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VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19, 2014  DAILY UPDATES AT WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM  75 CENTS

Voters approve levies with big margins SPORTS

Safe supermajorities for ops, tech funding in Valley schools Gymnasts host and take names at district tournament Page 7

Celebrate. Remember. Fight back

Photo by Mary Miller

BUSINESS

North Bend mom Erin Mitchell, with her daughter Maddy and friend Kylie Warren, offers memorials of light—handmade paper lanterns, or luminaria— at the Snoqualmie Valley Relay for Life kickoff party on Wednesday, Feb. 12. Mitchell, who lost her husband to gastric cancer five years ago, discovered Relay, and a community of “people that get it.” Learn more about the Valley’s 13th Relay for Life on page 8.

Growing ideas and gaining customers at big flower show Page 10

INDEX OPINION CALENDAR PUBLIC NOTICES MOVIE TIMES OBITUARY ON THE SCANNER

4 6 6 8 9 9

Vol. 100, No. 39

To the ends of the earth

Photo courtesy KCSO

Towel is clue in baby’s death

BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

SEE POLE TREK, 15

SEE ELECTION, 3

A sheriff’s cruiser parks on North Bend Way, near where an infant was found dead.

North Bend’s Marty and Chris Fagan take life-changing journey to South Pole Marty and Chris Fagan have climbed mountains, run hundred-mile races, and, last month they skied together to the South Pole, in minus50 degrees Fahrenheit. Extremes of the environment and endurance are familiar ground, maybe even favorites, for the North Bend couple, but what they really love, what motivates them, are simpler things: their 12-year-old son Keenan; the friends and community who helped them reach their South Pole goal; the chair that was waiting for each of them at the end.

All of the school levies on ballots in the Snoqualmie Valley appear to be passing with more than 60 percent support in the Feb. 11 election. In the latest round of counting in this all-mail election, Snoqualmie Valley’s $16 million Prop. 1, has 5,483 yes votes to 2,614 against. Prop. 2, the district’s $2.7 million technology levy, had even stronger support, with 5,589 votes in favor, 2,512 against. Prop. 1’s approval is at 67.7 percent, while Prop. 2 has won 69 percent approval.

Courtesy photo

North Bend couple Marty and Chris Fagan visit the official marker of the South Pole. The North Bend couple skied to the end of the earth, arriving Jan. 18.

King County Sheriff ’s deputies are seeking tips in the death and abandonment of a newborn in woods between North Bend and Snoqualmie on Wednesday, Feb. 12. Police received a 911 call around 2:15 p.m., and responded to the 38800 block of Southeast North Bend Way. The baby was found by a person walking nearby, in the woods near the Kimble Creek Bridge about 10 feet away from the edge of North Bend Way. SEE DEATH, 3

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2 • February 19, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Congressman Dave Reichert to talk business at Snoqualmie Chamber lunch, Feb. 21

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United States Congressman Dave Reichert takes the podium at the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce’s Friday, Feb. 21, luncheon. Reichert will talk about what is happening in Washington D.C. that will affect small business in 2014. Members

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Washington Filmworks will be visiting to explore the Snoqualmie Valley and talk about the future of filming movies, TV shows and commercials locally at the March luncheon of the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce, 11 a.m. Friday, March 21, at the TPC Snoqualmie Ridge. At the lunch, learn earn more about the economic impacts of filming in the Valley, and about Washington Filmworks. Learn more about the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce at http://snovalley.org.

Patrick Sprague 425-396-0340 35326 SE CENTER STREET SNOQUALMIE psprague@allstate.com

Dr. Brian Mayer DDS 425.888.2703

Washington Filmworks to explore the Valley in March

Correction on meet and greet date

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Last week it was reported that there would be an open house on March 14 at Si View Community Center hosted by the Snoqualmie Police Department. That information is inaccurate. The meeting date has yet to be set. For more information, write to info@ci.snoqualmie.wa.us or call 425888-3333.

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from the other Chambers within the 8th District will also be invited to the luncheon, which begins at 11:30 a.m. at the TPC Snoqualmie Ridge. Do you have a question for the Congressman? Submit your questions to Kaylee at khardman@snovalley.org. Registration deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18. Register at http://snovalley.org/.

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DEATH FROM 1 Detectives said the newborn baby appears to have been full term. On Thursday, detectives released a photo of a towel that was found with the baby. They are hoping that someone will recognize the towel and call in with information that will help in the investigation. The towel is a fullsize faded black bath towel with multiple color square patterns on one side and rectangles on the other side. It’s from Target’s Home collection. Detectives are asking anyone with information to call the King County Sheriff’s Office at (206) 296-3311 (24 hour hotline) or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.

BY SETH TRUSCOTT AND CAROL LADWIG Valley Record Staff

Gloria McNeely is five years shy of a century. She plans Seth Truscott/Staff Photo to make it, too, and 2020 isn’t that much of a stretch. McNelly was born on Feb. 12, 1919. She’s not only Snoqualmie’s Gloria McNeely, center, stands with friends at a city party in honor of her 95th birthday. seen a lot, she’s done a lot, and made enough friends to From left are Lanice Gillard, Bob Jeans, Mayor Matt Larson, Harley Brumbaugh and Dave Battey. warrant a 95th birthday celebration, held last Monday at Snoqualmie City Hall, put together by her local friends. • Nancy Keith, retiring executive director of Keys to the city The Snoqualmie resident is humble about all the attention, but takes it Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, 2007 all with good grace, and a few tears. Seven Valley movers and shakers, seven • Jim Ellis, retiring chair of Mountains “I am so lucky to live in such a beautiful place, surrounded by so many pro golfers, and two sister cities—those to Sound Greenway, 2007, leadership at warm, lovely people,” she said. “They all have a special part in my life.” are the recipients of the existing keys to McNeely has been a Snoqualmie resident for more than 70 years. Part Snoqualmie Point Park the city of Snoqualmie of the reason she’s going strong is her engagement in the community. • Mark Calcavecchia, 2011, Boeing Classic • Pat Anderson, 2013, service and leaderShe’s a dedicated local historian and editor—Gloria was an editor, writer Champion ship and bookkeeper at the Valley Record during the 1950s—who to this day, • Bernhard Langer, 2010 Boeing Classic puts in work on the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum’s publications. • Sister City of Chaclacayo, Peru, 2013 champion She helped plan the city’s centennial celebration, and meticulously • Kim Ferree, 2012, lifetime service award documented the area’s history. • Loren Roberts, 2009 Boeing Classic • Dave Battey, 2011, lifetime achievement When the love of her life, husband Denton, died of cancer in 1987, champion Gloria did her best to fill the void with civic involvement. • Gloria McNeely, 2010, lifetime Tom Kite, 2008 Boeing Classic champion “I started getting out and volunteering for stuff, because staying at achievement home was not an option,” she told the Record in 2010, when she received Denis Watson, 2007 Boeing Classic cham• Young Hoon Mun, 2009, for estaba lifetime achievement award from the city, plus the key to Snoqualmie. pion lishment of Snoqualmie Sister Cities “That’s what motivated me,” she said. “How do you fill this gaping hole? Tom Kite, 2006 Boeing Classic champion Association Well, it turns out, you don’t.” David Eger, 2005 Boeing Classic champion Instead, McNeely focused on her family, and her passion for history • Sister City of GangJin, South Korea, 2010 and the arts. She joined the museum board in 1987 because she enjoyed history and wanted to preserve the city’s heritage for her children. Later, she got involved with Snoqualmie Valley Arts Live, and served on the Snoqualmie Arts Commission. She’s an active member of the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce; she sings on the choir at the Snoqualmie United Methodist Church, Services by Healthy Smiles, Inc. at Mount Si Senior Activity Center. SEE GLORIA, 11 • Fluoride Treatment All for Only • Oral Cancer Screening • Dental Hygiene Assessment • Professional Cleaning By Licensed Hygienists of Teeth, Dentures & Partials Now accepting credit cards! • Referrals to Local Dentists

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Riverview School District, in the lower Valley, also ran two levies, a program and operations issue for $8.1 million, and a technology levy for $1.8 million. Prop. 1, the program and operations levy, got 2,888 yes votes, 1,634 no votes, for a 64 percent approval. Prop. 2 for technology got 2,977 votes in favor, 1,552 against, for a 65.7 percent approval. King County Elections will announce new totals daily as ballots continue to arrive in the mail. Final results are scheduled to be certified Feb. 25.

Big nine-five for Snoqualmie’s Gloria McNeely

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ELECTION FROM 1

Snoqualmie Valley Record • February 19, 2014 • 3

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VALLEYVIEWS

4 • February 19, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

Publisher William Shaw

wshaw@valleyrecord.com

Editor Seth Truscott

struscott@valleyrecord.com

Reporter Carol Ladwig

cladwig@valleyrecord.com

Creative Design Wendy Fried

wfried@valleyrecord.com

Advertising David Hamilton Account dhamilton@valleyrecord.com Executive Circulation/ Patricia Hase Distribution circulation@valleyrecord.com Mail PO Box 300, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 Phone 425.888.2311 Fax 425.888.2427 www.valleyrecord.com Classified Advertising: 800.388.2527 Subscriptions: $29.95 per year in King County, $35 per year elsewhere Circulation: 425.453.4250 or 1.888.838.3000 Deadlines: Advertising and news, 11 a.m. Fridays; Photo op/coverage requests in advance, please. The Snoqualmie Valley Record is the legal newspaper for the cities of Snoqualmie, North Bend and Carnation. Written permission from the publisher is required for reproduction of any part of this publication. Letters, columns and guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views of the Snoqualmie Record.

Serve and protect

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Perspectives on policing from the new Snoqualmie Valley department BY NICK ALMQUIST

Snoqualmie/North Bend Police Dept. Captain

A bump in the night, a suspicious vehicle parked out on the street, or that uncomfortable feeling you have when strange people show up periodically who don’t belong in the neighborhood. These are a few of the reasons why block watch programs, such as a neighborhood watch, are important to have. Most people know what is going on in their neighborhoods better than any outside agency. Utilizing what neighbors know and having open communication with other neighbors leads to less crimes and a better neighborhood atmosphere. Creating a group of neighbors that talk to each other and watch the neighborhood for anything strange or out of place is what makes the neighborhood watch. Neighborhood watch programs are a group of neighbors who get together and communicate with each other to share thoughts, ideas and information about what is going on near and around their homes. Meetings can be held amongst those neighbors to bring the neighborhood closer and get to know who is who in the neighborhood. Any issues or concerns can be brought to the police department and shared, so everyone can be brought up to speed on what is actually going on in the neighborhood. Police can’t be everywhere at once. Therefore, we do depend on information passed on to us from individuals or groups who see suspicious or unlawful actions taking place. When criminals know that a neighborhood isn’t going to stand for that type of behavior, they move on to another area that doesn’t stand together. If you or anyone that you know may be interested in starting a Neighborhood Watch program or interested in learning more about them, contact Officer James Sherwood at jsherwood@ ci.snoqualmie.wa.us or (425) 888-3333.

Success at the polls

Thank you, voters, for levy support We are extremely grateful to the community for supporting the school district levy propositions earlier this month. By supporting and passing these propositions on February 11, Snoqualmie Valley voters have once again chosen to make an investment in this community, in their schools, and in all children. Renewal of the two levy propositions was very important, as they make available a stable and predictable source of funding for the school district over the next four years. These levy funds provide for a substantial part of our school district’s budget, filling the gap between what is provided by the state, and what is actually necessary to sustain the educational program for the students in our schools. The benefits of a stellar school system are enjoyed by home owners, parents, community patrons, and the business community. Most importantly, these propositions will sustain a significant portion of the funding necessary to help our schools ensure all students are fully prepared for college, careers, and citizenship. On behalf of the young people of our community, I thank you for supporting the levy propositions and the schools of the Snoqualmie Valley. Joel Aune, Superintendent, Snoqualmie Valley School District

Where in the world do you dream of visiting?

OUT of the

PAST This week in Valley history

Thursday, Feb. 16, 1989

“I had tickets to Thailand, but we had to cancel the trip, so I would love to be in Thailand with my wife right now. And I would love to ski a glacier at one of the poles, and take my wife to Kruger National Park in Swaziland.” Colin Barber Snoqualmie

“I’ve always wanted to go to Italy, it’s my dream. I have no connection to Italy, but I’ve always been obsessed with it.” Molly McElroy North Bend

• Great Northwest Factory Stores” is the name of a different kind of retail center scheduled to open in North Bend a year from now. To afford the city a close look at what is planned, the Willey Creek Development Co. flew eight people to Vacaville, Calif., to check out a yearold outlet mall there. Taking the all-day trip were Mayor Fritz Ribary, councilmen Arlen Reno and Chris Roethle, and Valley Record reporter Paul Weideman.

Thursday, Feb. 20, 1964

“London. I love English culture.” Lisa Cosgrove Snoqualmie

“I think it would be really cool to go to the rainforest, some super-remote place in Brazil.” Dan White Works in Snoqualmie

• A 61-year-old widow, Mrs. Agnes M. Norman, was found bludgeoned to death in her trailer on the Ames Lake Cutoff Road Tuesday morning. Her nearly nude body was discovered by her sister, Mrs. Kenneth Sikes, of Carnation, lying against a bloodspattered bathtub. Sheriff’s investigators found a large rock on the floor and redstained footprints on the living room carpet. Sikes last saw her sister alive Monday when she visited her home.


WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Snoqualmie Valley Record • February 19, 2014 • 5

Board agrees on some bond aspects A unanimous vote to put a bond on the ballot isn’t essential, but it would be nice, said Snoqualmie Valley School Board members Feb. 6. What’s more important, they felt, was a unified front in pitching the bond to the community. Whether they could reach unanimity on either point was the unresolved question of the night. “I don’t know if this board is capable of a (split) vote and unanimous action,” said board member Dan Popp. The discussion was a follow-up from the Jan. 23 work session, recommended by Board President Geoff Doy. He had asked for “a conversation about what we do if we don’t get a unanimous response” when the board came to vote on a facilities bond. He emphasized the discussion would relate to any bond proposal, not just the current proposal. Option A, now under consideration, is a $216 million initiative for a sixth elementary, high school remodel and districtwide maintenance that had support from only three of the five board members at that work session. At the Feb. 6 meeting, all board members expressed a wish for a unanimous vote, and some skepticism about it happening. “It may very well come down to majority (split) vote, and unanimous action,” said board member Marci Busby, who felt the bond is not right for the district and asked for revisions. “I would just hope that… when we do go to vote, we all feel positive about it.”

Carolyn Simpson was also skeptical about unanimous action, saying that board members who opposed a bond proposal couldn’t be forced into supporting its campaign. She felt that any opponents should be asked, if not to wholeheartedly support a bond campaign, at least to not work openly against it. Doy felt strongly that all board members would need to agree to support a bond campaign, and that a split vote or less-thanunanimous campaign support represented “increasing levels of risk.” However, he was also against the board “being held hostage” by members opposed to a bond. “I don’t think we were elected to do nothing,” he said. To facilitate future bond planning, Doy also requested an unofficial agree/disagree vote from each board member on the specific needs of the district, categorized as: A sixth elementary school; another middle school; improving and replacing district infrastructure; improving/replacing the high school infrastructure; improving the high school’s capabilities for program offerings; and keeping the freshman program separated from the main campus. Board members agreed in general that the elementary and middle school were needed, but the category break-out for the other issues caused confusion, and Carolyn Simpson noted that the capacity of the high school should be a category in itself. The session ended with plans to further discuss the needs, and look at bond planning, including how late into 2015 the board could put a bond on the ballot.

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6 • February 19, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

CALENDAR SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

AARP TAX HELP: Get help with your taxes from AARP Tax Aide volunteers, 10 a.m. at North Bend Library. This program is free to everyone, regardless of income or age.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21 DANCING, LESSONS: A contra dance and waltz lesson is 6:30 to 10 p.m. at Sallal Grange, 12912 432nd Ave. S.E., North Bend. The band is “Creekside”, with Lindsey Dono as the caller. A meal is offered, with vegetable soup, and rustic bread, at 6:30 p.m. Dance leader, Tim Noonan, gives waltz lessons between 7 and 8 p.m. There will be contra dancing and waltzing from 8 to 10 pm. CHAMBER LUNCH: Congressman Dave Reichert speaks at monthly Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce Lunch, 11 a.m. at TPC Snoqualmie Ridge; www.snovalley.org.

SATURDAY, FEB. 22 WINE TASTING: Sample local wines, cheeses and chocolates at the Sno-Valley Senior Center’s second wine-tasting event, 5 to 7 p.m. at 4610 Stephens Ave., Carnation.

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FITNESS FUNDRAISER: Bootcamp for a Cause class for adults is 9 to 11 a.m. at the Snoqualmie Y. The workout supports the Y’s annual campaign to assist families in need. A suggested donation of $25 per adult will be taken at door. KIDS NIGHT OUT: Wacky Winter Olympics for children ages 3 to 12 is 6 to 10 p.m. at Snoqualmie Y. Fees vary for Y members and general community members. Pre-registration is required by calling (425) 256-3115.

SUNDAY, FEB. 23 MASON BEES IN YOUR GARDEN: Missy Anderson, Master Gardener and owner of Rent Mason Bees, gives a free talk on these native pollinators, 2 p.m. at Fall City Masonic Hall. You may already have some in the shingles of your roof or holes in your fence. Learn more at http://letusgarden.org.

MONDAY, FEB. 24 STORY TIME: Infant and Young Toddler Story Time is 11 a.m. at North Bend Library. For children, newborn to age 2, with an adult.

TUESDAY, FEB. 25 CAREGIVER CLASS: Powerful Tools for Caregiving is 10 a.m. at SnoValley Senior Center, 4610 Stephens Ave. Carnation. People

caring for a family member can find support and develop the tools they need to support the people in their charge. Register at (425) 761-2946. Free. STORY TIME: Toddler Story Time is 10 a.m. at the North Bend Library. For children ages 2 to 3, with an adult. STORY TIME: Preschool Story Time is 10:45 a.m. at North Bend Library. For ages 3 to 6 with adult. FOOD ADDICTION: Food Addicts Anonymous, 12-step program, meets in the Valley. Call (425) 260-4571 for directions and more information.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26 WELCOME TO OUR LADY OF SORROWS CATHOLIC CHURCH

Mass Schedule

Saturday 5pm • Sunday 8, 9:30 & 11am 39025 SE Alpha St. Snoqualmie, WA 98065 425-888-2974 • www.olos.org Rev. Roy Baroma, Pastor Mass at St. Anthony Church, Carnation. Sundays at 9:30am. Spanish Mass at 11am on the 1st Sunday 425-333-4930 • www.stanthony-carnation.org

STORY TIME: Toddler Story Time is 10 a.m. at Snoqualmie Library. For children, ages 6 to 24 months, with an adult. Mount Si Lutheran Church

411 NE 8th St., North Bend Pastor Mark Griffith • 425 888-1322 mtsilutheran@mtsilutheran.org www.mtsilutheran.org

Sunday Worship: 8:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 a.m. Praise Sunday School/Fellowship 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Please contact church offices for additional information

Wednesday Evening Worship 7pm “Like” us on Facebook – Mt. Si Lutheran Youth

PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE #990716 CITY OF NORTH BEND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Project: Amendments to North Bend Municipal Code Chapter 17.38 regarding the collection of Transportation Impact Fees Notice of Hearing Date: February 19, 2014 Public Hearing Date: March 4, 2014, 7 p.m. Applicant: City of North Bend Location: N/A – municipal code amendment Description of Proposal: The proposed amendments to North Bend Municipal Code include amendments to Chapter 17.38, Transportation Impact Fees, more specifically sections 17.38.020 Definitions, 17.38.030 Assessment of Impact Fees, 17.38.040 Exemptions. The amendment language is available on the City’s website under Notices. Public Hearing: On Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 7p.m., at the Mount Si Senior Center (411 Main Avenue S.), the City Council will hold a public hearing to receive public comment on the amendments described above. Written comments may be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on March 4, or in person at the hearing. Email or deliver comments to the contact below. For More Information: Contact Londi Lindell, City Administrator at (425) 888-7626 or via email to llindell@northbendwa.gov. Email or mail written comments for the Public Hearing to the North Bend, City Hall, PO Box 896, North Bend, WA 98045. Published in Snoqualmie Valley Record on February 19, 2014. PUBLIC NOTICE #988450 CITY OF NORTH BEND Request for Qualifications & Cost Proposal City of North Bend Downtown Plaza The City of North Bend, WA, is seeking proposals and interest from qualified Civil Engineering firms to provide design services to include environmental planning and permitting, plans, spec-

ification development and construction administration for an improvement project called the Downtown Plaza. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) regulations will need to be met as per the local agency guidelines (LAG) manual. The project is funded by a combination of Surface Transportation Program and local funds. Interested firms are encouraged to submit four (4) written and one (1) PDF copies of their proposal outlining their qualifications, project team, project schedule, project approach, availability and project manager’s experience, by no later than 2 p.m. March 12, 2014. Proposals should be submitted to Don DeBerg, P.E., Project Manager/Engineer, City of North Bend, P.O. Box 896, 1155 East North Bend Way, North Bend, WA 98045. A project description and the full Request for Qualifications is available by contacting Don DeBerg at (425) 888-7652 or email d d e b e rg @ n o r t h b e n d w a . g o v. Proposals received after 2:00 pm Wednesday, March 12th will not be considered. This is a Qualifications Based Selection Request for Qualifications and Cost Proposal. Submittals will be evaluated and ranked based on the following minimum content and factors deemed to be in the best interest of the City of North Bend: 1) Key personnel; 2) Firm experience with WSDOT LAG Manual and with WSDOT PS&E procedures; 3) Firm experience with environmental planning and permitting process; 4) Ability to meet schedule; 5) Approach to project; 6) Familiarity with relevant codes and standards; 7) Past performance/references; 8) Ability to provide MWBE and DBE participation. The Cost Proposal shall be submitted in a single separate sealed envelope containing itemized prices and hourly rates as described in the Request for Qualifications. The following is applicable to federal aid projects: The City of North Bend in accordance with Title VI of

the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidder’s that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. DATED THIS 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2014 CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON By: Kenneth Hearing, Mayor Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on February 12, 2014 and February 19, 2014. PUBLIC NOTICE #990653 CITY OF SNOQUALMIE NOTICE OF DETERMINATION OF NONSIGNIFICANCE (DNS) Issuance Date: February 11, 2014 Publication Date: February 19, 2014 Applicant: City of Snoqualmie Location: City of Snoqualmie Description of Proposal: Adoption of City of Snoqualmie General Sewer/Wastewater Facility Plan. The proposed update of the General Sewer/Wastewater Facility Plan (“Plan”) provides a long term planning strategy for sewer/wastewater system operation, addressing the City’s needs for wastewater collection, transmission, treatment and disposal for the 20-year planning period (2012 – 2032). The current Plan is a General Sewer Plan in conformance with WAC 173-240-050. The updated Plan serves both as a General Sewer

Plan in conformance with WAC 173-240-050 and an Engineering Report in conformance with WAC 173-240-060. The Plan provides updated population and flow projections based on updated population and flow data, evaluates both sewer system and wastewater treatment and reuse facility needs in detail, and proposes capital improvements to provide and maintain a high level of service through 2032. The new Plan contains design data and sizing calculations for the various proposed projects as well as other critical design data. Projects scheduled for construction will have a project level SEPA review by the City prior to construction unless it is determined that they are exempt. Threshold Determination: The City of Snoqualmie (lead agency for this proposal) has determined that the above referenced proposal does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement is not required under RCW 42.21.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of a complete environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request. This DNS is issued under WAC 192-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal for 15 days from the date of publication. Responsible Official: Nancy Tucker, Planning Director Comments on the Threshold Determination: The General Sewer/Wastewater Facility Plan is available for review at Snoqualmie City Hall at 38624 SE River Street, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. If you would like to comment on this Threshold Determination, your written comments should be sent to PO Box 987, Snoqualmie WA, 98065, Attn: Nancy Tucker, Planning Director, by March 4, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. The City will not take final action on this proposal until the end of the comment period. The issuance of this Determina-

tion of Nonsignificance should not be interpreted as acceptance or approval of this proposal as presented. The City of Snoqualmie reserves the right to deny or approve said proposal subject to conditions if it is determined to be in the best interest of the City and/or necessary for the general health, safety, and welfare of the public to do so. Published in Snoqulamie Valley Record on February 19, 2014. PUBLIC NOTICE #990813 CITY OF SNOQUALMIE DETERMINATION OF NONSIGNIFICANCE (DNS) Project Name: Amendments to Snoqualmie Municipal Code Title 17 - Zoning Issuance Date: February 13, 2014 Publication Date: February 19, 2014 Applicant: City of Snoqualmie PO Box 987 Snoqualmie, WA 98065 Description of Proposal: The proposed action is adoption of an ordinance amending three chapters of Title 17 Zoning of the Snoqualmie Municipal Code (SMC). Specifically, the ordinance would add a definition for “data center” to SMC section 17.10.020 – Definitions; add a new section to SMC 17.20.040 of Chapter 17.20 Commercial /Industrial District Regulations to establish limitations, requirements, and review and approval procedures for customary rooftop appurtenances; and amend section 17.55.020 Table of Uses in SMC Chapter 17.55 Use and Other Regulations to include certain retail uses as permitted uses in the Business Office District and to identify districts where call centers and data centers would be permitted or prohibited. The proposed amendments are consistent with the Snoqualmie Vicinity Comprehensive Plan. Location: Threshold Determination: After review of the environmental checklist, the City of Snoqualmie (lead agency for these proposals) has determined pursuant to RCW 43.21C.240 that the proposed zoning map

amendment will not have any probable significant adverse impacts on the environment. An environmental impact statement is therefore not required under RCW 42.21.030(2)(c). Responsible Official: Nancy Tucker, Planning Director This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the City. This information is available to the public on request. This MDNS is issued under WAC 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on these proposals for 14 days from the date of publication, allowing time for public comment. Comments on the Threshold Determination: If you would like to comment on this Threshold Determination, written comments should be sent to PO Box 987, Snoqualmie WA, 98065, Attn: Nancy Tucker, Planning Director, by March 4, 2014, at 5:00pm. The City will not take final action on this proposal until after the end of the comment period. The issuance of this DNS should not be interpreted as acceptance or approval of this proposal as presented. The City of Snoqualmie reserves the right to deny or approve said proposal subject to conditions if it is determined to be in the best interest of the City and/or necessary for the general health, safety, and welfare of the public. This DNS may be appealed, pursuant to WAC 197-11-680. Published in Snoqulamie Valley Record on February19, 2014.

To place a Legal Notice, please call 253-234-3506 or e-mail legals@ reporternewspapers. com


SPORTS

SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

Mount Si sending four to Mat Classic Eli Clure, who took first in his weight class at regionals last weekend at 120 pounds, will lead a Mount Si High School wrestling group to Tacoma and the state finals this weekend. Mount Si finished fifth as a team on points at regionals, Saturday, Feb. 15, at Skyline. Three wrestlers qualified and a fourth makes the trip as alternate. Clure quickly pinned his way through three rounds, beating Vancouver wrestler Darion Green in just under three minutes. Also going to the Mat Classic are Ryley Absher, who took third in his 145-pound weight class. Absher had a semifinal loss to Mountain View’s Nathan Spires, then pinned two foes in quick succession to punch his ticket. Andrew Harris, Mount Si’s heaviest contender at 195 pounds, also took third in his bracket. Harris pinned Kelso’s Kyle Heaton in the quarterfinal, fell to a Prairie wrestler then won his next two bouts by decision. Mount Si sends one alternate, who could wrestle if conditions align. Tanner Stahl took fifth in the 160 pound bracket. Also competing at regionals were Justin Edens, who took sixth at 152, Gunnar Harrison, who was sixth at 132, Jack Hamerly, sixth at 126. Cam McLain at 182, Tyler McConnell, at 126, Makhosandie Lancelot, at 106, Mason Marenco at 138 and Justin Pearl, at 170, also competed. Mat Classic XXVI, the WIAA state wrestling championships, are Feb. 21 and 22 at the Tacoma Dome. Learn more at www.wiaa.com.

District champions!

Mount Si gymnasts took the podium as district champions in competition last weekend in their home gym. The squad now advances to the state championships this weekend in Tacoma. Hosting the SeaKing district qualifiers, the Wildcats dominated on all events, with junior Jenn Rogers claiming the top all-around score. Carissa Castagno was ninth in all-around, Rogers took first on beam with a 9.050. Castagno was seventh. Rogers was second on floor with a 9.425. Castagno tied for 11th. On vault, Rogers was fifth. Castagno was seventh, Hailey Johnson tied for eighth. On bars, Rogers was second, and Mackenzie Brown took ninth. The Washington state gymnastics championships take place Friday, Feb. 21, at the Tacoma Dome Exhibition Hall.

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Photo by Christy Trotto

The Mount Si gymnastics team, hosting (and winning) districts on Saturday, Feb. 15. Jenn Rogers, the best all-around athlete at SeaKing, holds the team trophy.

Bringing the heat Postseason dreams cut short for legacy-setting Red Wolves team BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

It’s not how the Cedarcrest Red Wolves girls basketball team wanted to end their season. Coming into districts as the number-one seed, they faced a sure-handed Bellingham team in a rousing home game. But Cedarcrest’s energy fired up too late Friday. Coupled with another loss Monday to Lake Washington, their season has ended. On Friday, Feb. 14, the girls struggled to come back from behind after Bellingham pushed to a lead, 38-25 at the half. A concerted charge against the Red Raiders had the home crowd on its feet, but the clock gave out, with the Red Wolves down by two, losing 65-63. “We’ve got to quicken everything up,” coach Brad Knowles told the team at halftime. “If we had played the entire game like the fourth quarter, the game was over,” Knowles said. The Bellingham team, rooted on by a small but loud cheering section, rained bucket after bucket in the first half. “That team shot, lights out,” Knowles said. “Next to Kings, no one has shot that well against us.” “We just have to play a full game,” said senior guard Kalee Fowler. “We played a quarter and lost by two.” “We just have to come out strong,” said junior Megan Ditore, who nailed a couple of crucial threes during the fourth-quarter charge. “We just didn’t play our game.” Susan Kenney had a strong night, showing fire and drive as she battled in for shot attempts. She led the Red Wolves in scoring with 24 points. Lacey Deming shot nine, and Kaylee Fowler added eight.

Giving it all Red Wolves Class of 2014: Above, senior Kalee Fowler launches a free throw; Top right, Susan Kenney drives. Below, Lacey Fowler, left, and Kathryn Smith battle for rebounds.

Snoqualmie Valley Record • February 19, 2014 • 7

Senior Kathryn Smith said she and her teammates left it all on the court. “Every one of my teammates goes out every single game and gives it their hardest,” she said. Tonight, Lacey showed that. She was on the ground for everything.” Cedarcrest went into a tense loser-out situation Monday against a Lake Washington team that had beaten them once this season. The girls lost, 71-60, at

home, dashing their hopes. “Unfortunately, Lake Washington just had too much size, depth and sharp shooting…they hit nine threes,” Knowles told the Record by e-mail. The Red Wolves’ class of 2014 has been responsible for the past three-year record of 52-19, a first-ever league championship, three consecutive trips to districts, a first-ever state regional win and made the final eight in the state championships. “They are ‘basketball sisters’ who played basketball for many years together,” said Knowles. “They took on bigger schools, taller opponents, teams with more depth and always played well against them. These players put Cedarcrest girls basketball on the map and on a winning direction.” Next year’s team will be led by current junior Ditore, a starter all this season, and classmates LuAnn Townley and Avery Rich. The program will be young otherwise, with many freshmen and sophomores working for varsity spots. However, youth teams are also anxious to follow the Class of 2014’s steps.


8 • February 19, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Submit short films for Black Dog Flash Fest The Black Dog Arts Coalition is accepting submissions for its 2014 Flash Film Fest. The contest is open to all ages from teen to adult. Any genre is accepted from documentary, mockumentary, animation, but they are only taking a limited number of “R” rated films, as this is an all-ages show. Deadline for submission is Friday, Feb. 28. Work must not exceed 10 minutes, including title and credits. Filmmakers must reside in Washington. Viewings are 8 to 10 p.m. March 13, 14 and 15 at the Black Dogs Arts Café in Snoqualmie, open to the public. There is a nominal fee to enter the festival. To learn more, contact members@blackdogartscoalition. org or call (425) 831-3647.

NORTH BEND THEATRE SHOWTIMES WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

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Photos by Mary Miller

Right, dancer Staci Sutton looks up at a photo of her with her grandfather, who died of cancer. She wears his shirt as part of her costume. Left, emcee Bev Jorgensen embraces cancer survivor Kim Berkebile.

Giving more hope

See answers, page 11

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Survivors, allies gather to begin annual Valley Relay for Life fundraiser effort BY SETH TRUSCOTT

• FERN GULLY: THE LAST RAINFOREST, FREE SCHOOL’S OUT MATINEE, NOON • THE LEGO MOVIE �PG�, 3 AND 6 P.M.

Editor

Every story is a little different, but everyone inside this theater has got one. There’s Nell Engel of North Bend, a walker on Team Dy-No-Mites, who does Relay to make sure her two cute grandsons, Sawyer and Walker, can one day live without fear of cancer. Or Joe Dockery, behind the video camera a few rows back, who swapped stories of his video buddy, the late Bill Blakely, with me. THURSDAY, FEB. 20 There’s the teen dancer, Staci Sutton, who took the stage in a costume made in part from one of • GOONIES, FREE SCHOOL’S her grandpa’s old shirts, so that she’d always have part of him near, even though cancer took him. OUT MATINEE, NOON There’s North Bend resident Erin Mitchell, promoting the paper memorial lanterns by the stage • THE LEGO MOVIE �PG�, 3 AND with her daughter, Maddy. Mitchell lost her husband to gastric cancer almost five years ago. 6 P.M. Her mother introduced her to Relay for Life. It took about a year for Mitchell to be ready for it. And, when she took part, she discovered a community—“people that get it,” Mitchell said. “It’s been FRIDAY, FEB. 21 huge for me and my daughter.” • THAT DARN CAT, FREE Now in its 13th Valley year, Relay for Life is a 24-hour combination of party, memorial and maraSCHOOL’S OUT MATINEE, NOON thon that links cancer survivors, caregivers, patients and friends in an emotional fundraising event. • THE LEGO MOVIE �PG�, 2:30 The dozens who attended the kickoff rally February 12 for Snoqualmie Valley Relay for Life had AND 5 P.M. personal reasons for being here. This summer, they will celebrate, remember and fight back. Organizers are rounding up teams and also eager to involve cancer survivors, who will be honored with a special dinner and a luncheon during Relay. “We’ve set some high goals,” said emcee Bev Jorgensen, “and you can see the community coming together.” Dozens of local businesses have painted their shops purple or hung ribbons in support. Supporters include both the mayors of North Bend and Snoqualmie. North Bend’s Ken Hearing lost his mom and dad to cancer, then his older sister. “These days, that could have been treated. She could have been Fabric • Holiday a survivor today,” Hearing said. MON - FRI • 9am - 7pm Art • Jewelry • Clothes “Every time we do one of these relays, we provide more hope, SAT 10am - 7pm • SUN 1pm - 7pm Furniture • Home Decor more money toward research, so that more people can survive,” he added. “Let’s give more hope to more people.” When he was 8 years old, Snoqualmie mayor Matt Larson lost www.TrinketsandTreasuresFallCity.com a beloved aunt to cancer. Larson’s wife honored the legacy of her father by changing 33511 #1-SE Redmond-Fall City Rd • Fall City careers and working for the Fred Hutchenson Cancer Research Center. He recognized Relay’s “29 years of work, $4.5 billion raised, that is an absolutely powerful difference between when my aunt died and what happens today. These efforts bring hope that your kids and grandchildren won’t suffer the same losses.” The mayor proclaimed Feb. 12 at Relay for Life Day in Snoqualmie. Valley native Kim Berkebile took the stage at North Bend on the most popular contest in the Valley! Theatre to accept an honor from Jorgenson. When she as diagnosed a few years ago with cancer, Berkebile’s life changed. But she began to fight back, finding the little positives and vowing not to give up. www.valleyrecord.com Berkebile shared honors with her caregivers, whose “selflessness and compassion spurs us on.” On March 26th, watch for the Snoqualmie Valley Record's Two weeks ago, doctors found two new nodules of cancer in her lungs. “So, I enter another phase of this battle,” she told the audience. “All endings are also beginnings, we just don’t know it We want you to WIN! at the time. This is my new beginning.” For more information Advertising Executive • Relay for Life of Snoqualmie Valley is July 12 and 13 at North at 425.888.2311 or e-mail dhamilton@valleyrecord.com, Bend’ s Torguson Park. Learn more at snovalleyrelay.org. sskelton@issaquahreporter.com or wshaw@valleyrecord.com

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Across 1. Political leader 10. Type of memory chip, abbrev. 15. Dissolute person 16. Automatic transmission setting 17. Traveling from place to place 18. Interlaced 19. Bon ___ 20. Grimace 21. Life ___, candy 22. Brook 23. Track event 24. “Fiddler on the Roof” setting 27. Bridge and Rummy, e.g 28. Car dealer’s offering 29. Supports a particular faction (2 wds) 33. ___-bodied 34. Blender button 35. Face-to-face exam 36. Same side players 38. Biscotti flavoring 39. Assail 40. Piled high 41. Empathize 43. Lime-deficient soil fertilizer

44. Cuban cigar 45. Jaywalking, e.g. (hyphenated) 46. Come together 49. Change, as the Constitution 50. Art depicting natural scenery 52. Because 53. Expressions of regret 54. Fizzle, with “out” 55. Tennis boundaries

Down 1. Big loser’s nickname? 2. Josip Broz, familiarly 3. Not much (2 wds) 4. Big ___ Conference 5. Recluse 6. Boardwalk diversion 7. Cat sound 8. “Green Gables” girl 9. After expenses 10. Anthony ___, “ER” actor 11. Temporary 12. Split 13. Blatant 14. Department store department

21. Bender 22. Likeness 23. “Land ___!” 24. Bed board 25. Daughter of Zeus 26. Samoa’s basic monetary unit 27. Addition symbol 29. Student getting one-on-one help 30. Big bore 31. “___ on Down the Road” 32. Coaster 34. Ziti, e.g. 37. Wander aimlessly 38. Deodorant type 40. Take care of 41. Asian shrub yielding flaxlike fiber 42. Javelin, e.g. 43. One channel sound transmissions 44. Door fastener 45. Auto parts giant 46. Acquire 47. Fencing sword 48. Amount to make do with 50. Family dog, for short 51. Computergenerated image (acronym)


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OBITUARY Beverly Sams

A celebration of life for Beverly B. Sams of Fall City is 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, at Raging River Community Church, 31104 S.E. 86th St., Preston. Beverly, 81, died Monday, Feb. 10. Born April 3, 1932, to Lydia and Chris Septin Walla Walla, Wash., Beverly was the oldest of three children. Before her marriage to Ray Sams, she worked at the Walla Walla Cannery, a dime store, a dry cleaner, and at Whitman college, where she cleaned dorms.

She had always wanted to be an at-home mom, and enjoyed being at home with her family. She loved music, crafts and sewing, gardening and the outdoors, and did what she could to help people in need. Beverly is survived by her husband, Raymond Sams of Fall City, son Ron Ward of Renton, sister June Regula of Stanwood, brother Bud Sept of Walla Walla, and numerous neices, nephews, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She is also survived by two cousins she was especially close to, Harvey Rink and his wife Sharon of Rathdrum, Idaho, and Loris Schmidt and his wife Marilyn of Richland, Wash. In lieu of flowers, memorials may go to your favorite charity in Bev's name.

King County Sheriff Station FRIDAY, FEB. 7 FIREWOOD HEIST: At 10:06 p.m., a business in the 400 block of Southwest Mount Si Boulevard reported a theft and the current location of the theives, whom the caller had followed. The suspects were two men, seen taking bundles of firewood from outside the business and driving off without paying for them. They were not

ON THE SCANNER at the location specified when police arrived. TOOK THE PHONE, LEFT THE DRINK: At 2:08 p.m., a store employee in the 300 block of Southwest Mount Si Boulevard reported a theft. A suspect apparently stole a $650 iPhone from the counter when the clerk left it briefly. However, the suspect

Snoqualmie Valley Record • February 19, 2014 • 9

left behind a Red Bull drink can, from which police were able to take fingerprints.

SUNDAY, FEB. 9 ASSAULT: At 1:30 a.m., police were called to a business in the 300 block of West North Bend Way for a report of assault and malicious mischief.

MONDAY, FEB. 10 TV CHECK-OUT: At 3:34 p.m., a business in the 200 block

of North Bend Way West reported a theft. A motel guest had taken the TV out of his room when he left.

Snoqualmie Fire FRIDAY, FEB. 7 BROKEN PIPE: Snoqualmie firefighters were called to Railroad Avenue Southeast for a broken water pipe. Crews assisted the homeowners with locating the water shut‐off valve.

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10 • February 19, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Jerry and Aimee Sherrill of North Bend stand proudly in front of their Dahlia Barn booth at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show, Thursday, Feb. 6, at the Washington convention center in Seattle. Selling hand-bagged tubers grown from their Thorp, Wash., farm, they meet many new customers at the annual show, introducing the hottest varieties and new colors. The Dahlia Barn is open for dahlia tuber sales at the barn on weekends and April through May. Call or check the website, www.dahliabarn. com, for exact times. U-cut gardens are open on weekends in September. The Dahlia Barn is located at 13110 446th Ave. S.E., North Bend.

2014 Snoqualmie Valley Business Directory & Community Guide Advertise in the

Ready for the garden

A mom and daughter play with the moving, colorful glass bubbles in “Leisurely Morning in Mexico City,” a display garden by Adam Gorski Landscapes, Inc. of North Bend, at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show in Seattle. Gorski, below, and his team spent several days creating the south-of-the-border-themed display, which won a silver medal. Most noticeable was the sedum-covered pergola. Lots of visitors asked Groski how it’s done. You can learn more about his business at www.adamgorskilandscapes.com.

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In partnership with the Snoqualmie Commerce, the Valley Chamber of Commerce Valley Record will publish the 2014 Snoqualmie Valley Business Directory & Community Guide. This annual guide will feature useful local business listings and information on where to shop locally. It will also spotlight what to see and do in the Valley, along with great ideas for community activities and events, contacts, dining, events, services, shopping, school, recreation and parks. The Business Directory & Community Guide will be distributed in the Valley Record throughout the Valley

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which named her Mother of the Year in 1993; member of the original Voices of the Valley Singers; and member of the former Mount Si Business and Professional Women’s Association, a group that provided a network of support for businesswomen, and awarded

an annual scholarship to a high school student. At no point did she ever expect or seek her muchdeserved accolades, and even as she graciously accepts them, she tries to share the credit with others. She’s also a big reader, a book addict—a trait that runs in the family. “She and I are really bad when it comes to books,” said

Doreen Moore of Fall City, Gloria’s granddaughter, who attended Monday’s party. “Send us to the book store, and we need a cart to haul them out.” Her goal, for years, was to see the turn of the millennium. When that happened, 14 years ago, “I needed another goal. I chose 2020. I’ll only be 101!” Her birthday was a busy day. Her sons and their wives picked up Gloria after she had bowled

J. KHERA, DVM

Snoqualmie Valley Record • February 19, 2014 • 11

two of the usual three games her group does every Tuesday, for lunch out. Later, she played pinochle with the dozen or so fellow women players in North Bend, “so that concluded another wonderful day.” The real family celebration followed Saturday, with a big party at Snoqualmie’s Adventure Bowl lanes. “The great-grandchildren all think it’s fun to bowl with G.G.

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they sounded. They could hear how much the Fagans missed their son, and the Fagans, in turn, found out that he was worried for them. “The biggest danger to us in Antarctica would be us, making a mistake,” Marty said, such as sealing their tent too tightly (carbon monoxide poisoning) or cold injuries. As it was, they both developed touches of “frostnip,” a mild form of frostbite, and despite their best efforts, both lost the 12-15 pounds they’d been advised to put on before starting the trip. As they were preparing for the trip, Chris went to Ely, Minn., for a weeklong training session and evaluation from professionals. Marty did the same, but in Norway, which is the same place he had to go for some of the specialized gear

they needed for their trip. “You can’t get it at REI!” he laughed. For both of them, Chris said, the trainers had no concerns about their mental or physical toughness, but said, “You guys just need to learn to manage things in an extremely cold environment.” “And gain some weight,” Marty added. They did their best to add pounds before leaving Nov. 17, and the weather delays were frustrating, but also another valuable opportunity to rest up and bulk up. Still, they arrived at the South Pole each about 20 pounds lighter than they had started. “We assumed the sleds would get lighter as we went, as we ate our supplies, and we would get faster,” Marty said. “But we got lighter, so we didn’t really get any faster.”

The morning of Jan. 18, they awoke with their goal in sight, but, they were surprised to find, no accompanying adrenalin surge. “It ended up being one of the hardest days we had,” Marty said. “Even in the tent before (breaking camp), it was a subdued mood,” Chris said. They were both thinking, “We’ve got to go back out there and work really hard…” “… and it’s minus 50 Fahrenheit…” “…we can’t have something bad happen today…” “It was one of my most stressful days getting up in the morning, because I could tell how cold it was,” Marty finished. The colder temperatures and rising winds signaled the end of the weather window for polar expeditions. When the Fagans

flew out for Union Glacier the next day, much of the expedition support was packed up and on the plane with them, leaving the few expeditions still en route to pitch their own camps upon arrival, and call for their flights out the next day. Those harsh conditions were a great reminder of where they were, and what they’d done. “One of the things that motivated me along the way, and kept me going,” Marty said, pausing, “was my being just a very small little piece of polar history… putting our little mark and walking in the footsteps of so many people who came before us.” The Fagans will host a free public slideshow about their expedition at 7 p.m., Friday, March 14, at the Mt. Si High School Auditorium. Learn more at www.3belowzero.com.

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“We had 48 days of this underlying stress,” Marty began. “Physical, mental, emotional stress,” Chris added. “And it melted away in a few minutes. We sat in that chair, and it went away,” Marty finished. The chairs, and staff from the expedition company that sent them on their journey weeks earlier, were waiting for them inside a tent at the bottom of the world. “We didn’t actually know there was going to be this warm, heated tent,” Chris said, “…and a chair, that was the best.” They laugh, because it’s been about two weeks since they returned from their Antarctica adventure, but they still have glowing praise for those simple seats. The reason is obvious, to anyone who’s spent nine hours a day for the past 48 days dragging 200-plus pounds of food and supplies across nearly 600 miles of glacier in round-theclock daylight. “When you summit Everest, you summit, and that’s your pinnacle,” Marty explained. “Then you have to come back down again, and you’re coming down emotionally and physically. For us, we reached the pinnacle, and we actually got to stop!” That was a highlight, but maybe not the highlight, of a trip more than three years in the making for the Fagans, who left home Nov. 17 for a five-day supply and staging layover in Chile, then, after another five days of weather delays, to Union Glacier in Antarctica, with its memorable blue-ice runway, and finally to their starting point a few miles inland on a slow-moving glacier. As team 3 Below Zero, on Jan. 18, they completed that trip, an unguided, unsupported (no re-supply) and unassisted (powered solely by their own muscles), skiing expedition from the Ronne Ice Shelf to the South Pole, 560 miles away. They were also the first American married couple to make the trek. In their past 48 days on the ice, they’d seen no other living things. “I was in awe of where I was at times,” Chris said, “and really grateful to experience this pristine environment that very few had been in… I could feel that.” It was a little like being in space, they agreed. “It actually looked like the moon, many days to me,” Chris said. Marty, took inspiration from it, especially when a favorite song, the theme from “Apollo 13” started up on his music player. As their physical and emotional reserves dwindled -- they had planned and supplied for only 45 days on the ice, so had to ration their food supplies — they needed all the inspiration they could find some days. They found it in frequent

calls to their son — “I don’t think we would have gone if we couldn’t have talked to him,” Chris said — and in their daily blog posts, audio reports they made via satellite phone, and had posted and transcribed on their website, www.3belowzero. com. Students at their son’s St. Joseph’s School in Snoqualmie, and North Bend and Opstad Elementary Schools were following their daily blogs, and that helped, too. Chris remembered at first thinking that the daily blog was a big commitment, and yet another chore to do when they stopped for the “night,” but after she heard from some of their followers, she said “I wanted to do it.” Both of them were impressed with what they heard, and amazed that they were hearing it from third graders. “They would actually say things like ‘well, I used to take the easy way, and now I’m going to take the hard way.’ Wow, that’s kind of profound,” Chris remembered from some of theOpstad students’ messages. “Or ‘now after listening to your blog every day, I’m inspired to do big things, and I don’t even know what the big things are yet!’” By the end of their trip, the blog also had the unintended effect of telling their followers how they were, really. The cold was seeping into them, as the temperatures steadily dropped, even inside the tent. They were eating 5,200 calories a day, but burning 8,000 to keep the solid 15 miles-a-day pace they tried to set. Sleep was limited, and restless, although “our goal was to be at least prone for nine hours a day,” Marty said. They always knew they’d make it, Chris said, but some days, they had to dig deep for their strength. Followers of the blog said they could hear it, in how tired

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