SMSC Wacipi 2021 Program

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SHAKOPEE MDEWAKANTON SIOUX COMMUNITY

WACIPI AUGUST 20, 21, AND 22, 2021 PROGRAM


WELCOME!

Owas caŋte waṡte nape ciyuzapi. We greet you all with a good heart and a handshake. On behalf of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) Business Council, we would like to welcome you all to the annual SMSC Wacipi. This weekend is a time for our Community to come together to connect with our friends, relatives, and guests, and to share our culture with our neighbors.

This year, we have many thanks to give—from veterans and their families to frontline medical professionals and all other essential workers and their families—for the support and sacrifices that have been made during the pandemic. Wopida Tanka. Our Community and nation thanks you for your admirable work.

Throughout the Wacipi, you will experience times of fun and excitement, but there will also be times of reverence. Please find time to give thanks to the Creator, dance and sing with your neighbors and relatives, and enjoy the many food and craft vendors in attendance.

We are saddened to announce the passing of Community Members Doris Perrault-Guion, Scott Vig, Jennifer Campbell, Sally Milroy, William Brewer Sr., Roxanne Haines-Murman, and Adam Dedeker. We extend our condolences to their families.

Whether you traveled from just down the street or across the continent, we are honored that you chose to spend your weekend with us. Thank you to the hundreds of dancers and singers who are performing throughout the weekend, also to our very own Community Members and staff who work hard to make this an enjoyable weekend for all.

Congratulations to all of the high school, postsecondary, and GED graduates throughout Indian Country and beyond. These individuals will continue to grow as they become future leaders and create their own success stories. Again, thank you to all of our Community Members and staff who spent many days preparing for this year’s event. We are all here to celebrate culture, traditions, and heritage. We hope you have an unforgettable weekend at this celebration of life.

Pidauŋyaŋpi (We are thankful).

Keith B. Anderson CHAIRMAN

Cole W. Miller VICE-CHAIRMAN

Rebecca Crooks-Stratton SECRETARY/TREASURER


2 0 2 1 WAC I P I C O M M I T T E E Our fellow Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Members, relatives, friends, and guests: The Wacipi Committee would like to thank you for joining us for our annual celebration of life, the SMSC Wacipi. We have spent the last several months working hard to bring you a safe, exciting weekend full of singing, dancing, and culture—and we are excited to welcome you back to our Community.

all of the 2020 and 2021 high school, postsecondary, and GED graduates for their hard work and accomplishments.

The youth of our communities are our future leaders, and the Wacipi Committee would like to take a moment to congratulate

The committee would also like to thank all of the singers, dancers, and guests for being a part of this wonderful celebration. If you have any questions, concerns, or suggestions about our annual Wacipi, please do not hesitate to speak directly with any of us. We wish you a safe and enjoyable weekend.

Nick Brewer

Tricia Lafferty

Anita Campbell-Woods

Jake Thomas

2 0 2 1 S M S C R O Y A LT Y Celianna Thomas SMSC PRINCESS

Leila Brewer

SMSC JUNIOR PRINCESS

Karin Bryant-Lankin

Rosemma Mosley


A B O U T O U R WAC I P I We invite you to experience our culture and the history of a strong group of people by immersing yourself in the Wacipi experience. WHAT IS WACIPI?

Wacipi (pronounced wah-chee-pee), or Powwow, is a traditional Native American celebration of life. It is a time when people gather together to dance, sing, and celebrate, while renewing friendships, old and new. Meaning “they dance” in the Dakota language, the Wacipi has transcended generations and has taken on new forms and meanings over the years. Historically, it was a time to gather at the end of a season, to celebrate a good hunt, or to recognize a positive event. While the dances still hold sacred ceremonial meaning for those who participate, today’s Wacipi has evolved into a contest Powwow, where dancers and drum groups compete for top honors and prize money.

WHAT HAPPENS AT WACIPI?

The SMSC’s Wacipi is a contest Powwow, where dancers compete in several different categories of dance styles and in age groups, typically Junior, Teen, Adult, Golden Age, or Elders. The Wacipi begins with a blessing of the dance circle, called the Arena. A Grand Entry is held on each day of the Wacipi (and twice on Saturday), prior to the start of the dance contests and exhibitions. Each Grand Entry begins with a Native American veteran color guard carrying in the eagle staff and flags, followed by the entrance of visiting dignitaries, tribal royalty, and the dancers, categorized by dance style. After all the dancers have entered the Arena, a prayer is said. A drum group then sings a

Flag Song and a Veterans Song. As a sign of respect, attendees are asked to stand (if they are able) and remove their hats. Then, the Master of Ceremonies, called Eyapaha in Dakota, calls for intertribal dancing, allowing everyone to dance, no regalia necessary. Contest and exhibition dancing happens next, with the Eyapaha announcing each of the categories. WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE TRIBAL ROYALTY OR A TRIBAL AMBASSADOR?

Contemporary Powwows often feature braves and princesses, or tribal royalty. These individuals represent their respective tribal nations and act as ambassadors for their people. These individuals are selected through a contest, where they may display their knowledge of their language, history, dancing ability, or a combination of all three skills.

ETIQUETTE We encourage families, friends, and neighbors—both old and new—to learn about and experience our culture and way of life firsthand throughout the weekend. Because there are many sacred aspects to this event, please read and adhere to the following guidelines. Knowing a little bit about various customs will help you feel more comfortable as you take in and enjoy the Wacipi. BE RESPECTFUL

The Wacipi is a sacred gathering. We ask that visitors please be respectful at all times. Please refrain from talking during prayers. At the beginning of the Wacipi during Grand Entry, Honor Songs, and prayers, everyone will be asked to stand (if they are able) and remove their hats as the veteran color guard presents the eagle staff and flags. Please remain standing as the veterans, visiting dignitaries, tribal royalty, and dancers enter the Arena. The Master of Ceremonies (Eyapaha) will indicate when it is appropriate to stand during various songs and prayers throughout the Wacipi. If you

are elderly or have a medical condition, it is fine to sit if needed. THE ARENA

The Arena has a grassy, sacred middle area and has been blessed for the gathering. Prayers have been said, and tobacco has been offered to the Creator. In the very center of the Arena are flag poles and holders for eagle staffs and flags. The Arena is not an area for smoking, is not an area for children to play, and should not be used to cut across or as a shortcut. This area should be treated like a church.

HANDSHAKING IS DONE MORE GENTLY

Handshaking is a way to acknowledge and show respect for someone you are meeting. In Native American culture, handshaking is typically done more gently, with intention. DANCERS’ REGALIA

Always ask before touching anyone’s regalia, as some regalia is sacred or has been ritually purified. Regalia often shows designs, colors, and other ornamentation that represent the wearer’s tribe, family, or political or marital status. DRUM GROUPS

Because the drum holds special significance, please do not touch any of the drums or drumsticks. Please avoid walking between the chairs and the drum.


DA N C E C AT E G O R I E S A N D S T Y L E S During a contest Powwow, dancers compete for prize money. Judges selected by the Wacipi Committee will evaluate a dancer’s performance based on three criteria: knowledge and skill of the specific moves of his/her category; ability to keep time with the drum; and his/her regalia. HISTORY

REGALIA

STYLE

MEN’S TRADITIONAL

Warriors and hunters danced out the story of their battles or hunting endeavors when they returned.

May carry shields, weapons, staffs, or sticks, and possibly wear a bustle.

Northern and Southern styles are distinct from each other, with a different competition for each.

MEN’S GRASS

Traditionally performed after moving camp, to help prepare the earth in a good way for the people.

Long, flowing fringe of yarn or ribbons to represent grass. A yoke, breechcloth, a roach or wape a (wah-pe-sha), fringed anklets, ankle bells, beadwork, and moccasins may also be worn.

The movements of the dancer represent the flow of the prairie grass in the wind. Dancers shake and sway, while their feet perform a variety of slides, hops, and other moves.

MEN’S FANCY

Originated in Oklahoma at the beginning of the 20th century and sparked contest dancing.

Bright and colorful, with two bustles, a roach with feathers that are kept rocking, arm bustles, angora anklets, bells, and moccasins.

Consists of the standard double-step, with fancy footwork, acrobatics, speed, and showmanship on high display.

MEN’S CHICKEN

One of the oldest styles of dance, originating from the Blackfeet.

Skintight clothing, with smaller, old-fashioned bustles—often made with pheasant feathers—as well as ankle bells and bell drops.

Dancers imitate the prairie chicken mating dance.

WOMEN’S TRADITIONAL

A dance exemplifying elegance, grace, dignity, and modesty.

Buckskin or cloth dresses and a breastplate, carrying a shawl, a fan often made with eagle feathers, and a bag. A belt is often worn, with an attached knife sheath, awl carrier, and strike light bag.

Northern dancers often dance in place with the fringe of their dress and shawl swaying to the beat. Southern dancers move gracefully around the circle with their fringe swaying back and forth.

WOMEN’S JINGLE DRESS

Originated with the Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) as a ceremonial dance.

Dresses have rows of tin jingles made of snuff can lids. Dancers carry fans or bags, and wear eagle plumes on their heads.

In traditional jingle dress movements, the feet were barely raised above the ground, but modern dance steps have become more intricate.

WOMEN’S FANCY SHAWL

A relatively new dance from when women switched over from blankets to shawls.

Colorful, calf-length dresses or skirts are worn, with bright shawls and beadwork.

A very athletic dance, with competitors moving around the circle quickly to the beat of the music, spinning and using fancy footwork.

GOLDEN AGE (55-64)

Open to men and women dancers between the ages of 55 and 64.

Styles vary according to personal preference.

Men can choose Traditional/ Southern Straight or Fancy/Grass. Women can choose Traditional, Southern Buckskin/Cloth, or Fancy/Jingle.

ELDERS (65+)

Open to men and women dancers ages 65 and over.

Styles vary according to personal preference.

Any style may be performed in this category.


MEMORIES OF 2019



S TA F F

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

Vince Beyl White Earth Reservation Ojibway Tribe Ponsford, Minnesota

ARENA DIRECTOR

Chaske LaBlanc Dakota Morton, Minnesota

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

Redwing Thomas Isanti Dakota Santee, Nebraska

ARENA DIRECTOR

HEAD MEN’S JUDGE

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

Whitney Rencountre Crow Creek Hunkpati Dakota Rapid City, South Dakota

Clifton Goodwill Brando Jack Ojibwe/Cree/Lakota/Dakota Diné Reserve, Kansas White Cone, Arizona

HEAD WOMEN’S JUDGE

Winona Tahdooahnippah Comanche/Dakota Tama, Iowa


HEAD SINGING JUDGE

VETERANS

SECURITY

VETERANS

TABULATION

MDEWAKANTON PUBLIC SAFETY

Anthony Monoessy Comanche Fletcher, Oklahoma

Matt Bursott Ho-Chunk St. Paul, Minnesota

C&T Tabulating Clayton Crain Saskatchewan SOUND

Hokah Sound Dale Roberts Choctaw – Chickasaw Atwood, Oklahoma

Lakota Women Warriors South Dakota

Sisseton-Wahpeton Kit Fox Society Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Sisseton, South Dakota

SECURITY: 952.496.7222 | EMERGENCY: 911 The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community staffs its public safety department 24/7 with paramedics, EMTs, and firefighters, offering first-aid and emergency management. Mdewakanton Public Safety will be on-hand to direct guests in the case of an emergency, such as a tornado or strong winds.


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 20

10AM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 21 9AM

FLAG RAISING

ALL VETERANS: Please Stand By

REGISTRATION Dancer Registration Opens

7PM

GRAND ENTRY Evening Prayer Introduction of Flags and Eagle Staffs Introduction of Visiting Royalty CONTESTS ALL CATEGORIES: Tiny Tots, Juniors, Teens, Junior Adults, Senior Adults, Golden Age, and Elders

10AM

HONORING TRACY STADE-REPASKY Tiny Tots Special (Ages 5 and Under)

11:30AM

SMSC PRINCESS CELIANNA THOMAS SPECIAL Teen Girl’s Fancy (13-17)

NOON

D

Apeda = To strike or hit

REGISTRATION CLOSED Dancer Registration Closed for All Dance Categories GRAND ENTRY Introduction of Flags and Eagle Staffs Introduction of Visiting Royalty

3PM

TINY TOTS EXHIBITIONS Teens, Junior Adults, and Elders

CONTESTS Juniors, Senior Adults, and Golden Age 4:30PM 7PM

In modern times, the moccasin game still includes elements found in the original game—striking sticks that represent bows, pointed sticks that represent the arrows, and four pads that represent the moccasins. It is still a contest for prize and prestige. Spectators may also hear songs being sung to encourage the hider and to distract the seeker. Game styles and pieces may vary but the spirit of suspense, contest, and camaraderie is still the same. Háŋpa = Moccasin

MOCCASIN GAMES OPENING CEREMONY TOURNAMENT BEGINS

1PM

H Á Ŋ PA A P E D A

MOCCASIN GAME

REGISTRATION Dancer Registration Opens Moccasin Tournament Registration Opens (at Moccasin Games Tent)

10:30AM

12:30PM

uring a time of famine long ago, two hunters crossed paths while tracking a large herd of elk. One of the hunters was Dakota. Wanting to keep peace and take advantage of the big meat supply, they created a game to settle the question of stewardship over the elk. They put four moccasins down and hid a marker. Using their bows, they took turns striking the moccasin they thought the marker was under. When they chose correctly, they were rewarded with one of the other’s arrows. The process of the game left one defenseless due to the loss of arrows. The winner had all the arrows and the right to hunt the herd of elk.

ALL VETERANS: Please Stand By

to Assist with Flag Raising

to Assist with Flag Raising 3PM

FLAG RAISING

SPECTATORS HAND DRUM CONTEST Adults and Youth GRAND ENTRY Evening Prayer Introduction of Flags and Eagle Staffs Introduction of Visiting Royalty TINY TOTS EXHIBITIONS Juniors, Elders, and Junior Adults CONTESTS Teens, Junior Adults, and Elders

10PM

FIREWORKS

LIVESTREAM ALL THE ACTION AT SMSCWACIPI.ORG!


SUNDAY, AUGUST 22

9AM

FLAG RAISING

HOST DRUMS

ALL VETERANS: Please Stand By

NORTHERN CREE – ALBERTA

to Assist with Flag Raising 11AM

DRUMS

1PM

3PM

MATO PEJUTA – NEBRASKA

CHURCH SERVICE Tiowakan Spiritual Center 14625 Prairie Grass Drive, Prior Lake GRAND ENTRY Prayer Introduction of Flags and Eagle Staffs Introduction of Visiting Royalty

INVITED DRUMS NORTHERN: BLACK LODGE – WASHINGTON BLACK OTTER – ALBERTA SHOWTIME – SOUTH DAKOTA INDIAN HILL – CALIFORNIA

TINY TOTS

MANDAREE – NORTH DAKOTA SMOKEY TOWN – WISCONSIN

EXHIBITIONS Juniors, Teens, and Elders

WALKING BUFFALO – ALBERTA

CONTESTS Golden Age, Senior Adults, and Junior Adults

SOUTHERN:

TIEBREAKERS

OTTERTRAIL – OKLAHOMA

BLAZING BEAR – OKLAHOMA SOUTHERN BOYZ – OKLAHOMA

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Dance Arena

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Talking Circle

SMSC Mobile Unit/First Aid

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Food Court

Crafts

SMSC Merch Booth

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SPECIALS SATURDAY, AUGUST 21 10:30AM HONORING TRACY STADE-REPASKY Tiny Tots Special (Age 5 and Under) 1ST PLACE $500 and backpack with school supplies 2ND PLACE $400 and Backpack with School Supplies 3RD PLACE $300 and Backpack with School Supplies

11:30AM SMSC PRINCESS CELIANNA THOMAS SPECIAL Teen Girl’s Fancy (13-17)

1ST PLACE $400 2ND PLACE $300 3RD PLACE $200 5TH PLACE $100 6TH PLACE $50

4TH PLACE $200 and Backpack with School Supplies 5TH PLACE $100 and Backpack with School Supplies CONSOLATION (5) Backpack with School Supplies

SPECIALS, CEREMONIES, AND TRADITIONS SPECIALS

Throughout the Wacipi, honorary dances and ceremonies called “Specials” are integrated, usually celebrating a specific individual. FALLEN WARRIOR CEREMONY

If an eagle feather falls to the ground, an Eagle Feather/Fallen Warrior Ceremony is held for veterans to retrieve the “Fallen Warrior.” The SMSC has the highest respect for the waŋbdi, or eagle. The eagle flies higher than any other being and carries prayers to the Creator. Possession of an eagle feather is an honor. Eagle feathers are usually received as a gift from a relative, spiritual teacher, or from the eagle himself. Please Note: Photography is not allowed during this ceremony.

GIVEAWAY

A Giveaway is a tradition when someone has been honored or a major accomplishment is reached. The Master of Ceremonies (Eyapaha) announces the purpose of the Giveaway, and then simple, everyday gifts are given to the honoree. Blankets and special gifts, like Star Quilts, are given to individuals who have helped the family. Visitors are sometimes given small gifts as well. It is considered impolite to refuse a gift if given. A Giveaway is generally followed by a Wopida (Thank You) song and dance, where everyone who has received a gift is invited to participate in a round dance.

NAMING CEREMONIES

Naming Ceremonies are used when families want to give a spiritual or Native American name to an individual. A spiritual leader or respected elder performs this ceremony, and a Giveaway and Honor Song typically follow. Please Note: Photography is not allowed during this ceremony. HONOR SONGS

Honor Songs commemorate an individual who has passed away or achieved a significant accomplishment, such as graduating from school, being selected as royalty, or serving in the U.S. armed forces. Everyone is invited to shake hands with the individual and family.


2019 WINNERS ADULT MEN WINNERS ELDER MEN’S 1. Royce Kingbird 2. Wayne Pushetonqua 3. Greg Red Elk 4. Gary Medicine 5. Wilson Roberts MEN’S GOLDEN AGE FANCY/ GRASS 1. Jonathan Windy Boy 2. Mike One Star 3. Albert King Sr. 4. Wade Baker 5. Daryl Bearstail MEN’S GOLDEN AGE TRAD./ SO. STRAIGHT 1. Elvin Nicotine 2. Charles Hindsley 3. Pete Powless 4. Patrick Moore 5. Gary Richards Sr. JUNIOR MEN’S CHICKEN 1. Angelo Begay 2. Nelson Baker 3. Jamon Paskemin 4. Cortez Osborne 5. Justis WolfLeader JUNIOR MEN’S FANCY 1. Canku One Star 2. Marquel Crawford 3. Xavier Little Head 4. Gerimiah Holy Bull 5. Rylan Baker JUNIOR MEN’S GRASS 1. Trae Little Sky 2. Chad Browneagle 3. Desmond Madera 4. Joel Omeasoo 5. Lee Jack Jr. JUNIOR MEN’S SOUTHERN STRAIGHT 1. Marshall Funmaker Sr. 2. Lewis Perkins 3. Kiowa Cozad 4. Rusty Lowrance 5. Cory Chasenah JUNIOR MEN’S TRADITIONAL 1. Jared Brown 2. Talon Whiteye 3. Keith Tacan 4. Triston Lasley 5. Darius Isnana SENIOR MEN’S CHICKEN 1. Marty Thurman 2. TJ Warren 3. Rooster Top Sky 4. Todd Papequash 5. Daryl Three Irons SENIOR MEN’S FANCY 1. Nigel Schuyler 2. Darrell Hill 3. Wayne Silas Jr.

4. Tyler Lasley 5. Jay Mule SENIOR MEN’S GRASS 1. Jon Taken Alive 2. Alphonse Obey 3. Rusty Gillette 4. Randall Paskemin 5. Buck Spotted Tail SENIOR MEN’S SOUTHERN STRAIGHT 1. Everett Moore 2. Ronald Goodeagle Jr. 3. Denny MedicineBird 4. Mervel LaRose 5. Erwin Morris SENIOR MEN’S TRADITIONAL 1. Donovan Abbey 2. Richard Street 3. Will Hedgepeth 4. Russell McCloud 5. Lonny Street ADULT WOMEN WINNERS ELDER WOMEN’S 1. Dianne Goodwill-McKay 2. Madelynn Goodwill 3. Annamae Pushetonequa 4. Sharon Roberts 5. Elaine Medicine WOMEN’S GOLDEN AGE FANCY/JINGLE 1. Dianne Desrosiers 2. Ladybird Jack 3. Melinda Good Will 4. Daphne Maistoina 5. Brenda Davis WOMEN’S GOLDEN AGE TRAD./SO. BUCKSKIN 1. Tonya Moore 2. Linda Standing 3. Mary Olsen 4. Faith Carmona Pego 5. Dr. Lita Mathews JUNIOR WOMEN’S FANCY 1. Laryn Oakes 2. Tata Roberts 3. Jocy Bird 4. Morning Star Roberts 5. Beedoskah Stonefish JUNIOR WOMEN’S JINGLE 1. Ashleigh 2. Amanda Ironstar Goodwill 3. Tonia Jo Hall 4. Yanabah Whitehorse 5. Hokian Win McCloud JUNIOR WOMEN’S SO. BUCKSKIN/CLOTH 1. Amanda Harris Moore 2. Charish Toehay 3. Cheyenne Brady 4. Ashley Harris Baker 5. Erica Pretty Eagle Moore

JUNIOR WOMEN’S TRADITIONAL 1. Randi Bird 2. Krista-Marie Goodwill 3. Alva Fiddler 4. Arianna GreenCrow 5. Elyza Robertson SENIOR WOMEN’S FANCY 1. Star Whiteye 2. Bobbi Lynn Frederick 3. Nahmi Lasley 4. Verna Street 5. Valerie Parker SENIOR WOMEN’S JINGLE 1. Leah Omeasoo 2. Winona Tahdooahnippah 3. Grace Hill 4. Cassie Hindsley 5. Rowena Robetts SENIOR WOMEN’S SO. BUCKSKIN/CLOTH 1. Danita Goodwill 2. Toni Tsatoke-Mule 3. Sophia Thurman 4. Danielle Dione Moore 5. Alisabeth Narcomey SENIOR WOMEN’S TRADITIONAL 1. Tosha Goodwill 2. Lonna Street 3. Tara Whitehorse 4. Thea McCloud 5. Miranda Thomson Obey GIRLS WINNERS JUNIOR GIRL’S FANCY 1. Redstar Cavanaugh 2. Rayanna Bird 3. Lennyn Paskemin 4. Jaslynn Hill 5. Maniyeejack

4. Zyra Smith 5. Omiyosiw Warren TEEN GIRL’S TRADITIONAL 1. Tessa Abbey 2. Heaven Walsey 3. Victory Randall 4. Oteskwe Shebala 5. Jaynah Gopher BOYS WINNERS JUNIOR BOY’S FANCY 1. Jaymison Hill 2. Change Bison 3. Dallen Brown 4. Luke Cloud II 5. Cole Patrick JUNIOR BOY’S GRASS 1. Jackson Taken Alive 2. Roman Rasmussen 3. Thomas Bearstail 4. Tabawani Peters 5. Tanner Abbey JUNIOR BOY’S TRADITIONAL 1. Aison Funmaker 2. Dino MedicineBird-Busby 3. Simis Top Sky 4. Sinte-ska Roberts 5. Lucas Decorah TEEN BOY’S FANCY 1. Tyler Thurman 2. Brenden ElCucuy Patrick 3. Silas Whitebuffalo 4. Emmitt White 5. Parker Bearstail TEEN BOY’S GRASS 1. Wakinyan Fiddler 2. Mu Roberts 3. Peyton White Buffalo 4. George Gillette 5. Tyrin Lasley

JUNIOR GIRL’S JINGLE 1. Meah Bird 2. Tosha McCloud 3. Summer Cadotte 4. Lahlee LaBlanc 5. Keshina Jack

TEEN BOY’S TRADITIONAL 1. Ruben Little Head Jr. 2. Trevor Street 3. Jonah Jackson 4. Ronald Monoessy Jr. 5. Lincoln Kingbird

JUNIOR GIRL’S TRADITIONAL 1. Mahpiya Redman 2. Ataya Little Sky 3. Jayda Cavanaugh 4. Amari Funmaker 5. Dianna Funmaker

DRUM WINNERS DRUM WINNERS 1. Black Bear 2. MoTown 3. Bull Horn 4. Bear Creek 5. War Paint 6. Cozad

TEEN GIRL’S FANCY 1. Lara Lasley 2. Eahtosh Bird 3. Maloa Jacobs 4. Taley Fineday 5. Nicole Dashner TEEN GIRL’S JINGLE 1. Jonna Grace Brady 2. Neeta 3. Sapphire LaBlanc

HAND DRUM WINNERS 1. Northern Cree 2. Walking Buffalo 3. Black Bear 4. Southern Style 5. Bull Horn


WITH DEEPEST SYMPATHY DORIS M. PERRAULT-GUION JANUARY 4, 2020

Doris Perrault-Guion, age 79, of Shakopee, member of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community in Prior Lake, Minnesota, journeyed to the Spirit World on Saturday, January 4, 2020. A celebration of Doris’ life was held on January 7 at Tiowakan Spiritual Center. Doris was born on June 22, 1940, the daughter of Bernard and Elizabeth Vig. She was proud of her heritage and was always involved in the Community. Doris also had a love for travel and often rode her Harley to Sturgis or the Black Hills. SCOTT R. VIG FEBRUARY 27, 2020

Community Member Scott Richard Vig, Caske Ta ca Wihni Hok ida (First born son who hunts for deer, Boy), passed away at the age of 38 on Thursday, February 27, 2020. Funeral services were held on March 6, at Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church in Prior Lake. Scott was born on October 13, 1981, in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, the son of Charlie and Donna (Kraemer) Vig. He married Kristin Breault on October 6, 2007. Scott served on the Gaming Enterprise Board of Directors as Treasurer, and he was the leader of the SMSC’s Natural Resources and Infrastructure Community Member work group. JENNIFER C. CAMPBELL MAY 28, 2020

Jennifer Christine Campbell, member of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, passed into the Spirit World on Thursday, May 28, 2020, at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the age of 41. A private service was held on June 10 at Tiowakan Spiritual Center. Jennifer was born on July 30, 1978, in California, the daughter of Alan Campbell and Paula Firth. SALLY J. MILROY OCTOBER 4, 2020 Community Member Sally Jean (Blue) Milroy passed away on October 4, 2020, at the age of 87. Sally worked for the SMSC for many years and was the driving force behind the tribe’s first on-site dental and medical services. Sally was born in Ellsworth, Wisconsin, on February 28, 1933, the daughter of Howard Wilson Blue and Pearl Violet (Jones) Blue.

WILLIAM R. BREWER SR. NOVEMBER 15, 2020

William R. Brewer Sr., member of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, entered the Spirit World on Sunday, November 15, 2020, at the age of 56. A traditional allnight wake was held at Tiowakan Spiritual Center on November 16 through November 19, and funeral services took place on November 18. A private service was also held on November 19 at St. Cornelia’s Episcopal Church and Cemetery in Morton, Minnesota. William was born on April 16, 1964, in Shakopee, Minnesota, the son of Walter and Lois (Pendelton) Brewer. He enjoyed riding motorcycles, cars, and playing guitar. He also valued his Native American traditions. ROXANNE J. HAINES-MURMAN DECEMBER 16, 2020

Community Member Roxanne J. HainesMurman, Wakinyan Tawacin Tanka Win (Big Heart Thunder Woman), entered the Spirit World on December 16, 2020, at the age of 81. A traditional all-night wake was held at Tiowakan Spiritual Center on December 21, and a private family funeral service took place on December 22. Roxanne (Roxy) was born in Pipestone, Minnesota, on July 18, 1939, the daughter of Warner and Margaret Marie Cady (Larson) Nordgren.

ADAM N. DEDEKER JUNE 10, 2021

Adam Nicholas Dedeker, member of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, journeyed to the Spirit World on June 10, 2021, at the age of 41. A visitation was held June 17 at Tiowakan Spiritual Center. A second visitation was held on June 18, also at Tiowakan, followed by the funeral service. Adam was born on January 9, 1980, the son of Bob (Robin) Dedeker and Lori (Don) Whaley.


OFFICIAL WACIPI MERCHANDISE

MDEWAK ANTON

L I F E WAYS PUBLIC EXHIBIT EXPLORE DAKOTA HISTORY AND HERITAGE THROUGH A MULTISENSORY EXPERIENCE THAT TRACES THE ROOTS, CULTURE, LANGUAGE, AND LIFEWAYS OF THE MDEWAK ANTON PEOPLE, PAST AND PRESENT.

2300 Tiwahe Circle Shakopee, MN 55379 952.233.9151 shakopeedakota.org

EXTENDED HOURS

DURING WACIPI!

WACIPI SPECIALS: FREE ADMISSION WITH TRIBAL ID

$4.00 DISCOUNT

GENERAL ADMISSION

Pick up your official 2021 SMSC Wacipi T-shirts, sweatshirts, hats, and more from the merchandise booth, located just west of the Arena!

PARKING LOT SHUTTLE

FRIDAY: 10AM-6PM | SATURDAY: 10AM-6PM | SUNDAY: NOON-4PM OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE SHAKOPEE MDEWAKANTON SIOUX COMMUNITY

Courtesy shuttles will be available to help transport attendees from the parking lot to the Arena.

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If you are in need of medical assistance at any point during the Wacipi, emergency medical services personnel are on-site and available to assist for the duration of the event.


SHAKOPEE MDEWAKANTON SIOUX COMMUNITY 2330 SIOUX TRAIL NW PRIOR LAKE, MINNESOTA 55372

WACIPI 2022

SAVE THE DATE AUGUST 19, 20, AND 21

@SHAKOPEEPOWWOW #SMSCWACIPI #SMSCCULTURE

HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES COVID-19 The SMSC’s first and highest priority is the health and safety of our members, employees, and guests. Help us prevent community spread of COVID-19 by adhering to the following health and safety protocols, as developed and overseen by SMSC Tribal Public Health:

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community has zero tolerance for gang activity. For the viewing enjoyment of everyone, umbrellas are not allowed in the stands.

Visitors: Face coverings are strongly recommended, unless you are fully vaccinated. (Please note, face coverings are required on all shuttle buses.) Dancers and Wacipi Contracted Staff: Face coverings are required, unless proof of vaccination is provided. Invited Drum Groups: Face coverings are strongly recommended, unless proof of vaccination is provided. Please practice social distancing whenever possible. If social distancing cannot be easily maintained (such as in the dance arena), face coverings are strongly encouraged. All staff members are required to complete a daily health screening prior to reporting for work on-site. If you think you may be experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, please seek assistance from SMSC Tribal Public Health at the Mobile Unit. Please be advised that SMSC Tribal Public Health is continuously monitoring the situation and will provide updated guidance as needed—please defer to all posted event signage and staff guidance upon arrival. If you have any questions, please seek assistance from SMSC Tribal Public Health at the Mobile Unit.

Raffle tickets may not be sold or purchased on the Wacipi Grounds or any other SMSC property. For the comfort of all Wacipi guests, bleacher seating may not be saved. Blankets left unattended will be removed. No exceptions.

Any audio, video, or photographic commercial recording at the SMSC Wacipi is strictly prohibited. You may record and produce only one copy of Wacipi for private use. All media must have advance permission to cover Wacipi. Please keep in mind, photographs are not appropriate during the Naming and Eagle Feather/Fallen Warrior ceremonies. Please respect the dancers. If you wish to take their photograph outside the dance arena, ask their permission first.

All participants and guests attending the SMSC Wacipi do so at their own risk. The SMSC is not responsible for any injury, damage, or theft to a person or their property. The SMSC does not waive its sovereign immunity from suit by conducting any activity in coordination with its Wacipi. The SMSC retains the legal authority to expel any person from its land at any time and for any reason.

Please extinguish all tobacco products before entering the Arena by using the ashtrays provided. No dogs allowed on the Wacipi Grounds, except for service dogs.

By attending the SMSC Wacipi, you agree to release any rights to any public or private media recording that may include inadvertant recordings of you by Wacipi staff or approved media outlets.

Elders and those who are disabled are given priority when it comes to golf cart rides to and from the parking lot areas.

Elders and those who are disabled may sit in a special seating area at the announcer’s stand. The SMSC is not responsible for lost envelopes, merchandise, or possessions.

The SMSC bans guns on these premises. Alcohol and drugs are also prohibited. You will be asked to leave if you have or are under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

The SMSC is not responsible if a performance or scheduled event is canceled. Dates and times are subject to change without prior notice.

SMSCWACIPI.ORG

WACIPI GROUNDS: 3212 DAKOTAH PARKWAY | SHAKOPEE, MN | 55379