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P INK R D & FOOD

POSSIBLE RESTAURANT

Ten eateries share how they’ve adapted in the age of the pandemic

By Mat t Lardi e | Photogra phy by B et h Ma n n

rea restaurants are walking a tightrope as the COVID-19 threat persists, attempting to pull off a balancing act that allows them to survive without compromising the health and safety of employees and customers. To say it’s been difficult would be the understatement of the year. It’s been close to six months since the first coronavirus case was identified in North Carolina. As the state began to reopen over the summer and cases spiked, most restaurants faced the agonizing decision of whether, and how, to welcome back their customers. We reached out to several eateries to get a sense of what life has been like. Some have cautiously reopened. Others are still weighing their options. All agree on one thing – this is a whole new world, and survival means getting creative. 52

KITCHEN EXPERIMENTS

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ne immediate decision that all restaurants faced when the stay-at-home order went into effect was how to remain open, if at all. With little to no advanced warning, entire business models had to be reimagined. COPA in Durham was in the process of redoing its point-of-sale systems when the shutdown happened and was able to switch to pickup and delivery almost instantly. “We never closed completely,” co-owner Elizabeth Turnbull says. “We were able to get online ordering up and running within 10 days.” For Hillsborough’s Radius, the experience was a bit more challenging. They tried delivery at first, but as coowner Kate Carroll explains, “Delivery was a complex and expensive option we realized we couldn’t sustain. We didn’t have the human power to make delivery

Profile for Shannon Media

Durham Magazine Sept 2020  

The Food and Drink Issue

Durham Magazine Sept 2020  

The Food and Drink Issue

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