Elizabeth’s Pizza Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pasta. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-9292; elizabethspizzapittsboro.com

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. 120 Lowes Dr., Ste. 100; 919-545-2330; carolinabrewery.com/ pittsboro Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, baked goods. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562; thecitytap.com Compadres Tequila Lounge Mexican restaurant with a variety of classic dishes. 193 Lowes Dr.; 919-704-8374; compadresnc.com

The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine-dining. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/house

House of Hops Relaxed bar and bottle shop with a large craft beer selection on tap. 112 Russet Run, Ste. 110; 919-542-3435; houseofhopsnc.com

Taste of the South People.Food.Music.

Voted Favorite Comfort/Southern Food!

408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill 919.942.5837 mamadips.com Call us for Catering Porch Dining and Parking Available

Starters | Wings | Banh Mi | Pho Vermicelli | Pan Fried | Rice Plates

Lunch & Dinner Mon-Sun 11 am - 9 pm Breakfast/Brunch Sat & Sun 8 am - 1 pm

508a West Franklin Street Chapel Hill

919.942.8201

PHOHAPPINESS.COM

919.391.3706 | PENOGRILL.COM 105 E FRANKLIN ST. | CHAPEL HILL

FLAVORFUL IS MEMORABLE! CALL US TO CATER YOUR NEXT EVENT.

July/August 2019

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DINING GUIDE

Moon Asian Bistro An Asian fusion restaurant offering sushi, Chinese dishes like sweet-and-sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way, Ste. 100; 919-869-7894; moonasianbistroch.com The Mod Wood-fired pizza, salads, small plates and a full bar. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883; themodernlifedeli.com

Postal Fish Company Fresh seafood from North Carolina’s coast prepared thoughtfully by chefs James Clark and Bill Hartley. 75 W. Salisbury St.; 919-704-8612; postalfishcompany.com

Roost Beer Garden Wood-fired pizza, local brews and live music. 2000 Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-1239; fearrington.com/roost

S&T’s Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007; sandtsodashoppe.com Small B&B Cafe Offbeat, eco-friendly eatery with outdoor seating offering farmto-table fare for breakfast and lunch. 219 East St.; 919-537-1909; smallbandbcafe.com

Starrlight Mead

Heavenly Honey Wines

It’s Honey... All Grown-up!

Our internationally

Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 130 Lorax Ln.; 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com award-winning wines are expertly crafted on the

premises from fruits, herbs, and locally

sourced honey.

The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty cakes. 664 West St.; 919-542-4452; thephoenixbakerync.com Pittsboro Roadhouse Hearty American entrees, burgers and salads. 39 West St.; 919-542-2432; pittsbororoadhouse.com

The Place to Chill on the Hill Since 1982

Come relax in our

tasting room, the perfect place to sit, sip, savor,

The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. 35 Suttles Rd.; 919-542-1062; rootcellarpbo.com

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

RADIUS Discover what “Best Of” is made of!

Downtown Chapel Hill 106 W. Franklin St. 919.942.7867 www.yogurtpump.com 148

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112 N. Churton Street • Hillsborough

radiuspizzeria.net

and learn about the art of honey wine.

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376; virliesgrill.com Located in the Heart of Pittsboro at Chatham Mills

Thursday - Saturday 12-6 pm, Sunday 1-5 pm StarrlightMead.com

919-533-6314

480 Hillsboro St. - Around back, under the water tower


D I NI NG GUI D E

SILER CITY Artisan Hub Scratch-made breakfast and fresh lunches including salads, sandwiches, burgers, and specials like chicken & waffles and shrimp & grits. 113 W. Raleigh St.; 919-663-1758; artisan-hub.business.site

A LS O CH E CK O UT TH E S E DURH AM RE STAURANTS …

Compadres Mexican restaurant with a variety of classic dishes. 115 Siler Crossing; 919-663-5600; compadresnc.com

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food with a Mediterranean flair. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com

Oasis Fresh Market & Deli Local organic soups, sandwiches and Mediterranean specialties. 117 S. Chatham Ave.; 919-799-7434; oasisfreshmarket.com

Boricua Soul Puerto Rican-meetsSouthern soul-food dishes like chopped barbecue-filled empanadas, arroz con gandules, maduros and mac-and-cheese “just the way Grandma makes it.” 318 Blackwell St.; boricuasoulnc.com Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees, as well as small plates featuring oysters, shellfish, and meats and cheeses. 111 Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com

Cucciolo Osteria Italian fare. 601 W. Main St.; 984-243-8744; cucciolodurham.com Duck Donuts Warm, made-to-order doughnuts and coffee. 5320 McFarland Rd., Ste. 140; 919-973-1305; duckdonuts.com Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416-3823; elmosdiner.com Fairview Dining Room Washington Duke Inn’s AAA Four Diamond-rated restaurant. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

The Place to Be!

CHAPEL HILL FAVORITE FOR 39 YEARS BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK IN THE TRIANGLE!

ITALIANPIZZERIAIII Contemporary South Indian Cuisine.

Fine Dining. Patio Dining. Complimentary Valet Parking. FOR CATERING OF ANY OCCASION, PLEASE GIVE US A CALL! 508 WEST FRANKLIN STREET, CHAPEL HILL

308 West Franklin Street Downtown Chapel Hill 919.537.8258 | 1.800.CholaNad cholanad.com



Catering for private parties & events available

919 968 4671 italianpizzeria3.com

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DINING GUIDE

A L S O C H E C K O U T T H ES E D URH AM RE STAURANTS … Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com Goodberry’s Frozen Custard All-natural frozen custard with a variety of topping options. 3906 N. Roxboro St.; 919-4772552; goodberrys.com Jack Tar and the Colonel’s Daughter Diner fare with a twist. Classic diner menu, served all day long, plus smaller dinner menu. Brunch is served on Saturday and Sunday mornings. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-682-5225; jacktardurham.com La Vaquita Taqueria Authentic Mexican restaurant serving tacos on homemade corn tortillas with traditional fillings like lengua (braised tongue) and carnitas. 2700 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-402-0209; lavaquitataqueria.com Littler Look for latkes Benedict, panroasted striped bass with sungold tomato and blueberry panna cotta at this small

restaurant with big tastes. 110 E. Parrish St.; 919-374-1118; littlerdurham.com Mad Hatter Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries, salads, sandwiches. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com MarketPlace JB Duke Hotel’s main restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-660-6400; jbdukehotel.com Mez Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes with a fresh twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com Neomonde Authentic Mediterranean food like manousheh and kabobs, including a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-680-1886; neomonde.com NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats like salmon and tuna steaks, and pasta like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com

Simple food made the hard way

TOMATO FESTIVAL JULY 11-14 Dinner Every Night Brunch on Sunday reservations 919.929.2263 www.acmecarrboro.com As seen in Bon Appétit, Esquire, Garden & Gun, and Southern Living 150

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Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft eggs on white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com Saladelia Cafe Espresso and smoothie bar, pastries, sandwiches. 2424 Erwin Rd., 406 Blackwell St. and 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the  Carolina coast. 608 N. Mangum St. and 2637 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-8970 and 919-237-3499; saltboxseafoodjoint.com

SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY LONG

WITH CLASSIC LUNCH AND DINNER FARE WE CATER! Call 919.428.4470 to discuss your upcoming event! Fried Chicken, Craft Cocktails, Buttertmilk Biscuits and other Southern Fare 101 E. Franklin St. 919.967.2678 lulaschapelhill.com

324 W. RosemarY St., Chapel Hill 919.967.7110 breadmens.com


ENGAGEM ENT

Antipov & Whitney BY HA N N A H LEE

H

elen Antipov and Thomas Whitney met nearly 30 years ago in Maine and later on at the wedding of Tom’s brother, David Whitney, and Helen’s sister, Rita Whitney, where they were maid of honor and best

man. But it wasn’t until May 2018 that they reconnected in Australia, where their relationship blossomed after Helen ran a full marathon and Tom, a half. Helen’s goal was to run a marathon on all seven continents. In March, she planned to run on her sixth continent: Antarctica. To get there, Tom, Helen, Rita and David traveled 10 days by a research vessel from the southernmost city in the world, Ushuaia, Argentina, across Drake’s Passage to the Antarctic Peninsula. After a few days aboard the Russian vessel, Tom proposed on March 20. Though it was much to her surprise, Helen said yes, and the 110 passengers and entire crew celebrated their engagement. Even with no advanced notice, the expedition company put on a party with food, Champagne and a ukulele serenade of Bob Marley’s “Is This Love.” With Tom, Helen will go to Tanzania in March 2020 to complete her final marathon on all seven continents. The couple plans to get married Dec. 7, 2019 at a local farm wedding venue. (“Yes, we have two brothers marrying two sisters,” Helen adds.) As a member of The Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce, Helen’s goal is to use all local vendors who are members of The Chamber, including Pastor Justin Simmons who will preside over the ceremony. Helen will wear her mother’s 1961 wedding dress. CHM

CHAPEL HILL • CARRBORO • HILLSBOROUGH • ORANGE COUNT Y

the

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

our readers’ favorites, revealed

DON’T MISS A SINGLE ISSUE! SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Go to www.chapelhillmagazine.com

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W EDDING

Wiggins & Lercher BY ELIZABETH HOL M ES PHOTOGRA P HY BY KRYSTA L KAST K RYSTA LKASTPHOTOG R A P HY.COM

L

oving Chapel Hill came easy to Farrell Wiggins and Daniel Lercher. As a third-generation Tar Heel from Wilson, North Carolina, Farrell grew up attending sporting events at UNC and earned a bachelor’s degree in exercise and sports science in 2011. For his part, Daniel, a Nebraska native who earned a doctorate in medicine from the University of Nebraska, traveled to Chapel Hill for the first time in 2009 for an interview with the UNC Medical Center. He got the job, moved to town and never left. In 2014, Farrell got a job at there too, but they did not officially meet until crossing paths at The Crunkleton in 2015. They began to take active notice of each other at the hospital and soon progressed to a first date at Merritt’s Pasture. In August 2017, Daniel secretly cleared Farrell’s schedule and gave her notecards with hand-drawn pictures of an airplane and the White House, part of a surprise weekend of travel to Washington, D.C. and then to New York. They retraced their footsteps from a previous visit to D.C., one of the first trips they had taken as a couple. Daniel asked her to marry him on the balcony of the Newseum on Aug. 18, 2017. After New York, they returned to Chapel Hill for a surprise engagement party with food prepared by Al and Melody Bowers, owners of Al’s Burger Shack. They began preparing for the official “I do.” As they planned, they knew that they wanted it to be a full Chapel Hill experience. They held the rehearsal dinner at the Horace Williams House, and db sutton & company did Farrell’s hair for the wedding. But their planning couldn’t account for everything. On Sept. 2, 2018, 20 minutes before their outdoor ceremony at Fearrington Gardens, it 152

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began to storm. Staff quickly moved the ceremony inside the Fearrington Barn. Later that evening, Farrell and Daniel, their parents – Jack and Sheila Wiggins, and David Lercher and Minnie Abromowitch – and friends and family danced to music from Liquid Pleasure. Farrell and her father chose James Taylor’s “You Can Close Your Eyes,” for their dance, a song Jack sang to her when she was a child. As might be expected, Farrell and Daniel reside in Chapel Hill. CHM


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Chapel Hill Magazine July/August 2019  

The Best of Chapel Hill Issue

Chapel Hill Magazine July/August 2019  

The Best of Chapel Hill Issue