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Shaker Heights Beloved Community

The Life & Teachings of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

January 4-18, 2021 a 14-day learning guide for students & families of all ages


"The holiday must be substantive as well as symbolic. It must be more than a day of celebration . . . Let this holiday be a day of reflection, a day of teaching nonviolent philosophy and strategy, a day of getting involved in nonviolent action for social and economic progress." Coretta Scott King, the Washington Post, 1983


Table of Contents Martin Luther King, Jr. Coretta Scott King Montgomery Bus Boycott Southern Christian Leadership Conference The Children’s Crusade Letter From a Birmingham Jail The March on Washington Civil Rights Act Nobel Peace Prize Selma & the Voting Rights Act Dr. King's Visit to Shaker Heights The Poor People’s Campaign MLK Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change The Dream Continues

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January 18, 2021 Events Beloved Community

Special thanks to the many volunteers who contributed to this two week focus on Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. including but not limited to: Student Group on Race Relations (SGORR), Shaker Schools Foundation, Family And Community Engagement Center (FACE), Shaker Heights Public Library, Shaker Heights Schools faculty and staff, Shaker Arts Council, and the Shaker Heights Parent Teacher Organization (PTO).


Day 1

Martin Luther King, Jr

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was born Michael Luther King, Jr. in Atlanta, Georgia on January 15, 1929. There he grew up with his three siblings, A.D. King, Donn Clendenon, Christine King Farris, and parents, Reverend Michael King Sr. and Alberta King. When Dr. King was five years old his father visited Germany, and became so passionate about Martin Luther, a German reformer, that he changed his name, and by effect his son’s, to Martin Luther King. King's father and grandfather, James King, were both pastors at Ebenezer Baptist Church. His family was always involved in the church, but it was not until his senior year of high school that King began pursuing a career in theology and preaching. Following his high school graduation, at age 15, King studied for a sociology degree from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia an all male Historically Black Colleges & Universities reputable for its liberal arts courses. King was crowned Valedictorian of his class at Morehouse when he graduated in 1948 and went on to attend Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he connected his Christianity to a call for racial reconciliation. King finished ministry school in 1951 then completed his dissertation on systematic theology at Boston University in April 1955.


Day 1

Martin Luther King, Jr

Suggested Readings PK-4: I am Martin Luther King, Jr by Brad Meltzer 5-8 grades: M.L.K.: Journey of a King by Tonya Bolden Teens: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Freedom Movement by Lillie Patterson

Online Resources for further study How did Dr. King’s upbringing and education influence his goals and accomplishments?

5th & Up: Animated Life of MLK ALL: Hero For All: Martin Luther King, Jr. - National Geographics KIDS

I am Martin Luther King Jr by Brad Meltzer recording


Day 2

Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott King was an African American civil rights leader, activist, author, and the wife of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. She was born April 27, 1927 in Marion, Alabama to Obadiah Scott, a businessman, and Bernice McMurray Scott, a talented singer. She had three siblings and during her childhood, she was known to use singing and violin as a form of activism. Coretta attended Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio where she studied music before transferring to the New England Conservatory in Boston. She met her future husband, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., while they were both students in Boston. Soon, they began to work side by side in the fight for equality and Coretta established her own career as an activist. During her lifetime, she took part in many events such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955 and worked to pass the 1964 Civil Rights Act. She also made way to Ghana to mark their nation's independence in 1957. After her husband's assasination Mrs. King successfully lobbied for his birthday to become a federal holiday. Dr. King is only one of two individuals to be honored with a National holiday in recognition of their birthday. She continually took action to make the world a better place long after Dr. King's departure. Coretta Scott King passed away from cancer on January 30, 2006. She was laid in state at Georgia's State Capitol, being the first woman and African American with that honor.


Day 2

Coretta Scott King

Suggested Readings PK-4: Coretta Scott by Ntozake Shange 5-8: Coretta Scott King: I Kept on Marching by Kathleen Krull Teens: Coretta: My Life, My Love, My Legacy by Coretta Scott King and Rev Dr. Barbara Reynolds

Online Resources for further study

How does the work of Coretta Scott King impact us today?

5th & Up: See Her Story - video by Katie Couric 5th & Up: American Academy of Achievement Interview with Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott by Ntozake Shange


Day 3

Montgomery Bus Boycott

When Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was 26 years old, he led the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) to spearhead a boycott of the city’s municipal bus company. When Rosa Parks was arrested on December 1, 1955 for not giving up her seat to a white man on the bus, the MIA decided to boycott the city's buses because of their segregation in hopes of forcing the companies to change their policy. On January 30, 1956 Dr. King’s home was bombed for his leadership role in the bus boycott. About

90 participants in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, including Dr. King, were indicted under a law against protesting businesses as the bus company went bankrupt due to the boycott. Found guilty, Dr. King immediately appealed the decision. Dr. King’s trial and conviction helped bring national attention to the cause with such leaders as Bayard Rustin, an activist who helped organize the March on Washington movement, supporting the boycott. On November 13, 1956, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the bus company’s segregation seating policy unconstitutional under the 14th Amendment. Dr. King called off the boycott on December 20, 1956, after 381 days, and Rosa Parks—known as the “Mother of the Civil Rights Movement”—would be one of the first to ride the newly desegregated buses.


Day 3

Montgomery Bus Boycott

Suggested Readings PK-4: Pies from Nowhere, How Georgia Gilmore Sustained the Montgomery Bus Boycott by Dee Romito 5-8: The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks (Young Reader's Edition) by Jeanne Theoharis Teens: Stride toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story by Marting Luther King, Jr.

Online Resources for further study Why is the Montgomery Bus Boycott an important moment in American History?

PK-4: Kids Academy -Animated 5th & Up: The Life of Rosa Parks 5th & Up: What Really Happened Happened ALL: MLK plans Montgomery bus boycott Parental Guidance: Rosa Parks:The NonAccidental Matriarch Parental Guidance: MLK Jr called to action after bomb threat

Pies from Nowhere by Dee Romito read by Shakerite Ms.Billie Morgan


Day 4

Southern Christian Leadership Conference

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) is a civil rights organization founded in 1957, as an offshoot of the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA). At 28 years old, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Ralph Abernathy, Fred Shuttlesworth, and others, founded the SCLC in order to have a regional organization that could better coordinate civil rights protest activities across the South. From the beginning, the SCLC focused its efforts on citizenship schools and efforts to desegregate individual cities such as Albany, Georgia and Birmingham, Alabama along with playing large roles in events like the March on Washington. Dr. King was the president of the newfound association which fought for civil rights through boycotts and other non-violent means. The SCLC also broadened its focus to include issues of economic inequality, starting the Poor People's Campaign in 1967. SCLC not only laid the groundwork for non-violent protest over the past thirty years and is currently being lead by Bernard Lafayette and Charles Steele Jr. and continues to fight for civil rights, focusing on contemporary issues such as police brutality.


Day 4

Southern Christian Leadership Council

Suggested Readings PK-4: Lift As You Climb, the Story of Ella Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell 5-8: One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia Teens: Why We Can’t Wait by Martin Luther King, Jr

Online Resources for further study How influential do you think community organizing like the SCLC was in orchestrating the Civil Rights movement?

5th & Up: SCLC 50th Anniversary - video

Lift As You Climb, The Story of Ella Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell


Day 5

The Children's Crusade

At age 34, Dr. King and other civil rights leaders planned to desegregate Birmingham, a city known for its discriminatory practices, by using non-violent tactics. SCLC leader James Bevel started to enact plans for a “Children’s Crusade” that he and other leaders believed might help turn the tide in Birmingham. On May 2, 1963, more than one thousand students, ages ranging from 7-18 years old, skipped classes and gathered at 16th Street Baptist Church to march to downtown Birmingham, Alabama. As they peacefully approached police lines, hundreds were arrested and carried off to jail in paddy wagons and school buses. When hundreds more young people gathered the following day for another march, white commissioner, Bull Connor, directed the local police and fire departments to use force to halt the demonstration. Photos of the children being attacked gained national attention, which forced Birmingham’s officials to finally acknowledge the movement and make a change. The event urged President John F. Kennedy to express support for Federal civil rights legislation and the eventual passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.


Day 5

The Children's Crusade

Suggested Readings PK-4: Let the Children March by Monica Clark-Robinson 5-8: We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson Teens:The Young Crusaders: The Untold Story of the Children and Teenagers Who Galvanized the Civil Rights Movement by V.P. Franklin

Online Resources for further study Would you have marched along with these students? What do you think your parents would have said?

Parental Guidance: The Children's Crusade documentary (for older audiences)

Let the Children March by Monica Clark-Robinson read by Shakerite Gina Ambercrombie-Winstanley


Day 6

Letter from a Birmingham Jail

On April 12, 1963, when he was 34 years old, Dr. King was arrested for the thirteenth time and sentenced to jail for leading a nonviolent march designated to bring national attention to racism, breaking a state law that banned mass gatherings. While in solitary confinement, he wrote the famous “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.� Dr. King began writing after reading an open letter in the newspaper written by Christian and Jewish leaders who were criticizing both the demonstration and King himself. Initially, the letter was written on the margins and small scraps of the newspaper. Dr. King wrote that people have a moral responsibility to stand up and take action for what they believe in, rather than waiting for the justices to come from the court. An example he included explains how himself, along with many demonstrators, risk their lives for change while others sit on the sidelines. Dr. King got help from his lawyer, Clarence B. Jones, by asking him to smuggle the letter out of the jail and give it to his wife, Coretta Scott King. Jones then typed the letter, helping it to be widely published on June 12, 1963 during the Birmingham campaign in newspapers such as the New York Post. Dr. King’s letter from a Birmingham jail was even introduced into the congressional records.


Day 6

Letter from a Birmingham Jail Suggested Readings

PK-4: The Youngest Marcher by Cynthia Levinson 5-8: The Watsons Go to Birmingham – 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis Teens: Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter from Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed a Nation by Jonathan Rieder

Online Resources for further study Alone in a jail cell, how do you think Dr. King stayed motivated?

All: Letter From a Birmingham Jail - MLK audio ALL: King's arrest - video

The Youngest Marcher by Cynthia Levinson


Day 7

The March on Washington

When Dr. King was 34 years old, he helped to organize the March for Jobs and Freedom with A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin. More commonly known as the March on Washington, this event was a significant civil rights protest that took place on August 28, 1963. Around 250,000 people from all over the country gathered in front of the Lincoln Memorial to protest for economic justice. The March on Washington was also meant to draw attention to the many challenges that African Americans faced. One of the most memorable moments of the march was when Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his I Have a Dream oration. What started off as a speech about the long struggle and injustices facing African Americans turned into an impromptu vision for the future when Mahalia Jackson, a legendary gospel singer performing the lead-in to his speech, shouted, “Tell them about the dream, Martin. The Dream.” For approximately 15 minutes, Dr. King spoke passionately about equality for all stating, “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.’”


The March on Washington

Day 7

Suggested Readings PK-4: We March by Shane Evans 5-8: Martin’s Dream Day by Kitty Kelley Teens: Troublemaker for Justice: The Story of Bayard Rustin, the Man Behind the March on Washington by Jacqueline Houtman, Walter Naegle, Michael G. Long

Online Resources for further study What impact did the March on Washington have on American history? Since “I Have a Dream” was an impromptu speech, what do you think MLK was planning to say about Jobs & Freedom?

ALL: I have a Dream speech ALL: Mahalia Jackson video Parental Guidance:March on Washington Reflections and Text References to Police Brutality

We March by Shane Evans Read by Shakerite David Peake


Day 8

Civil Rights Act

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlaws discrimination on the basis of race, sex, religion, color, and national origin. Originally this legislation was proposed by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 after protests, boycotts, sit-ins, and the Children’s Crusade all of which were led by civil rights activists, including 34-year-old Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and 23-year-old John Lewis. Four days after Lyndon B. Johnson became president, he put pressure on Congress to get the bill passed. After almost 100 amendments were rejected that tried to weaken the bill, it was passed on July 2nd, 1964. This pivotal legislation was signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson and accompanied by civil rights leaders. The Civil Rights Act ended legal segregation and started the movement to desegregate schools and other public places. This act was the model for other civil rights laws and has been the foundation for legal decisions protecting the rights of many groups who have been oppressed in the United States.


Day 8

Civil Rights Act

Suggested Readings PK-4: Memphis, Martin and the Mountain Top, The Sanitation Strike of 1968 by Alice Faye Duncan 5-8: The Passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by Xina M. Uhl Teens: Port Chicago 50: Disaster Mutiny and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin

Online Resources for further study How has the passage of the Civil Rights Act changed the lives of everyone in the United States? In what ways does the Civil Rights Act still get challenged today?

ALL: You Can Be ABCs ALL: President Lyndon B. Johnson Signs Civil Rights Act - video ALL: History of the Civil rights Movement - video

Enough! 20 Protesters Who Changed America by Emily Easton read by Shakerite Lisa Vahey


Day 9

Nobel Peace Prize

On December 10, 1964, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. received the Nobel Prize for Peace during an awards ceremony in Oslo, Norway. At the age of 35, Dr. King was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. Established in 1897, this award is to be given “to the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between the nations and the abolition or reduction of standing armies and the formation and spreading of peace congresses.� When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement. This prestigious award propelled the modern American Civil Rights Movement into global and renowned recognition. After receiving the award, Dr. King stated in his speech, "this Nobel Prize was won by a movement of great people, whose discipline, wise restraint, and majestic courage has led them down a nonviolent course in seeking to establish a reign of justice and a rule of love across this nation of ours."


Nobel Peace Prize

Day 9

Suggested Readings PK-4: Alfred Nobel: The Man Behind the Peace Prize (True Stories) by Kathy-jo Wargin 5-8: Greta’s Story: The Schoolgirl Who Went on Strike To Save the Planet by Valentina Camerini Teens: Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? by Martin Luther Dr. King Jr. (Author), et. al

Online Resources for further study

Why do you think it’s important for people to take a stand in the movement for justice?

ALL Anyone Can Change the World 5th & Up: Acceptance speech

The Undefeated by Kwame Alexander read by Shakerite Ifeolu Claytor


Day 10

Selma & Voting Rights Act

In early 1965, a 36 year old Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) made Selma, Alabama, the focus of its efforts to register Black voters in the South. Alabama’s Governor George Wallace, who was a notorious opponent of desegregation, and the local county sheriff led a steadfast opposition to Black voter registration drives; as only 2 percent of Selma’s eligible African American voters had managed to register. On March 7, 1965 six hundred marchers got as far as the Edmund Pettus Bridge, outside Selma, when they were attacked by state troopers wielding whips, nightsticks and tear gas. The brutal scene was captured on television, enraging many Americans and drawing civil rights and religious leaders of all faiths to Selma in protest. On March 21, 1965 some 2,000 protesters set out on the three-day journey, this time under federal control, protected by the U.S. Army troops and Alabama National Guard forces. “No tide of racism can stop us,” Dr. King proclaimed from the steps of the state capitol building, addressing the nearly 50,000 supporters who met the marchers in Montgomery. This victory in Selma brought widespread attention to voting rights in the south and the eventual creation of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which allowed all U.S. citizens to vote.


Day 10

Selma & Voting Rights Act Suggested Readings

PK-4: Equality’s Call, The Story of Voting Rights in America by Deborah Diesen 5-8: Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March by Lynda Blackmon Lowery Teens: March [trilogy] by John Lewis

Online Resources for further study

Why do you think people are moved to protest?

5th & Up: The History of Voting in the US 5th & Up: Rep. John Lewis Reflects on Bloody Sunday - audio PARENTAL GUIDANCE: Selma to Montgomery marches - videos

Equality's Call, the Story of Voting Rights in America by Deborah Diesen read by Shakerite Adrienne Paine


Day 11

Dr. King's Visit to Shaker

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made a visit to Shaker Heights, Ohio in 1965, when he was 36 years old. Although Dr. King was invited by Rev. Dr. Joan Brown Campbell and her husband Rev. Dr. Albert M. Pennybacker of Heights Christian Church, he was not permitted to speak in the sanctuary. Instead, some officials used the excuse that the facilities were under construction. Undaunted, the Reverends arranged for him to speak outside on the side porch of Heights Christian Church on Van Aken Blvd. Due to threats of violence to members of the congregation and many residents, a police officer spent the night inside the church before the event to help protect the property. While many people did not support Dr. King’s visit, it is estimated that about 1,000 people attended the weekday speech to hear him talk about the Civil Rights mission. Dr. King’s many visits to the greater Cleveland area were in large part to help Carl Stoke’s political campaigns. Carl Stokes was eventually elected mayor of Cleveland, Ohio in November 1967, thus making him the first African American mayor of a major city. Per Dr. King, “No person has the right to rain on your dreams”.


Day 11

Dr. King's Visit to Shaker

Suggested Readings PK-4: We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices by Wade Hudson & Cheryl Willis Hudson 5-8: Harbor Me by Jacqueline Woodson Teens: Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

Online Resources for further study

How do you feel after learning MLK came to Shaker?

ALL: Conversations in Courage: The Visit-video

Why is it important we continue his work in Shaker?

ALL: Video of MLK Visit to Heights Christian Church As Good as Anybody by Richard Michelson read by Shakerite Lisa Hamilton


Day 12

The Poor People's Campaign

The Poor People's Campaign was established by Dr. King and the SCLC in November 1967 as the next struggle for genuine equality. While some doubted this ambitious goal for economic freedom, Dr. King believed it was “the beginning of a new cooperation, understanding, and a determination by poor people of all colors and backgrounds to assert and win their right to a decent life and respect for their culture and dignity” (SCLC, 15 March 1968). They began to organize the Poor People's March on Washington to help bring attention to economic justice for poor people in the U.S. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 and did not make it to the Poor People’s March on Washington, but Coretta Scott King and thousands of other women began demonstrations on Mother’s Day, May 12, 1968. A temporary settlement was established on the Mall in Washington, D.C. where approximately 3000 protestors stayed between May 14- June 24, 1968. They organized a set of demands for Congress for free surplus food distribution to 200 counties and promises from federal agencies to hire poor people, but lead organizer and Baptist minister, Ralph Abernathy, was not satisfied with these concessions.


The Poor People's Campaign

Day 12

Suggested Readings PK-4: Beautiful Moon by Tonya Bolden 5-8: Martin Rising: Requiem for a King by Andrea Davis Pinkney Teens: All Labor Has Dignity by Martin Luther King, Jr

Online Resources for further study What do you think economic justice is? Why is it important to have diverse groups advocating for causes as with the Poor People's Campaign?

All: Dr. King Launches the Poor People's Campaign 5th & Up: Everybody’s Got a Right To Live - song 5th & Up: PBS Newshour - Poor People's Campaign 2018 video 5th & Up: The Other America speech 5th & Up: Poor People's Campaign Open Letter 2020 Beautiful Moon by Tonya Bolden read by Shakerite Joe Miller


Day 13

MLK Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change is located in Atlanta, Georgia. It was established in 1968 by Coretta Scott King following his assassination. The center has a mission of “preparing global citizens to create a more just, humane and peaceful world using Dr. King’s nonviolent philosophy and methodology”. The archives include papers written by Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, along with those of other organizations involved in the Civil Rights Movement. The King Center is a local and global resource dedicated to continuing the legacy of Dr. King and encouraging positive social change. The center currently not only educates the future leaders, both American and international, but also supports initiatives around social justice causes such as voting rights. You can stay engaged with the center through their weekly programming, such as information sessions about important issues and interviews with current civil rights leaders. In celebration of MLK Day 2021, the King Center is hosting a worldwide Teach-In on Building the Beloved Community “to educate people of all ages about Dr. and Mrs. King’s legacy and how to champion the completion of their unfinished work.”


Day 13

MLK Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

Suggested Readings PK-4: Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up By Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney 5-8: A Good Kind of Trouble by Lisa Moore Ramée Teens: All the Days Past, All the Days to Come by Mildred D. Taylor

Online Resources for further study

What can you do to continue Dr. King’s efforts today?

ALL: The King Center...History, Vision and Nonviolence 5th & Up: MLK Talks 'New Phase' Of Civil Rights Struggle

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up By Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney read by Shakerite Leon Bibb


Day 14

The Dream Continues

Though Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated at 39 years old in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968, his legacy lives on. His children and granddaughter carry on the fight for civil rights. Dr. King’s eldest son, Martin Luther King III, is a lawyer and human rights advocate. Like his father, he continues to push for justice and rights for all. He has many incredible achievements, which include leading the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and engaging with political leaders such as former President Barack Obama. With his independent work and these achievements, Martin Luther King III is a strong advocate. The youngest of four children, Dr. Bernice King is the current CEO of The King Center and continues her parents’ legacy with a training program called the Nonviolence Fierce Urgency of Now – Nonviolence365®. On August 28th 2020, the 57th anniversary of the famous I Have a Dream speech, Dr. King’s 12 year old granddaughter, Yolanda King, gave a speech on the exact steps as her grandfather once did. Named after her aunt, Yolanda is focused on genuine equality for all and pushes Generation Z to be a voice for change. Together, Martin Luther King III. Dr. Bernice King and Yolanda King are strong voices and continue Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 's legacy.


Day 14

The Dream Continues

Suggested Readings PK-4: I Promise by LeBron James 5-8: Enough! 20 Protesters Who Changed America by Emily Easton Teens: Dear Martin by Nic Stone

Online Resources for further study

What is the importance of caring on such a legacy? How does Dr. King's legacy live on in you?

ALL: Kid President How to Change the World ALL: Where Do We Go From Here ALL: Stevie Wonder's Campaign for a MLK Holiday All: Say My Name -The On Being Project

I Promise by Lebron James


Jan 18

MLK Day Events Monday, January 18, 2021

10am - Noon Donations Drive Shaker Heights Middle School Below are suggestions for items most in need at Bellefaire, Family Promise, Fostering Hope, Unity in Community, and local senior facilities: Non-perishable Food Toiletries: Toothbrush, toothpaste, shampoo, body wash/soap, washcloth, hand wipes Bedding: new twin size blanket, new pillow, new pillow case Baby Supplies: diapers (size 4-6 only), baby wipes, sippy cups, child size dishes/utensils “Thinking of You� Homemade cards 2:00 - 4:30pm Celebration with a Cause Join us for multigenerational fun as we celebrate the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with inspiring messages, beautiful performances, and Calls to Action during a joyous setting with the Moreland Theatre and dj R.Y. said it.


Shaker Heights Beloved Community Did you know that you can help to make MLK’s Dream come true? Small everyday things can lead to big change! Fill in the list with how you plan to live out Dr. King’s legacy.

1. Watch MLK Day of Service Legacy 2. Donate items you don’t use anymore 3. Talk to a friend from a different neighborhood 4. Donate to the Little Free Pantries & Little Free Libraries 5. Attend City Council & School Board Meetings 6. Become an active member of a grassroots organization 7. Join a new sport or community group 8. Join a school club 9. Listen to SGORR’s The CORE podcast 10. Watch Witness to History 11. VOTE 12. ________________________ 13. ________________________ 14. ________________________ 15. ________________________


Profile for Shaker Schools

MLK Learning Guide 2021  

MLK Learning Guide 2021