Page 1


Southern and Eastern Regional Operational Programme 2007 - 2013 Annual Implementation Report 2009

1


Objective concerned

Regional Competitiveness Employment Objective (Objective 2)

Eligible area concerned

Southern & Eastern NUTS 11 Region

Programming Period

2007-2013

Programme number (CCI no.)

CCI number 2007IE162PO002

Programme Title

Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme

Reporting Year

2009

Date of approval of the Annual Report by the Monitoring Committee

28th April 2010.

2


3


1. Introduction 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Background 1.3 Financial Plan of the Operational Programme 1.4 Monitoring Committee Approval

5 5 6 8 9

2. Overview of the Implementation of the Operational Programme 2.1 Achievement and analysis of the progress 2.1.1 Financial Management and Control 2.1.2 Information on the Physical Progress of the Operational Programme 2.1.3 Financial Information 2.1.4 Information about the breakdown of use of the funds 2.1.5 Assistance by target groups and areas 2.1.6 Assistance repaid or re-used 2.1.7 Qualitative Analysis 2.1.8 Contribution to the Lisbon Targets 2.1.9 Promotion of Equal Opportunities and application of the Horizontal Principle 2.1.10 Partnership Arrangements 2.2 Compliance with Community Law 2.3 Significant problems encountered and measures taken to overcome them 2.4 Changes in the context of the Operational Programme Implementation 2.5 Relevant National Policy Developments 2.6 Relevant Policy Developments at Priority Level 2.7 Substantial modification under Article 57 of regulation (EC) No. 1083/2006 2.8 Complementarity with other instruments 2.9 Monitoring and Data Collection Arrangements

10 10 10 12 14 18 18 19 19 19 20 21 22 23 24 34 38 41 42 44

3. Implementation by Priority 3.1 Priority 1 Innovation and the Knowledge Economy 3.2 Priority 2 Environment and Accessibility 3.3 Priority 3 Sustainable Urban Development 3.4 Technical Assistance Priority 3.5 Demonstration of the effects of the Promotion of Equal Opportunities s 3.6 Share of the priority allocations used in accordance with Article 34 (2)

45 72 94 105 108 109

4. ESF Programmes: Coherence and Concentration

110

5. ERDF/CF Programmes: Major Projects

111

6. Technical Assistance

112

7. Information and Publicity

113

8. Financial Drawdown

116

9. Context Indicators

117

Annex 1 Annex 2 Annex 3 Annex 4

118 119 161 162

Project Level Report Horizontal Principle Reports Membership of Monitoring Committee Financial Tables

4


1. Introduction 1.1 Introduction This is the third Annual Implementation Report for the Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme for 2007-2013. It reports on the progress achieved under the OP for the year 2009. The report complies with Article 67 of Regulation 1083/2006 which requires the Managing Authority to submit an Annual Implementation Report within six months of the end of each full calendar year of implementation; and has been compiled in accordance with the format specified in Annex VI of Commission Regulation (EC) No 846/2009 (amending Annex XVIII of Regulation (EC) 1828/2006). This report relates to the period 1st January 2009 to 31st December 2009. The aim of the annual report is to provide a comprehensive overview of the implementation of the OP. Each Member State is required to prepare a National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) as a reference instrument for the preparation of the operational programmes for the 2007-2013 period. The regulations provide that the NSRF document sets out the strategic orientation for the Structural Funds, the link between Community priorities and national and regional policies, and the priority themes chosen for assistance from the funds and it is on that basis this Regional Operational Programme has been prepared. The Community Strategic Guidelines (CSG) sets the key priorities for the Structural Funds for the period 2007-2013. These are to promote and encourage innovation, the knowledge economy, enterprise, research and development, and Information Communication and Technology (ICT). Under the CSG, Cohesion Policy is to support the creation of more and better quality employment, and invest in the skill level and adaptability of workers and businesses. It will also support improving the attractiveness of Member States and their regions in order to improve accessibility and the quality and level of services available to their citizens. The aim of the Regional Competitiveness and Employment Objective is to anticipate and promote economic change by improving competitiveness and attractiveness of regions through a limited range interventions taking into account the particular development needs identified. The CSG sets out the need for Member States and regions to concentrate on three priorities in order to assess a programmes contribution to the objectives of the Lisbon Community Programme. The three priorities are1: o Improving the attractiveness of regions by investment in accessibility aiding the provision of adequate quality and level of services, and preserving their environmental potential o Encouraging innovation, entrepreneurship and the knowledge economy o Creating more and better jobs through actions by encouraging people into employment or entrepreneurial activity and by improving the adaptability of workers and enterprise. The S&E Regional OP continues as approved by the Commission in December 2007 to contribute to the Regional Competitiveness and Employment Objectives.

1

Community Strategic Guidelines page 12.

5


1.2 Background The current round of EU Structural and Cohesion funding covers the period 2007-2013. Under Article 6 of the General Regulation (EC) 1083/20062, regions not covered by the Convergence Objective will be eligible for assistance under the Competitiveness and Employment Objective. This includes the Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly (S&E) NUTS II region. The S&E Regional OP has a financial plan of €367m to draw down the €146.6m ERDF allocation based on the current 40% EU co-financing rate, which was approved by the EU Commission in October 2007. The profile of the allocated money is evenly distributed across the lifetime of the programme. The Irish Government, as set out in the National Strategic Reference Framework3 (NSRF) has decided that Cohesion policy will be delivered through separate Regional Operational Programmes for the BMW and the Southern and Eastern regions and a national ESF Operational Programme. The Regional Operational Programmes are part-funded by the ERDF. The S&E Regional Assembly is designated by the Government to be the Managing Authority for the S&E Regional Operational Programme and is responsible for its preparation and delivery. Given the agreed objectives of Cohesion Policy, Structural Funds are being concentrated on implementing community policies, namely the renewed Lisbon Agenda4 and the Göthenburg Declaration5. The specific focus is on innovation and the knowledge economy, environment and risk minimisation, accessibility to services of general interest (broadband, transport infrastructure), increasing adaptability of workers and enterprises, enhancing access to employment, and social inclusion measures. The Operational Programme was designed to set out a development strategy and it includes a coherent set of priorities to meet the strategic objectives set for the Regional Operational Programme under the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF). The final Operational Programme was submitted to the European Commission on March 6th, 2007, within the statutory deadline. The following are the priorities included in the OP: ƒ Priority 1: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy ƒ Theme 1 – Development of Regions RTDI Capacity o Sub – Theme 1: Applied Research Enhancement (ARE) o Sub – Theme 2: Commercialisation Fund o Sub – Theme 3: Incubation Centre Development o Sub – Theme 4: Building the Research Capacity & Capability within Higher Education Institutions. ƒ Theme 2 – Entrepreneurship in Micro-enterprises ƒ Theme 3 – Experimental Innovation Actions ƒ Priority 2: Environment and Accessibility ƒ Theme 1 – Environment & Risk Prevention o Sub – Theme 1: Rural Water Source Protection o Sub – Theme 2: Village Sewerage Systems ƒ Theme 2 – Renewable Energy o Sub – Theme 1: Renewable Energy Deployment - CHP & Bioheat (ReHeat) Programme o Sub – Theme 2: Stimulating energy efficiency first (Energy for Business Programme) o Sub – Theme 3: Renewable Energy Deployment – Renewable Energy R, D&D Programme o Sub – Theme 4: Integration and Innovation – Sustainable Development Zones ƒ Theme 3 – Information & Communications Technology Accessibility / Broadband Provision and Demand Stimulation ƒ Priority 3: Sustainable Urban Dimension ƒ Theme 1 – Gateway and Hub Challenge Funds o Sub – Theme 1: Urban Regeneration 2

European Commission (2006) Council Regulation (EC) 1083/2006 of 11th July , 2006 laying down general provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund and the Cohesion Fund and repealing Regulation (EC) 1260/1999. http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docoffic/official/regulation/pdf/2007/feder/ce_1083(2006)_en.pdf 3 Government of Ireland (2007) National Strategic Reference Framework for Ireland, 2007-13 4 European Commission (2005) Common Actions for Growth and Employment – the Community Lisbon Programme http://ec.europa.eu/growthandjobs/pdf/COM20_330_en.pdf 5 European Commission (2001) A sustainable Europe for a better World: A European Strategy for Sustainable Development – Proposal to the Gothenburg European Council http://europa.eu.int/eurlex/en/com/cnc/2001/com2001_0264en01.pdf

6


o o o

Sub – Theme 2: Public Transport Sub – Theme 3: Sports and Cultural Facilities Sub – Theme 4: ERDF Gateways Grant Scheme

ƒ Priority 4: Technical Assistance ƒ Theme 1 – Technical Assistance

7


1.3 Financial Plan of the Operational Programme

Community Funding (a)

National counterpart (b) = ((c) + (d))

Indicative breakdown of the national counterpart

National Public funding (c) Priorities Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Environment and Accessibility

€m

€m

€m

96.00

144.00

144.00

26.00

39.00

Sustainable Urban Development

20.00

Technical Assistance Total

6

National private funding (d) €m

Total funding (e) = (a)+(b)

CoFinanci ng rate (f) = (a)/(e)

For Information

EIB contrib utions

Other funding 6

€m

%

€m

€m

0

240.00

40%

0

37.00

39.00

0

65.00

40%

0

150.00

30.00

30.00

0

50.00

40%

0

127.00

4.60

7.40

7.40

0

12.00

38%

0

0

146.60

220.40

220.40

0

367.00

40%

0

314.00

Including national private funding where priority axes are expressed in public costs

8


1.4 Monitoring Committee Approval Article 67(1) of regulation 1083/2006 requires that the Managing Authority send an Annual Implementation Report (AIR) to the Commission by 30th June each year, having first been approved by the Monitoring Committee. This draft AIR was submitted to the Monitoring Committee for their consideration at their meeting on the 28th April 2010, at which the draft annual report was approved.

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2. Overview of the Implementation of the Operational Programme 2.1 Achievement and analysis of the progress The main focus of the Managing Authority in 2009 was on the continued implementation of the S&E Regional Operational Programme. Most of the co-funded themes are now operational and expenditure todate is €310.179. As can be seen from the indicator tables below whilst only 3 years into the implementation of the programme many of the final targets are well on the way to being realised. The cofunded Urban regeneration sub-theme has not commenced to-date however in consultation with the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and the Certifying Authority (Dept of Finance) the Managing Authority has initiated an ERDF co-funded Gateway Grant Scheme to ensure activity under this priority. It should also be noted that there has been very little activity in some of the exchequer only funded schemes due to the current economic crisis and resultant impact on the public finances. 2.1.1 Financial Management and Control As reported in the last Annual Report most of the requirements for the financial management and control systems were put in place during 2008 including, inter alia: • Implementation Plans for each theme/sub-theme were agreed with the Intermediate Bodies and presented to the Monitoring Committee held on ; • The Selection Criteria was agreed by the Monitoring Committee by written procedure; • The Systems Description was forward to the Commission by the ERDF Financial Control Unit in October 2008. Following some queries from the Commission an amended Systems Description was forward in February 2009 and formal approval was received on 20th of July 2009; • Formal administrative agreements were put in place between the IB and MA during 2008; • Financial Management and Control circular and National Eligibility Rules have been circulated to all Intermediate Bodies and Public Beneficiary Bodies; • The Information and Publicity Guidelines which were prepared in conjunction with the Department of Finance in 2008 were formally circulated in 2009. The main focus of the Managing Authority therefore in 2009 was on the provision of guidance to Public Beneficiary Bodies and Intermediary Bodies in advance of the first expenditure declarations during the year; managing authority verifications of declared expenditure; ensuring compliance with the above financial management and control provisions; and working with the Intermediate Bodies to update their Procedures Manuals and to finalise the sampling methodologies. Verification Checklists and Guidance Document In accordance with Article 13 of Regulation (EC) 1828/2006, the Managing Authority has prepared detailed checklists to cover all aspects of desk-based and on-site verification of eligible expenditure. This guidance along with guidance on appropriate sampling methodologies was issued to all Intermediary Bodies during 2008. During 2009 the Managing Authority worked with the Intermediate Bodies to agree and finalise the sampling methodologies where relevant. 2009 sampling methodologies were agreed with the Intermediate Bodies that submitted claims for ERDF cofunding (Form B2) in 2009: - Enterprise Ireland, CEB Coordination Unit (Priority 1, Micro Enterprise theme) - Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources (Priority 2, Broadband Provision and Demand Stimulation sub-theme) EU Structural Funds IT System (EU SF IT System) The EU Regulations provide that the Member States shall have reliable accounting, monitoring and financial reporting systems in computerised form and systems and procedures to ensure an adequate audit trail. The Irish Authorities have agreed that an appropriate option to meet the Commission Requirements was to establish a centralised database with web access for all bodies with the functionality to create the B1, B2 and B3 declaration forms and subsequently propose them to the body immediately above them in the cascade for approval. The system will also generate payment claims to the European Commission. The EUSF IT System, is used by the all the actors in the financial management and control cascade system in accordance with the shared management responsibilities. As stated in the 2008 report the EU SF I.T. System went live for the bodies involved in the ESF Human Capital Investment Operational Programme 07-13 during the

10


summer of 2008. However for both the S&E and BMW Regional Operational Programmes (ERDF), the system was further tested until the end of 2008. The system then went live for the ERDF Programmes in 2009 and the Managing Authorities started the training of Intermediate Bodies and Public Body Beneficiaries on the system in February. This training was ongoing in the first half of 2009 and the system was then utilised by some of the bodies involved to declare expenditure to the Managing Authority during the third quarter of 2009. Guidance Seminars In conjunction with the training on the EU SF IT System, the Managing Authority organised a series of Guidance Seminars for Intermediate and Public Beneficiary Bodies in the early part of 2009. The aim of the seminars was to introduce and provide guidance on the financial management and control arrangements for the period 2007-13, including the systems description, national eligibility rules, I.T. system for certification of expenditure, administrative agreements, expenditure verification arrangements, audit arrangements and treatment of irregularities. These seminars were organised in conjunction with the BMW Regional Assembly and the Certifying Authority. The following are the seminars which took place: Date Presentation Title 10th February Financial Management Training – CEB’s 18th February Financial Management Training – CEB’s th 25 February Financial Management Training – CEB’s 5th March Financial Management Training 15th June Financial Management Training th 11 November Financial Management Training 1st December Financial Management Training

Presentation to County & City Enterprise Board County & City Enterprise Board County & City Enterprise Board Intermediate Bodies SEI & DCENR Mid West Regional Authority South East Regional Authority

Advance Payment In addition to the advance payments received by the Certifying Authority from the EU Commission of 2%, €2.932m in November 2007 and 3% in 2008 (€4.398m) a further advance of 2.5% (€3.665m) was received in April 2009 bringing the total advance to €10.995m. Expenditure Declarations 2009 saw the first expenditure declarations submitted to the Managing Authority which was then certified and submitted by the Certifying Authority to the EU by the October 31st deadline. As specified in the Systems Description the declarations of expenditure in the format of the Form B’s are submitted via the centralised EU SF I.T. System. During 2009 the Managing Authority received 3 Form B2 declarations via the I.T. System. Following the checks completed by the Managing Authority these were then declared to the Certifying Authority on 3 Form B3’s, a Form B3 per Priority, via the EU SF I.T. System. The table below sets out the details of the Form B3’s: Total Public Eligible ERDF B3 No. Theme & Sub Theme € € Innovation & Knowledge Economy €22,633,359.67 €9,053,343.87 9 Microenterprise 10

Technical Assistance

11

Environment & Accessibility Broadband TOTAL

€145,598.58

€58,239.43

€7,714,971.16

€3,085,988.46

€30,493,929.41

€12,197,571.76

In accordance with the Systems Description and the Managing Authorities Procedures Manual the Managing Authority conducted verification checks on the expenditure declarations submitted by the various Intermediate Bodies; Enterprise Ireland for the Micro Enterprise theme, Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources for the Broadband sub-theme and the Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly for Technical Assistance. The verifications covered administrative, financial, technical and physical aspects, as appropriate7. This in effect involved the Managing Authority checking that the Intermediate Body has carried out its responsibilities with regard to conducting administrative and on-the-spot checks on the Public 7

As specified in Article 13 of the Implementation Regulation

11


Beneficiary Body in accordance with the Administrative Agreement and the procedures manual. Also to ensure that adequate backup documentation is retained to support the expenditure declarations submitted and that the records of each verification, stating the work performed, the date and the results of the verification, and the measures taken in respect of irregularities detected is maintained. Any findings made during these verifications were resolved before the claim was submitted to the Certifying Authority. Of the €30.494m Total Public Eligible expenditure declared €8.043m has been transaction tested by the relevant Intermediate Bodies. N+2 The 2009 N+2 target for the Southern & Eastern Regional OP was €19.720m ERDF. When the advance payments totalling €10.995m and the 1st expenditure declaration of €12.198m are taken into account the total drawn down from the EU Commission amounts to €23.193mwhich exceeds the 2009 N+2 target by €3.473m. Revision to the Systems Description Only a small change to the Systems Description was necessitated in 2009 and this with regard to the minor organisation changes within the Regional Assembly concerning the Technical Assistance Priority. This change was notified to the ERDF Financial Control Unit. 2.1.2 Information on the Physical progress of the Operational Programme. Detailed information on the physical progress of the Operational Programme is presented below and by priority in section 3 of this report. Physical Indicators are at priority level for this Operational Programme. An update of the context indicators that were included in the Operational Programme is included under section 9. Implementation has commenced on aspects of three of the four priorities. Priority 1: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy The Incubation Centre Development subtheme, while reporting very little expenditure in 2009, funding has been approved for 2 additional Incubation Centres in Cork Institute of technology and University of Limerick. Construction work has commenced and the funding paid to the colleges is on a phased bases following inspection by the Intermediate Body. Under the Micro Enterprises Theme the number of microenterprises assisted now stands at 5,342. Priority 2: Environment and Accessibility The Department of Environment, Heritage & Local Government is examining the reports on the pilot projects for Village Sewerage and Water Source Protection schemes. They expect schemes under the non co-financed Risk Prevention & Water Protection theme will be identified in liaison with local authorities for delivery in 2010. Priority 3: Sustainable Urban Development The themes under priority 3 are most affected by the downturn in the economy with a significantly reduced level of exchequer vote activity than forecasted. However the ERDF Gateways Grant scheme is now under way. Following the Call for Proposals 4 projects were approved in Cork, Dublin, Limerick and Waterford. The projects are now being rolled out and the bulk of the expenditure will take place in 2010. Priority 1: Innovation and the Knowledge Class Indicator Output Result Output

No. of Incubation Centres Total employed in Incubation Centres No. of additional researchers employed in the region’s HEIs No. of training days provided to SMEs No. of micro-enterprises supported No. of recipients of training in micro-enterprises theme

Baseline 9 284

Final target 16 434

Outturn to 31.12.09 11 447

0

560

686

74,294 4,029

249,294 8,029 141,159 56,184 Male 84,275 Female 700 Other 32,558 108

165,462.5 5,342

57,159 Result No. of jobs created in micro-enterprises theme No. of enterprises created in incubation centres

24,858 62

108,446 44,432 Male 63,546 Female 468 Other 23,609.5 129

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Core Indicators No.

Indicator

1 6 7 8

Jobs Created Research Jobs Created No. of direct Investment Aid No. of start ups supported

9

Jobs created from direct investment aid

Baseline

Final Target

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09

25142 0 4029 62 24858

32992 560 8029 108 32558

24056.5 686 5342 129 23609.5

Priority 2: Environment and Accessibility Class Indicator Output

Result Output Result Output Result

No. of rural water source protection projects supported No. of STEDS projects supported Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) Reduction in protected sources Population equivalent served by STEDS schemes No. of energy schemes introduced No. of energy efficient/renewable energy buildings supported No. of initiatives to enable broadband infrastructure and service provision Additional businesses with broadband available

Baseline

Final target

Outturn to 31.12.09

0

12

0

0

12

0

N/A

75%

0

N/A

4,200

0

N/A

6

N/A

900

4 Not available at present

0

3

1

0

25,943

14,577

Core Indicators No. 12 26

Indicator Additional Population Covered by broadband access Additional Population served by wastewater projects

Baseline

Final Target

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09

221239

110619

4200

0

13


Priority 3: Sustainable Urban Development Class Indicator Baseline

Output

Result

No. of Integrated growth centre strategies approved No. of public transport projects supported Quantitative and Qualitative progress of each gateway/hub Total investment in gateways and hubs Increased public transport usage in the Gateways

Final target

Outturn to 31.12.09

0

10

0

0

To be determined

0

To be determined by a speciallycommissioned baseline study

To be determined following the baseline study

0

To be determined

To be determined

To be determined

To be determined

Core Indicators No.

Indicator

Baseline

22

Additional Population Served with improved urban transport

Final Target

Priority 4: Technical Assistance Class Indicator Number of Monitoring Committee Meetings held Number of Evaluations & Studies conducted Verification Audits & Closure audits Number of annual publicity events % Achievement of Physical and Financial Targets

Output

Result

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09

Baseline

Final target

Outturn to 31.12.09

0

7

3

0 0 0

3 Annual 7

0 0 2

0

100%

18%

2.1.3 Financial Information Expenditure 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009 Priority Theme

Total Expenditure * Community (€m) Contribution (€m) 1 Innovation & Knowledge Economy 99.865 39.946 2 Environment & Accessibility 21.801 8.722 3 Sustainable Urban Development 2.632 1.053 4 Technical Assistance 0.178 0.071 Total Programme Total 124.477 49.793 * Expenditure reported incurred by public beneficiary body but not declared to Managing Authority for proposal to the Certifying Authority.

Year

2007

Total Eligible Public Expenditure (€m) 1=2+3+4 €62.445

Total ERDF (€m)

2 €24.980

Total Matching Exchequer (€m) 3 €37.471

Total Matching Other Public (€m) 4 €0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5 €0.000

Other Non coFinanced Expendit ure (€m) 6 €3.590

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2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

€123.261 €124.477 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €310.189

€49.308 €49.793

€73.606 €73.105

€0.347 €1.579

€0.000 €30.494

€4.921 €0.297

€124.081

€184.181

€1.926

€30.494

€8.808

During 2009 €124.477m has been reported as expended by the Public Beneficiary bodies across all 4 Priority areas. This results in a community contribution of just over €49.793m. The largest area of expenditure was in the Innovation and Knowledge Economy Priority contributing directly to the Lisbon Agenda. An interim claim was declared by the Managing Authority via the EUSF IT System 2007-2013 to the Certifying Authority in advance of the 31st October 2009 deadline. The claim comprised total eligible expenditure of €37.365m (including private), total public funding of €30.494m, the ERDF amount is €12.198m. Cumulative 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009 Priority Theme

1

Total Cumulative Expenditure * (€m)

Cumulative Community Contribution (€m)

Innovation & Knowledge 267.630 Economy 2 Environment & Accessibility 39.033 3 Sustainable Urban 3.210 Development ** 4 Technical Assistance 0.310 Total Programme Total 310.189 * Expenditure reported incurred by public beneficiary body but not proposal to the Certifying Authority **Priority 3: Expenditure under the Sustainable Urban Dimension amounts to €12.018m in total of which €3.210m is co-funded.

Expenditure reported to MA for 01.01.09 to 31.12.09 (€m)

107.054

22.633

15.619

7.715

1.284

0

0.124 0.146 124.181 30.494 declared to Managing Authority for Priority For the period 2007-2009

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Priority Axes by source of funding € 2009 Expenditure Corresponding paid out by the Public beneficiaries contribution included in payment claims sent to the managing authority Priority Axis 1 ERDF €22.633m €22.633m Of which ESF type 0 0 expenditure Of which ERDF type 0 0 expenditure Priority Axis 2 ERDF €7.715m €7.715m Of which ESF type 0 0 expenditure Of which ERDF type 0 0 expenditure €0.000m €0.000m Priority Axis 3 ERDF Of which ESF type 0 0 expenditure Of which ERDF type 0 0 expenditure Priority Axis 4 ERDF €0.146m €0.146m Of which ESF type 0 0 expenditure Of which ERDF type 0 0 expenditure Grand Total €30.494m €30.494m Total in transitional regions in the grand total Total in non€30.494m €30.494m transitional regions in the grand total ESF type expenditure in the grand total where the Operational Programme is cofinanced by the ERDF *2.5% advance paid by the Commission in 2009.

Private Expenditure

0

Expenditure paid by the body responsible for making payments to the beneficiaries

Total payments received from the Commission

€99.865m

€9.053m

0

0

0

0 €21.801m

0

0

0

0

0 €2.632m

€3.086m

0

0

0

0

0 €0.178m

€0.056m

0

0

0 0

0

0 €124.477m

€12.195m €3.665m*

€124.477m

€15.86m

16


Priority Axes by source of funding € Cumulative Expenditure paid Corresponding out by the Public beneficiaries contribution included in payment claims sent to the managing authority

Priority Axis 1 ERDF Of which ESF type expenditure Of which ERDF type expenditure Priority Axis 2 ERDF Of which ESF type expenditure Of which ERDF type expenditure Priority Axis 3 ERDF Of which ESF type expenditure Of which ERDF type expenditure Priority Axis 4 ERDF Of which ESF type expenditure Of which ERDF type expenditure Grand Total

Private Expenditure

Expenditure paid by the body responsible for making payments to the beneficiaries

Total payments received from the Commission

€267.626m

€9.053m

0

0

€22.633m

€22.633m

0

0

0

0

0

0

€7.715m

€7.715m

0

0

0

0

0

0

€0m

€0m

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

€0.146m

€0.146m

€0.310m

€0.056m

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

€30.494m

€30.494m

0

0 €39.033m

€3.086m

0

0 0

€3.210m

0 €310.189m

€12.195m €10.995m*

Total in transitional regions in the grand total Total in nontransitional €30.494m €30.494m €23.190m** €310.189m regions in the grand total ESF type expenditure in the grand total where the Operational Programme is co-financed by the ERDF * An advance of 2%, €2.932m was paid in November 2007 by the EU to the Certifying Authority. A further 3% was received in 2008 (€4.398m) and a third advance of 2.5%, €3.665m was paid in April 2009 bringing the total advance to €10.995m. ** This includes the advance.

17


2.1.4 Information about the breakdown of use of the funds Cumulative breakdown of allocations of the Community contribution by category (Part C of Annex 11 of the Implementing Regulation). Information on the cumulative breakdown of allocations of the Community contribution by category as set out in Annex 11 of the Implementing Regulation is presented in preliminary format hereunder based on expenditure reported to-date. This will be finalised prior to submission of the Annual Implementation Report to the EU Commission. Priority

Code Dimension 1

Code Dimension 2 Form of finance

Code Dimension 3 Territory

Code Dimension 4 Economic Activity

Code Dimension 5 Location

Community Contribution

1

01

01

01

22

IE02

€24.90m

1

02

01

01

22

IE02

€64.69m

1

08

01

01

22

IE02

€6.162m

1

08

01

05

22

IE02

€9.393m

1

08

02

01

22

IE02

€0.689m

1

08

02

05

22

IE02

€1.220m

2

43

01

05

21

IE 02

€7.579m

2

15

01

05

10

IE 02

€8.040m

3

61

01

01

22

IE02

€1.284m

4

85

01

01

00

IE02

€0.105m

4

86

01

01

00

IE02

€0.019m

Total

€124.08m

*Reported expenditure not certified to the Commission. ▲ Micro-Enterprise – Innovation and Entrepreneurship theme includes ESF type expenditure which will be captured on the IT system and will reported on expenditure declared to the Commission in the Final AIR for June 30th. 2.1.5 Assistance by target groups and areas Expenditure was reported under the four priorities for 2009. The former specifically targets small businesses in the region and the latter is to support the management, evaluation and monitoring of the Regional Operational Programme. Reported Priority Theme Sub Theme Expenditure

Innovation & the Knowledge Economy

Environment & Accessibility

Applied Research Enhancement Entrepreneurship in Microenterprises Renewable Energy

Applied Research Enhancement Commercialisation Fund Incubation Centre Development Building Research Capacity & Capability within HEI Micro-Enterprise CHP & Bioheat (ReHeat) Programme Energy for Business Programme

No No No Yes Yes

Yes No

18


Risk Prevention & Water Protection

Renewable Energy Development & Deployment Strategic Development Zones Ocean Energy Development Rural Water Source Protection

Yes No Yes No

Village Sewerage Systems

No

Information and Communication Technology Accessibility

Broadband

Yes

Sustainable Urban Development

The Gateway & Hub Challenge Theme:

Public Transport Arts Capital Fund Sports Capital Programme Swimming Pool Programme ERDF Gateways Grant Scheme

Yes No No No Yes

Technical Assistance

Technical Assistance

Yes

2.1.6 Assistance repaid or re-used There has been no assistance repaid or re-used following cancellations of assistance, as there has been no assistance certified to the Commission. 2.1.7 Qualitative Analysis Implementation commenced on four themes in 2009. Expenditure of ₏298.093m is reported to date which represents 43.77% of the OP total. At this relatively early stage in the Operational Programme it is premature to try to present a meaningful analysis of the progress achieved as only a number of themes have reported expenditure. An additional 5342 enterprises were assisted. This directly contributes to the Lisbon strategy of increasing adaptability of enterprises. The Microenterprise theme continues to build on the capacity developed in the 2000-2006 OP with respect to the promotion of equal opportunity between men and women. 2.1.8 Contribution to the Lisbon Targets The conclusions reached at the European Council meeting held in Lisbon in 2000 included a commitment to make the European Union the most dynamic and competitive knowledge-based economy in the world, with more and better jobs and greater social inclusion, by 2010. Following a review of the achievement of this goal in 2004, the re-launched Lisbon Agenda placed particular emphasis on growth and jobs. The National Strategic Reference Framework and this Operational Programme reflect the priorities set out in the Irish Government’s National Reform Programme (NRP) which was submitted to the EU in October 2005. This brought together a wide range of policies and initiatives, the implementation of which were aimed at sustaining Ireland's strong economic performance and employment growth. The NRP identifies three broad policy areas: macro-economic policy, micro-economic policy and employment policy. In addressing the Lisbon goals, the NRP states that global markets and global competition characterise the environment within which the Irish economy must prosper and compete as part of the EU of 27 Member States. In a rapidly changed economic environment the NRP 2008-2010 which was submitted in October 2009 stresses the importance of the framework provided by the NRP for articulating Ireland’s approach to generating economic growth and job creation. The Government has indicated that it will bring forward revised and new strategies over the period ahead in response to an extremely fast-changing situation. It brings together a broad range of policies and initiatives within the framework of the Towards 2016 social partnership agreement, the implementation of which aim to ensure a return by Ireland to strong economic growth and employment performance as its overall contribution to the renewed Lisbon Agenda over the period to 2010, while stressing also the interdependence of social, environmental and economic goals. The outcome of the review of the Towards 2016 agreement by the Government and Social Partners that took place over recent months is reflected in the Review and Transitional Agreement 2008-2009. The implementation of the development strategy, priority objectives and selected interventions as outlined in this OP will contribute to Ireland meeting its commitments as set out in the National Reform Programme and in accordance with Article 29(1) of the General Regulation, the Annual Report on the implementation of the National Reform Programme will include a concise section on the contribution of the OP to the

19


implementation of the National Reform Programme. The following table sets out the correlation between the priorities in the S&E Regional OP and the Lisbon Agenda Guidelines. Priority Guideline Reference Guideline Increase and improve investment in research and development, in particular in the private sector, with Guideline 7 a view to establishing a European area of Priority 1: knowledge Innovation, ICT and Guideline 8 Facilitate all forms of innovation the Knowledge Facilitate the spread and effective use of ICT and Economy Guideline 9 build a fully inclusive information society Promote a more entrepreneurial culture and create a Guideline 15 supportive environment for SMEs Encourage the sustainable use of resources and Priority 2: Guideline 11 strengthen the synergies between environmental Environment and protection and growth Risk Prevention Encourage the sustainable use of resources and Priority 3: Guideline 11 strengthen the synergies between environmental Sustainable Urban protection and growth Development Priority 4: n/a n/a Technical Assistance Based on the cumulative breakdown of allocations presented above, it is possible to provide an indication of the achievement of the earmarking targets to date. This is presented in the following table: Priority

Theme

Priority 1

Development of Region’s RTDI Capacity Development of Region’s RTDI Capacity Entrepreneurship in Micro Enterprise

Priority 2

Priority 3 Priority 4 Total

CHP & Bioheat Programme Renewable Energy Development & Deployment Energy for Business Broadband Provision and Demand Stimulation ERDF Gateway Grants

Categorisation Code

Reported Expenditure

Lisbon earmarking

01

62.239m

Yes

02

161.728m

Yes

08

43.663m

Yes

43

8.280m

Yes

43

6.684m

Yes

43

3.968m

Yes

15

20.101m

Yes

01

3.210m

Yes

85 86

0.264m 0.046m

No No 99.9%

2.1.9 Promotion of Equal Opportunities and application of the Horizontal Principles In accordance with Article 16 of Council Regulation (EC) 1083/2006 laying down the general provisions on the ERDF, the Operational Programme sets out information on the steps taken to ensure equality between men and women, the integration of a gender perspective and the prevention of discrimination on the basis of gender, race or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation during the various stages of implementing the Funds and, in particular, in the access to them. The objectives of the Operational Programme will also be pursued within the framework of sustainable development and the promotion of the goal of protecting and improving the environment in accordance with Article 17 of the above regulation. In addition, the OP incorporates mechanisms to promote social inclusion during implementation.

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See Annex 2 for details of Horizontal Principle Reports for 2009. 2.1.10 Partnership Arrangements In accordance with Articles 11 and 32(2) of the general regulation, the Managing Authority prepared the Operational Programme following consultation with national, regional and local authorities, representatives of economic and social partners and non-governmental organisations. This built on the well-established institutional arrangements that have been put in place as part the Irish social partnership process, up to and including the current agreement Towards 2016, and which was successfully applied to the previous programming periods. Many of the partners are actively engaged in programme implementation as Intermediary Bodies and beneficiaries of the interventions. This partnership principle is also strongly reflected in the membership of the OP Monitoring Committee, which is set out in Annex 3 of this report and will also be reflected in the conduct of Evaluations.

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2.2 Compliance with Community Law As set out in the adopted Operational Programme, the S&E Regional Assembly as Managing Authority for the OP is required to ensure that operations financed by the Funds, are in conformity with the provisions of the Treaty, with instruments adopted under it and with Community policies and actions in the field of competition and with procedural and material State aid rules applicable at the point of time when the public support is granted. The Managing Authority will also ensure that the European public procurement directives are complied with, in respect of the award of contracts for projects funded by European funds. During 2009, there were no significant problems encountered related to compliance with Community law in respect of state aids or public procurement, under the Operational Programme.

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2.3 Significant problems encountered and measures taken to overcome them The Managing Authority mindful of the pressures on public expenditure arising from the current economic downturn is working closely with the Government Departments to ensure that the composition and integrity of the Operational Programme is maintained. There was no allocation to the Urban Regeneration theme in 2009 as a result the Managing Authority instituted discussions with the Department of Environment and the Local Authorities to agree a strategy to safe guard the priority’s profile. Arising from these discussions the Managing Authority introduced the ERDF Gateways Grant Scheme. Under this theme, grant assistance was made available for the 4 NSS Gateways in the Southern & Eastern Region (Dublin, Cork, Limerick/Shannon and Waterford) for projects which will improve the Gateways economically, environmentally, socially, and/or culturally and which fell within the scope of Article 8 of Commission Regulation 1080/2006. A total of ₏11 million was available for allocation as grant assistance at a maximum grant rate of 50%. The matching 50% must come from the Local Authority’s own resources, which may not entail borrowing. Works should be completed by 31st December 2010.

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2.4 Changes in the context of the Operational Programme Implementation Changes in the context of the operational programme implementation This section sets out relevant developments at national level and at priority level. It also provides a socioeconomic overview of the region in 2009 where the relevant statistics are available. The Operational Environment The S&E Region consists of 53% of the land area, 73% of the population and the average value added per person generated in the S&E region was 10.2% above the state average in 2006. At NUTS 111 level the Dublin region had the highest GVA per person in 2006 at 140.9%8 of the state average. The Southern and Eastern region covers 13 counties including 16 county councils, 5 Regional Authorities and 4 cities. The region extends from the south west of the country (Kerry) up to county Meath and it includes the capital, Dublin. The other main cities of the region are Cork, Limerick and Waterford Demographic Trends in the S&E Region Overall the population of the Republic grew by 8.0% over the six year 1996-2002 inter-censal period and by 8.2% over the four year 2002-2006 period. The population of the S&E Region is 3.105m in a Region of 36,414 km2 (85.3 persons per km2). The 2006 Census showed that population increased in every county in Ireland however the nature of this growth was not even. The fastest growing counties were Fingal (+43,400 or 22.1%), Meath (+28,616 or 21.4%) and Kildare (+22,131 or 13.5%). The population of all counties in Leinster apart from Dublin City (+2%), DĂşn Laoghaire-Rathdown (+1%) and Dublin South (+3.4%) grew by more than the national average rate of 8.1%. Taking a ten year perspective (i.e. 1996-2006), three counties in the S&E Region accounted for about 29% of the 609,000 growth in population at State level. They were Fingal, Meath and Kildare. On the other hand Cork City and Limerick City were the only two of the thirty-four administrative counties to experience population decline between 2002 and 2006, the decreases being 3.2% and 2.7% respectively. Cork County (+11.4%) was the fastest growing county in Munster, followed by Waterford County (+9.2%) and Limerick County (+8.3%). Developments in the suburban areas adjacent to the cities of Cork, Waterford and Limerick were major contributors to this growth. In relation to sustainable settlement patterns, the outcomes of the 2006 census as well as indicating positive population trends in many previously under-developing counties also indicate that urban sprawl continues to be a feature of new settlement patterns. This is demonstrated by the changes in the population of the Mid-East Region which grew by 18.8% between the years 1996-2002 and by 18.1% to 2006. The following bar chart shows the population levels for the NUTS III regions over the three censi. Population of the 1996-2006 by NUTS III Regions

Source: Central Statistics Office, Census of Population 2006

8

Central Statistics Office (2009) County Incomes and Regional GDP 2009

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Socio-Economic Context The National Macro-Economic Context The past eighteen months or so have been an exceptionally difficult period for the Irish economy. While there are a number of contributory factors, two stand out – the global recession brought about by difficulties in world financial markets and domestically the correction in the property market. There is some evidence that while activity will remain at lower levels in the near-term, the worst of the decline may have passed. Externally, a global recovery appears to be underway, although there is a broad consensus among the main international forecasting institutions that this will be fairly modest. While Ireland will lag the global economic recovery, it is expected that economic growth will emerge during 2010, although it is expected that it will be 2011 before we experience positive growth for the year as a whole. However, there remain outstanding issues in the domestic economy – such as loss of international competitiveness, an over-supply of housing, high levels of public and private indebtedness – which will continue to weigh on activity in the short-term. While there have been significant revenue-raising measures introduced in the December 2008 Budget and the Supplementary Budget in April 2009, the scope for further extensive revenue measures was limited. The Report from the Commission on Taxation recommended that the tax base should be made broader and less volatile and this will be an important factor in medium term taxation policy. In seeking to stabilise the public finances for 2010, the Government in its December 2009 Budget took into account previous domestic and international experience of fiscal consolidation and focused on public spending. In this regard, current expenditure, which was approximately €56 billion in 2009, encompasses three areas of broadly equal weight: the public service pay-bill, social welfare spending and programme spending. In order to achieve the necessary savings, the Government made budgetary adjustments in the order of €4bn. This feeds into the Government Plan to reduce the budget deficit to below 3% by the revised deadline of 2014 as agreed by the Commission. Further measures will be required in order to achieve this target. Why action is needed Given the very substantial contraction in living standards that we are experiencing, the public finances will be under pressure for the foreseeable future. The normal cyclical improvement in the economy over the medium term will not be sufficient to eliminate the gap between revenue and expenditure because of the narrow tax base and the fact that the tax content of export-led growth is less than that of domestically-driven growth. In other words, a large part of the deficit is permanent, or structural, and will not be eliminated without action. This is why expenditure-reducing measures and revenue-raising measures have been necessary and why further adjustments are essential. Emerging Economic and Budgetary Position GDP was reported to have declined by 7½ % in 2009, a figure which was broadly in line with forecasts published in the April Supplementary Budget. Activity is projected to decline at a more moderate rate in 2010 – probably by around 1½ % – although annual growth is expected to turn positive during the second half of the year. A General Government Balance of the order of -113/4 % of GDP is estimated in 2009. According to the NTMA the National Debt increased from €50 billion at end-2008 to €75.2 billion by end2009, this is a debt to GDP Ratio of 65%. If no corrective action is taken the deficit is likely to rise to around 14 % of GDP in 2010. However, it is hoped that the measures introduced by the Government in Budget 2010 will stabilise the deficit at the 2009 level. Rationale for taking action now The conditions for economic recovery encompass three broad strands. The Government has taken action in each of these aimed at: ƒ Repairing our banking system, thereby facilitating the provision of adequate credit within the economy; ƒ Restoring the public finances to sustainable and lower deficit levels over the medium-term; ƒ Fostering sustainable employment through improving competitiveness, thus safeguarding future living standards. 9 The economic climate is impacting on the capacity of Government Departments to co-finance expenditure under some themes in the S&E OP namely the Gateway & Hub Challenge Funds of the Sustainable Development Priority and the Strategic Development Zones of the Renewal Energy Theme. However under the Sustainable Development Priority the Monitoring Committee in May 2009 approved the ERDF Gateway Grants Scheme and activity is currently taking place. A number of exchequer only 9

http://www.finance.gov.ie/documents/publications/prebudget09/prebud2009.pdf

25


funded themes are currently on hold due to the current fiscal climate. This section sets out the economic and public financial position at national level and some recent socio-economic changes that have taken place at regional level. Economic and Public Financial Position 1. The Irish economy contracted by -7.75% in 2009 as a combination of deteriorating domestic and external conditions affect activity. 2. The economic outlook in all of our major trading partners has deteriorated significantly with all of them forecast to be in recession this year. For a small open economy this is having a detrimental effect on our ability to export. 3. In terms of our single largest trading partner – the UK economy – the recessionary conditions have also been accompanied by a significant depreciation of sterling. This has created difficulties for us, especially for Irish firms exposed to the sterling area which tend to be labour-intensive, small and medium-sized enterprises. 4. On the domestic front, we are in the midst of a major correction in our housing market. The large increase in housing supply in recent years resulted in ‘excess supply’ and output is being cut back dramatically. This has implications for overall economic activity and for employment and has spilled-over to the rest of the economy. 5. The rapid rise in unemployment is, in part, a reflection of the sectoral nature of the economic shock – while all sectors have been affected, the sectors experiencing the sharpest contraction in activity are labour-intensive sectors, such as construction, industry and – increasingly of late – retail. The rate of unemployment at the end of 2009 was 12.4% which is comparable to the rates in 199510 6. The worsening in the economic environment has had significant negative consequences for the public finances. While increases in unemployment-related spending have had a negative impact, the large deficits in 2008 and 2009 are mainly the result of the very poor performance of tax revenues. In 2009, even with the revenue raising measures set out in the Supplementary Budget, tax revenues, were approximately 27 % below 2007 levels. The decline in capital taxes (Capital Gains Tax, Capital Acquisitions Tax and Stamp Duty) is of particular note. 7. In Council 104(7) recommendation to Ireland on correcting the excessive deficit (4th April 2009) the Irish Authorities were requested to: “in particular, implement reforms to reduce current spending over the coming years and reconsider investment priorities in the light of the changed economic environment”. 8. The December 2009 Budget was the latest in a series of actions taken by the Irish Government to bring order to the public finances while faced with a weakening international and domestic economy. As recommendation by the Ecofin Council, the Government has found it necessary against this difficult economic background to reduce spending and increase revenues and introduced a number of measures to restore order to the public finances as follows: Date Measure Jul 2008 Expenditure savings of €440 million in 2008 and €1 billion in 2009. Oct 2008 Budget 2009 delivered strict containment of expenditure and a range of revenue raising measures of almost €2 billion. Jan 2009 Addendum to the Irish Stability Programme Update setting out a medium-term plan to return the General Government Deficit below the 3% of GDP deficit limit by 2014 (Extension of one year agreed by the Commission November 2009) Underpinning that plan was the need to find savings of up to €2 billion in 2009. Feb 2009 Expenditure savings of €2 billion in a full year announced. The most significant component of this package was the introduction of a pension-related pay deduction for public servants. In addition, the postponement of the next rounds of the Social Partnership pay agreement ‘Towards 2016’ secured savings on the pay bill. In 2010 these are estimated to achieve of up to €1 billion in savings. Apr 2009 Supplementary Budget - Expenditure (€1.5bn) and revenue measures of (€1.8bn) in current year or €5bn over a full year. Dec 2009 The Government introduced €4 billion cuts to public spending in 2010 Budget 9. The Government has been conscious of the need to show a credible route to restore order to the public finances while also protecting the economy given its current fragile condition. A borrowing target of approx. 12% of GDP has been set for 2010, representing the most appropriate balance between these two important objectives.

10

QNHS March 2010.

26


10. Following the Supplementary Budget in April 2009, which set out details of a five year plan to bring the General Government deficit below the EU 3% of GDP limit by 2013 (extended to 2014), the Government continued on the objective of restoring the public finances in the December 2009 budget and in so doing demonstrates that the Government is taking the necessary hard decisions to underpin the stability of the public finances and thereby help sustain future economic growth. 11. The strategy has been welcomed by the Commission, the Eurogroup President and the President of the ECB as appropriate. 12. The Government is trying to ensure that the economy is suitably competitive in order that Ireland is in a position to benefit from the global recovery when it emerges. Impact of the Current Economic Climate on the S&E Region The scale and speed of the impact of the changed economic circumstances is very much evident in the data from 2009. Employment fell by 121,800 (-7.9%) in the Southern and Eastern region 45,100 (-8.5%) and by in the Border, Midland and Western region in the year to the last quarter of 2009. There were increases of 21,300 (+40%) and 76,500 (+65%) in the numbers unemployed in the Border, Midland and Western and Southern and Eastern regions respectively. The participation rate in the Border, Midland and Western region was 58.6% compared with a participation rate of 62.2% in the Southern and Eastern region. At NUTS III level, employment fell in all regions with the South-East (-11.7%) and Border (-11.65%) regions showing the largest percentage decreases over the full year 2009. This compares to a 8.1% decrease for the State.11 These conditions are likely to deepen in the short run and according to the Ireland’s Economic and Social Research Institute’s (ESRI) Quarterly Economic Commentary; unemployment will rise to 16.8% by 2010. Live register data shows that there has been an increase of 26% in the Live Register in the S&E Region in the between February 2009 and February 2010. The most up-to-date regional data for Ireland in relation to output is only available up to 2006 and therefore a true reflection of this economic downturn on the performance of S&E Region’s GVA cannot currently be measured. Current Position of the S&E Regional OP The EU Commission has been made aware of the difficulties in relation to the implementation of the Sustainable Urban Development Priority over the past year (i.e. at the S&E Monitoring Meeting on 18th May 2009, at the Annual Review Meeting in Brussels on 26th November, 2009) and at a number of other informal meetings over the past year or so. The first estimates of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and Gross National Product (GNP) for the year 2009 as a whole indicate that GDP was 7.1% lower than in 2008 while GNP was 11.3% lower than in 2008. This is the largest decline in output ever recorded in a single year. Initial estimates for the fourth quarter of 2009 show a decline, on a seasonally adjusted basis, of 2.3% in both GDP and GNP compared with the previous quarter. In comparison with the corresponding quarter of 2008, GDP at constant prices was 5.1% lower while GNP was 10.4% lower. Some of the main features of the results are: o Consumer spending (personal consumption of goods and services) in volume terms was 5.2% lower in Q4 2009 compared with the same period of the previous year. o Capital investment, in constant prices, declined by 28.2% in Q4 2009 compared with Q4 2008. o Net Exports (exports minus imports) in constant prices were €2,042 million higher in Q4 2009 compared with Q4 2008. o The volume of output of Industry (incl. Construction) decreased by 6% in Q4 2009 compared with Q4 2008. Within this the output of the Construction sector fell by 32.3% over the same period. Output of Distribution, Transport and Communications was down 7.0%, while Output of Other Services was 2.3% lower in the fourth quarter of 2009 compared with the same period of last year. GNP The estimate of GNP is derived by adjusting GDP for income flows between residents and non-residents. The timing of these flows can be variable. They include, in particular, the profits of foreign owned enterprises which increased by €858m between Q4 2008 and Q4 2009. The increase, in this quarter, in the net factor income flows is also affected by (a) reduced credits (inward flows), compared to Q4 2008, to Irish outward direct investment enterprises and (b) increased interest payments on government debt. As a result, the decline in GNP was more severe than that in GDP.

11

http://www.cso.ie/releasespublications/documents/labour_market/current/qnhs.pdf

27


Source: Dept of Finance, Monthly Economic Bulletin – April 2010 The scale and speed of developments has seen a rapid deterioration in Irelands’ fiscal position and a sharp rise in unemployment. Unemployment rate at the end of 09 was 12.4% with the long-term unemployment rate at 4.1%. The Irish Central Bank’s latest Quarterly Bulletin12 expect GDP to decrease by a further 1% in 2010 and GNP by 2%, this compares to -7% and -11.3% in 09 respectively. The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) in their Quarterly Economic Commentary13 reflect on how difficult a year 2009 was and also predict a modest contraction in the 2010. They also expect unemployment to peak at 14% of the labour force in the latter part 2010. Table 1: Southern & Eastern Region Socio-economic indicators Year State S&E BMW Population (000’s) 2006 4,239.8 3,105.5 1,134.3 Employment (000’s)14 2009 1,887.7 1,405.2 482.5 Unemployment rate 2009 12.4 12.1 13.2 Disposable income per capita (state = 100) 2007 100 102.7 92.515 GVA per person (state = 100) 2006 100 110.2 72.2 In the 4th quarter of 2009 there were 1,887,700 persons in employment in the state, an annual decrease of 166,900 or 8.1%. The largest annual decrease in employment since the labour force survey was first undertaken in 1975. The overall employment rate among persons aged 15-64 in Qtr4 2009 fell to 61.2%, down from 62.9% in Q4 2008. National Employment and Labour Force figures Qtr 4 2009 Persons Change in Quarter Main Results Q4 200916 1,887,700 Employment -34,700 Unemployment 267,400 -12,400 Labour Force 2,155,200 -47,100

Change in Year -166,900 +97,700 -69,100

Regional Employment and Labour Force figures Qtr 2 2009 Persons Change in Quarter Main Results Q2 200917 1,405,200 Employment - 21,800 Unemployment 193,800 -4,500 Labour Force 1,599,000 -26,300

Change in Year -121,800 +76,500 - 45,500

12

Central Bank (2010). Quarterly Bulletin No.1 2010 (January). ESRI 2009. Quarterly Economic Commentary. Winter 2009 14 QNHS – Quarter 4 2009- Labour Market- published 24th March 2010 15 County Incomes and Regional GDP 2007 16 http://www.cso.ie/releasespublications/documents/labour_market/current/qnhs.pdf 17 http://www.cso.ie/releasespublications/documents/labour_market/current/qnhs.pdf 13

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Full-time employment declines by over 193,200 over the year Full-time employment fell by 193,200 on an annual basis with declines in both male (-152,500) and female (-40,800) full-time employment. The largest decreases in full-time employment occurred in the Construction (-84,700), Industry (-33,000) and Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles (-28,500) sectors. Each of these sectors showed a small increase in part-time employment: Construction (+5,100), Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles (+3,800) and Industry (+3,200). There was an increase of 26,400 in the numbers employed part-time, with male part-time employment increasing 25,300 over the year while female part-time employment was almost static, increasing by 1,000 over the same period. All occupational groups showed a decline in employment over the year. The largest decreases were in the Craft and related (-70,800), Plant and machine operatives (-27,400) and Other (-23,900) groups. 18 Number of unemployed increases to almost 267,400 There were 189,100 males and 78,400 females unemployed in the fourth quarter of 2009, bringing the total number of unemployed up to 267,400, an increase of 97,700 (+57.6%) in the year. The number of unemployed males increased by 72,000 (+61.5%), with female unemployment increasing by 25,800 (+49.0%). On a seasonally adjusted basis the number of persons unemployed increased by 10,100 between Q3 2009 and Q4 2009. Unlike previous quarters more than half of the annual increase in unemployment was in long-term unemployment (+51,400 or 52.6% of the total increase) bringing the total level of long-term unemployment to 89,100. As of Q4 2009 long-term unemployment accounted for 33.3% of total unemployment compared with 22.2% a year earlier. For the first time since Q4 2007 short-term unemployment actually fell over the quarter while long-term unemployment continued to increase. Over the year unemployment increased for both males and females for all age groups with the largest increase recorded for those aged 25-44 (+55,400). The unemployment rate increased from 7.6% to 12.4% over the year. This brings the unemployment rate to a level comparable with that of 1995 when the unemployment rate was 12.2%. The male unemployment rate was 15.7% and the female unemployment rate was 8.3% in Q4 2009. Seasonally adjusted, the male and female unemployment rates stood at 16.6% and 9.0% respectively. The long-term unemployment rate was 4.1% in Q4 2009 compared with a rate of 1.7% in Q4 2008.19 Number of employees decreases by over 128,300 There were 1,550,700 employees in the fourth quarter of 2009 representing an annual decrease of 128,300. The number of male employees fell by 92,600 with the number of female employees declining by 35,800. Sectors which had the largest decreases in the number of employees continued to be Construction (-59,000), Industry (-29,900) and Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles (-23,800). The estimated number of self-employed persons was 323,200 in Q4 2009 representing a decrease of 38,400 over the year. In the year to Q4 2008 the number of self-employed persons decreased by 500. Overall participation rate continues to fall The overall participation rate declined from 62.9% in Q4 2008 to 61.2% in Q4 2009. The male participation rate decreased from 72.2% to 69.5% in the year while the female participation rate declined from 53.9% to 53.2% over the same period. Participation rates fell across all age groups unlike previous quarters when rates for some age groups were steady or still showing minor increases. The greatest decreases continued to be shown in the 15-19 and 2024 age groups. Non-Irish national labour force declines by almost 10% There were an estimated 422,900 non-Irish nationals aged 15 years and over in the State in the fourth quarter of 2009, a decrease of 41,500 or 8.9% over the year. This compares with a decrease of 20,900 or 4.3% in the fourth quarter of 2008. The number of non-Irish nationals aged 15 and over in the State has been declining since Q4 2007 when the number peaked at 485,300. In the fourth quarter of 2009 the estimated number of non-Irish nationals in the labour force was 303,100, a decrease of 33,600 or 10.0% in the year. A decrease of 29,800 had been recorded in the year to Q4 2008, the first quarter in which an annual decline in the non-Irish labour force has been recorded. The number of Irish nationals in the labour force decreased by 35,500 or 1.9% in the year. 18 19

http://www.cso.ie/releasespublications/documents/labour_market/current/qnhs.pdf http://www.cso.ie/releasespublications/documents/labour_market/current/qnhs.pdf

29


According to ILO criteria, 255,200 non-Irish nationals were in employment in Q4 2009 representing a decrease of 50,100 (-16.4%) over the year. A further 47,900 were unemployed, an increase of 16,500 in the year to Q4 2009. Nationals of the EU15 to EU27 States showed a decline in employment of 30,400 (21.1%) and an increase in unemployment of 10,700 over the year. In the fourth quarter of 2009 non-Irish nationals accounted for 13.5% of all persons aged 15 and over in employment. This compares with 14.9% in Q4 2008 and 16.2% in Q4 2007. More than a third (33.6%) of workers in Accommodation and food service activities, 22.2% in Administrative and support service activities and 18.8% in Information and communication were non-Irish nationals. The largest decreases in employment for non-Irish nationals occurred in the Construction (-17,500), Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles (-8,600) and Industry (-6,400) sectors. Regional Comparisons Employment fell by 45,100 (-8.5%) in the Border, Midland and Western region and by 121,800 (-8.0%) in the Southern and Eastern region in the year to the fourth quarter of 2009. There were increases of 21,300 (+40.6%) and 76,500 (+65.2%) in the numbers unemployed in the Border, Midland and Western and Southern and Eastern regions respectively. The participation rate in the Border, Midland and Western region was 58.6% compared with a participation rate of 62.2% in the Southern and Eastern region. At NUTS3 level, employment fell in all regions with the South-East (-11.8%) and the Border (-11.7%) regions showing the largest percentage decreases. This equated to an annual decrease of 25,900 in the numbers in employment in the South-East and an annual decrease of 24,900 in the Border region. All regional data is based on the location of the respondents’ usual address. Principal Economic Status The number of persons describing their usual situation as 'at work' fell by 160,100 in the year to 1,829,400. This drop comprised of 126,900 males and 33,200 females. Meanwhile the number describing themselves as 'unemployed' rose by 134,300 in the year to 335,500. Regional GVA Trends In terms of regional economic growth performance, the most recently published data on Regional GVA (Gross Value Added) and Disposable Incomes is for 2007. The average value added per person generated in the Southern and Eastern region was 11.2% above the State average in 2007. The level of GVA per person in the Southern and Eastern region increased by 57.1% in the period 2000 to 2007 while the GVA per person in the Border, Midlands and Western region increased by 53.6% during the same period. The gross value added per person in the Border, Midland and Western NUTS2 region was 69.3% of the State average in 2007, down from 71.0% in 2006. When measured against the EU average it has decreased from 103.2% in 2006 to 102.7% in 2007. At the NUTS3 regional level, the Dublin region had the highest GVA per person in 2007 at 41.2% above the State average. The combined Dublin plus Mid East region in 2007 was 22.8% above the State average. The level of GVA per person in this region has exceeded the State average by at least 17% in each year since 2000. Dublin and Mid East regions are combined together as they are affected significantly by workers living in one region and commuting to work in the other. Meanwhile the Midland region has the lowest GVA per person in 2007 at 65.8% of the State average.20 Over the period 2000 to 2006, the output from the Region grew by 12.1 % compared to 15.2% for the BMW Region, it is important to note however that the BMW Region grew for a much lower base. The S&E Region contributed 81.1% of total national GVA in 2005 this figure has fluctuated within one percentage point over the period under consideration and stood at 80.7% in latest figures released from the CSO21. What is clear from the figures below is that Ireland’s economy during 2000-2006 has been largely driven by the Dublin and South-West Region while the remaining regions have struggled to make any significant gains outside their historical share of national output.

20 21

County Incomes and Regional GDP 2007 Central Statistics Office (2009) County Incomes and Regional GDP 2009

30


Index Values of GVA per Person, 2006 to 2007

Source: Central Statistics Office (2010), County Incomes and Regional GDP 2007 Regional Income Trends For the two NUTS 2 regions in the state, the disposable income per person in 2007 of the Southern and Eastern region was 2.7% above the State average while the corresponding figure for the Border, Midland and Western NUTS 2 region was 7.5% below the State average. The gap of 10.2 points between the two regions has decreased from the gap that existed in 2006 (10.9 points) and in 2005 (11.6 points). At the level of the eight Regional Authority areas the Dublin region had the highest disposable income per person, being 10.8% above the State average in 2007; the comparable figure in 2000 was 16.6%. The disposable income per person of the Midland region was 8.8% below the State average in 2007 and was the lowest of the eight Regional Authority areas. Regional Labour Market Trends Employment dropped by 7.9% in the S&E Region over the past 12 months and 8.5% in the BMW Region. The rates of unemployment in the BMW Region have been consistently higher than the S&E Region but the yearly change from Qtr 4 2008 to Qtr 4 2009 shows a broadly similar decrease in employment. The labour force participation rate is currently 62.2% in the S&E region which has a lower dependency rate, in comparison to the BMW Region which has a labour force participation rate of 58.6%. National Reform Programme As a follow on from the first National Reform Programme (NRP) Ireland sets out a range of actions to achieve economic and employment growth over the 2008-2010 period. The economic situation has changed rapidly during the course of 2008 and 2009, with a domestic slowdown due to declining construction output compounded by the severe international financial crisis. This creates serious economic and fiscal challenges for the Irish Government and is already being reflected in increased unemployment. The updated National Reform Programme sets out the current policies and strategies of the Irish Government in the areas of macroeconomic policy, structural and market reforms, and employment. It also responds to specific issues raised by the Commission in their 2007 Progress Report. The Programme has been prepared after consultation with the social partners under Ireland’s social partnership framework, in particular the Review of Towards 2016 which took place during 2008. It is informed by the shared analysis of the social partners and also takes account of consultation with the relevant Oireachtas Committee and the Regional Assemblies.

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In view of the fast-changing economic situation, Ireland’s 2009 Budget was brought forward to 14th October 2008 and a supplementary budget was passed by the houses of the Oireachtas in April 2009. While key elements of the Budget are reflected in this Programme, Government policies will continue to evolve in response to the serious challenges which lie ahead. However, the broad thrust of the Government’s strategy remains clear and is consistent with the priorities identified by the European Council including: • investing in Research & Development and innovation to build a knowledge-based economy •

providing a positive climate for entrepreneurship and start-up companies, and supporting export-led growth

improving skill levels throughout the workforce and helping those who lose their jobs back into employment or training, and

increasing energy efficiency and moving towards a low carbon economy.

The NRP was prepared during a period of significant economic change and uncertainty with a deteriorating economic outlook, both internationally and domestically. This uncertain and difficult economic environment re-emphasised the importance of the framework provided by the NRP for articulating Ireland’s approach to generating economic growth and job creation. The Government indicated that it will bring forward revised and new strategies over the period ahead in response to an extremely fast-changing situation. The NRP brings together a broad range of policies and initiatives within the framework of the Towards 2016 social partnership agreement, the implementation of which aim to ensure a return by Ireland to strong economic growth and employment performance as its overall contribution to the renewed Lisbon Agenda over the period to 2010, while stressing also the interdependence of social, environmental and economic goals. The outcome of the review of the Towards 2016 agreement by the Government and Social Partners that took place in advance of the preparation of the NRP 2008-2010 is reflected in the Review and Transitional Agreement 2008-200922. The parties endorsed the broad conclusions from the report prepared by the National Economic and Social Council (NESC), The Irish Economy in the Early 21st Century, including that “a combination of factors in 2008 has created an exceptionally difficult policy context in which to manage the economy’s transition to the next phase of development. The sharp contraction of the domestic construction sector, the global credit market squeeze, greatly increased energy and commodity prices, a strong euro and a major weakening of current tax revenue combine to make it difficult – and even risky or foolhardy in the opinion of some – to look too far ahead”23. The parties also recognised the implications of these developments, in particular higher energy and food prices, for the most vulnerable in society. The Government and the Social Partners concluded that: • the Irish economy can be strong and dynamic again, provided the right decisions are taken during this difficult period, •

services, exports and employment can be further expanded, while manufacturing, including the export orientated food and drink processing sector, will continue to have a key role in Ireland’s economic development,

people’s skills and capabilities are the core economic asset,

Ireland’s continuing economic and social infrastructure deficit means that a high level of investment in infrastructure should be sustained,

there is a need to fine-tune some of the strategic investments in the National Development Plan and Towards 2016, elements of which need modification in the light of new information and understanding,

social partnership, which has contributed to the economic and social progress of the last two decades, continues to have an important potential contribution in managing a difficult transition for the economy and protecting the vulnerable during what is an uncertain conjuncture.

22

http://www.taoiseach.gov.ie/index.asp?locID=231&docID=4033 http://www.nesc.ie/dynamic/docs/Report%20117The%20Irish%20Economy%20in%20the%20Early%2021st%20Century.pdf 23

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The Government and Social Partners state their intention to work together through the current period of economic transition and uncertainty to ensure that the Vision and Goals set down in Towards 2016 can still be achieved.24 Social Inclusion Aspects The National Action Plan for Social Inclusion 2007-2016, Building an Inclusive Society, (NAP inclusion), which was launched in February 2007, sets out a wide-ranging and comprehensive programme of action to address poverty and social exclusion. The plan, together with the social inclusion commitments in the national social partnership agreement, Towards 2016, and the National Development Plan 2007-2013, constitute Ireland’s strategic process for addressing social inclusion objectives. Through the social partnership process, close linkages have been developed between the NAP inclusion and NRP processes, recognising that economic growth and social development are inter-connected and mutually reinforcing policy goals. The overall goal of the NAP inclusion is: To reduce the number of those experiencing ‘consistent poverty’ to between 2% and 4% by 2012, with the aim of eliminating consistent poverty by 2016, under the revised definition. In order to achieve this overall goal, the plan has a strong focus on actions and targets with 12 high level goals and 153 targets and actions, spanning all stages of the lifecycle. These are designed to mobilise resources to address long-standing serious social deficits, and ensure that a decisive impact on poverty is made over the lifetime of the plan. The recently-submitted National Report for Ireland on Strategies for Social Protection and Social Inclusion 2008-2010 draws on the NAP inclusion in relation to social inclusion objectives. The National Report recognises that economic and social objectives are intertwined, and states (in section 1.2.16) that: “Access to quality employment opportunities is regarded as the best route out of poverty and social exclusion.” The report sets out the four high-level objectives for social inclusion, one of which is: Access to Quality Work and Learning Opportunities, with a particular focus on increasing employment participation among marginalised groups. The National Report also sets out the current debate in Ireland on pensions, reflecting the recurring theme in the Government Green Paper on Pensions, about how to align ambitions in relation to the coverage and adequacy of the pensions system with the economic and financial sustainability issues flowing from demographic changes.25

24 25

National Reform Programme 2008-2010 - October 2008 NRP 2008-2010

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2.5 Relevant National Policy Developments National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) 2007-2013 In July 2007, the European Commission approved Ireland’s National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF), this sets out in broad terms how Ireland will invest €750m in EU funding over the period 20072013. The NSRF outlines the strategy for allocating the available funding through the selected operational programmes. The objective is to provide an overarching structure for each member state that allows for the development of operational programmes and ensures consistency with Community and national policies. Key priorities for the NSRF include: • Promoting investment in human capital through up-skilling the workforce, increasing participation in the workforce, and activating groups outside the workforce; • Supporting innovation, knowledge and entrepreneurship in the regions; and • Strengthening the competitiveness, attractiveness and connectivity of the National Spatial Strategy, through improved access to quality infrastructure and promoting environmental and sustainable development. These will be implemented through three Operational Programmes: • Border, Midland and Western Region Operational Programme (ERDF); • Southern and Eastern Region Operational Programme (ERDF); and • European Social Fund (Employment and Human Resources) Employment and Human Resources Operational Programme. National Development Plan 2007-13 The National Development Plan (NDP) 2007-2013, launched in Dublin Castle on January 23rd, 2007 is a high level strategic document which sets out within a sustainable economic and budgetary framework indicative seven year investment allocations for the various sectoral areas, totalling almost €184bn. The NDP 2007-2013 sets out the key high level objectives of investment for Ireland in the period 2007-2013 as follows: • Promotion of sustainable economic and budgetary stability; • Promotion of national competitiveness; • Fostering better balance in regional development with a particular focus on assisting all regions to deliver to their maximum potential; • Delivery of economic and social infrastructure in an efficient Value for Money Way which improves the quality of life of our citizens; • Environmental sustainability; • Promotion of social inclusion; and • Development of strong cross-border and all island economic and sectoral co-operation The 2007-2013 NDP will focus on five investment priorities as follows: €bn. Investment (Current Prices) Economic Infrastructure Enterprise, Science and Innovation Human Capital Social Infrastructure Social Inclusion Total

54.7 20.0 25.8 33.6 49.6 183.7

April 2009 Budget Impact on NDP Delivery The Government in presenting the Supplementary Budget in April stated their commitment to protecting jobs and helping those without jobs. The Government’s proposal to establish an Enterprise Stabilisation Fund will help with the process of supporting employment by a redirecting of the NDP to support employment and enterprise. The broad cost of each 1000 people who lose their jobs is now estimated at about €21 million. In order to support employment, the Tánaiste and Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment will set up an Enterprise Stabilisation Fund worth €100 million over two years. In conjunction with the banking sector this fund will provide direct financial support to eligible internationally trading enterprises. The Government will also implement measures to support the “Smart Economy” through investment and incentives to reach an R & D target of 2½% of GNP by 2013. R&D spend over the last decade has trebled. It is now around €2.5 billion of which some two thirds comes from the enterprise sector.

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Strategies to save jobs are according to Government to be matched with a re-orienting of the economy to produce export-led growth. In the Supplementary budget April 2009 the Government introduced amongst other measures: • support individual enterprise through enhanced access to the Back To Work Enterprise Allowance Scheme, which will facilitate some 1,400 additional claims; • encourage further education through earlier eligibility for the Back To Education Allowance; • facilitate work experience through a new scheme, to include placement of graduates, which will cater for 2,000 people; • expand activation opportunities for over 14,000 people; • support redundant apprentices to receive additional training in the education sector – for up to 700 people; • enable participation in further and higher education for over 6,000 people; and • initiate pilot training schemes for workers on a three-day week. • enhancement to the R&D tax credit regime. • scheme of tax relief for the acquisition of intangible assets, including Intellectual Property as a means of supporting the Smart Economy to attract high quality employment to the economy. Capital Spending The Government is determined to maintain high levels of public investment. However, spending cannot be maintained at the levels envisaged when the economy was in rapid expansion. They have committed to progressing projects that maximise economic and social returns. The Government has decided to set the Exchequer capital allocation at €7.3 billion for 2009, which is greater than 5% of projected GNP. The Government has also fixed the overall Exchequer capital allocation for public investment for the next four years • €6.6 billion in 2010, • €5.5 billion in 2011 and • €6 billion in 2012 and 2013. This represents an average of 4% of projected GNP over the period out to 2013. Significant reductions in tender prices will facilitate the delivery of a large part of the NDP programme within the envisaged timescale. The Government has re-allocated money to more labour intensive areas and will be putting in place further measures to prioritise the more productive and more labour intensive elements of capital investment. Rural Development National Strategic Plan and Programme 2007-2013 In July 2007, the EU Rural Development Committee approved Ireland’s Rural Development Programme for the period 2007-2013. The rural development strategy and programme was developed in line with the EU’s rural development framework and through consultation with relevant stakeholders by the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs. Under the programme Ireland will receive €2.33bn from the European Agriculture Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) which with national co-financing will bring the total budget to €5.78bn. The measures in the Programme address three priorities - competitiveness, the environment and the wider rural economy. The main agri-food measures are REPS 4 / Natura (€2.98bn), Disadvantaged Areas (€1.8bn), Early Retirement (€418m), Installation Aid (€63m) and Farm Investment (€85m). Overall these Schemes account for 93% of the Programmes total public budget. It also provides increased support for restructuring through improved rates under the early retirement and installation aid schemes. Support will also be provided in the areas of capital investment, training and advice. There will be a 17% increase in REPS payments and payments under the Disadvantaged Areas scheme will increase by 8%. Over €425m will be provided to support improvements to the quality of life in rural areas and the diversification and development of the rural economy. This represents a trebling for such activities over the next seven years. Of the total, €234m will come from the European Union and the remainder from the Exchequer. The Programme will be delivered by the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs through a network of Local Action Groups as was the case for the existing LEADER+ programme. The Programme will play a key and vital role in ensuring that the aims of the Government in relation to rural development are rolled out and achieved over the next seven years. National Spatial Strategy 2002-2020 The publication of the National Spatial Strategy in November 2002 established a 20-year framework for regional development in Ireland. It identified four Gateways and four Hubs in the S&E Region which would act as the economic drivers for the Region. One mechanism to facilitate the implementation of this strategy

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was through the Regional Planning Guidelines (RPGS) process. The RPGS were initially adopted by the Regional Authorities in 2004 for each of the NUTS III regions and outline how development will take place over timeframe of the NSS. The areas, which they cover, include managing population growth, regional identity, infrastructure, social facilities, sustainability of rural areas, the environment, economic development and cultural amenities. The Regional Authorities are currently engaged in a review of the RPGs and the preparation of new RPGs for the period 2010-2022, to be completed by 2010. In parallel to this the 2009 Planning Amendment Bill will seek to strengthen links between local and regional planning. Ex Ante Evaluation An ex ante evaluation of this OP was conducted by FGS Consulting in parallel with the drafting and finalisation of the OP between July 2006 and February 2007. The overall aim of the evaluation was to improve the quality, effectiveness and consistency of the Structural Funds assistance and the implementation of the OP. The ex ante evaluation addressed the following: • Appraisal of socio-economic analysis and relevance of the draft programme; • Evaluation of the rationale of the draft programme and its consistency; • Appraisal of coherence of the strategy with regional and national priorities and Community Strategic Guidelines; • Evaluation of expected results and impacts; and • Appraisal of proposed implementation and monitoring systems. The overall assessment of the draft OP was positive, in terms of its logical flow running from regional analysis to strategy to Priorities and to Implementation and its compliance with the EU General Regulation 2006 Article 36, national policies, regional priorities and needs, geographic concentration and compliance with environment and equality requirements. It also pointed out that there is a clear public intervention rationale for investment areas. The report did point out that given the strategic nature of OP and even though equality between men and women and non-discrimination issues have been appropriately taken into account, there is some scope to improve this further and this will need to be factored into future implementation, monitoring and evaluation arrangements as appropriate. The indicators identified (and their causality) are broadly appropriate, nevertheless, the report did suggest a number of additional indicators to expand the number and coverage of indicators. The report also noted that overall the proposals for implementation systems are in line with the Commission’s requirements and the details provided in relation to implementing provisions for managing, monitoring and evaluating the programme are appropriate. The ex ante evaluation made 23 specific recommendations in relation to OP Appraisal and Analysis , Objectives and Internal Coherence, Policy and Implementation Risks, External Coherence, Expected Results and Impacts and Implementation Systems all of which were taken on board by the MA. Strategic Environmental Assessment Directive 2001/41/EC which provides for the assessment of the effects of certain plans and programmes on the environment (“SEA Directive”) came into force in Ireland on 21st July 2004. The Directive applies to plans and programmes for which the first formal preparatory action is taken on or after 21 July 2004. The main objective of the SEA Directive is to “provide for a high level of protection for the environment and to contribute to the integration of environmental considerations into the preparation and adoption of plans and programmes with a view to promoting sustainable development.” The authority responsible for preparing the plan or programme is usually responsible for undertaking the SEA. Regarding the S&E OP, the relevant Irish Regulation is European Communities (Environmental Assessment of Certain Plans and Programmes) Regulations (S.I. 435 of 2004). Gateway Development Index The Southern and Eastern (S&E) and the Border, Midland and West (BMW) Assemblies commissioned the construction of a Gateway Development Index (GDI), to determine how the nine Gateway cities and towns are performing against their objectives as set out in the National Spatial Strategy 2002-2020 (NSS). It’s the first such study of its kind in Ireland to focus solely on the effectiveness of the Ireland’s regional development strategy in the context of Gateways as drivers of economic development in the regions. The Gateway Development Index helps capture the impact of investment in the Gateways under the National Development Plan (NDP) and the Regional Operational Programmes (ROPs) for the period 2007-2013. It will complement the monitoring of the NDP, NSS and ROPs. The first GDI report was published in the Spring 2009 and the index will be replicated again in 2010 and 2013. The study is 40% co-funded by the European Regional Development Funds with the balance coming from Irish exchequer funding.

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Evaluation The Managing Authority intends to conduct a mid term evaluation on the S&E Regional Operational Programme in the second half of 2010. The evaluation will cover all themes of the Operational Programme and will analyse performance to date.

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2.6 Relevant Policy Developments at Priority Level Innovation, ICT and the Knowledge Economy In April 2007, Forfás published Promoting Enterprise-Higher Education Relationships which identified key areas which need to be addressed to ensure Ireland remains at the forefront of international trends in research and innovation. It examined the current relationship that exists between higher education institutions and identified potential for further exploitation of this relationship. It found that while there had been some success to date, higher education-enterprise collaboration operates at a very low level in Ireland and that the structures that are in place to encourage and support the process have failed to achieve significant results. This is further developed in their June 2007 publication, The Role of Institutes of Technology in Enterprise Development which is of particular relevance to the BMW Region as there are five institutes of technology in the sub-region, four of which are the main higher education providers in their respective regions. The regional context of each institution which determines the strategic focus of each institution was found to be the key factor in determining its role in enterprise development. This report identified further potential for the development agencies to enhance strategic relationships with the institutes. This could assist institutes in their planning for emerging opportunities to meet enterprise education, training, research or development requirements. The further development of the role of institutes of technology in the BMW Region could lead to a real impact on the economic potential of the Region and facilitate the delivery of high value-added industries to the Region. The Forfás report published in October 2007, Towards Developing an Entrepreneurship Policy of Ireland sets out a blueprint to drive entrepreneurship in Ireland. Following on from the Small Business Forum recommendation that the Government should formally adopt a national entrepreneurship policy, Forfás were tasked with drawing up an entrepreneurship policy statement. The intention is to develop a blueprint to drive entrepreneurship in a similar manner to which characterised the drive to attract foreign direct investment to Ireland. This report focuses on developing entrepreneurial activity in Ireland by building on Ireland’s strengths and providing for a mechanism to reduce barriers to entrepreneurship on an ongoing basis. It identifies key areas for development relating to culture, education and entrepreneurship amongst women and immigrants. A vision for an entrepreneurial society is established and measures to further improve the environment for entrepreneurship are outlined. The report sets out an approach to implement the development of an entrepreneurship for Ireland, the finalisation of this policy will have an impact on the regions as it attempts to foster a culture of entrepreneurship throughout Ireland. Ireland recorded the fourth highest growth in terms of new broadband fixed lines per 100 population in the EU in the period January 2007 to January 2008, however significant differences persist in terms of broadband availability between urban and rural areas across Ireland. The European Commission’s Progress Report on the Single European Communications Market 2007 found that the DSL coverage in terms of population in rural areas is 64% compared to the DSL national average of 86%. In July 2007, Chambers Ireland in partnership with the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg) published the findings of their eBusiness Survey 2007. The survey analyses the usage and attitudes of Irish business to telecommunications, internet services and ebusiness applications. The survey found that business in the BMW Region were less likely to be connected to the internet and had lower levels of access to broadband than the Southern and Eastern Region26. Mobile broadband is spreading quickly, Ireland recorded average growth in new fixed broadband internet lines in the EU in 2008. However, the digital divide persists in rural areas where fixed broadband (DSL) coverage is 73% compared to 89% of national coverage. Competition on the market for fixed calls remains limited. Take up of fixed broadband internet grew to 20% of the population in 2008, compared to 17% one year earlier in Ireland. This is closing in on the EU average of 23% and almost 10 percentage points more than two years ago. In addition, mobile and cable operators continued to attract new broadband customers in 2008. Fixed broadband (DSL) coverage in rural areas stood at 73%, an increase of 9 percentage points over a year. This is still however 16 percentage points less than national coverage, although this digital gap has narrowed from 22 percentage points last year. Mobile broadband penetration (including access to the internet via mobile phones as well as data cards) – a way of bridging the digital divide in areas where fixed networks have not developed – reached 20.5% in January 2009, largely above the EU average of 13%. Ireland has launched a National Broadband Scheme (NBS) to extend broadband access to the estimated 10% of Irish people without access to the existing broadband infrastructure. It is expected that broadband services will be deployed in all NBS areas within 22 months.27 26 27

Regional level data provided by Chambers Ireland upon request. http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/doc/factsheets/14thimplementation/14th-progress-report-ie-final.pdf

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Approval for Cycle 4 (2007-2010) the Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions was given in August 2007 and drawdown of funds by institution began in 2008. Funding is spread over 12 institutions in the S&E Region. Of a total exchequer capital allocation of c. €109million, some €100 million was approved for the S&E Region. Cycle 5 will be a 5-year programme from 2010-2014. It was launched in 2009 with a total fund of €300 million, with approximately €200 million for capital development and €100 million for recurrent costs. Environment and Risk Prevention Under the Kyoto Protocol Ireland agreed to a target of limiting its greenhouse gas emissions to 13% above 1990 levels by the first commitment period 2008-2012 as part of its contribution to the overall EU target. Ireland ratified the Kyoto Protocol on the 31 May 2002, along with the EU and all other Member States, and is internationally legally bound to meet the greenhouse gas emissions reduction target. In March 2007 the Government launched Ireland’s National Climate Change Strategy 2007-2013 which sets out the strategy to meet these Kyoto commitments by providing a framework for action to reduce Ireland's greenhouse gas emissions Some of the key targets outlined in the strategy include: - 15% of electricity to be generated from renewable sources from 2010 and 33% by 2020 - Biomass to contribute up to 30% of energy inputs from at peat stations by 2015 - 33% energy savings across the public sector by 2020 Island Grid Study. This study sought views on the development of a joint strategy for the provision of renewable energy sourced electricity within the All-island Energy Market leading up to 2020. With the objective that consumers, North and South, could continue to benefit from access to sustainable energy supplies provided at a competitive cost. It also sought to examine how the island might best develop the SEM28 electricity infrastructure to allow the maximum penetration of renewable energy. This report is one of the most advanced and comprehensive of its kind in the world, the study examined: • a range of generation portfolios for Ireland, • the ability of our power system to handle various amounts of electricity from renewable sources, • the investment levels required, and • the climate change and security of supply benefits that would accrue. The Environmental Protection Agency report, The Quality of Drinking Water in Ireland found that the S&E Region’s overall level of compliance was 97.6% in 2006 based on a point sampling of drinking water. This represents an improvement on the 2005 figure which found that the region was 97.2% compliant. Renewable Energy Target to be exceeded – reported in the Irish Times on 05.03.10 “Ireland is set to overshoot its target for generating 40% of its electricity needs from renewable energy by 2020, Minister for Energy Eamon Ryan revealed yesterday. Mr Ryan, addressing the National Summit on Renewable Energy ….. said renewable energy targets were ahead of target and about three new interconnectors linking Ireland to the UK and France were in planning. In addition, he had recently approved a study of an undersea high voltage cable which would like offshore-wind farms to electricity grids on both sides of the Irish Sea, he revealed. Mr Ryan was speaking as the European Commission signed off on a grant of €110 million for the development of the east-west interconnector between Deeside in Wales and Co. Meath. The European Investment Bank has also announced “soft loans” which will see up to €300 million invested in the interconnector. A further allocation of up to €200 million has been approved by the bank for development of the ESB’s renewable energy business, principally wind farms.” Sustainable Transport The Transport 21 investment package was announced in May 2006. From 2006 to 2015, capital investment in the Irish transport system will take place under the framework of Transport 21. It is designed to resolve the problems of backlogs in previous capital investments, while at the same time meeting expected growth in transport demand. The aims of Transport 21 are to: • Increase accessibility; 28

On November 1st 2007, the all-island SEM went live. The SEM is a gross mandatory pool through which almost all electricity generated of supplied in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland must be traded, and replaced bilateral arrangements in each of these jurisdictions. The main change under the SEM is that the wholesale price of electricity will now be market-driven rather than determined administratively as was the case previously. The SEM is the most significant component to have been delivered to date under the All-island Energy Market Development Framework that was agreed between the Governments and energy regulators of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland in November 2004.

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• Ensure sustainability; • Expand capacity; • Increase use; and • Enhance quality. A total national investment package of €34.4 bn. has been allotted over the 10 year period, providing the necessary funding to: • Complete the development of the inter-urban motorway network by 2010; • Bring about improvements in the rest of the national road network, focusing particularly on the balanced regional development objectives of the National Spatial Strategy and on the needs identified in the National Roads Needs Study; • Complete the safety programme on the national rail network; • Bring about a radical improvement in the level and quality of rail services, based on the policy framework provided by the Strategic Rail Review; • Improve regional and rural public transport services; • Fund essential capital works at the six existing regional airports; • Address accessibility for people with mobility, sensory and cognitive impairments by implementing the commitments in The Department of Transport's Sectoral Plan under the Disability Act 2005. • Deliver a sustainable transport system that balances social, economic and environmental considerations. In the 2008 annual report (2009 not published yet) the Department of Transport reported significant progress on Transport 21 projects and programmes. The highlights of the year are set out below. Total expenditure for the year was just over €3 billion of which €2.5 billion was provided by the Exchequer. This represents a 6% increase on the Exchequer outturn for 2007. When the once-off payment for VAT on the Westlink buyout in 2007 is excluded, expenditure on the national roads’ programme was almost the same in 2008 as in 2007. For the second year running, expenditure on public transport, at €890 million, was considerably higher (39%) than the previous year. During the year, the Government carried out a review of expenditure in light of the changing economic circumstances and, as a result, reduced the Transport 21 capital allocation for the year by €20 million. A carryover of €77.5 million was brought into 2009. The progress of previous years in developing the major inter-urban roads (MIUs) was maintained. By the end of the year, 420 kilometres of the total 738 kilometres of MIUs were open to traffic (57%) and all remaining sections are at construction. Phases 1 and 3 of the M50 upgrade were completed including the opening of the major upgraded interchanges at the N4 and N7 (Red Cow) Junctions and the introduction of barrier-free tolling on the Westlink Bridge. This has resulted in a reduction of thirty minutes for southbound motorists at peak times. Work on Phase 2 of the upgrade is continuing and will be completed in 2010. Work also started on the western section of the Atlantic Road Corridor between Gort and Crusheen. Seven national road projects were completed during the year and construction started on five others. A total of seventeen major road projects were under construction at year-end. Significant developments on Metro North were the submission of a railway order application by the Railway Procurement Agency (RPA), and the issue of an invitation to pre-qualified bidders to submit PPP tender proposals.29 Construction work continued on a number of projects, including the Luas extensions to Cherrywood and Docklands, Phase 1 of the Western Rail Corridor, the Midleton rail line and the Kildare Rail project, while work started on Phase 1 of the Navan line and on the Dublin City Centre rail resignalling project. Iarnród Éireann continued to introduce into service its new intercity railcar fleet and they are now operating on most intercity routes. One hundred and eighty three railcars have been delivered and, at year-end, one hundred and twenty six were in service bringing increased capacity and improved services across the intercity network. An order for a further fifty one railcars was placed towards the end of 2008. A number of programmes such as the railway safety, the automation of level crossings and the removal of speed restriction programmes continued throughout the year enhancing the safety of the railway and reducing journey times on the network. The programme of expanding the Quality Bus Corridor Network in Dublin also continued with over thirteen kilometres of new bus priority schemes coming into operation. A further four kilometres of additional bus lane were obtained within the network of existing Quality Bus Network by revisiting selected schemes to further enhance the level of priority given to buses. Bus priority schemes were also introduced in Limerick, Galway and Cork and planning and design for bus lanes was carried out in Waterford. Bus Éireann introduced over one hundred and sixty accessible, environmentally friendly new buses into service in an investment of €50m, which enabled the expansion of existing services and the introduction of new routes. A total of €14m was spent on regional airports including the commencement of co-funding for the City of Derry Airport runway safety project. 29

Transport 21, Progress in Motion, 2008

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2.7 Substantial modification under Article 57 of regulation (EC) No. 1083/2006 No modifications are required at this time

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2.8 Complementarity with other instruments The Operational Programme sets out arrangements on complementarity with other current programmes. As Managing Authority for the Operational Programme, the S&E Regional Assembly is responsible for ensuring that the arrangements are put in place with other Programme Managers to ensure that assistance from the Funds is consistent with the activities, policies and priorities of the Community and complementary with other financial instruments of the Community. The objective is to ensure that no duplication exists which might reduce the impact of the programme. These other programmes include • ESF Human capital Investment Programme • National Rural Development Programme • European Fisheries Fund • EU Research Framework Programmes • PEACE III Programme • Territorial Co-operation (Objective 3) Programmes • National Development Plan In order to ensure co-ordination across OPs, the Managing Authority participates on the Committee on Coordination of EU funds established and chaired by the Department of Finance, as set out in the NSRF. Contribution to the Lisbon Targets In a rapidly changed economic environment the NRP 2008-2010 which was submitted in October 2008 stresses the importance of the framework provided by the NRP for articulating Ireland’s approach to generating economic growth and job creation. The Government has indicated that it will bring forward revised and new strategies over the period ahead in response to an extremely fast-changing situation. It brings together a broad range of policies and initiatives within the framework of the Towards 2016 social partnership agreement, the implementation of which aim to ensure a return by Ireland to strong economic growth and employment performance as its overall contribution to the renewed Lisbon Agenda over the period to 2010, while stressing also the interdependence of social, environmental and economic goals. The outcome of the review of the Towards 2016 agreement by the Government and Social Partners that took place in 2008 is reflected in the Review and Transitional Agreement 2008-2009. The implementation of the development strategy, priority objectives and selected interventions as outlined in this OP will contribute to Ireland meeting its commitments as set out in the National Reform Programme and in accordance with Article 29(1) of the General Regulation, the Annual Report on the implementation of the National Reform Programme will include a concise section on the contribution of the OP to the implementation of the National Reform Programme. The following table sets out the correlation between the priorities in the S&E Regional OP and the Lisbon Agenda Guidelines. Priority Guideline Guideline Reference Increase and improve investment in research and development, in Guideline 7 particular in the private sector, with a view to establishing a European area of knowledge Priority 1: Facilitate all forms of innovation Innovation, ICT and Guideline 8 the Knowledge Facilitate the spread and effective use of ICT and build a fully Guideline 9 Economy inclusive information society Promote a more entrepreneurial culture and create a supportive Guideline 15 environment for SMEs Priority 2: Encourage the sustainable use of resources and strengthen the Guideline 11 Environment and synergies between environmental protection and growth Risk Prevention Priority 3: Encourage the sustainable use of resources and strengthen the Guideline 11 Sustainable Urban synergies between environmental protection and growth Development Priority 4: n/a n/a Technical Assistance

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Based on the cumulative breakdown of allocations presented above, it is possible to provide an indication of the achievement of the earmarking targets to date. This is presented in the following table: Priority Theme Categorisation Reported Lisbon Code Expenditure earmarking Priority 1 Development of Region’s 01 €62.239m Yes RTDI Capacity Development of Region’s 02 €161.727m Yes RTDI Capacity Entrepreneurship in Micro 08 €43.663m Yes Enterprise Priority 2

Priority 3 Priority 4 Total

CHP & Bioheat Programme Renewable Energy Development & Deployment Energy for Business Broadband Provision and Demand Stimulation ERDF Gateway Grants

43

€8.280m

Yes

43

€6.684m

Yes

43

€3.968m

Yes

15

€20.101m

Yes

01

€3.210m

Yes

85

€0.310m

No 99.9%

Contribution of the ESF to the implementation of guidelines and recommendations under the European Employment Strategy (as set out in Article 2,1 of Regulation No. 1081/2006). The Southern and Eastern Regional Operational Programme is co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund and the Irish Exchequer. However, it is intended to utilise the flexibility provided for under article 34(2) of Council Regulation (EC) No 1083/2006 which allows an ERDF Programme to finance actions which fall within the scope of the ESF, subject to a limit of 10% of Community funding for each priority of the Operational Programme for the training element of the Entrepreneurship in Micro-enterprises Theme. In accordance with Commission Regulation (EC) No 1828/2006, such expenditure will be reported to the Commission through the EU SF IT system.

43


2.9 Monitoring and Data Collection Arrangements Third Meeting of the Monitoring Committee The third meeting took place on 18th May 2009, progress on the implementation of the OP was considered. Financial data is being collected via an IT System that is shared by the BMW OP & the Human Capital Investment OP. The method for collecting physical outputs is via the monitoring committee reports. The Monitoring Committee considered the progress achieved under the OP and the received an update on the Gateway Development Index. Amended Implementation Plans were also presented to the Committee for information. The Committee also received an update on the following: • Department of Finance Circular on Financial Management and Control • National Eligibility Rules • Financial Systems Description • IT System • Administrative Agreements • Information and Publicity Guidelines Data Collection For each theme, output and result indicators have been specified and agreed. Data will be provided in the annual progress reports for each theme to monitor progress against the agreed indicator targets. A standard reporting template was approved at the November 2007 Monitoring Committee meeting. In addition the IT system is capturing project-level data as set out in Annex III of the Implementation Regulation.

44


3. Implementation by Priority 3.1 Priority 1 Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Introduction The overall objective of this Priority is to develop further, in accordance with the Lisbon Agenda objectives, the knowledge, R&D, innovation and innovation and entrepreneurial base of the Region’s economy and to support collaboration and technology transfer between research institutions and the business sector in order to boost the Region’s growth and competitiveness. Cumulative public eligible expenditure to end December 2009 is reported as €267.63m. This Priority is divided into three separate but related Themes as follows: 1. Development of the Region’s RTDI capacity 2. Entrepreneurship in Micro Enterprise 3. Experimental Innovative Actions The choice of Themes reflects the importance of ensuring the continued development of the Region’s research and development and innovation capacity as key contributors to the achievement of innovation and knowledge economy objectives and of enhancing the entrepreneurial skills of small firms. Overall, Priority 1 (Innovation and the Knowledge Economy) has reached 96.62% expenditure of the amount budgeted for in the financial tables for the period 2007-2013 Themes 1 (Development of the Region’s RTDI Capacity) and 2 are at varying states of progress compared to their annual forecasted expenditure in the Financial Tables. However, Theme 3 has yet to commence, as exchequer funding has not to date been provided. Overview of Priority Progress Theme 1: Development of Regions RTDI Capacity Theme 1 consists of 4 sub-themes: - Sub – Theme 1: Applied Research Enhancement (ARE) Up to December ’09, funding has been awarded to 9 Applied Research Centres and a joint Centre with two locations in the S&E Region. 4 of these 9 centres were funded under the Productive Sector Operational Programme ‘00-‘06. In ‘08, Enterprise Ireland has restructured the Applied Research Enhancement Programme. The programme was expanded into three phases: PIONEER, NEW CENTRE START and ARE+. The Pioneer and New Centre Start phases operation with open calls, whereas the ARE+ phase is only open to existing ARE Centres. In the 2009 PIONEER Programme prioritisation was given to colleges with no ARE activity provided that they meet the other criteria in terms of technology and commercial justification. Although projects were approved in ’07 and ‘08 under this theme, no incurred expenditure has been reported because Enterprise Ireland had not received expenditure claims from the individual institutes by the end of ‘09. The first claim for ERDF co-funding is expected be submitted to the Managing Authority in 2010. No additional PIONEER, ARE or ARE+ Centres were approved in the South and East in 2009. - Sub – Theme 2: Commercialisation Fund The objective of the programme is to foster a dynamic and commercially aware research community and to create an environment that promotes entrepreneurship. In so doing an accessible route to commercialisation is established for the transfer of knowledge from the research base into industry. As part of its commitment to facilitating the commercialisation of research, EI provides a range of supports under the Commercialisation Fund. These include a Proof of Concept Programme, a Technology Development Programme and Commercialisation Plus funding. Under the ’07-‘13 Operational Programme, up to the end of ’09, 322 Commercialisation Fund proposals were approved comprising of 89 Technology Development projects, 210 Proof of Concept projects and 23 Commercialisation plus projects. This includes 69 projects in 2009 made up of 16 Technology Development projects, 45 Proof of Concept projects and 8 Commercialisation plus projects. Funding of €53m was approved to Commercialisation Fund projects from 2007 to 2009 but the first B1s capturing eligible expenditure will not be submitted by the Public Beneficiary Bodies until April 2010. Therefore, the first claim, covering ’07-’09 expenditure, is expected be submitted to the Managing Authority in 2010. - Sub – Theme 3: Incubation Centre Development This Intervention is concerned with the provision of supports and business space within the environment of a third level institution that will advance the development of emerging high potential start-up companies. The measure provides for the development of the infrastructure of the Institutes of Technology and the Universities by the provision of Incubation Centres. These Centres facilitate the commercialisation of research and development projects carried out by the incubating companies. The colleges are also encouraged to provide dedicated mentoring and support services to incubator facilities. Nine centres are open for business and are operating very successfully as demonstrated in the performance indicators. These are: Blanchardstown, Carlow, Cork, Dun Laoghaire, Limerick, National College of Ireland, Tallaght, Tralee

45


and Waterford. Up to December 31st 2009, there were 129 companies incubating in 9 Centres in Blanchardstown, Carlow, Cork, Dublin NCI, Dun Laoghaire, Limerick, Tallaght, Tralee and Waterford. 447 personnel were employed of which 73 are female. There are 16 female promoters across the 9 Centres. Two additional facilities in the Cork Institute of Technology and the University of Limerick were approved by the Enterprise Ireland Board in April and September 2009 and are currently under construction. The first claim for ERDF co-funding is expected be submitted to the Managing Authority in 2010. - Sub – Theme 4: Building the Research Capacity & Capability within Higher Education Institutions Approval for Cycle 4 (2007-2010) the Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions was given in August 2007 and drawdown of funds by institution began in 2008. Funding is spread over 12 institutions in the S&E Region. Of a total exchequer capital allocation of c. €109m, some €100m was approved for the S&E Region. €223.96m in eligible public expenditure was reported up to end December 2009 to the Monitoring Committee, however, the first claim for ERDF co-funding is expected to be submitted to the Managing Authority in 2010. Theme 2: Entrepreneurship in Micro Enterprise The operational period for the Micro-Enterprise sub-theme commenced with effect from 1st January 07. After 3 years of being operational, the theme is well under way and the performance indicator outturn to 31st December 09 shows that individual final targets have been reached between 52% and 83%. €43.66m in eligible public expenditure was reported up to end December 2009. Compared to the adopted financial plan for Priority 1, the expenditure reported by this theme is 18% of the total funds allocated to the Priority. Theme 3: Experimental Innovation Actions Theme 3 has yet to commence, as exchequer funding has not been provided to date. This theme will be evaluated further in the context of the Mid Term Evaluation. Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

No. of Incubation Centres Total employed in Incubation Centres No. of additional Researchers employed in the region’s HEI No. of training days provided to SMEs No. of micro-enterprises supported No. of recipients of training in micro-enterprise theme No. of jobs created in micro-enterprises theme No. of enterprises created in incubation centres

9 284 0 74,294 4,029 57,159 24,858 62

Final Target 16 434 560 249,249 8,029 141,159 32,558 108

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09 11 447 686 165,462.5 5,342 108,446 23,609.5 129

Core Indicators No.

Indicator

1 6 7 8 9

Jobs Created Research Jobs Created No. of direct Investment Aid No. of start ups supported Jobs created from direct investment aid

Baseline

Final Target

25142 0 4029 62 24858

32992 560 8029 108 32558

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09 24056.5 686 5342 129 23609.5

Expenditure (€m)

Year

2007 2008 2009

Total Eligible Public Exp.

Total ERDF

1=2+3+4 €60.118 €107.642 €99.865

2 €24.051 €43.057 €39.946

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

3 €36.077 €64.585 €59.919

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Cumulative Eligible Exp. declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5 €0.000 €0.000 €22.633

Other Non co-Financed Exp. 6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

46


2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €267.626

Cumulative Expenditure As % of Cumulative Forecast

€107.054

€160.581

€0.000

€22.633

€0.000

€267.626 96.62%

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Priority: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Theme: Development of the Region’s RTDI Capacity Sub-theme: Applied Research Enhancement Intermediate Body: Enterprise Ireland 1. Introduction Enterprise Ireland recognises that the Institutes of Technology have a key role to play in developing innovative technologies in collaboration with local industry to deliver maximum industrial impact. The role of the Institutes of Technology in research and development is still a relatively new and evolving one although the Sector is recognised as having developed a track record in industry-relevant and applied research. The Applied Research Enhancement (ARE) Programme provides an opportunity for the Institutes to develop research capability in areas of relevance to industry both regionally and nationally and of strategic importance to the individual college. The benefits may be in the development of the research capabilities of existing companies in the region or the creation of new companies within the region. The objectives of the Programme are to: • Establish an applied research capability within the IoT and a commercialisation focus for the existing research competency • Build the applied research competency of the research team to compete successfully for National and International research funding to support a growing applied research presence in the Institute of Technology In 2008 Enterprise Ireland restructured the Applied Research Enhancement Programme in order to increase its effectiveness, widen its capacity to enhance the IoT research capabilities to benefit of regional industry and to provide continued support for existing ARE centres that have successfully demonstrated their capacity to work with industry. Rather than setting up a number of new centres in a one-size fits-all approach, in the longer term it was agreed to take a more strategic approach and establish industry relevant centres on a phased basis. Not all of the colleges are starting on the same level and some need more assistance than others to get their research activities up and running on a level that is sufficient to work with industry. High performing ARE Centres that have proven they have the skills and resources to work with industry will have the opportunity to apply for further support through the ARE+ strand of the Programme. The restructured ARE programme has 3 strands: • ARE PIONEER: Provides an opportunity for smaller and more focused centres to be established around new and emerging research groups in the colleges giving them the capacity to engage in R&D with local industry (funding of up to €250k over a 2 year period). • ARE New Centre: Provides funding for the creation for new ARE centres over 4 years (funding of up to €2m over a 4 year period). • ARE+: Supports existing high performing ARE centres for up to 4 more years (funding of up to €800k over a 4 year period). A mid-term evaluation of an ARE+ centre will take place in year two. Centres that are under performing will cease to be supported by EI. Proposal submission, selection and approval The PIONEER operates via an Annual Call and the New Centre Starts operate via an Open Call. ARE+ funding is by invitation only and is only available to existing ARE Centres coming to the end of their initial seed funding. Each of these Centres are invited to submit an ARE+ application. In all strands of the Programme, the ARE Programme team works closely with the applicant Institute, the relevant Technology Directorate and Regional Specialists in Enterprise Ireland. After submission, the New Centre and ARE+ applications are evaluated by a panel made up of academic and industrial experts. A site visit also takes place. The proposal is finally brought to the Industry Research & Commercialisation Committee for approval and to the Enterprise Ireland Board if appropriate. The PIONEER proposals are reviewed internally by the appropriate Technology Directorate and Industry Sector team and if the evaluations are favourable the applications will be brought to the IRCC with a recommendation for funding. Proposals will be selected and prioritised for consideration according to the following criteria:1. Achievement of balanced regional development. In the 2009 PIONEER Programme prioritisation was given to colleges with no ARE activity provided that they meet the other criteria in terms of technology and commercial justification, 2. Achievement of a sectoral balance. 3. Mutual agreement between Enterprise Ireland and the college authority on an appropriate research agenda for the region. 2. Class

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Final Target

Outturn to 31st December 2009

48


Output No of ARE Centres in place/extended 4 11 9 Result No of industrially focussed projects 4 50 49 There are currently nine Applied Research Centres up and running in the South and East Region in Cork (3), Dublin (1), Tallaght (1), Waterford (3) and a joint Centre between Limerick and Tralee Institutes of Technology. These 9 ARE Centres in the South and East region completed 49 industrial collaborative projects with industry partners in 2009. These projects are defined as projects in excess of 10 working days. No additional PIONEER, ARE or ARE+ Centres were approved in the South and East in 2009. A list of the current Applied Research Centres is available. 3. Year

Expenditure (€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Other Non CoFinanced Expenditur e

1=2+3+4 2 3 4 6 2007 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 2008 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 2009 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 2010 €0.000 2011 €0.000 2012 €0.000 2013 €0.000 Cumulative Total €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 Enterprise Ireland expects that the first claim under this Operational Programme will be submitted in June 2010. Funding of €7.49m was approved to the new Centre Start projects in 2007 and 2008 but the first B1s capturing eligible expenditure will not be submitted by the Public Beneficiary Bodies until April 2010. 4. North-South Co-operation The Measure focuses on investment in applied research capability in the South but all ARE Centres are open to engagement with industry and 3rd level institutions in the North regarding collaborative projects in R&D and on consultancy to industry. Another Enterprise Ireland Programme (coordinated with Invest NI), the Innovation Vouchers, allows for companies in the North to work with researchers in the South and vice versa. Some of this activity is implemented through the ARE Centres. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements Publicity is driven in a number of ways: - Adherence to the regulations concerning the use of NDP and EU logos is a condition of all contracts between Enterprise Ireland and the Institutes of Technology. This involves, by way of example, the use of appropriate logos and text references in brochures, promotional material, signage, etc. -Through a dedicated presence on the Enterprise Ireland web site (http://www.enterpriseireland.com/ResearchInnovate/) and individual web sites for the centres (for example www.cappa.ie) - In the official centre launches. - The launch of a case studies brochure. - In relevant presentations and articles. The assistance of the European Union is acknowledged at all times. ‘Innovating for Regional Industry’ Enterprise Ireland’s National Conference of Applied Research Centres was held in Cork on September 30th 2009. Mr. Billy Kelleher T.D. Minister for Trade and Commerce highlighted the opportunity for companies to engage with research teams at the Institute's of Technology. The conference entitled ‘Innovating for Regional Industry’ showcased how research teams in Irish Institutes of Technology can assist companies to identify and develop new products, services and market opportunities through research and innovation. The individual centres also host a number of Industry open days to showcase their facility and skillsets to local industry. 6. Horizontal Issues Centre progress reports are completed quarterly and the number of female personnel in each Centre is tracked. Up to December 31st 2009, funding has been awarded to nine Applied Research Centres in Cork

49


(3), Dublin (1), Tallaght (1), Waterford (3) and a joint Centre with two locations in Limerick and Tralee Institutes of Technology. The Centres employed 41 personnel; 30 male and 11 female. The gender balance is a reflection of the discipline of the technology and the participants of females taking up Engineering. For example the Bio Lifesciences attract a higher female participation than Engineering & Electronic disciplines. 7. Compliance with Community Policies Enterprise Ireland have agreed thresholds and authorisation limits which determine the particular quotation or tendering procedure to be followed, and the authorisation required before the organisation commits to spend. This must be followed for all purchases. National Procurement Guidelines and EU Directives apply not only to formal written contracts but to all purchasing activities. Enterprise Ireland seeks to ensure that its practices and procedures are open, objective and transparent. In this respect, the published National Procurement Guidelines and EU Directives must be followed. 8. Future prospects At this time we cannot commit to additional commitments in relation to new ARE Centres and PIONEER Centres due to budgetary restrictions. In 2010, three ARE Centres in the South and East region will be invited to make an application for ARE+ funding. These are the 3CS Centre in Waterford Institute, the TEC Centre in Cork Institute and the Shannon ABC Centre in Tralee and Limerick Institutes. 9. Any adjustments required The final target for industrially focussed projects will be revised upwards. 10. Annexes Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Report.

50


Priority: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Theme: Development of the Region’s RTDI Capacity Sub-theme: Commercialisation Fund Intermediate Body: Enterprise Ireland 1. Introduction Enterprise Ireland seeks to encourage and facilitate high quality applied research aimed at the commercial exploitation of knowledge. The Commercialisation Fund is concerned with generating project outputs suitable for commercial exploitation opportunities for the benefit of the Irish economy. The objective of the programme is to foster a dynamic and commercially aware research community and to create an environment that promotes entrepreneurship. In so doing an accessible route to commercialisation is established for the transfer of knowledge from the research base into industry. As part of its commitment to facilitating the commercialisation of research, EI provides a range of supports under the Commercialisation Fund. These include a Proof of Concept Programme, a Technology Development Programme and Commercialisation Plus funding. The Proof of Concept aims to support academic researchers to explore innovative scientific concepts with commercial potential. Grants of €50k to €100k may be awarded for up to 12 months. The Technology Development programme is designed to assist researchers in accomplishing substantive applied research projects based on a foundation of confidence that the underlying technologies are sound and that there is a reasonable prospect of serving a worthwhile, identifiable market. Grants of €100k to €400k may be awarded for 18 to 36 months. Commercialisation Plus provides funding for those completed projects that have reached advanced commercialisation discussions with potential industrial partners, but need to address specific market validation issues. There are three Calls for Proposals per year – Spring, Summer and Winter. The evaluations are composed of both internal and external assessments and they focus on the commercial potential and technical merit of each proposal. Projects are assessed in light of the end goal objective of producing licensing agreements and/ or spin-out companies. Technology Development Proposals are evaluated under the following criteria; Technical Merit, Innovation, Commercial potential, potential to exploit In Ireland, the team, project plan and costing. Proof of Concept proposals are evaluated under the following criteria; Technical Feasibility, Commercial potential, Team, Resources, Project plan and Costing. After evaluation proposals are brought to Enterprise Ireland’s Industrial Research and Commercialisation Committee (IRCC) for approval. This committee is composed of senior members of Enterprise Ireland, the Department of Enterprise Trade and Employment, the Department of Agriculture, the IDA, senior academics and independent industrial experts and members of the business community. 2. Class

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Final Target

Outturn to 31st December 2009

Output

Number of approvals by IRCC -Proof of Concept, Technology Development, 0 350 332 Commercialisation Plus Result Licenses achieved as a result of funded research 0 40 79 Start-up Enterprises arising from funded 0 25 24 research Under the new Operational Plan, 322 Commercialisation Fund proposals were approved comprising of 89 Technology Development projects, 210 Proof of Concept projects and 23 Commercialisation plus projects. This includes 69 projects in 2009 made up of 16 Technology Development projects, 45 Proof of Concept projects and 8 Commercialisation plus projects. 3. Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

51


2012 €0.000 2013 €0.000 Cumulative Total €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 Enterprise Ireland expects that the first claim under this Operational Programme will be submitted in June 2010. Funding of €53m was approved to Commercialisation Fund projects from 2007 to 2009 but the first B1s capturing eligible expenditure will not be submitted by the Public Beneficiary Bodies until April 2010. 4. North-South Co-operation The Measure focuses on the development of commercialisable research in the South with the main objective being economic impact for Ireland. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements The contribution of the EU Structural Funds 2007-2013 will be acknowledged in all brochures, promotional material, press releases, publicity activity, advertisements, signage, applications forms, annual reports, letters of offer, etc., by use of appropriate logo and text references. A dedicated commercialisation communications unit within Enterprise Ireland is responsible for continued promotion of the scheme and commercialisation in general. This includes advertisement campaigns, road shows, and dedicated websites. 6. Horizontal Issues This initiative is a competitive programme whereby awards are made on the merits of individual applications. Thus the gender split within the programme is reflective of the existing gender split within colleges. Enterprise Ireland has putting in place a system that will allow us to measure the percentage of female researchers participating in the programme. 7. Compliance with Community Policies Enterprise Ireland have agreed thresholds and authorisation limits which determine the particular quotation or tendering procedure to be followed, and the authorisation required before the organisation commits to spend. This must be followed for all purchases. National Procurement Guidelines and EU Directives apply not only to formal written contracts but to all purchasing activities. Enterprise Ireland seeks to ensure that its practices and procedures are open, objective and transparent. In this respect, the published National Procurement Guidelines and EU Directives must be followed. 8. Future prospects There were three calls for proposals in 2009 and the successful projects in the winter 2009 call, were approved by the IRCC in January 2010. Last year we had anticipated three calls would take place in 2010. However at this time, due to budgetary restrictions, there are no further calls for Proof of Concept projects or Technology Development projects planned for the remainder of the year. The Commercialisation Plus strand of the Programme is still open for business. 9. Any adjustments required No adjustments are required at present. 10. Annexes Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Report.

52


Priority: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Theme: Development of the Region’s RTDI Capacity Sub-theme: Incubation Centre Development Intermediate Body: Enterprise Ireland 1. Introduction This Intervention is concerned with the provision of supports and business space within the environment of a third level institution that will advance the development of emerging high potential start-up companies. The measure provides for the development of the infrastructure of the Institutes of Technology and the Universities by the provision of Incubation Centres. These Centres facilitate the commercialisation of research and development projects carried out by the incubating companies. The colleges are also encouraged to provide dedicated mentoring and support services to incubator facilities. The Centres complement other NDP supported initiatives to deliver innovation and technology to the region. The programme aims to accelerate the development of high potential start-up companies through a combination of business support services, infrastructure and access to the expertise of the host third level institution. As such, its objectives can be seen as three-fold: - Fostering entrepreneurship and campus company activity - Help realise the commercial potential of Ireland’s research community - Supporting balanced regional development. Applications for support to extend incubation space In May 2008 Enterprise Ireland opened a new Call under the Campus Incubation Programme with total maximum expenditure estimated to be in the region of €15-20m. The Call was open to the Institutes of Technology to expand their existing business incubation facilities where a clear case was made of unmet entrepreneurial demand coupled with host institution capability and commitment to address this. The funding supports additional business incubation space that will aid the development of manufacturing and internationally traded services companies in the regions which demonstrate the potential to become sustainable and grow in the longer-term. In line with existing arrangements, the duration of company tenancy will be two years nine months. Each successful applicant may receive aid up to a maximum of €2.5m, or 90% of eligible expenditure whichever is the lesser, to expand its existing campus incubator. The 2007-2013 Regional Operational Programmes include provisions to co-finance these facilities at a rate of 40%. Enterprise Ireland operates a two step application process and to date six Institutes of Technology including three from the SE region have submitted Expressions of Interest. One application was approved for funding and the two remaining applications are on hold due to the budgetary restrictions now in place. Applications for support to establish a new incubation centre Applications from universities are received on a case-by-case basis and assessed in a similar manner to the Institutes of Technology. The University of Limerick submitted an application to construct a new campus incubation facility. Up to now this was the only Irish university without approval for an incubation facility on campus. Proposals are brought to the relevant Committee of the Intermediate Body (the Industrial Research & Commercialisation Committee or IRCC) for approval. This committee is composed of senior members of Enterprise Ireland, the Department of Enterprise Trade and Employment, the Department of Agriculture, IDA, senior academics and independent industrial experts and members of the business community. Where required, applications are submitted to the Enterprise Ireland Board for approval. To be considered for support, proposals must be supported that meet the following criteria: 1. Enterprise need; there is evidence of the unmet market need that cannot be catered for through natural turnover of existing client companies or in similar facilities in the region. 2. Host institution capability and commitment. The fit of business incubation within the wider institutional strategy and evidence of institutional commitment to company creation, including supports provided to centre managers and to client companies and plans for developing these. The centre should have a strong track record to date in terms of occupant quantity and quality and their turnover. 3. Contribution to balanced regional development, there will be an impact on regional employment of companies coming through centre and the Centre will continue to create linkages with other enterprise development facilities and initiatives in the region. 4. Viability of the proposal; Construction costing including value for money and a projected cash-flow for the facility. 2. Class Output

Performance Indicators Indicator No. of business incubation centres in place/ extended

Baseline

Final Target

9

16

Outturn to 31st December 2009 11

53


Result

No of companies in centres 62 108 129 No of employees in these companies 284 434 447 Nine centres are open for business and are operating very successfully as demonstrated in the performance indicators. These are: Blanchardstown, Carlow, Cork, Dun Laoghaire, Limerick, National College of Ireland, Tallaght, Tralee and Waterford. Up to December 31st 2009, there were 129 companies incubating in 9 Centres in Blanchardstown, Carlow, Cork, Dublin NCI, Dun Laoghaire, Limerick, Tallaght, Tralee and Waterford. 447 personnel were employed of which 73 are female. There are 16 female promoters across the 9 Centres. Two additional facilities in the Cork Institute of Technology and the University of Limerick were approved by the Enterprise Ireland Board in April and September 2009 and are currently under construction. The first facility is an extension to the Rubicon Incubation Centre in Cork Institute of Technology. Funding of €1.8m was approved for additional incubation space of 850m2 comprising 18 incubation units. The second facility is a new incubation centre on the University of Limerick campus. Funding of €2.64m was approved for a 1700m2 building comprising of 18 business units and 2 bio-incubation labs suitable for hosting start up companies in the life sciences sector. Funding has also been provided to support centre manager costs in the Institutes of Technology. In addition, a network of centre managers located in the Institutes of Technology is in place through which they can share experiences, good practice and participate in training. The network meets with Enterprise Ireland on a quarterly basis. 3.

Expenditure(€m)

Year

Total Eligible Public Expenditure

1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total ERDF

2 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

3 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 2007 €0.000 2008 €0.000 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 Total Enterprise Ireland has funded two new approvals in the Incubation Programme in the SE region in 2009. Funding to the colleges is on a phased basis following inspection by the Grants Administration Department in Enterprise Ireland. We expect to make a claim to drawdown funding in June 2010. 4. North-South Co-operation As an infrastructural initiative, the measure focuses on investment in the Republic of Ireland. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements Publicity has been driven in a number of ways: - Adherence to the regulations concerning the use of NDP and EU logos is a condition of all contracts between Enterprise Ireland and the Institutes of Technology. This involves, by way of example, the use of appropriate logos and text references in brochures, promotional material, signage, etc. - Through a dedicated presence on the Enterprise Ireland web site (www.enterpriseireland.com/campusincubation) and individual web sites for the centres (for example www.synergycentre.ie). - In the official centre launches. The centres have been officially opened by Government ministers with all the attendant media coverage that accompanies such an event.

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•

On December 8th 2008, the TĂĄnaiste and Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment Mary Coughlan, TD, announced that employment in incubation centres across Ireland had passed the 1,000-mark and a case studies brochure was launched. In relevant presentations and articles. The assistance of the European Union is acknowledged at all times.

6. Horizontal Issues This initiative is a competitive programme whereby awards are made on the merits of individual applications. Notwithstanding, Enterprise Ireland has put in place a number of initiatives to track the participation of female employees located in companies in the supported Incubation Centres. 7. Compliance with Community Policies In line with the regional development aim of the EU Structural Funds, this measure aims to enhance the quality and availability of employment, and build research and technological capability within the regions. It is achieving this by providing dedicated support to the Institutes of Technology and Universities to develop their regional innovation infrastructure. The extension call is open to all Institutes of Technology in the region and the Universities make application for support on a case by case basis. The contractual arrangements between Enterprise Ireland and the colleges include a requirement that Public Sector Guidelines are strictly adhered to in relation to the construction of the centre and the procurement of goods and services associated with it. 8. Future prospects The Campus Incubation Call is currently on hold due to budgetary restrictions. While networking and support activities for the Centre Managers and Centre Tenants are progressing, Enterprise Ireland is not expecting to approve additional new builds or extensions to existing facilities in 2010. 9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Report.

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Priority: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Theme: Development of the Region’s RTDI Capacity Sub-theme: Building the Research Capacity and Capability within HEI, Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme (RFES) Intermediate Body: Department of Education and Science 1. Introduction The PRTLI aims to support a strategic and planned approach by third-level institutions to the long-term development of their research capabilities, consistent with their existing and developing research strengths and capabilities. The programme also seeks to enhance the quality and relevance of graduate output and skills and to encourage co-operation between researchers within and between institutions. Proposals are required to promote excellence in research and are made by institutions rather than by specific faculties or individuals. The emphasis is on assisting institutions to enhance and develop research capabilities. Research in a wide range of areas is eligible for support including humanities, science, technology and the social sciences. An independent international panel of leading academics and researchers, who are individuals of the highest standing in their respective disciplines and research communities, evaluate proposals. No Irish person is permitted to participate in the decision-making process, ensuring complete independence and enabling the panel to assess proposals using international best practice as a guide. Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme (RFES) The SSTI states that “world class research requires first class people and the supporting infrastructure within which to carry out that research”. It further identifies a ‘shortfall in the provision for buildings, equipment and support services’. The HEA/Forfás Research Infrastructure Review published 2006 further identified research facilities that are “in poor condition and not fit-for-purpose”. The Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme (RFES) targets the elimination of sub standard research facilities. It serves two principal purposes. Firstly, it permits institutions to undertake the necessary refurbishment, conversion and / or upgrade of facilities in their ownership so as to permit the conducting of high-quality research in line with institutions’ strategic priorities. The scope of the scheme extends both to existing facilities in use for research purposes as well as facilities planned to be adapted for exclusive use for existing research purposes. Secondly, the scope of the scheme extends to enabling institutions to acquire necessary equipment for the conducting of research as appropriate to national and institutional priorities. €47.3 million under the RFES scheme was awarded to HEI’s in the S&E Region, spread over twenty four projects. This was made up of €35.4m for buildings and €11.8m for equipment and furniture. A full list of projects funded under the RFES scheme can be found in Appendix 1. There have been four cycles of awards under the PRTLI to date. Cycle CAPITAL €m CURRENT €m TOTAL €m 1 – (2000-2003) 177.5 28.6 206.1 2 – (2001- 2004) 48.8 29.7 78.5 3 – (2002– 2006) 178 142.4 320.4 4 – (2007- 2012/13) 131.3 129.4 260.7 Total 535.6 330.1 865.7 Note: Totals include both exchequer and private funding. PRTLI Cycles 1, 2 and 3 are now complete. Cycle 4 of the PRTLI builds on the achievements of the three previous cycles under the Programme. In addition to its main objective of supporting world class research, it also rewards innovation and collaboration in higher education. The PRTLI is a key element of the Strategy for Science Technology and Innovation (SSTI), the road map for the implementation of Government policy to develop a knowledge economy and Fourth Level Ireland. ‘World class research, world class people and world class enterprises with the drive to succeed, and the resources to do it’ are what the SSTI aims to deliver. Details of the awards under Cycle 4 of the PRTLI are available on the website of the HEA at www.hea.ie. 2. Class Output Result

Performance Indicators Indicator Enhanced collaboration through the development of National Collaborative Programmes An increase in physical

Baseline

Final Target

2

No fixed no. of collaborations set.

Outturn to 31st December 2009 103

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infrastructure (work spaces) contributing to meeting SSTI goals New and Replacement Work Spaces

New 2998 and Workspaces: Replacement 1071 (For both S&E and BMW)

Provision of new and unique infrastructure (specialised facilities) for Ireland Enhanced teaching & learning through the development of Graduate Education Programmes

Further graduate initiatives expected in Cycle 5

Workspaces: 198 provided and 3,175 m2 completed E.G. Mace Head GMP Manufacturing Facilities; e-Inis; Digital Humanities Observatory Ten out of the sixteen programmes that are being funded under Cycle 4 of PRTLI have a graduate education component

Continued The provision of a framework for funding for the development of enhanced individually graduate programmes will provide a funded graduate nationally relevant broad skill set of researchers importance to academia, policy and industry in Ireland. The increases proposed in the SSTI and the active encouragement of the professional development of researchers in Ireland, with the aim to see a significant movement into the enterprise sector, underscores the need for a ‘graduate school type mechanism’ in the country. Increased Physical Infrastructure – S&E and BMW regions - There are an additional 819 work spaces being provided through PRTLI Cycle 4, with 483 replacement places also being provided, bringing the total number to 1,302. Approval for Cycle 4 of the PRTLI was given in August 2007 and drawdown of funds by institutions began in 2008. Of a total exchequer capital allocation of c. €109 million, some €100 million was approved for the S&E Region. Funding is spread over 12 institutions and includes collaborative projects in the Humanities, Nanotechnology, Biophotonics and the Environment. The Space target in respect of these projects is 18,958m2. There are a total of 15 building projects; 14 equipment only projects and 4 Refurbishment/Equipment projects in the S&E region. By the end of 2009, six projects were completed (4 refurbishments and two new buildings), with 11 building projects already begun. The remaining have construction companies’ onsite, equipment procured or tenders received. Increased human infrastructure - The PRTLI enables the quality training of young researchers, who are required both for the public and private sectors. The programme will contribute significantly and directly to the doubling of Ph.D. outputs in order to upscale research across all the disciplines. This includes building critical mass in research teams and Cycle 4 is contributing to meeting these goals. As the 2007/08 academic year had already commenced before implementation plans were agreed, much of the human infrastructure was recruited during 2008, with many taking up positions for the 2008/09 academic year. As at 31st December 2009 approximately 97% of the positions to be funded over the lifetime of the programme are in place. In some cases projects have been extended until 2012/13. Regional Breakdown of Human Infrastructure Regional breakdown [Posts] Region PIs Researchers (PhD+) Research Assistants Technicians PhD Student Places Others S&E 35 122 23 28 286 76 BMW 8 28 3 4 44 0 Total 43 150 26 32 330 76

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Approx. €55.24m in recurrent funding and €78.9m of capital funding has been issued to institutions under PRTLI Cycle 4 since the announcement of the awards in August 2007 up to the end of 2009 for the S&E Region. Additional Information in relation to progress under PRTLI The following table provides additional information on activities under the PRTLI Cycle 4. Approximately 97% of the positions to be funded over the lifetime of the programme are in place Class Indicator Outturn to 31 Dec 09 Head Count Appointed [ S&E] Male * Female * Outputs PI’s 23 16 Researcher PhD+ 104 56 Research Assistants 14 18 Technicians 23 9 PhD Students 184 150 Other 37 52 Total 385 (287 in 301 (178 in 2008) 2008) ** [ Both regions]

Equipment purchase 226 (127 in 2008) Peer Review Publications 1645 (739 in 2008) Conference/ Presentations 2870 (977 in 2008) Research Awards 579 (299 in 2008) Patents/ IP Output 59 (21 in 2008) Teaching & Learning Additions to existing courses 386 (247 in 2008) Collaborations New national collaborations 103 (40 in 2008) established New international collaborations 257 (122 in 2008) established North/ South Collaborations 23 (12 in 2008) established Industry Collaborations established 75 * Note 1: Positions appointed related to S&E Higher Education Institutions only. These figures relate to Head Count appointed to date, hence difference with number of posts approved. Figures also cumulative and can include where people leave and are replaced on projects. ** Note 2: Due to the national collaborative nature of PRTLI, all other indicators are for Cycle 4 projects as a whole, both S&E and BMW regions. The large increase in collaborations is due in part to the increased involvement by Irish institutions in FP7 projects. In addition, by 2009 all projects were fully formed and in a stronger position to develop international ties. These collaboration can take any form – joint applications for funding, student/staff exchanges, research projects embarked upon, etc. Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme (RFES) M2 delivered to M2 delivered Workstations Workstations Researcher Researcher date [gross] to date [new] [Total] [New] Places [Total] Places [New] 16,841 7,808 1,610 556 675 459 All HEI’s awarded RFES funding Cork Institute of Technology Biopharmaceutical Chemical Research €0.325m Redevelopment of existing space to provide wet-lab facilities, autoclave room, meeting area and bioinformatics facility for the expansion of the research cluster Dublin City University Bio-analytical Science Facility €3.765m Refurbishment of vacated space in old college buildings to house additional workstations which were integrated with specialist facilities in bio-analytical and bioengineering sciences Dublin City University School of Computing Research Facility €0.840m Conversion of undergraduate space in the School of Computing into fit-for-purpose research space to support large-scale research ventures involving inter-institutional collaborations and industrial partnerships between the Faculties of Engineering and Computing Dublin City University

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Humanities and Social Sciences Research Facility €0.430m Created a quality, fit-for-purpose research space for 3 University Designated Research Centres within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, thereby fostering innovative collaborative links Institute of Technology, Blanchardstown Engineering Research Laboratory €0.161m Creation of a dedicated, hardware-centred research laboratory space within the Engineering Department for researchers in the areas of clinical engineering (incorporating medical device test, measurement, and sensor development) and roads infrastructure management (incorporating machine vision, GPS, and sensor fusion). Institute of Technology, Tallaght Applied Research Capacity Enhancement €1.400m Increased laboratory research space in the areas of bioscience and engineering in order to facilitate the development and strengthening of inter-institutional collaborations. Funding also used to upgrade equipment to support ongoing research activities. Institute of Technology, Tralee Establishment of a Mammalian Cell Culture Facility €1.024m Upgrading of laboratories in applied biotechnology including a clean air facility dedicated to postgraduate training and applied biotechnology research in mammalian cell culture techniques. Limerick Institute of Technology Enhancement of Department of Applied Science Infrastructure €0.500m Funding to equip a new laboratory in the Department of Applied Science which has an active core research team in analytical and forensic science Mary Immaculate College Upgrading of Postgraduate Research Centre €0.035m Upgrading of accommodation in the Postgraduate Research Centre including IT facilities and equipment National University of Ireland, Maynooth Callan Building Enhancement €2,900,000 Creation of new and refurbished laboratory and office space in the area of the biosciences, thereby consolidating and enhancing existing analytical facilities and services into a single, more effective unit. National University of Ireland, Maynooth Refurbishment of St. Anne’s House €2.000m Renovation of a 1960s’ building to accommodate research groups in the areas of climate change and the Innovation Value Institute (IVI)—two of NUI Maynooth’s key research areas and areas of strategic growth St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra DORAS FEASA: Refurbishment and Enhancement of Digital Research Tools and Facilities €0.400m To increase SPD’s research-focused ICT capacity and expertise through the development of a high-quality repository of research literature, theses, reports, teaching materials, and digitized records with open access options. Trinity College Dublin Trinity SFI Centres Enhancement Plan €3.170m Adaptation and refurbishment of space in the Trinity Technology & Enterprise Campus (TTEC), and to procure core equipment for research in the areas of nano-science and biological immunology Trinity College Dublin Sir Patrick Dun’s Laboratories for Translational Research, St. James’s Hospital Campus €3.200m Re-development of the translational medical research laboratories on the St. James’s hospital site with a view to establishing a fit-for-purpose, fully-integrated modern and well-equipped translational research facility Trinity College Dublin Arts Technology Research Laboratory €1.700m Adapt and equip two units in the Trinity Technology and Enterprise Centre (IITEC) as a dedicated postgraduate media arts and technology research facility, namely, the Arts Technology Research Laboratory (ATRL). University College Cork Kane (Science) Building: Core Research Facilities for the Chemical and Physical Sciences €5.040m Refurbishment of laboratory space in the Kane Building constructed in the 1970’s and housing the Departments of Chemistry and Physics and the computer network for the UCC campus. Upgrading of the core electrical services and network connectivity of the building. University College Cork Mammalian Cell and Microbial Culture €2.211m Refurbishment of laboratory space and replacement of obsolete equipment and in the Food Science Academic Building, thereby addressing both capacity and health and safety issues

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University College Dublin Science Centre Research Development €8.109m Refurbishment of existing space in the Science Centre to provide additional research capacity and to create fit-for-purpose laboratory facilities University College Dublin Nano-biology and Energy Research Development €2.060m Creation of a dedicated Energy Centre with a nano-fabrication laboratory and provision of new imaging facility including a transmission electron microscope University of Limerick Composite and Glass Materials €1.565m Refurbishment of laboratory space and replacement of equipment for the Composites and Glass Research Cluster (CGRC) within the Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI). This upgrade facilitated the cluster’s development in nano-composites, an increasingly important application of nanotechnology. University of Limerick Food and Health €2.280m Restructuring the space and provision of equipment-intensive analytical laboratories and postgraduate workstations for the food and health research group working in the core areas of functional foods, food safety, human metabolism, bioenergetics, health and physical activity University of Limerick The Charles Parsons Initiative (CPI) on Energy and Sustainable Environment €0.972m Refurbishment of rooms in the Main University Building for use by the CPI and renewal of equipment for this research group Waterford Institute of Technology Pharmaceutical & Life Sciences Cluster €2.035m Conversion and upgrading of space to accommodate the Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences research cluster and provision of core items of equipment Waterford Institute of Technology Telecommunications Strand €1.200m Provides for the complete refurbishment of accommodation and the purchasing of essential equipment for the Telecommunications Software & Systems Group (TSSG), the Optics Research Group (ORG), and the Mobile Telecommunications Group (MTG) - groups with a complementary focus that work collaboratively 3.

Expenditure(€m)

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

1=2+3+4 €45.740 €92.848 €85.374 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

2 €18.300 €37.139 €34.150

3 €27.450 €55.709 €51.225

€223.963

€89.589 Capital 1,661,708 25,918,071 0 27,528,779

Total Matching Other Public

4

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

6

€0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000

€134.384

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

Recurrent

Capital 582,757 4,136,675 26,564,560 31,283,992

PRTLI Cycle 2 Cycle 3 Cycle 4 Total

Recurrent 2,146,298 2,838,324 13,230,000 18,214,622

0 2,013,185 14,667,543 16,680,728

Recurrent 0 0 27,344,001 27,344,001

Capital 0 3,715,417 52,345,826 56,061,243

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4. North-South Co-operation Opportunities for the promotion of north south co-operation present as follows: • At project inception stage whereby institutions are encouraged to adopt a collaborative approach with higher education institutions within the island of Ireland. • Institutions are also encouraged to propose the participation of non higher education Irish research partners including partners from the business sector, non governmental organisations and other stakeholders within the island of Ireland in their proposals. The programme further encourages international collaboration so as to add value to the research capabilities being established and to support the development of networks that might enable enhanced quality research from Irish researchers. With respect to All-Island collaboration, the PRTLI Cycle 4 Call text which sets out the guiding principles of the programme specifically encourages collaboration with higher-education institutions in Northern Ireland. 6 of the 16 PRTLI Cycle 4 recurrent projects currently funded include collaborative partnerships with Northern Institutions (37.5 % of projects funded). In line with this, the following projects with S&E partners have north south collaborative partnerships: • Irish Social Sciences Platform (ISSP) – DCU, NUIG, NUIM, UCC & UL – Queen’s University Belfast is a collaborating partner. • Humanities Serving Irish Society (HSIS) - DCU, NUIG, NUIM, TCD, UCC, RIA, NCAD – Queen’s University Belfast and University of Ulster are both collaborating partners. • National Programme on Biopharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences – DCU, UCC, UCD & TCD – Queen’s University Belfast is a collaborating partner. • Environment and Climate Change: Impacts and Responses Graduate Programme – UCC, TCD, NUIG, NUIM, UL & CIT – Queen’s University Belfast is a collaborating partner. • GradCAM – The Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media – DIT & NCAD – University of Ulster is a collaborating partner. Currently part of on-going development with northern partners: • Clinician – Scientist Training Programme (CSTP) & MMI – UCD, UCC, TCD, RCSI, NUIG – Queen’s University Belfast is a collaborating partner. Projects have also established a number of cross border collaborations since funding began in 2007. A total of 23 new collaborations have been established to date across eight projects, all of which include institutions from the South and East region. Some examples of these are evident in the INSPIRE project (Integrated Nanoscience Platform for Ireland) who have established a competition within their outreach activities entitled Debating Science Issues, which is a dynamic debating competition which invites young people to engage in debate on the cultural, societal and ethical implications of advances in biomedical science. It is open to students in the senior cycle of secondary schools in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. In addition to this, in collaboration with the Nanoscale Simulators of Ireland, INSPIRE is collaborating with Queen’s University Belfast, on the delivery of remote lectures. The first lecture by QUB was presented on 30th October and will be available to all INSPIRE partners. The course title was Statistical Mechanics. Another example of North/ South collaborations that have developed since commencement of funding include a partnership in bio-catalysis between the company Almac based in Belfast and a UCC research team that is part of the National Programme on Biopharmaceutical and Pharmacological Science. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements On commencement of PRTLI projects, institutions were informed on their letter of offer that it is a requirement that an acknowledgement of the financial contribution from the PRTLI is included on all press and information material, and on all other communications actions undertaken including launches, publications, advertising, website, seminars, presentations etc. Projects have been informed of the following regarding requirements under ERDF funding: “It is a requirement that an acknowledgement of the financial contribution from the ERDF is included on all press and information material, and on all other communications actions undertaken including launches, publications, advertising, website, seminars, presentations etc. The Higher Education Authority will monitor compliance with these publicity requirements and will seek an update on your institution’s communication and dissemination strategy for PRTLI funded projects in the progress reports.” Projects have been routinely informed of the publicity requirements required under funding, and are continuously reminded of their requirements under ERDF funding regarding the required use of logos and acknowledgment of the source of funding. As part of this commitment to ensure compliance, featured on the PRTLI Cycle 4 webpage is a reminder of required logos, along with the logos available for download. Officials from the Higher Education Authority are conducting information seminars on publicity

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requirements, procedures and eligibility guidelines at all the third level institutions. Copies of the Publicity Guidelines including the publicity handout from the seminar organised by the Regional Assemblies are included with the handouts to the institutions. Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme (RFES) On commencement of RFES projects, institutions were informed on their letter of offer that it is a requirement that an acknowledgement of the financial contribution from the RFES is included on all press and information material, and on all other communications actions undertaken including launches, publications, advertising, website, seminars, presentations etc. Projects have been informed of the following: “It is a requirement that an acknowledgement of the financial contribution from the ERDF is included on all press and information material, and on all other communications actions undertaken including launches, publications, advertising, website, seminars, presentations etc.” HEI’s have been routinely informed of the publicity requirements required under funding, and are continuously reminded of their requirements under ERDF funding regarding the required use of logos and acknowledgment of the source of funding. As part of this commitment to ensure compliance, featured on the HEA website is a reminder of required logos, along with the logos available for download. Officials from the Higher Education Authority are conducting information seminars on publicity requirements, procedures and eligibility guidelines at all the third level institutions. Copies of the Publicity Guidelines including the publicity handout from the seminar organised by the Regional Assemblies are included with the handouts to the institutions. 6. Horizontal Issues Gender Equality: With regards to gender equality at project selection stage, there was a commitment to ensuring that the International Assessment Panel was gender balanced. Likewise, institutions are encouraged to have regard for gender equality in the composition of internal assessment boards tasked with formulating institutions proposals. Similarly institutions are encouraged to promote gender equality in the recruitment of researchers. The EU principle of gender mainstreaming applies and applicants are encouraged to take action to encourage female leads on research projects and in line with this are required to report the ratios of males to females working on projects. However, evaluation of research proposals is based purely on the scientific and technical merit of proposals. Within the PRTLI Cycle 4 Call Text, the following was included under the monitoring and evaluation of the programme: “All programmes will require proofing having regard to Gender, the Environment, Poverty and Rural Development. A particular focus on Gender Proofing will apply to the PRTLI in forthcoming cycles. Institutions should be aware that the NDP Gender Equality Unit will require gender data on the composition of assessment boards from formulation of institutional proposal through to the recruitment of researchers.” In line with reporting requirements, institutions are required to report on the gender breakdown of positions filled to date. As such the following is the breakdown of positions appointed to 31st Dec 2009 for the programme as a whole. Male Female Total 433 349 782 From this, the South and East breakdown is as follows; Male Female Total 385 301 686 Approx 44% of the head count of positions in the S&E institutions have been filled by women. Environment Sustainability: Under PRTLI Cycle 4, a total of €11.5m will be invested in the area of the Environment under the Environment & Climate Change: Impacts and Responses Graduate Programme. Led by NUI Galway, this project will develop a specific Graduate Research Education Programme in Environment and Marine research. South and East partners within the consortium include CIT, NUIM, TCD, UCC and UL, who will receive a total of €5.7m. under the project. In relation to general environmental sustainability, currently projects deriving capital supports that require local authority planning consents are required to comply fully with all conditions prescribed in the consent. These would usually address some environmental issues including integrating the design of the new facility with the existing built environment, the treatment of surface water and management of waste. Over the period of the measure, consideration will be given to detailing emerging innovative measures that support and promote environmental sustainability. These include employing energy efficiency designs that

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maximise natural light and ventilation, encouragement of the use of renewable energy sources and reduction in CO2 emissions. Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme (RFES) In relation to environmental sustainability, currently projects deriving capital supports that require local authority planning consents are required to comply fully with all conditions prescribed in the consent. These would usually address some environmental issues including integrating the design of the new facility with the existing built environment, the treatment of surface water and management of waste. Over the period of the measure, consideration will be given to detailing emerging innovative measures that support and promote environmental sustainability. These include employing energy efficiency designs that maximise natural light and ventilation, encouragement of the use of renewable energy sources and reduction in CO2 emissions. 7. Compliance with Community Policies The public procurement procedures for the projects under the Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions are the same procedures that apply to all government projects. In the case of Third Level institutions, the institutions themselves are the client, so the onus is on them to ensure that the guidelines are being adhered to at all times. If a Contracting Authority fails to comply with the requirements under Public Procurement Law then they face the possibility of their tender procedure being suspended, an award of a tender being set aside, an award of damages being made against them or a review of their decision by the European Commission. The Public Procurement is made up of National Guidelines, three European Union ("EU")Public Procurement Directives which govern supply, services and works contracts, a separate Utilities Directive which governs entities in the transport, water, telecommunications and energy sectors and two remedies Directives under which the procedures under the above Directives can be reviewed. Under the EU Procurement Directives where the EU Procurement Directives apply, Contracting Authorities are required to give notice of tenders by using either Prior Indicative Notices ("PIN") or a contract notice which should be published in the Official Journal of the European Commission ("OJEC") within the time limits set out in the EU Procurement Directives. Contract Notices published in local or national newspapers should not be published before notices are put in the OJEC and must not contain information other than that published in the OJEC. Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme (RFES) The public procurement procedures for the projects under the Research Facilities Enhancement Scheme are the same procedures that apply to all government projects. In the case of Third Level institutions, the institutions themselves are the client, so the onus is on them to ensure that the guidelines are being adhered to at all times. If a Contracting Authority fails to comply with the requirements under Public Procurement Law then they face the possibility of their tender procedure being suspended, an award of a tender being set aside, an award of damages being made against them or a review of their decision by the European Commission. The Public Procurement is made up of National Guidelines, three European Union ("EU")Public Procurement Directives which govern supply, services and works contracts, a separate Utilities Directive which governs entities in the transport, water, telecommunications and energy sectors and two remedies Directives under which the procedures under the above Directives can be reviewed. Under the EU Procurement Directives where the EU Procurement Directives apply, Contracting Authorities are required to give notice of tenders by using either Prior Indicative Notices ("PIN") or a contract notice which should be published in the Official Journal of the European Commission ("OJEC") within the time limits set out in the EU Procurement Directives. Contract Notices published in local or national newspapers should not be published before notices are put in the OJEC and must not contain information other than that published in the OJEC. 8. Future prospects The assessment process for PRTLI Cycle 5 (2010-2014) was launched in ’09 and is ongoing. 9.

Any adjustments required

10.

Annexes

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Priority: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Theme: Entrepreneurship in MicroEnterprise Sub-theme: Intermediate Body: Enterprise Ireland 1. Introduction The Micro-enterprise Theme is delivered through the 22 City and County Enterprise Boards (CEBs) located in the S&E region. CEBs were established in 1993 and subsequently given statutory status under the Industrial Development Act of 1995. Their statutory function is to stimulate economic and entrepreneurial activity at local level and to develop local indigenous enterprise in the micro-business sector. Each CEB operates as a stand-alone limited company whose actions are delivered under an Operating Agreement to be agreed between the individual CEB and Enterprise Ireland. Enterprise Ireland supports the region’s 22 CEBs through centralised co-ordination including, annual Exchequer allocations which fund expenditure cofinanced under the Regional OP. The CEBs operate in accordance with the Regional Operational Programme for 2007-13, under the Micro-Enterprise Innovation and Entrepreneurship sub-theme of the Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Axis. The County and City Enterprise Boards, established at 22 locations across the S&E region, deliver the actions described under this theme. The operational period for the Micro-enterprise sub-theme commenced with effect from 1 January 2007 and will report to the Monitoring Committee under the Indicators and Cross-cutting themes in the Implementation Plan agreed by the Monitoring Committee. The theme is designed to achieve over the term of the Operational Programme increased rates of business start-up and expansion, and increased competitiveness, innovation and technological adaptation by micro-enterprises (the enterprise sector which encompasses small and start-up enterprises employing not more than 10 people). As part of the aim under the Priority of the Regional Operational Programme to nurture a positive culture of entrepreneurship and promote the formation of new and innovative enterprises with growth potential, the CEBs are charged with primary responsibility at local level for: • cultivating a favourable culture of entrepreneurship at local level and • Supporting the development of enterprises. A suite of focused business supports and services are made accessible by County Enterprise Boards (CEBs) to enterprises, to enable existing and start-up entities to increase their management capability, to raise productivity, to adapt Information and Communication Technology (ICT) applications and to create sustainable employment. To give effect these objectives under the Micro-enterprise theme of the 2007-13 Operational Programme, the CEBs • promote a local enterprise culture and entrepreneurship by means of initiatives such as ‘Start-YourOwn-Business’, provision of Business Information, Schools Enterprise Programmes, Awards schemes, thematic networks based on identified sectoral- and enterprise-requirements, to include addressing specific needs under networks such as ‘Women-in-Business’, ‘Plato’ and cross- Border cooperation as appropriate. • support business start-ups and expansions through financial grants; • encourage and facilitate greater innovation and effective ICT usage and adaptation and export output and sales within small businesses; • Build the capacity of owner/managers of micro-enterprises through general business training, tailored mentoring Programmes and business networks. Since 1st January 2010 new financial instruments, approved by An Tánaiste (in November 2009) for use by the Boards, came into effect. The aim of the new Financial Instruments is to build more sustainable, innovative start ups and support expansion of small enterprises. The new financial instruments, which replace all existing grant schemes, consist of a Priming Grant, a Business Expansion/Development Grant and a Feasibility / Innovation Grant. Priming Grant: The maximum Priming Grant payable shall be 50% of the investment or €0.150m whichever is the lesser. Grants over €0.080m and up to €0.150m shall be exceptional and shall only apply in the case of projects that clearly demonstrate a potential to graduate to Enterprise Ireland and/or to export internationally. In all other cases, the maximum grant shall be 50% of the investment or €0.080m whichever is the lesser. Subject to the 50% limit, a maximum grant of €0.015m per full time job created shall apply in respect of any employment support granted. Businesses that satisfy the eligibility criteria and are within the first eighteen months of trading are eligible to apply for Priming Grants. Business Expansion Grant: The maximum Business Expansion Grant payable shall be 50% of the investment or €0.150m whichever is the lesser. Grants over €0.080m and up to €0.150m shall be exceptional and shall only apply in the case of projects that clearly demonstrate a potential to graduate to Enterprise Ireland and/or to export internationally. In all other cases, the maximum grant shall be 50% of the investment or €0.080m whichever is the lesser. Subject to the 50% limit, a maximum grant of €0.015m

64


per full time job created shall apply in respect of any employment support granted. With a view to aligning the new Financial Instruments to Enterprise Ireland’s HPSU Scheme, Priming Grants Business Expansion/Development grants can cover all business costs directly attributable to starting a new business or growing and developing a business, save payments to State Bodies. Feasibility / Innovation Grant: The maximum Feasibility / Innovation Grant payable for the S&E Region shall be 50% of the investment or €0.020m whichever is the lesser. The Committee are requested to note that in 2010 the Exchequer Capital funding (Measure 1 & 2) provided for the Boards was reduced by approximately 26%. This reduction in funding will pose considerable additional challenges for the Boards in supporting micro-enterprises in 2010. Repayable element of the grant schemes: One component of grant assistance under the Measure 1 (Selective Financial Intervention) type support is that a percentage of all approvals must be in repayable form. In 2004 at least 28% of the total approvals of grants made by a CEB each year were to be in refundable form. This applied to all grants approved whether from Exchequer grant or from refundable aid. The figure of 28% was subject to review and in late 2008 the percentage was increased to 30%. The 30% is a minimum requirement and CEBs can apply a higher level if they wish. Boards are required to actively monitor and manage the approval of grants throughout the year to ensure that 30% is met at year end. The refundable/repayable element is maintained in a separate refundable aid account and all Grants funded by the refundable aid account must be paid from this account. This would include grant repayments, proceeds of redemption of preference shares, interest receipts, dividends and any other related receipts arising in respect of refundable aid issued. CEBs are under instruction to disburse the balances in their refundable aid accounts on an ongoing basis and not allow the build-up of balances beyond those needed to meet known commitments. Furthermore, the Refundable Aid monies may only be used to fund business projects/activities in accordance with the criteria that apply to support under Measure 1 and must meet the same evaluation criteria and limitations as are applicable to Measure 1. In addition, a number of CEBs support community based enterprise centres through provision of direct financial support funded by the refundable aid account. For both the old and new financial instruments the Implementation Plans for Measure 1 - Selective Financial Interventions, provide that a portion of the grant assistance issued shall be in repayable form in certain circumstances where the grant amount exceeds a given percentage of eligible expenditure. Refundable aid usually takes two forms – refundable grants or equity (redeemable preference shares). Refundable grants are effectively loans and would typically have to be repaid in instalments over a period of 3 – 5 years, sometimes after an initial repayment holiday. Policy in relation to interest varies between Boards but most would be interest free or at a highly preferential rate. Preference Shares can be purchased from enterprises with a specified redemption date, again normally between 3 – 5 years. The dividend rate on preference shares is also a matter for individual Boards and would usually be at zero or a preferential rate. In all cases the criteria for awarding refundable aid are the same as for grants and the maximums specified in the Implementation Plans adopted by the respective OP Monitoring Committees must be respected. General demand for CEB services For 2010 a total of €28,310,000 has been provided in respect of activities and administration costs associated with the City and County Enterprise Boards (CEBs). This compares to €34,847,000 in 2009. Consequently there is a reduction of approx 27% in available budget to the 35 CEBs for 2010. Against this reduction in budget is a growth in demand for services being reported by CEBs. A recent snapshot of demand for services shows that in some areas there is a two fold increase in applications for financial assistance, a significant demand for Measure 2 type support – in particular mentoring and training for start up companies. In the larger urban areas of Dublin (4 CEBs), Limerick and Galway there is a reported demand for mentoring for sustainability of micro enterprises. Counties such as Wicklow and Carlow have processed the same level of applications this year as in the total of last year. Applications for start your own business courses are growing with a number of CEBs reporting they had to add additional courses to their schedules. Just three CEBs have reported no change in demand. Micro enterprises are also coming together to participate in added value networks and training. The Cork West CEB is providing a business development programme and advanced food business development programmes to 13 Cork West food businesses. CEBs are also encountering a number of high profile closures and downsizings which is not limited to large urban areas. Anecdotally there is a fall off in the number of feasibility studies being supported as CEBs switch their focus to job creation and sustainability elements of micro enterprise support. Meeting such demand is proving challenging. CEBs can carry forward commitments up to 50% of their Measure 1 budget from one year to the next. Towards the second half of 2009 an increase in demand for services resulted in increased approvals, and consequently in Measure 1 type commitments in the region of €3.7 million being carried forward into 2010, against an allocation of €6.5 m. Given the reduced allocation for 2010 there is reduced

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capacity in CEBs to fund additional projects from direct Exchequer funding and therefore CEBs are utilising their refundable aid balances to a greater degree. Notwithstanding the need for contingent liabilities in respect of repayments, many CEBs are however anxious that the limitations to budget for 2010 will quickly reduce approval rates and have reported demand outstripping available funding. This is supported by the fact that a number of CEBs have drawn down 100% of their annual allocation to date and a high number of CEBs have drawn down 75% or more. This does not reflect the situation in 2009 where draw downs were more phased. In addition, it is too early in the year to anticipate decommitals of projects whereby funds become available. Some CEBs are also working with the credit unions to leverage financial support for micro enterprise, whereas the broader financial community is seen as unsupportive. Another factor impacting on meeting the growth in demand is the introduction of a new suite of financial instruments which provide for increased levels of grant assistance for companies, requiring increased levels of funding and / or commitments per individual projects. The suite of financial instruments was introduced to encourage the development of more sustainable companies. 2. Class Output

Result

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Output No of micro-enterprises assisted30 Of which Male Promoters Of which Female Promoters Of which Promoter is company/partnership/other No of training days provided31 Male Female Other Result No. of jobs created in assisted micro-enterprise3 Male F/T Female F/T Male P/T Female P/T 2. No of training recipients4 Of which Male Of which Female Of which companies/partnership/Other

4,029 2647 1202 180

Final Target 2013 8,029 5,276 2,395 358

Out-turn to end of 2009* 5342 3609 1521 212

74,294

249,294

165,462.5 71,409.3 93,867.0 186.10

24,858 14,012 7,786 2,178 3,942 57,159 22,353 34,474 351

32,558 18,353 10,200 2,854 5,156 141,159 56,184 84,275 700

23,609.5 12,801 7,466 2,445 4,240 108,446 44,432 63,546 468

** The figures above for “No. of Jobs created in assisted micro-enterprise” show that job numbers have reduced by 2,584 since 2008 (2008 Total figure 26,193.5) in the S&E region. This reflects the changed economic environment in the broader economy and is in line with the reduction in jobs reported by other job creation agencies such as Enterprise Ireland.

3. Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Expenditure (€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €14.378 €14.794 €14.491 €0.000 €0.000

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

€5.751 €5.918 €5.796

€8.627 €8.877 €8.695

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €22.633

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure 6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

30

PMS Report N109 “Key and Secondary Indicators Summary – Key no 3, Secondary Indicator no 6” out-turn to 31/12/09, printed 05/03/10 including baseline figure 31 PMS Report N110 “National Development Plan Performance Indicators – Key no 9” out-turn to 31/12/09, printed 05/03/10 including baseline figure 3 PMS Report N117 “National Roll Up Summary” our-turn to31/12/09, printed 05/03/10 4 PMS Report N110 “National Development Plan Performance Indicators – Key no 4” out-turn to 31/12/09, printed 05/03/10 including baseline figure

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2012 €0.000 2013 €0.000 Cumulative Total €43.663 €17.465 €26.198 €0.000 €22.633 €0.000 *2007 & 2008 expenditure was claimed in the B2 submitted in 2009 for the reporting period 01/01/07 to 31/12/08. **The figures above may be adjusted in line with the final submissions of the B1 from the County and City Enterprise Boards In 2010 the Exchequer Capital funding (Measure 1 & 2) provided for the Boards was reduced by approximately 26%. This reduction in funding will pose considerable additional challenges for the Boards in supporting micro-enterprises in 2010. *Cork North CEB:- No verifiable eligible expenditure on Form B1 reporting period 01/01/07 to 31/12/08 was included in the B2 submitted in 2009 (for reporting period 01/01/07 to 31/12/08). *Wexford CEB:- will have a potential of an additional €1.410m to declare in the next B1 (not included in figures above) which will be submitted in 2010, and will be subject to verification. **2009 Expenditure - The figures above may be adjusted in line with the final submissions of the B1 from the County and City Enterprise Boards.

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CEB

Carlow Clare Cork City Cork North Cork South Cork West Dublin City Fingal Dublin South Dun Laoghaire Rathdown Kerry Kildare Kilkenny Limerick City Limerick County Meath Tipperary North Tipperary South Waterford City Waterford County Wexford Wicklow Total

2007, 2008 & 2009 Estimate Breakdown of Measure 1 Expenditure that is in Refundable Form for the S&E Region 2007 Estimate – 2008 Estimate – 2009 Estimate – at least 30% of at least 30% of at least 30% of the total the total the total Total approvals of approvals of approvals of Expenditure 2007 M1 Exp. 2008 M1 Exp. 2009 M1 Exp. grants made by grants made by grants made by M1 for 2007, a Board each a Board each a Board each 2008 and 2009 year must be in year must be in year must be in refundable refundable refundable form form form 247,256.43 74,176.93 166,209.05 49,862.72 210,692.78 63,207.83 624,158.26 198,529.00 59,558.70 224,963.00 67,488.90 267,602.00 80,280.60 691,094.00 142,550.09 42,765.03 192,571.02 57,771.31 175,440.51 52,632.15 510,561.62 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 75,000.00 22,500.00 75,000.00 367,143.53 110,143.06 391,137.39 117,341.22 426,691.45 128,007.44 1,184,972.37 79,803.03 23,940.91 264,563.86 79,369.16 72,595.52 21,778.66 416,962.41 561,013.10 168,303.93 358,746.82 107,624.05 381,088.20 114,326.46 1,300,848.12 289,900.00 86,970.00 181,750.00 54,525.00 188,560.00 56,568.00 660,210.00 362,500.00 108,750.00 291,875.00 87,562.50 326,750.00 98,025.00 981,125.00 452,550.00 135,765.00 458,800.00 137,640.00 294,104.00 88,231.20 1,205,454.00 217,347.00 65,204.10 286,888.90 86,066.67 312,348.62 93,704.59 816,584.52 263,935.00 79,180.50 281,135.00 84,340.50 133,636.00 40,090.80 678,706.00 192,343.89 57,703.17 206,491.00 61,947.30 292,362.00 87,708.60 691,196.89 164,392.34 49,317.70 149,896.39 44,968.92 228,187.00 68,456.10 542,475.73 298,142.13 89,442.64 191,693.00 57,507.90 290,798.00 87,239.40 780,633.13 159,755.53 47,926.66 164,423.00 49,326.90 319,401.00 95,820.30 643,579.53 203,973.00 61,191.90 159,482.00 47,844.60 213,284.00 63,985.20 576,739.00 226,586.70 67,976.01 199,320.38 59,796.11 214,511.32 64,353.40 640,418.40 168,884.48 50,665.34 215,119.64 64,535.89 156,531.55 46,959.47 540,535.67 221,282.71 66,384.81 200,364.48 60,109.34 199,418.95 59,825.69 621,066.14 362,124.02 108,637.21 285,575.00 85,672.50 307,460.50 92,238.15 955,159.52 256,087.47 76,826.24 286,948.53 86,084.56 231,583.44 69,475.03 774,619.44 5,436,099.45

1,630,829.84

5,157,953.46

1,547,386.04

5,318,046.84

1,595,414.05

15,912,099.75

Total Estimate of 2007, 2008, 2009 Refundable amount. 187,247.48 207,328.20 153,168.49 22,500.00 355,491.71 125,088.72 390,254.44 198,063.00 294,337.50 361,636.20 244,975.36 203,611.80 207,359.07 162,742.72 234,189.94 193,073.86 173,021.70 192,125.52 162,160.70 186,319.84 286,547.86 232,385.83 4,773,629.93

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4. North-South Co-operation Cross-border trade and business co-operation is facilitated and encouraged by CEBs, especially by those in border regions. CEBs actively engage and collaborate with Enterprise NI, the Northern network of Local Enterprise Agencies, in ongoing programmes such as Microtrade and Trade links. Joint CEB-LEA (Local Enterprise Agencies) activities under the programmes aim to introduce micro-businesses in either jurisdiction to the island wide market possibilities for their products and services. Other activities promoted through the programmes include business visit exchanges, joint marketing initiatives, exhibitions, alliances and joint ventures etc. Co-operation in female entrepreneurship is encouraged through links established by the CEB Women-in-Business Networks with various women groups/organisations in NI. The following is a summary of actions from a number of CEBs: Limerick County Enterprise Board actively engages with cross border companies in an experience sharing exercise regarding the development of food enterprises. The majority of the activity took place in 2008 however one to one relationships have developed from those activities. The Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Board was the managing agent on behalf of the County and City Enterprise Boards for the Micro Trade Programme. Phase 2 of the Micro Trade Programme ended in July 2009. Micro Trade was a joint initiative between IntertradeIreland, County & City Enterprise Boards and Enterprise Northern Ireland. The programme helped small businesses build contacts, markets and partnerships across the island of Ireland. Meath CEB are partnering with Louth and Monaghan CEB in the preparation of an application to the East Border Region for the delivery of 3 pillars of the Innovation Framework. Wicklow CEB promotes North South Co operation through the supports available to client companies through InterTrade Ireland (including Micro Trade, Fusion & Acumen programmes). There was no cost to Wicklow CEB in relation to this activity in 2009. Kilkenny CEB clients were encouraged to • avail of Micro Trade funded initiatives (e.g. Link-Up Partnership Grants) to support North-South co-operation; • attend cross-border Networking Events; and • Participate in Micro Trade funded events and programmes held in 2009, aimed at promoting cross border trade. This was done by regularly e-mailing clients about forthcoming initiatives/events and by featuring same in the Board’s electronic newsletter. Kerry CEB is involved in ongoing participation in Micro Trade and client referral. Fingal CEB maintained its involvement in the Micro Trade programme linking Fingal companies with counterparts in N.I. The Micro Trade programme was discontinued around the middle of 2009, so the reference to this involvement is relevant to the early part of 2009 only. Level of resources committed: Fingal CEB committed Executive time only to this. South Cork CEB: Micro Trade (which was discontinued in 2009) had been an excellent programme providing a uniform bridge for the CEB clients (and particularly for those CEBs at furthest remove from Northern Ireland) to engage with business opportunities from NI. In 2009 South Cork, in partnership with the other Cork CEBs, Cork County Council and Cork Chamber, held a major business forum with 400 owner managers attending from Ireland and beyond. A particular emphasis was placed on ensuring Northern Ireland companies were aware of the initiative and the partnership engaged the former Micro Trade Development Officer to inform the Local Enterprise Agencies etc in Northern Ireland of the event resulting in a number of Northern Ireland companies attending. Cork South CEB intend again in 2010 staging Cork MEET (at which in 2009 there were 2,500 one-to-one half hour business meetings) and following the success would hope that Intertrade Ireland would see merit in supporting the event as resources available to CEBs are reducing. Level of resources committed: Approximately €3,500 was committed in 2009 towards the work of the former Micro Trade co-ordinator to promote Cork MEET to the Northern Ireland marketplace. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements Publicity: CEBs continue to publicise their programmes and activities using local printed and electronic media. Mail shot advertising, national and local Newspaper advertorials and advertisements, as well as signage for CEB-sponsored exhibitions and enterprise events constitute the bulk of CEB expenditure outgoings on publicity. Websites maintained by each CEB equally notify and publicise their activities. In each case the EU logo and accreditation is printed and displayed prominently. Events: Cork County & City Enterprise Boards, Trading Link Cork is a dynamic partnership promoting Cork, and assisting innovative Cork companies to explore the international marketplace. Trading Link Cork is led by Cork County Council and partnered by The Cork Enterprise Boards and the Cork Chamber.

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CORKMEET 2009 was funded and organised by Trading Link Cork. CORKMEET 2009 was a three-day international business networking forum which took place at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Cork, from 11-13 November 2009. The 3-day programme was arranged to heighten networking opportunities for attendees in a variety of formats. The promotional literature demonstrated the appropriate EU Support. Clare County, Limerick City, Limerick County and Tipperary North Enterprise Boards “New Horizons” is a new networking event which was held in May 2009 in association with Clare County, Limerick City, Limerick County and Tipperary North Enterprise Boards. In excess of 220 SME’s from the mid west region attended the event. The promotional literature contained the appropriate EU Logos. “Mid West Regional Business Week” was held in October 2009. This event was held in association with CEB’s from Clare, Limerick County, Limerick City, Kerry and North Tipperary. Over 50 events were held throughout the week and very positive feedback was received from clients who attended the various networking events, seminars, training etc. Clare CEB hosted the Enterprise Bus for the week of 5th-9th October, 2009. The Bus visited 10 locations throughout Clare with approximately 50 clients visiting over the course of the week. West Cork Enterprise Board. WCEB distributed their Spring/Summer 2009 Training Programmes information leaflet to 2,200 SME’s and general businesses in West Cork. The promotional literature contained the appropriate EU Logos. Launch of Seafood Programme in West Cork - In 2009 West Cork Enterprise Board designed and developed an innovative new training programme, for nine West Cork seafood companies, which aims to stimulate Irish seafood sector growth, which was launched in 2010, at the new Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) Seafood Development Centre, Clonakilty, West Cork. The programme called “Developing a Sustainable Seafood Business” is a joint initiative between the West Cork Enterprise Board and Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), the Irish Sea Fisheries Board, and will offer extensive training and mentoring expertise to eight West Cork Seafood companies over a twelve month period. The programme was advertised in 2009 in a local newspaper with the appropriate logos Wexford CEB - In January 2009, and again in September 2009, 3,500 training brochures were distributed to Wexford CEB client companies – all documentation publicly acknowledged ERDF and EU co-financing requirements. Wexford CEB website www.wexfordceb.ie incorporates Structural Funds logos. Waterford City Enterprise Board - Under Waterford City Enterprise Boards Empower Initiative which grant aids the development of web sites, it is a condition attached to grant aid that the NSRF and EU logo along with acknowledgement of funding from these sources are included on the home page of each site. Tipperary South Enterprise Board - ERDF contribution is promoted through the following documentation and channels throughout 2009; • Training leaflet • Web Site • Newsletter • Annual Report • Primary Schools programme • PowerPoint presentations • M1 Plaques Tipperary North Enterprise Board - “National Enterprise Awards County Final” was held in October 2009. The invitation acknowledged support of EU and Structural Funds. Tipperary North CEB ran a one day Start up Boot Camp run in conjunction with Nenagh Chamber of Commerce in 2009. Six North Tipperary women attended the National Women’s Enterprise Day in Mullingar. The support of the EU and Structural Funds was acknowledged. 423 students attended three separate Enterprise Days held in conjunction with Tipperary Institute in Thurles. The support of the EU and Structural Funds was acknowledged. Limerick County Enterprise Board sent “Women in Business” Invitations to over 500 clients and advertised in local media on a monthly basis with due recognition of ERDF and structural funds contributions highlighted. Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Board - On the 19th – 21st June 2009, from 10am – 6pm daily the Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Board ran its 1st Summer Fair in Marlay House, Marlay Park. This highlighted talents on many individual businesses in the area providing an opportunity for visitors to view and purchase work from a wide variety of talented people. 33 exhibitors took part and the products exhibited included Jewellery, designer knitwear, fashion accessories, gourmet foods, children’s gifts, woodcarving, aromatherapy, photography, glass, art and much more. The total estimated attendance over the three days was 2,200 people. 250 invitations were sent out and 6000 flyers/posters were put in various locations throughout the area. All of the above forms of advertising for the event contained the Structural Funds and ERDF logo. Four of the Dun Laoghaire Rathdown CEB pop-up banners were used at the event and the Pop-up banners contain the Structural Funds and ERDF logo. Carlow, Kilkenny, South Tipperary, Waterford County, Waterford City and Wexford Enterprise Boards were involved in the “South East Spirit of Enterprise Week 2009” in association with a number of other

70


public and private parties. This was a week of intensive advice, inspiration and training provided to get businesses in shape to succeed. The promotional literature contained the appropriate EU Logos. Final CEB published a guide titled “The Fingal Guide to Enterprise” to provide businesses/ entrepreneurs in Fingal with practical guidance and assistance. This guide was published in hard copy and is also available online at the portal website www.fingalenterprise.ie. NSRF and EU logo along with acknowledgement of funding from these sources are included on the home page of this site. 6. Horizontal Issues Gender Equality: All CEBs generally seek to proactively gender-mainstream their operational activities and structures, particularly in regard to gender balance requirements, with a view to achieving optimum levels of gender equality. This is achieved through direct gender based interventions e.g. women in business training and development programmes which aim to raise awareness and provide direct assistance through grants, and through peer group delivery/awareness. Broad Equality: (Gender, Marital status, Family, Age, Disability, Race, Sexual orientation, Religion and Membership of the Traveller Community). All CEBs help promote equal diverse and socially inclusive societies and help combat poverty and inequality through co-operation with local and rural development structures and facilitation of job creation. This is evidenced by the provision of tailored locally delivered programmes which seek to support all local communities equally e.g. prison, Traveller communities, immigrant communities. 7. Compliance with Community Policies CEBs were advised of the provisions of Commission Regulation 1998/2006 in relation to notification and monitoring of levels of State aid. Confirmation of compliance is monitored under the ‘Article 13’ verification checks which will be carried out by the Enterprise Ireland (Implementing Body) throughout the period of the Operational Programme 2007-13. As State Agencies CEBs must abide by the Public Procurement Guidelines - Competitive Process 2004 Guidelines on conducting an appropriate competitive process under national rules and revised EU public procurement Directives, these largely replace the provisions of the 1994 Guidelines [Green Book]. Threshold <€5K €5K-€50K €50K – EU Threshold Process Min. 3 verbal Min. 3 written quotes Formal Tendering Process www.etenders.gov.ie Voluntary OJ EU quotes Award Lowest Price / Evaluate most suitable offer Lowest price or MEAT most suitable against specified requirements. Notify unsuccessful bidders Notify unsuccessful bidders. 8. Future prospects The introduction of new financial instruments will provide CEBs with a range of updated and refocused supports to enable them to encourage and support new innovative and sustainable start ups and expanding companies, however for 2010 the reduction in Exchequer funding will pose additional challenges to CEBs 9. Any adjustments required A revised Implementation Plan to include the New Financial Instruments has been prepared for the Monitoring Committee.

10. Annexes Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Report. Broader Equality Horizontal Principle Report.

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3. Implementation by Priority 3.2 Priority 2 Environment and Accessibility Introduction Funding is provided under the priority to stimulate energy efficiency and renewable energy production, the development of efficient energy management systems. The Renewable Energy Theme is designed to assist Ireland in devising and implementing the most efficient means to reduce its reliance on imported fossil fuels. A key objective of the priority is to increase broadband take-up throughout the region in order to contribute to the sustainable development of the Region. A further aim of this priority is to contribute to the sustainable development of the rural areas of the region by protecting surface and groundwater from pollution. The priority objectives will be pursued under three separate Themes as follows: • Environment and Risk Prevention • Renewable Energy • ICT Accessibility During 2009 sub-themes in the Renewable Energy and the ICT Accessibility Themes reported expenditure. The National Broadband Scheme (NBS) was launched in January 2009; half of the NBS coverage area will be enabled by the end of 2009. Approximately 47% of electoral districts are to be covered in the S&E Region. In relation to the Environment and Risk Prevention Theme which covers water source protection and pilot village waste-water initiatives, the roll out will commence once the two pilot projects have been completed and assessed. The cumulative Priority level expenditure to end December 2009 is reported as €39.033 million which represents 18.15% of Priority level expenditure. Overview of Priority Progress Theme 1: Environment & Risk Prevention There was no expenditure reported under this Theme in 2009. The Department, in partnership with the National Federation of Group Water Schemes has implemented a national pilot source protection scheme with the objective of putting in place a national strategy for the protection of surface and ground water sources from agricultural pollution, commercial/industrial and residential sources. The pilot programme is being co-ordinated through the Science Dept, Dundalk Institute of Technology. The Wastewater Treatment Pilot Projects advanced by the Department, the National Rural Water Monitoring Committee and the local authorities was completed in 2007. The objective of the project is to assess new cost effective ways of providing a wastewater collection and treatment systems for small rural villages and to test a range of innovative technologies for collecting and treating domestic wastewater and include conventional and membrane based package treatment plants as well as vacuum sewers as opposed to traditional gravity and pumped systems. It is expected that liaison with local authorities on the identification and selection of schemes for inclusion in this intervention will commence in 2010 for both of these sub-themes. Theme 2: Renewable Energy Cumulative Eligible Expenditure reported for the Renewable Energy Theme is €18.932. Implementation has commenced on the Renewable Energy, Research & Development and Deployment Programme, the CHP & ReHeat (Bioheat) Programme & the Energy for Business Programme. The Ocean Energy Development Unit (OEDU) has been established to implement the Government’s policy decision to accelerate the development of Ocean Energy (Wave and Tidal) in Ireland. It was established to advance the deployment of ocean energy technologies in Ireland by increasing the capacity for research and development both with academic institutions and commercial entities developing devices in Ireland. The expanding remit of SEAI has enabled them to shape the development and delivery of a number of core initiatives, additional to the ones foreseen at the commencement of the National Strategic Reference Framework as is instanced with the inclusion of the Ocean Energy Development strand. Theme 3: ICT Accessibility Cumulative expenditure for the ICT Accessibility Theme is €20.101m. Implementation has commenced on the National Broadband Scheme. Following the conclusion of a technology neutral procurement process, the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources on 23 December 2008 entered into a contract with Hutchison 3G Ireland Ltd (trading as “3”) for the implementation of the NBS. The National Broadband Scheme (NBS) was launched in January 2009; half of the NBS coverage area will be enabled by the end of 2009. The NBS will be rolled out on an electoral division basis and will address electoral divisions (1,028) that are deemed to be without adequate broadband services. 47% of the EDs to be covered under the NBS are located within the S&E Region. Almost half of the entire NBS coverage area will be enabled by end 2009

72


while all residential and business premises within the NBS Coverage Area will have broadband connectivity by end September 2010. Performance Indicators Class Indicator Output Result Output Result Output Result Result

No. of rural water source protection projects supported No. of STEDS projects supported Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) Reduction in protected sources Population equivalent served by STEDS schemes No. of energy schemes introduced No. of energy efficient / renewable energy buildings supported No. of initiatives to enable broadband infrastructure and service provision Additional businesses with broadband available No. in Clár regions

Baseline

Final Target

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09

0

12

0

0

12

0

NA

75%

0

NA NA

4,200 6

0 4

NA

900

0

3

1

0 0

25,125 0

14,577 0

Core Indicators No. 12 26

Indicator

Baseline

Additional Population Covered by broadband access Additional Population served by wastewater projects

Final Target

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09

221239

110619

4200

0

Expenditure(€m)

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Exp.

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

1=2+3+4 €2.288 €14.945 €21.801 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

2 €0.915 €5.982 €8.722

3 €1.373 €8.963 €13.079

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€39.033

€15.619

€23.414

€0.000

Cumulative Expenditure to 31.12.09 As % of Cumulative Forecast 2007-2013

Cumulative Eligible Exp. declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5

Other Non co-Financed Exp.

€0.000 €0.000 €7.715

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€7.715

€0.000

€39.033 18.15%

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Priority 2: Environment and Accessibility Theme 1: Risk Prevention and Water Protection Sub-theme 1: Village Sewerage Systems Intermediate Body: Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government 1. Introduction The Wastewater Treatment Pilot Projects advanced by the Department, the National Rural Water Monitoring Committee and the local authorities was completed in 2007. Following full commissioning of the plants, performance monitoring commenced in 2008 and continued in 2009. Substantial progress has been made on preparation of reports on the pilot project with just one remaining element, relating to septic tanks effluent drainage systems (see below), remaining to be fully reported on before completion of an overall final report in 2010. The objective of the pilot project is to assess new cost effective ways of providing a wastewater collection and treatment systems for small rural villages and to test a range of innovative technologies for collecting and treating domestic wastewater and include conventional and membrane based package treatment plants as well as vacuum sewers as opposed to traditional gravity and pumped systems. As part of a programme to evaluate new technologies for providing cost-effective and efficient wastewater collection and treatment for small rural villages, a Septic Tank Effluent Drainage System (STEDS) was also assessed. The STEDS approach is based around the retention of the septic tank on the householder’s property and the collection of the effluent only for subsequent treatment and disposal. It is expected, in cases where the outcome of the pilot scheme, or individual pilot schemes as the case may be, prove effective and of value under Irish conditions, that liaison with local authorities on the identification and selection of schemes (where appropriate conditions apply) will take place later this year. 2. Class Output Result 3. Year

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Number of Schemes Population equivalent served Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Exp.

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Final Target 0

Outturn to 31st December 2009 0 0

12 2,800

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

Total Exp. declared to Managing Authority at year end

Other Non CoFinanced Exp.

1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

2 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

3

4

5

6

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

4. North-South Co-operation Not Applicable. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements This is an exchequer funded theme which is not co-funded. 6. Horizontal Issues See Annex. 7. Compliance with Community Policies This is an exchequer funded theme which is not co-funded

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8. Future prospects It is expected, in cases where the outcome of the pilot schemes, or individual pilot schemes as the case may be, prove effective and of value under Irish conditions, that liaison with local authorities on the identification and selection of schemes (where appropriate conditions apply) will take place later this year. 9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report.

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Priority 2: Environment and Accessibility Theme 1: Risk Prevention and Water Protection Sub-theme 2: Rural Water Source Protection Intermediate Body: Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government 1. Introduction The Department, in partnership with the National Federation of Group Water Schemes has implemented a national pilot source protection scheme with the objective of putting in place a national strategy for the protection of surface and ground water sources from agricultural pollution, commercial/industrial and residential sources. The pilot programme is being co-ordinated through the Science Dept, Dundalk Institute of Technology. This involves the ongoing assessment and monitoring of the entire Milltown lake catchment area in Churchill/Oram, Co. Monaghan. It also involved farmyard surveys, investigations into septic tanks and soil status. To date three interim reports on progress and findings so far have been prepared. It is intended to have the final report ready in September 2010 and that this report be accompanied by a guidance document covering the intention that the methodologies, structures and systems to be employed in the conduct of this exercise be such as to create a model of best practice, suitable for replication nationally as a key element of the national strategy on community-based drinking water source protection throughout Ireland. It is expected that liaison with local authorities on the identification and selection of schemes, as appropriate, for inclusion in this intervention will commence later this year. 2. Class

Performance Indicators Indicator

3. Year

Expenditure(€m) Total Total Eligible ERDF Public Exp.

Outturn to 31st December 2009 Output Number of Group Water Schemes 0 12 0 Result Biochemical Oxygen Demand 17% BOD reduction 0 In 2009 the Rural Water Programme continued to focus on measures to bring group water schemes with a private source of supply into compliance with National Drinking Water Quality Standards. The national action plan, which identified 728 schemes serving over 88,000 households, was over 78% completed (570 schemes) serving over 73,000 households (83%) at end of 2008. By end of August 2009, the number of schemes completed had reached 595. Completion figures for end 2009 are being compiled.

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

2 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

Baseline

Final Target

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

3

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Exp. declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure 6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

4. North-South Co-operation Not applicable in this region. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements This is an exchequer funded theme which is not co-funded 6. Horizontal Issues See Annex. 7.

Compliance with Community Policies

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This is an exchequer funded theme which is not co-funded 8. Future prospects Progress is expected in 2010 when it is intended to liaise with Local Authorities with a view to identifying schemes which can be considered appropriate for advancement. 9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report.

77


Priority 2: Environment and Accessibility Theme 2: Renewable Energy Sub-theme 1: CHP and BioHeat (ReHeat) Programme Intermediate Body: Sustainable Energy Ireland 1. Introduction The CHP & ReHeat (Bioheat) Programmes are aimed at stimulating the installation of new renewable energy plants supplying space, water and process heating in the commercial, industrial, services, public sectors as well as ESCO (Energy Supply Company) installations by means of grant assistance. The Programme is focussed on biomass boilers (fuelled by wood chips and wood pellets), solar thermal collectors and heat pumps. The CHP Deployment Programme will provide grant support to assist the deployment of small-scale (<1MWe) fossil fired CHP and biomass (anaerobic digestion (AD) and wood residue) CHP systems. The Programme will include biomass (anaerobic digestion (AD) and wood residue) CHP, and micro CHP. 2. Performance Indicators Class Indicator Output The development of a CHP and Bioheat Boiler Deployment Programme to assist in the deployment of small-scale fossil fired CHP, and biomass CHP and heating systems in industrial, commercial and public sectors.

Result

Baseline

Leveraged investment

The development of a CHP and Bioheat Boiler Deployment Programme to assist in the deployment of small-scale fossil fired CHP, and biomass CHP and heating systems in industrial, commercial and public sectors. 3. Year

2007 2008 2009

Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €1.275 €4.520 €2.485

Final Target 50-80 new gas fired CHP installations; 450 - 600 wood fuelled boilers supported by end 2010 12,000 m2 of installed solar panels. 15 - 20 heat pumps systems Leveraged investment of €30m in CHP in Ireland; Leveraged investment of approximately €85m in ReHeat by 2010. 1.5 - 2 MWth of installed capacity from heat pumps systems

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

€0.510 €1.810 €0.994

€0.765 €2.710 €1.491

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Outturn to 31st December 2009 49 new gas fired CHP installations 37 biomass projects were completed in 2009 2,440 m2 solar thermal projects were completed in 2009 58 heat pump projects were completed in 2009. Leveraged investment of approximately €18.83m in CHP in Ireland (2007-2009); (€1.2m in 2007, €7.83m in 2008, €9.80m in 2009) Leveraged investment of approximately €17.32m in ReHeat (2007-2009) ; (€2.13m in 2007, €10.83m in 2008, €4.36m in 2009) Every €1m invested in the ReHeat Programme generates 6,000 tonnes of CO2 savings and displaces 22,000 MWh of fossil fuel.

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €2.485

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure

6 €0.000 €0.000

78


2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €8.280

€3.314

€4.966

€0.000

€2.485

€0.000

4. North-South Co-operation SEAI chairs the implementation of the work of the Sustainable Energy Working Group (a Working Group under All Island energy Joint Steering group [JSG]). The focus of the JSG’s attention has been on elements of the all-island electricity work programme. SEAI participates in the All Island Grid Study which will form the basis for ensuring the long term renewable electricity policy targets. From a Renewable energy deployment perspective, SEAI is participating in the work programme which is informing the delivery of 2020 renewable electricity policy targets North and South. SEAI delivers an Annual Energy Awards Initiative on an all-island basis that encourages active participation from organisations, industry and businesses on the Island of Ireland. SEAI has established a sustainable energy community programme in Dundalk, called Dundalk 2020. This project proposal aims to move communities in Dundalk to more sustainable patterns. The project includes a cross-border dimension where Dundalk is working with the associated communities of Newry in delivering the project philosophies in a move to a more sustainable energy economy. In May 2009, Newry city launched its Sustainable Energy Zone. SEAI is an active participant on the Newry Steering Group sharing lessons from Dundalk 2020. SEAI has collaborated with Southern Regional College on their series of Carbon Northern Ireland lectures. The launch of the Newry SEZ is aligned to a report published by the ICLRD. This report identified 4 projects to be progressed and the Newry SEZ is one project identified. http://iclrd.org/web/category/publications. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements The European Union strapline, logo and artwork will be used at all opportunities in communications regarding projects either directly by SEAI or by project beneficiaries. All logo/ credit usage will comply fully with applicable guidelines. The use of such materials is a requirement on all branded publications. A beneficiary list will be published in the SEAI Annual report. 6. Horizontal Issues Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic Reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The principle of Environmental Sustainability is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production. Environmental sustainability remains a key component of the Irish Government’s economic stimulus Policy. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. From an environmental sustainability perspective, there are a number of actions identified in the Report to Government, namely Green procurement; Renewable energy and providing energy efficiency; Green enterprise zones; and World Class green R&D. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum. It estimates that up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. For every €1 spent by SEAI on its programmes, a total of €5.50 is accrued to the Irish economy in energy and carbon savings. 7.

Compliance with Community Policies

8.

Future prospects

9.

Any adjustments required

79


10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report.

80


Priority: Environment and Accessibility Theme: Renewable Energy Sub-theme: Energy for Business Intermediate Body: Sustainable Energy Ireland 1. Introduction The objective of this Programme is to deliver energy cost- and carbon-reduction services to all sectors of business through network, training and advisory programmes. Building on a suite of services established through Budget 2007, widening participation and consequent energy savings across business. Programmes range from certified energy management for advanced firms to assessment and advice services for SMEs. SEEEP; This Programme was established to enable Ireland’s public and commercial sectors to take a lead in sustainable energy action, by encouraging and supporting their adoption and application of exemplary energy management and green procurement practices throughout their buildings and facilities. The programme will tackle market barriers (economic, technical, institutional and informational) to energy efficiency uptake by creating, orchestrating and supporting efficient models of intervention. It will assist the development of new modes of efficiency engagement for the sectors via utilities, ESCO’s and other market actors (e.g. auditors/ assessors). The Irish Government in its Energy White Paper and its National Energy Efficiency Action Plan has set a target of a 33% increase in energy efficiency in the public sector by 2020. 2. Performance Indicators Class Indicator Baseline Output Deliver a range of 0 Engagements Baseline support established for programmes and energy efficiency services across of business the business against which to sector, measure progressively improvement servicing more businesses (measured in terms of energy spend by those businesses).

Result

To establish high efficiency as the norm in the public and commercial sectors through tailored advice, training and mentoring and assistance in structured energy management systems

0 Advice mentoring /assessments registrations 0 Energy MAP training programmes delivered 0 Best Practice initiatives delivered

Final Target

Demonstrate progress to NEEAP Targets (335 by 2020)

Outturn to 31st December 2009 Large Industry Increased penetration of SEAI programmes. Currently 139 Companies accounting for 70% of industrial energy use participate in LIEN and Agreements. SMEs Engagement with over 1000 firms (505 in 2007, 540 in 2008 and 615 new companies) by end of 2009. Over 1660 SME companies (since 2007) registered for energy efficiency supports with savings captured in 2009) 1,240 Advice mentoring and assessments registrations There were 325 in 2007; 570 in 2008 and 390 in 2009. 11 Energy MAP training programmes Delivered 18 Best Practice initiatives (including Lighting guide series – 8 guides , 3 groups in Water Services, 4 Energy Efficient design (EED) reviews, and Energylink) Commenced work on the Monitoring and Reporting System (M&R system) for Energy Services Directive regulations32

32

One of the additional developments under the Energy in Business programme is a focus on energy efficiency in the public sector. SEAI proposes to include the activities relating to “Support For Exemplar Energy Efficiency Projects” under the Energy in Business initiative. This inclusion is subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance.

81


Level of energy spend in businesses targeted for energy management advice and support services

Cumulative energy savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services Cumulative Total Primary energy Equivalent (PEE) Savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services To lead, inspire and support the public sector in adopting and maintaining exemplary standards of energy management and the achievement of aggressive NEEAP targets.

Zero businesses involved in energy management in business support services

Provision of energy management advice and support services to businesses with energy spend of €1,300m Business sector is 20% more efficient than baseline. €306m

6370 GwH

0 exemplar energy saving actions 0 Local Authorities and Additional Public sector bodies implementing world class structured energy management systems.

44 companies accredited to international energy management standards.

Large Industry Cumulative 2007 – 2009 Estimated energy savings of €140m SME Services, Cumulative 2007 – 2009 Estimated energy savings of €5.7m Large Industry Cumulative 2007 – 2009 Estimated energy savings: 4000GWh SME Services, Cumulative 2007–09 Estimated energy savings of 100GWh Provided financial support to 74 exemplar energy saving actions based on replication, saving and labour-intensity criteria through SEEAP. Six Local Authorities and 5 Additional Public sector bodies implementing world class structured energy management systems.

82


SEEEP Class Indicator Output To establish high efficiency as the norm in the public sector through tailored advice, training and mentoring and assistance in structured energy management systems

Result

3. Year

To lead, inspire and support the public sector in adopting and maintaining exemplary standards of energy management and the achievement of aggressive NEEAP targets.

Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €3.968 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €3.968

Baseline 0 Advice mentoring and assessments registrations

Final Target Demonstrate progress to NEEAP Targets (335 by 2020)

0 Energy MAP training programmes delivered

Brussels

0 Best Practice initiatives delivered 0 exemplar energy saving actions 0 Local Authorities and Additional Public sector bodies implementing world class structured energy management systems. Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

Outturn to 31st December 2009 345 Advice mentoring and assessments registrations 11 Energy MAP training programmes Delivered 18 Best Practice initiatives (including Lighting guide series – 8 guides , 3 groups in Water Services, 4 Energy Efficient design (EED) reviews, and Energylink) Commenced work on the Monitoring and Reporting System (M&R system) for Energy Services Directive regulations Provided financial support to 74 exemplar energy saving actions based on replication, saving and labour-intensity criteria through SEEAP. Six Local Authorities and 5 Additional Public sector bodies implementing world class structured energy management systems.

€0.000 €0.000 €1.587

€0.000 €0.000 €2.381

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€1.587

€2.381

€0.000

€0.000

Other Non CoFinanced Expenditure

€0.000

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

4. North-South Co-operation SEAI chairs the implementation of the work of the Sustainable Energy Working Group (a Working Group under All Island energy Joint Steering group [JSG]). The focus of the JSG’s attention has been on elements of the all-island electricity work programme. SEAI participates in the All Island Grid Study which will form the basis for ensuring the long term renewable electricity policy targets. From a Renewable energy deployment perspective, SEAI is participating in the work programme which is informing the delivery of 2020 renewable electricity policy targets North and South. SEAI delivers an Annual Energy Awards Initiative on an all-island basis that encourages active participation from organisations, industry and businesses on the Island of Ireland. SEAI has established a sustainable energy community programme in Dundalk, called Dundalk 2020. This project proposal aims to move communities in Dundalk to more sustainable patterns. The project includes a cross-border dimension where Dundalk is working with the

83


associated communities of Newry in delivering the project philosophies in a move to a more sustainable energy economy. In May 2009, Newry city launched its Sustainable Energy Zone. SEAI is an active participant on the Newry Steering Group sharing lessons from Dundalk 2020. SEAI has collaborated with Southern Regional College on their series of Carbon Northern Ireland lectures. The launch of the Newry SEZ is aligned to a report published by the ICLRD. This report identified 4 projects to be progressed and the Newry SEZ is one project identified. http://iclrd.org/web/category/publications. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements The European Union strapline, logo and artwork will be used at all opportunities in communications regarding projects either directly by SEAI or by project beneficiaries. All logo/ credit usage will comply fully with applicable guidelines. The use of such materials is a requirement on all branded publications. A beneficiary list will be published in the SEAI Annual report 6. Horizontal Issues Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic Reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The principle of Environmental Sustainability is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production. Environmental sustainability remains a key component of the Irish Government’s economic stimulus Policy. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. From an environmental sustainability perspective, there are a number of actions identified in the Report to Government, namely Green procurement; Renewable energy and providing energy efficiency; Green enterprise zones; and World Class green R&D. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum. It estimates that up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. For every €1 spent by SEAI on its programmes, a total of €5.50 is accrued to the Irish economy in energy and carbon savings. 7.

Compliance with Community Policies

8. Future prospects The expanding remit of SEAI has enabled SEAI to shape the development and delivery of a number of core initiatives, additional to the ones foreseen at the commencement of the National Strategic Reference Framework. In the submission of its Implementation Plan to the Regional Assemblies and Government, SEAI stated its intention to outline future sub-themes upon receipt of indications from government on the funding of sustainable energy priorities. One of the additional developments under the Energy in Business programme is a focus on energy efficiency in the public sector. SEAI proposes to include the activities relating to “Support For Exemplar Energy Efficiency Projects” (SEEEP) under the Energy in Business initiative. Further details on these projects are available. This inclusion is subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. The Ocean Energy Development Unit has been included (since 2009) subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. The above programmes deliver activities on a national basis (i.e. both BMW and SE regions). The financial profile associated with each programme is limited to the capital requirements for effective delivery. 9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report.

84


Priority: Environment and Accessibility Theme: Renewable Energy Sub-theme: Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Intermediate Body: Sustainable Energy Ireland 1. Introduction The main focus of the RE RD&D programme is on stimulating the deployment of renewable energies. It adopts an aggressive technology-led approach to renewable resolving technology and market barriers such as energy storage and demand management in the electricity sector. It involves the deployment of renewable and alternative energy technologies in residential, commercial, public, and community buildings through a combination of grant and regulatory interventions. The Ocean Energy Development Unit (OEDU) has been established to implement the Government’s policy decision to accelerate the development of Ocean Energy (Wave and Tidal) in Ireland and it was established to advance the deployment of ocean energy technologies in Ireland by increasing the capacity for research and development both with academic institutions and commercial entities developing devices in Ireland. This has, as objectives: - Targets for the connection of 75Mw of ocean energy by 2012 and 500Mw by 2020 (Programme for Government and White Paper) - The creation, in Ireland, of a centre of excellence in OE technology and the stimulation of a worldclass industry cluster. 2. Class Output

Result

Performance Indicators Indicator Baseline Acceleration of the development and deployment in the Irish marketplace of competitive renewable energy products, processes and systems. Enabling technical and other barriers to market uptake and/or modal switching to be overcome. The number of RE RD&D projects delivered under the following areas

Shared cost

Final Target Delivery of 100 R&D projects to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy

6.8% (2005) 8.6 % (2006) of electricity consumption from renewable energy

Wind equates to 15% of national electricity demand in 2010 and 40% demand by 2020.

30 RE RD&D Shared Cost

Outturn to 31st December 2009 SEAI delivered 14 research reports/ studies to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy

Total final consumption from renewable energy was 10%. There was 1,441MW of wind generation connected to the grid at the end of 2009 and it provided 14% of national electricity demand. SEAI delivered 14 reports across a variety of technologies including • Seismic Acquisition on the Southern Margin of the Dublin Basin • The development and mobilisation of the Wood Fuel Quality Assurance scheme • Development of a 500 kW Fluidised Bed Boiler through to market release • Innovative Demonstration of an Electric Vehicle, EV Accelerator and Electric Vehicles in a Captive Fleet 14 RE RD&D Shared Cost projects (cum. from 2007)

85


projects 54 RE RD&D demonstration projects 20 RE RD&D Shared cost R&D / Public Good activities Upgraded National Ocean Test Facility (NOTF) operational.

Demonstration Shared cost R&D Commissioned public good activities Acceleration of the development of Ocean Energy (Wave and Tidal) in Ireland.

¼ scale test site operating in Galway Bay. HMRC established as Centre of Excellence.

Full scale wave test site underway for completion for 2010/11.

9 RE RD&D demonstration projects (cumulative from 2007) 7 RE RD&D Shared cost R&D / Public Good activities (cumulative from 2007) Ocean energy prototype fund developed and launched with 12 companies engaged and grants awarded to 8 companies, resulting in €4.2m commitments with €1.2m of that awarded. Selection of one tidal and one wave energy technology for full scale prototype test support and installation. (Completed – Wavebob & Open Hydro) Full scale wave test site development underway (Completed)

Increased the capacity for research and development within academic institutions.

¼ scale ocean energy device in testing/development at Galway.

NOTF contributing to OE research and development and providing services for industry development.

National wave basin facility project at HMRC / NOTF commenced. (Completed) Three reviews commissioned including (1) Strategic Environmental Assessment for OE (2) Review of engineering and specialist support requirements for the OE sector and (3) review of Marco-Economics and Strategy for Ocean Energy. (Completed)

Increased number First Ocean and stronger Energy grid commercial connected device entities producing power. developing devices and projects in Ireland. [Please note that the reported outturn indicators are now reporting newly funded projects and are cumulative from 2007, rather than 2006 as previously reported.] 3. Year

Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

1=2+3+4 €0.949 €2.820 €2.915 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €6.684

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

€0.380 €1.130 €1.168

€0.569 €1.690 €1.747

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€2.678

€4.006

€0.000

€0.000

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

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4. North-South Co-operation SEAI chairs the implementation of the work of the Sustainable Energy Working Group (a Working Group under All Island energy Joint Steering group [JSG]). The focus of the JSG’s attention has been on elements of the all-island electricity work programme. SEAI participates in the All Island Grid Study which will form the basis for ensuring the long term renewable electricity policy targets. From a Renewable energy deployment perspective, SEAI is participating in the work programme which is informing the delivery of 2020 renewable electricity policy targets North and South. SEAI delivers an Annual Energy Awards Initiative on an all-island basis that encourages active participation from organisations, industry and businesses on the Island of Ireland. SEAI has established a sustainable energy community programme in Dundalk, called Dundalk 2020. This project proposal aims to move communities in Dundalk to more sustainable patterns. The project includes a cross-border dimension where Dundalk is working with the associated communities of Newry in delivering the project philosophies in a move to a more sustainable energy economy. In May 2009, Newry city launched its Sustainable Energy Zone. SEAI is an active participant on the Newry Steering Group sharing lessons from Dundalk 2020. SEAI has collaborated with Southern Regional College on their series of Carbon Northern Ireland lectures. The launch of the Newry SEZ is aligned to a report published by the ICLRD. This report identified 4 projects to be progressed and the Newry SEZ is one project identified. http://iclrd.org/web/category/publications. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements The European Union strapline, logo and artwork will be used at all opportunities in communications regarding projects either directly by SEAI or by project beneficiaries. All logo/ credit usage will comply fully with applicable guidelines. The use of such materials is a requirement on all branded publications. A beneficiary list will be published in the SEAI Annual report 6. Horizontal Issues Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic Reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The principle of Environmental Sustainability is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production. Environmental sustainability remains a key component of the Irish Government’s economic stimulus Policy. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. From an environmental sustainability perspective, there are a number of actions identified in the Report to Government, namely Green procurement; Renewable energy and providing energy efficiency; Green enterprise zones; and World Class green R&D. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum. It estimates that up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. For every €1 spent by SEAI on its programmes, a total of €5.50 is accrued to the Irish economy in energy and carbon savings. 7.

Compliance with Community Policies

8.

Future prospects

9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report.

87


Priority: Environment and Accessibility Theme: Renewable Energy Sub-theme: Strategic Development Zones Intermediate Body: Sustainable Energy Ireland 1. Introduction The programme will reward collaborative actions at Local Authority level by helping to fund targeted activities within designated sustainable energy communities in order to trigger the accelerated delivery of the Government Energy White Paper targets. The programme is designed to encourage strong private sector and whole-community participation in the achievement of those objectives. Its objective is to promote exemplar sustainable settlements in growth areas by encouraging local authorities to lead by example in their areas and to use their powers to designate SEZs. No current finance is being claimed under the SEZ Initiative as, at present, the Initiative is primarily focused on one zone in Dundalk and this zone is part-financed by the European Union under the EU RTD FP6. 2. Class

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Final Target

Output

Demonstrate and promote integrated community approaches to sustainable energy via a network of Sustainable Energy Zones

No SEZ in Ireland

Three Zones fully operational

Result

Number of sustainable energy zones that each comprise a mix of social and private houses, industry, institutional buildings and transport facilities.

The Provision of models and lessons to motivate and guide regulators, developers and consumer choice

10,000 MWh contribution from renewable electricity within the 3 SEZ per annum

Contribution from renewable electricity within SDZ Penetration of renewable heat into the SDZ Improvement in energy efficiency performance of the buildings within the SDZ

20% contribution from renewable electricity within SDZ in 2010 10% penetration of renewable heat into the SDZ in 2010 40% improvement in energy efficiency performance of the buildings within the SDZ in 2010

Outturn to 31st December 2009 One zone in progress in Dundalk. Local Authorities were engaged in a dialogue on SEZ programme in SEZ. Framework Energy Supply Contract (ESC) developed Development of a research platform within Dundalk SEZ Technical data from Dundalk collected and analysed. Cumulative savings of approx 2,500 tonnes of CO2 over all projects. One zone in progress in Dundalk involving public sector, businesses and consumer population 5% (cumulative) contribution from renewable electricity within SDZ by 2009 1% penetration of renewable heat into the SDZ by 2009 >40% improvement in energy efficiency performance of the buildings within the SDZ by 2009

88


3. Year

Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

4. North-South Co-operation SEAI chairs the implementation of the work of the Sustainable Energy Working Group (a Working Group under All Island energy Joint Steering group [JSG]). The focus of the JSG’s attention has been on elements of the all-island electricity work programme. SEAI participates in the All Island Grid Study which will form the basis for ensuring the long term renewable electricity policy targets. From a Renewable energy deployment perspective, SEAI is participating in the work programme which is informing the delivery of 2020 renewable electricity policy targets North and South. SEAI delivers an Annual Energy Awards Initiative on an all-island basis that encourages active participation from organisations, industry and businesses on the Island of Ireland. SEAI has established a sustainable energy community programme in Dundalk, called Dundalk 2020. This project proposal aims to move communities in Dundalk to more sustainable patterns. The project includes a cross-border dimension where Dundalk is working with the associated communities of Newry in delivering the project philosophies in a move to a more sustainable energy economy. In May 2009, Newry city launched its Sustainable Energy Zone. SEAI is an active participant on the Newry Steering Group sharing lessons from Dundalk 2020. SEAI has collaborated with Southern Regional College on their series of Carbon Northern Ireland lectures. The launch of the Newry SEZ is aligned to a report published by the ICLRD. This report identified 4 projects to be progressed and the Newry SEZ is one project identified. http://iclrd.org/web/category/publications. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements The European Union strapline, logo and artwork will be used at all opportunities in communications regarding projects either directly by SEAI or by project beneficiaries. All logo/ credit usage will comply fully with applicable guidelines. The use of such materials is a requirement on all branded publications. A beneficiary list will be published in the SEAI Annual report 6. Horizontal Issues Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic Reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The principle of Environmental Sustainability is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production. Environmental sustainability remains a key component of the Irish Government’s economic stimulus Policy. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. From an environmental sustainability perspective, there are a number of actions identified in the Report to Government, namely Green procurement; Renewable energy and providing energy efficiency; Green enterprise zones; and World Class green R&D. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum. It estimates that up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through

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activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. For every â&#x201A;Ź1 spent by SEAI on its programmes, a total of â&#x201A;Ź5.50 is accrued to the Irish economy in energy and carbon savings. 7.

Compliance with Community Policies

8.

Future prospects

9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report.

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Priority: Environment and Accessibility Theme: ICT Accessibility Sub-theme: Broadband Provision and Demand Stimulation Intermediate Body: Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources 1. Introduction Under this Theme, support from public funds will be provided primarily to overcome identified gaps in broadband infrastructure. This will be achieved through the following schemes: • Completion of the Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs) in partnership with local and regional authorities. A further phase of MANs will be considered once the effectiveness of spending under the first phase has been addressed. • Scheme to subsidise the provision of broadband services in un-served areas. A new National Broadband Scheme (NBS) is currently under way to deliver broadband to areas of the country where broadband coverage was deemed to be insufficient. This will be implemented over the early part of the plan. • Facilitating access to advanced telecommunications infrastructure by SMEs. • Stimulation of demand for advanced telecommunications services among SMEs. Objectives • The Metropolitan Area Networks (MANS) Programme is constructing open access wholesale telecommunications networks to facilitate the delivery of open access broadband infrastructure to competing service providers. The Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources is currently analysing options for further investment under the MANs programme which is guided by the next generation broadband policy paper published in June 2009, the Value for Money and Policy review undertaken on the first phase of the MANs published in July 2008. • The Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources (DCENR) is considering initiatives aimed at stimulating demand for advanced telecommunications services among SMEs. • The National Broadband Scheme (“NBS”) is to provide affordable, scalable broadband services to fixed residences and businesses within certain designated rural areas where broadband coverage was deemed to be insufficient. Extension and take-up of broadband facilities in rural areas is an important policy objective. Bridging the digital divide will make all of Ireland better able to engage in our knowledge society. Following the conclusion of a technology neutral procurement process, the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources on 23 December 2008 entered into a contract with Hutchison 3G Ireland Ltd (trading as “3”) for the implementation of the NBS. The NBS will be rolled out on an electoral division basis and will address electoral divisions (1,028) that are deemed to be without adequate broadband services. 47% of the EDs to be covered under the NBS are located within the S&E Region. A map of the NBS Coverage Area is available on the Department’s website at the following link http://www.dcenr.gov.ie/Communications/Communications+Development/National+Broadband+Scheme.ht m The company continues to progress its network rollout and services have gone live in almost half of the designated areas to be covered under the Scheme. All residential and business premises within the NBS Coverage Area will have broadband connectivity by end September 2010. 2. Class Output Result

3. Year

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

No. of initiatives to enable broadband infrastructure and service provision Additional businesses with broadband available No. in Clár regions Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4

0

Final Target 3

0

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

Outturn to 31st December 2009 1

25,125

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5

14,577 0 Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure

6

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2007 €0.064 €0.025 €0.038 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 2008 €7.605 €3.042 €4.563 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 2009 €12.433 €4.973 €7.460 €0.000 €7.715 €0.000 2010 €0.000 2011 €0.000 2012 €0.000 2013 €0.000 Cumulative Total €20.101 €8.040 €12.061 €0.000 €7.715 €0.000 Forecasted Expenditure to end 2009 is €38m. Actual outturn is €20.101m. (€7.715m reported in B2 to date; €12.386m to be reported in April 2010 B2) The shortfall in expenditure against the Annualised Forecast is due to; • not currently including expenditure on Phase II MANs projects (Kerry, Wicklow, Fingal) which were included in original forecast and may be subsequently included upon agreement with the Regional Assembly; • milestone payments under the NBS Project were not made until such time as the requisite % of broadband coverage was certified. 4. North-South Co-operation Not Applicable. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements The Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources in association with the Regional Assembly for the S&E Region will take steps to ensure that adequate publicity is given to the measure with a view to making the general public, potential beneficiaries and trade organisations aware of the opportunities afforded by the measure. The contribution of the ERDF and Exchequer Funds will be acknowledged in all advertisements, publicity and forms and by means of a notice at sites during construction and at facilities once they are completed. All Information and Publicity will be undertaken in accordance with the Communications Plan. A publicity file is held by both the Public Beneficiary Body and the Implementing Body to record all publicity measures and use of EU Logos. See department’s website with logo’s and Press release January 2009 acknowledeging EU Co-financing. 6. Horizontal Issues Social Inclusion: All businesses in Rapid or Clár areas currently without broadband will have broadband available to them as a result of the NBS. Sustainable Development (Environment): MANs: The infrastructure proposed for rollout under the measure comprises telecommunications hardware of fibre optic cable. They are constructed under best practice guidelines issued from the Dept of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and implemented by each Local Authority in the regions. The infrastructure is also subject to local planning permissions and road opening licences designed to minimise the impact of the infrastructure on the local environment. NBS: The NBS Service Provider is required to comply with national and EU planning and environmental regulations and guidelines in respect of works associated with the NBS, including, if appropriate, the Foreshore Acts. In addition the Service Provider is required to consider potential environmental impacts and to favour lower impact approaches in supplying broadband under the NBS. 7. Compliance with Community Policies State Aid approval was received for both the MANs and NBS Projects. MANs decision N 284/2005 – Ireland. NBS Decision no. N 475/2007 DCENR ensures compliance by public beneficiary bodies under their aegis with national and EU guidelines and directives on public procurement in respect of all EU co- financed operations under their remit. These include guidelines issued by the National Public Procurement Policy Unit within the Department of Finance in July 2004. In accordance with EU Treaty provisions and Directives in particular (2004/18/EC), public procurement must be carried out in an open, objective and transparent manner. The EU Directives, National Procurement Regulations and 2004 Public Procurement Guidelines – Competitive Process impose legal obligations on public bodies in regard to advertising and the use of objective tendering procedures for contracts above certain value thresholds. As the Intermediate Body, DCENR ensures compliance with this requirement as part of the verification checks conducted in compliance with this agreement. Public Beneficiary Bodies are obliged to: • Advertise their requirements in the Official Journal of the European Union

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• • •

(OJEU). Use procurement procedures that provide open and transparent competition. Apply clear and objective criteria, notified to all interested parties, in selecting tenders and awarding contracts. For the following contracts types: • Works-building and civil engineering contracts. • Supplies-purchasing of goods and supplies. • Services-consultancy, financial, advertising. Advertisements in the OJEU should be published on the etenders website, and if supplemented by advertisements in the national media ensure that national advertisements do not appear before the date of dispatch of the OJEU and must not contain any information additional to that in the OJEC advertisement. 8. Future prospects The company continues to progress its network roll-out and services have gone live in almost half of the designated areas to be covered under the Scheme. The entire NBS coverage area, comprising of 1,028 Electoral Divisions must be covered by end of September 2010. As regards demand stimulation initiatives, under the NBS contract 3 is required to implement 2 marketing campaigns in the NBS coverage area: • White Label Marketing – promotion of broadband in general (supplier neutral). Messages will focus on demand stimulation, i.e. will announce the arrival of broadband and articulate the benefits and uses of broadband to residential and business Customers • 3’s Retail marketing – promotion of the NBS product. Messages will focus on availability, ease of use, ease of install and value for money. Both campaigns will use a variety of media to communicate the messages including direct mail, outdoor advertising, online marketing, press and radio advertising, stakeholder events etc. It is possible that a number of projects will be included in 2009 on agreement with the Regional Assembly. 100mbps to post primary schools project A Scheme to provide 100Mbps broadband access and associated services to 78 post-primary schools participating in a pilot project to examine the process and procedures required to delivery a wider rollout of the network to all 730+ post-primary schools is currently being considered for inclusion in the Southern and Eastern Regional Operational Programme. The 100mbps to schools pilot project aims to deliver 100Mbps broadband access to 78 schools following publication of the Government Policy Paper in June 2009. There are 47 schools located in the S&E region. Following the procurement process for the access connectivity and the subsequent contract negotiations, final contacts have been signed with 4 companies for the delivery of the required bandwidth connections from each of the 78 schools to a HEAnet pop location. Following the procurement process for the equipment and associated services for a new high speed broadband network for schools and subsequent contract negotiations, final contracts have been signed with Telindus for the supply of Juniper products for the core, aggregation and edge networks. Following the Ministerial decision of July 2009 to equip each school participating in the pilot project with ICT hardware in line with the recommendations of the ICT Strategy Group, DCENR ran a procurement process under the Department of Finance Framework Agreement for the purchase and distribution of 2000 laptops. Dell Ireland was successful and subsequently delivered the laptops to the schools in December 2009. The value of the laptops delivered to schools in the S&E Region is €0.528m. The rollout of the network will be completed by end Q2 2010. As per the agreed contracts all connections must be completed by 1 April 2010. 9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report. Social Inclusion Horizontal Principle Report.

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3. Implementation by Priority 3.3 Priority 3 Sustainable Urban Development This Priority seeks to enhance the attractiveness of the designated Gateways and Hubs in the Region as places to live in, to work in and to invest in. It is intended to complement Priorities 1 and 2 as well as any other investment strategies which are supporting the implementation of the National Spatial Strategy. A central aim is to support and complement efforts to ensure that the cities and towns maximise their potential. In particular this Priority will complement the substantial investment which is planned under the new National Development Plan 2007 – 2013 in support the objectives of the NSS for urban areas, and in particular the Gateways Innovation Fund. It is intended that there will be three Themes under this Priority, one focused on the four designated Gateways, one on the designated six Hubs, and a third complementary Theme dealing with inter-Gateway collaboration. For each of the Gateway and Hubs Themes there is planned to be interventions covering a number of strands including urban regeneration, public transport and sports and cultural facilities. During 2009 the Managing Authority introduced a new sub theme, the ERDF Gateway Grant Scheme. Under this theme, grant assistance was made available for the 4 NSS Gateways in the Southern & Eastern Region (Dublin, Cork, Limerick/Shannon and Waterford) for projects which will improve the Gateways economically, environmentally, socially, and/or culturally and which fell within the scope of Article 8 of Commission Regulation 1080/2006. A total of €11m was available for allocation as grant assistance at a maximum grant rate of 50%. The matching 50% must come from the Local Authority’s own resources, which may not entail borrowing. Works must be completed by 31st December 2010. A call for proposals was made to the 4 Gateway Authorities in July 2009 and these were subsequently assessed by a Project Selection Committee in September 2009 compromising representatives from both Regional Assemblies, the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and the Department of Finance. Following the assessment the Steering Committee approved the following grants: Cork Gateway: €2.80m This is to co-finance the entire costs of the Christ Church project under which it is proposed to be converted into an Arts Centre in conjunction with the adjoining Triskel Arts Centre. (Grant amount €2.18m), plus the Phase I costs of the St Luke’s project consisting of essential conservation works to be undertaken to ensure the fabric and integrity of the building is protected. Dublin Gateway: €2.4m This grant is in respect of the Smithfield project and consists of the completion of the public realm improvements to the Square. Limerick/Shannon Gateway: €3.0m This grant is in respect of the Limerick city centre project and consists of the ‘Crossroads’ public transport hub and public realm enhancement works. Waterford Gateway: €2.76m The Waterford proposal consists of two separate but related projects. The first and largest project consists of the restoration and conversion of a collection of adjoining buildings (including a Protected Structure) in the city centre in Council ownership into a crystal manufacturing and visitor centre. Initially the centre is to house Waterford Crystal, but in the longer term the centre would house a number of craft crystal manufacturers. The related second project is located nearby and consists of extending and upgrading the Bolton Street car park to provide a dedicated tourist coach parking area, which is lacking in the city at present. Given the impending demise of Waterford Crystal from their Kilbarry site and given the importance crystal making to the city in employment and tourism terms, this proposal by the City Council to re-establish a crystal manufacturing and visitor centre in the heart of the city.  This grant is in respect of the total costs of both projects. Performance Indicators Class Indicator

Output

No. of Integrated growth centre strategies approved No. of public transport projects supported Quantitative and Qualitative progress of each gateway/hub

Baseline

Final target

Outturn to 31.12.09

0

10

0

0

To be determined

0

To be determined by a speciallycommissioned baseline study

To be determined following the baseline study

0

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Total investment in gateways and hubs

Result

To be determined

To be determined

Core Indicators No.

Indicator

Baseline

22

Additional Population Served with improved urban transport

Outturn to 31st Dec. 09

Final Target

Expenditure(€m)

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.578 €2.632 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €3.210

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.000 €0.231 €1.053

3 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

4 €0.000 €0.347 €1.579

€1.284

€0.000

€1.926

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €3.590 €4.921 €0.297

€0.000

€8.808

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Priority: Sustainable Urban Development Theme: The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme Sub-theme: Urban Regeneration Intermediate Body: 1. Introduction In relation to the 2007 - 2013 programme the Urban and Village Renewal strand of the programme was deferred indefinitely due to budgetary constraints and a Nil return was submitted.

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Priority: Sustainable Urban Development Theme: The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme Sub-theme: Public Transport Intermediate Body: Department of Transport and Marine 1. Introduction Limerick Junction Rationalisation This work is part of the Removal of Speed Restrictions Programme which Iarnród Eireann is undertaking and which aims to improve speeds on the rail network to support the increased frequency on the Intercity services. The objectives in respect of the rationalisation of Limerick Junction are to facilitate an increase in the use of public transport on rail services through Limerick Junction and ensure a decrease in journey times in respect of services through Limerick Junction. Physical work in respect of the Limerick Junction rationalisation will be completed in 2011. 2. Class

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Final Target

Outturn to 31st December 2009

Output Result The removal of the present speed restrictions through the stations will reduce up and down journey time for non stopping trains by 112 and 102 seconds respectively and for stopping trains by 40 and 64 seconds respectively. The line speed through the stations will be 70MPH. 3. Year

Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total 4.

1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

Other Non CoFinanced Expenditure

€8.704

6 €3.590 €4.879 €0.235

North-South Co-operation

5. Information and Publicity Requirements The Department of Transport and Iarnród Eireann will comply with all Information and Publicity Requirements. 6.

Horizontal Issues

7.

Compliance with Community Policies

8. Future prospects Some of the elements of the work have started. There has been a delay due to demand on resources and it is intended to recommence the next phase of the project during 2010, with completion due in 201, subject to the capital allocation to the Department of Transport. 9.

Any adjustments required

10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report. Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Report.

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Social Inclusion Horizontal Principle Report.

98


Priority: Sustainable Urban Development Theme: The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme Sub-theme: Arts Capital Fund Intermediate Body: Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism 1. Introduction New rounds of the Arts Capital Fund, has been deferred due to budgetary constraints. Capital arts projects are being undertaken in the Southern & Eastern Region under the ACCESS II Arts Capital grants scheme. However, none of these projects are being co-financed from ERDF Funding. In the present economic climate it is not known when a new round of the scheme will be announced. 2. Performance Indicators Class Indicator Baseline Final Target Outturn to 31st December 2009 Output Result 3. Year

Expenditure(â&#x201A;Źm) Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure

6

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total 4.

North-South Co-operation

5.

Information and Publicity Requirements

6.

Horizontal Issues

7.

Compliance with Community Policies

8.

Future prospects

9.

Any adjustments required

10.

Annexes

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Priority: Sustainable Urban Development Theme: The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme Sub-theme: Sports Capital Programme Intermediate Body: Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism 1. Introduction Sports capital projects are being funded in the Southern & Eastern Region under previous rounds of the Sports Capital Programme. However, none of these projects are being co-financed from ERDF Funding. In the present economic climate it is not known when a new round of the programme will be announced. 2. Class

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Final Target

Outturn to 31st December 2009

Output Result 3. Year

Expenditure(â&#x201A;Źm) Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5

Other Non Co-Financed Expenditure

6

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total 4.

North-South Co-operation

5.

Information and Publicity Requirements

6.

Horizontal Issues

7.

Compliance with Community Policies

8.

Future prospects

9.

Any adjustments required

10.

Annexes

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Priority: Sustainable Urban Development Theme: The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme Sub-theme: Swimming Pool Programme Intermediate Body: Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism 1. Introduction In relation to the 2007 - 2013 programme the Swimming Pool Programme was deferred indefinitely due to budgetary constraints and a Nil return was submitted.

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Priority: Sustainable Urban Development Theme: The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme Sub-theme: ERDF Gateways Grant Scheme Intermediate Body: Southern and Eastern Regional Assembly 1. Introduction Under this theme, grant assistance was made available for the 4 NSS Gateways in the Southern & Eastern Region (Dublin, Cork, Limerick/Shannon and Waterford) for projects which will improve the Gateways economically, environmentally, socially, and/or culturally and which fell within the scope of Article 8 of Commission Regulation 1080/2006. A total of €11m was available for allocation as grant assistance at a maximum grant rate of 50%. The matching 50% must come from the Local Authority’s own resources, which may not entail borrowing. Works must be completed by 31st December 2010. A call for proposals was made to the 4 Gateway Authorities in July 2009 and these were subsequently assessed by a Project Selection Committee in September 2009 compromising representatives from both Regional Assemblies, the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and the Department of Finance. This assessment was carried out by reference to a number of criteria namely: • Strategic Fit • Innovation, • Funding Proposal and Value for Money • Demonstration of additionality and benefits accruing • Community / Council involvement • Delivery • Strength of proposal Following the assessment the Steering Committee approved the following grants: Cork Gateway: €2.80m This is to co-finance the entire costs of the Christ Church project under which it is proposed to be converted into an Arts Centre in conjunction with the adjoining Triskel Arts centre. (Grant amount €2.18m), plus the Phase I costs of the St Luke’s project consisting of essential conservation works to be undertaken to ensure the fabric and integrity of the building is protected. With regard to the Christchurch project, work commenced on site in December 2009 and is on schedule. Work is scheduled to commence in January 2010 at the St Luke’s site. Dublin Gateway: €2.4m This grant is in respect of the Smithfield project and consists of the completion of the Public Realm improvements to the square. Following approval the proposals were developed in further detail and in early November 2009 a presentation of the proposed development was made to both the Members of the Central Area Committee and public representatives for the Central Area. A few issues relating to the proposed design were raised which the Project Team examined. In December 2009 a further presentation was made to the elected representatives and to the former HARP Monitoring Committee. The statutory (i.e. Planning and Development Regulations 2001 - Part 8) public notice for local government works was lodged in December 2009. As part of the process the plans and particulars of the proposed development were made available for inspection by the public who have the opportunity to make submission or observations until the 26th of February 2010. It is expected that works will start on site by late May 2010. Limerick/Shannon Gateway: €3.0m This grant is in respect of the Limerick city centre project and consists of the ‘Crossroads’ public transport hub and public realm enhancement works. Considerable pre planning, planning and procurement work has been undertaken during 2009 with Part VII planning permission granted, prequalification and detailed tender competition in of prequalified candidates and award of contract to specialist Consultants to provide multidisciplinary professional services for public realm design works in Limerick City, Pre-qualification tender competition undertaken for short listing of contractors for Works Contract, Detailed Design Drawings, Condition Survey and Site Investigations undertaken, Detailed Tender documentation prepared and circulated to short listed contractors and Award of Works Contract to successful tender and allow for appropriate standstill period. Waterford Gateway: €2.76m The Waterford proposal consists of two separate but related projects. The first and largest project consists of the restoration and conversion of a collection of adjoining buildings (including a Protected Structure) in the city centre in Council ownership into a crystal manufacturing and visitor centre. Initially the centre is to house Waterford Crystal, but in the longer term the centre would house a number of craft crystal manufacturers. The related second project is located nearby and consists of extending and upgrading the Bolton Street car park to provide a dedicated tourist coach parking area, which is lacking in the city at present. Given the impending demise of Waterford Crystal from their Kilbarry site and given the

102


importance crystal making to the city in employment and tourism terms, this proposal by the City Council to re-establish a crystal manufacturing and visitor centre in the heart of the city. This grant is in respect of the total costs of both projects. The civil works on the manufacturing plant and visitor centre commenced at the end of November 2009 and are expected to be finished at the end of March 2010. The Mechanical and Electrical installation is underway. The tourism experience installation is at tender stage. The coach / car parking will commence in March 2010. 2.

Performance Indicators

Class

Indicator

Output Result

Number of projects Number of public buildings upgraded Tbc – link to Gateway Development Index

3. Year

Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure

Total ERDF

Baseline

Final Target

0 0

6 3

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

Outturn to 31st December 2009 4 0

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Other Non CoFinanced Expenditure

1=2+3+4 2 3 4 6 2007 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 2008 €0.578 €0.231 €0.000 €0.347 €0.042 2009 €2.632 €1.053 €0.000 €1.579 €0.062 2010 €0.000 2011 €0.000 2012 €0.000 2013 €0.000 Cumulative Total €3.210 €1.284 €0.000 €1.926 €0.000 €0.104 * No expenditure has been, as yet, officially declared to the Managing Authority. The figures in the table above were derived from the Progress Reports submitted by each Gateway. It is envisaged that the first series of claims under the scheme will by submitted in late Spring / early Summer 2010. 4. North-South Co-operation This is not applicable to the Scheme. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements Both the Gateway Authorities and the S&E Regional Assembly have sought to publicise the Scheme and the work being undertaken through the various projects. Details have been posted on the Authorities’ websites and press releases have been circulated to the major national and local media. The Gateway Authorities have / will erected billboards at each work site with the appropriate logos displayed prominently. An example of this is shown below:

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Site Sign for Christchurch

Site Sign for Saint Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church. 6. Horizontal Issues The Horizontal Principles applicable to the Scheme are Environmental Sustainability and Social Inclusion. Please see Annex 2 for detail. 7. Compliance with Community Policies This sub theme is not subject to state aid criteria. Procurement Procedures have / will been/ be utilised in the appointment of consultants, where required, and contractors to carry out work on site. The Gateway Authorities involved have advised that all processes have / will comply with both EU and National Guidelines where applicable. 8. Future prospects All claims made under this sub theme will be subject to a series of checks from PBB, IB and MA levels. It is envisaged that the IB will be in a position to undertake on site visits with each Gateway Authority in late Spring / early Summer 2010, dependant on submission of claims. Work is progressing on each project and it is envisaged that the target date, 31st December 2010, for finishing of the grant aided works will be met 9. Any adjustments required There are no adjustments required to the Implementation Plan at this time. 10. Annexes Environmental Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report. Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Report. Social Inclusion Horizontal Principle Report. Broader Equality Horizontal Principle Report.

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3. Implementation by Priority 3.4 Technical Assistance Priority Priority: Technical Assistance Theme: Technical Assistance Sub-theme: Technical Assistance Intermediate Body: Southern and Eastern Regional Assembly 1. Introduction The overall objective of the Technical Assistance Priority is to support the management, evaluation and monitoring of the Regional Operational Programme. Under this Priority, expenditure which is in accordance with Article 46 of Council Regulation (EC) No. 1083/2006 shall be eligible to cover costs incurred by the Managing Authority (or agencies acting on its behalf) in relation to the overall management of the Operational Programme. The Technical Assistance Priority also covers the cost of recoupment of approved costs of the EU Operational Committees of the Regional Authorities (at NUTS III level). The Technical Assistance priority covers the appropriate costs of the ERDF Financial Control Unit and other specialist units within the Department of Finance as well as the costs of the management controls undertaken by the Managing Authority. The Priority is administered by the Regional Assembly under the general control of the Operational Programme Monitoring Committee. During the 12 month period January to December 2009, the Managing Authority continued to implement the necessary arrangements to allow it to fulfil its responsibilities in relation to the Regional OP and the Structural Funds as a whole. The Regional Authorities and their EU Operational Committees also continued with their responsibilities to examine and monitor EU-funded expenditure in their regions, and to serve on the Monitoring Committees on which they are represented. The Regional Assembly launched the Gateway Development Index Report during 2009. This Index was commissioned by both Regional Assemblies in conjunction with the Spatial Planning Unit within the Department of the Environment, Heritage & Local Government and measures the extent to which the designated Gateways are progressing as drivers of regional economic development. A public awareness survey was also conducted to capture resident’s views of quality of life and the impact of Gateway designation to each Gateway City/town. The BMW and S & E Regional Assemblies are jointly involved in the preparation of a Survey on “Public Attitudes of Irelands European Union Structural Funds Programme 2007-2013”. This is a follow on study to one conducted by the NDP/CSF Information Office for the 20002006 funding period. This research provided a benchmark for levels of awareness amongst the general public. The current survey aims to update this research and ascertain the level of knowledge/awareness of Irelands EU Structural Funds Programme, projects carried out, different EU Funds and also their contribution to economic and social development, the Operational Programmes and awareness of different EU Funds. 2. Class Output Result

3. Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Performance Indicators Indicator

Baseline

Number of Monitoring Committee meetings held Number of evaluations & Studies conducted Verification Audits & Closure Audits Number of Annual Publicity events % Achievement of Physical & financial targets Expenditure(€m) Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.036 €0.096 €0.178 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

0 0 0 0 0

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2

3

4

€0.014 €0.039 €0.071

€0.021 €0.058 €0.107

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Final Target 7 3 Annual 7 100%

Outturn to 31st Dec 2009 3 0 0 2 18%

Total Expenditure declared to Managing Authority at year end 5 €0.000 €0.000 €0.146

Other Non CoFinanced Expenditure 6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

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2013 €0.000 Cumulative Total €0.310 €0.124 €0.186 €0.000 €0.146 *Includes claim amounting to €0.014m paid to the South West Regional Authority.

€0.000

4. North-South Co-operation This measure has no significant North-South element. However, any joint initiatives which support greater North-South Co-operation (e.g. conferences or seminars) on matters of mutual benefit may be funded from this Measure. 5. Information and Publicity Requirements In the implementation of the Measure regard has been had to the Regulation on Structural Funds Information & Publicity (EC 1828/2006) and Dept. of Finance Circulars on NDP Publicity. In particular, the following have been used by the Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly as means of highlighting public awareness and of achieving publicity for the OP and the NDP as a whole: • Ensuring the use of the Assembly and EU logos when advertising for staff, tendering etc, • Circulation of Annual Report to Regional Authorities, Local Authorities etc., • Taking advertisements in various publications as a method of publicising the OP • Ongoing development of the Regional Assembly website www.seregassembly.ie A major Annual Publicity Event was held in Trim, Co. Meath on 2nd October 2009, which also marked the launch of the Regional Assembly’s policy paper on “Innovation Challenges for SMEs”. The event aimed to provide small and medium enterprises the opportunity to discuss the obstacles and challenges they face in introducing innovation into their business model. It also highlighted the Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013 and the support received from the EU and Exchequer for the Operational Programme. The work of the Regional Assembly and progress on the Operational Programme to date was also publicised through the use of two live, on-site Outside Broadcasts, one with WLR Radio Station Waterford and another with KFM Radio Station, Kildare. Assembly staff, Councillors and a beneficiary body gave an overview of the Operational Programme and the Assembly’s role. 6. Horizontal Issues The activities funded under the measure are aimed at ensuring that the measures and the OP generally are achieving their objectives, which include the horizontal priorities of environmental sustainability, equality, including gender equality and social inclusion. 7. Compliance with Community Policies The Technical Assistance measure is not subject to state aids. The Regional Assembly will comply with Community Policy regarding public procurement and monitor the same at NUTS III level. 8. Future prospects Under this Priority the ERDF may, subject to the limits set down in Article 46 (1) (a), support areas such as preparation, management, monitoring, evaluation, information and control activities of the Operational Programme together with activities to reinforce the administrative capacity for implementing the Fund. The following indicative operations are eligible under this Theme: • Expenditure related to the preparation, selection, appraisal and monitoring of assistance and of operations; • Expenditure on meetings of monitoring committees and of sub-committees relating to the implementation of assistance; • Expenditure relating to audits and on-the-spot checks of operations; and • Expenditure on information actions relating to the Operational Programme. (publicity for individual Theme under the other Priorities of the OP will be funded from the allocation of the relevant Theme and/or from the budget of the relevant Implementing Agency). • Redevelopment of the Regional Assembly website www.seregassembly.ie The Regional Assembly will hold its Annual Publicity event in May, the title of which is “Renewable Energies; job opportunities in the southern and Eastern Region”. The Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly will carry out a Mid-Term Evaluation in Q3 & Q4 2010, the Terms of Reference for engagement of consultants has been prepared. 9. Any adjustments required No adjustments are required at this time.

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10. Annexes Environment Sustainability Horizontal Principle Report. Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Report. Broader Equality Horizontal Principle Report. Social Inclusion Horizontal Principle Report.

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3.5 Demonstration of the effects of the Promotion of Equal Opportunities Information on the promotion of equal opportunities and the application of the horizontal principles is presented in Section 2.1.9 and in Annex 2 of this report.

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3.6 Share of the priority allocations used in accordance with Article 34 (2) Complementary financing of actions that fall within the scope of assistance under the European Social Fund arises in Priority 1 in the micro-enterprise theme from the financing of training programmes which form part of the suite of business development supports provided by the County Enterprise Boards. The amount of financing as a proportion of the priority total will be captured by the EU SF IT system as part of its project accounting, monitoring and financial control functions, and will be reported accordingly.

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4 ESF Programmes: Coherence and Concentration The Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme is co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund and the Irish Exchequer.

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5. ERDF/CF Programmes: Major Projects There were no major projects notified to the Commission in 2009.

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6. Technical Assistance An expenditure report on the use made of technical assistance during 2009 is provided under Priority 4 of the Priority Progress Report. During the year to end 2009 the Managing Authority continued to implement the necessary arrangements to allow it to fulfil its responsibilities in relation to the Regional Operational Programme. The Regional Authorities and their EU Operational Committees also continued with their responsibilities to examine and monitor EU-funded expenditure in their regions, and to serve on the Monitoring Committees on which they are represented. Annual Publicity Event An “Innovation Challenges for SMEs” Conference was held in Trim on 2nd October 2009, it was well attended by business leaders, entrepreneurs and regional development experts. This was the annual publicity event for the OP for 2009 which fulfils the Managing Authority obligation under Article 7.2 (b) of Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1828/2006. The Conference provided a forum for business to provide feedback to the Managing Authority on the business needs which could potentially be met through the Micro Enterprise theme. The event was also used to promote and highlight the Operation Programme 2007-2013 and the support of the ERDF and the exchequer funding for the OP. Gateway Development Index The Southern and Eastern (S&E) and the Border, Midland and West (BMW) Assemblies commissioned the construction of a Gateway Development Index (GDI), to determine how the nine Gateway cities and towns are performing against their objectives as set out in the National Spatial Strategy 2002-2020 (NSS). It’s the first such study of its kind in Ireland to focus solely on the effectiveness of the Ireland’s regional development strategy in the context of Gateways as drivers of economic development in the regions. The Gateway Development Index helps capture the impact of investment in the Gateways under the National Development Plan (NDP) and the Regional Operational Programmes (ROPs) for the period 2007-2013. It will complement the monitoring of the NDP, NSS and ROPs. The first GDI report was published in the Spring 2009 and the index will be replicated again in 2010 and 2013. The study is 40% co-funded by the European Regional Development Funds with the balance coming from Irish exchequer funding.

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7. Information and Publicity Implementation of the Communication Plan The Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly as Managing Authority for the Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013 has contributed to the preparation of the Communication Plan for the NSRF 2007 – 2013. This plan includes a wide range of information and publicity actions to be implemented at Operational Programme level. This plan has been submitted to the European Commission. The Communication Plan sets out the information and publicity strategy for Ireland’s National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) and for the two Regional Operational Programmes (OPs). It outlines how the Managing Authorities and other bodies responsible for administering and delivering the programmes will provide information on the Operational Programmes and publicise their outcomes and achievements. This Communication Plan has been drawn up in accordance with the Commission Implementation Regulation (EC) No 1828/2006. Aims of the Communication Plan: The aims of this Communication Plan are to increase public awareness, transparency and visibility of the Operational Programmes and of EU Cohesion and Regional Policy at National, Regional and Operation level. It will do this by: • Highlighting the role and contribution of Ireland’s EU Structural Funds Programmes 2007-2013 and the progress achieved; • Emphasizing the joint actions taken by the EU and Ireland and the results accomplished; • Ensuring that assistance from the Funds is transparent by providing potential beneficiaries with clear and detailed information on conditions of eligibility and procedures for applying for funding; • Supporting the implementation of the NSRF and the OPs by increasing the understanding of the objectives of the programmes among potential beneficiaries, the general public, implementing bodies, the social partners and other interested organisations; • Disseminating information on Ireland’s EU Structural Funds Programme 2007-2013 widely through all available communication channels; • Ensuring compliance with the EU Regulations; and • Ensuring that the responsibilities of beneficiaries, as specified in Article 8 of Commission Implementation Regulation (EC) 1828/2006, are understood and applied. During the twelve months ended 31st December, 2008 a host of activities were engaged in and every opportunity was availed of to increase public awareness of NSRF and EU funding. Activities Undertaken in twelve months ending 31st December 2009 The Annual Conference organised by the Managing Authority entitled “Innovation Challenges for SME’s” was held on the 2nd October 2009. It was well attended by business leaders, entrepreneurs and regional development experts. This was the annual publicity event for the OP for 2009 which fulfils the Managing Authority obligation under Article 7.2 (b) of Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1828/2006. The annual publicity event provided a forum for business to provide feedback to the Managing Authority on the business needs which could potentially be met through the sub-theme. The annual conference was also used to promote and highlight the Operation Programme 2007-2013 and the support of the ERDF and the exchequer funding for the OP. The Conference and ERDF funding was promoted by two radio broadcast shows in the weeks prior to the Conference. These two radio broadcast shows publicised the ERDF funding received by various final beneficiaries within the two local radio broadcast areas. Presentations have been made during this period are as follows: Date Presentation Title 10th February Financial Management Training – CEB’s 18th February Financial Management Training – CEB’s 25th February Financial Management Training – CEB’s th 5 March Financial Management Training 15th June Financial Management Training 11th November Financial Management Training 1st December Financial Management Training 24th March 16th April

Presentation to County & City Enterprise Board County & City Enterprise Board County & City Enterprise Board Intermediate Bodies SEI & DCENR MWRA SERA Finish Delegation Bulgarian Delegation

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Meetings- the following meetings took place during the period. 09/01/09 Corporate Committee Meeting 09/01/09 Regional Assembly Meeting 30/01/09 Members Workshop 13/02/09 Planning & Infrastructure Sub-Committee Meeting 11/02/09 Employment & Social Inclusion Sub-Committee Meeting 18/02/09 Agriculture & Rural Development Sub-Committee Meeting 20/02/09 Enterprise & Productive Investment Sub-Committee Meeting 06/03/09 Joint Regional Assembly Meeting 24/04/09 Planning & Infrastructure Sub-Committee Meeting 17/04/09 Employment & Social Inclusion Sub-Committee Meeting 16/04/09 Agriculture & Rural Development Sub-Committee Meeting 23/04/09 Enterprise & Productive Investment Sub-Committee Meeting 18/05/09 Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme Monitoring Committee 08/05/09 Regional Assembly Meeting 02/10/09 Annual Conference 16/10/09 Planning & Infrastructure Sub-Committee 16/10/09 Employment & Social Inclusion Sub-Committee 16/10/09 Enterprise & Productive Investment Sub-Committee 16/10/09 Agriculture & Rural Development Sub-Committee 18/09/09 Annual General Meeting of the Regional Assembly 18/09/09 Regional Assembly Meeting 13/11/09 Regional Assembly Meeting 11/12/09 Employment & Social Inclusion Sub-Committee 11/12/09 Planning & Infrastructure Sub-Committee 11/12/09 Enterprise & Productive Investment Sub-Committee 11/12/09 Agriculture & Rural Development Sub-Committee National Press Releases and Regional Media Interviews Monitoring Committee Meeting NBS Launch 11th May EU Flag flying for a 2 week period 11th September Outside Broadcast with WLR, Waterford City 28th September Outside Broadcast with KFM, Naas, Co. Kildare Public Notices/Advertisements 11th May EU Flag flying for a 2 week period 11th September Outside Broadcast with WLR, Waterford City 28th September Outside Broadcast with KFM, Naas, Co. Kildare Performance Indicator Table

Number of people dealt with/accessing information (website and public information office) breakdown by Operational Programme Number of Annual Events Number of seminars/presentations Number of public launches/events/press releases/interviews of interventions by Operational Programme

Baseline 2007

Mid-Term 2010

Final Target 2013

3,000 per month

3,000 per month

3,000 per month

0 3 7 0 45 105 This is a monitoring indicator designed to monitor transparency of the individual measures. Targets have not been set.

Outcome Dec 2009

24 24+5+1 from above

Level of satisfaction with seminars and related documentation

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Level of overall public awareness of the EU Structural Funds Programme* Level of awareness of the role of the S&E OP Level of awareness of the individual Funds (ESF & ERDF)* This is a monitoring indicator designed to monitor transparency of the individual measures. Targets have not been set. * A public awareness survey will be commissioned. The survey will provide figures for public awareness and enable targets to be set Local press coverage by operational/programme/priority

1

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8. Financial Drawdown Along with the advances received in 2007 of 2% (€2.932m) and in 2008 of 3% (€4.398m) a further advance of 2.5% was received in 2009 bringing the total advance to €10.995m. In addition to this the first certified declaration of expenditure was sent to the Commission by the Certifying Authority by the 31st October deadline totalling €30.494m in public eligible expenditure. On foot of this €12.195m was paid by the EU Commission. There are no further claims outstanding with the Commission at this time.

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9. Context Indicators Category

Indicator GDP/Capita, S&E Region

Macroeconomic

Total Employment in S&E Region Gross Output per person engaged in Industry in S&E Region

Baseline Value €35,727 1,539,800 € 385,575

€571,166 (2006)33 47.2%35

Source CSO (QNHS Qtr 4 2008) QNHS Qtr 4 2008 CSO (2008) CSO, Census of Industrial Production (2006) CSO/Forfás Community Innovation Survey Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (2006) Environmental Protection Agency (2007) Sustainable Energy Ireland, Energy Efficiency in Ireland Eurostat. Internet Usage by Enterprise

Innovation Activity Rate, S&E Region34

52.2%

Entrepreneurial Activity Rate in Ireland36

17.9% (2005)

17.9 % (2007)

Average Drinking water compliance level in S&E Region37

96.4% (national)

97.6% (Regional level)

Energy Efficiency in Ireland38 (1995=100)

85.0 (2005)

84.0 (2007)

% of Businesses with Broadband in Ireland

48% (2005)

83% (2008)

Population of Gateways and Hubs

Gateways: Dublin 1.12m Cork 123,062 Limerick 54,023 Waterford 44,594

Gateways: Dublin 1.19m Cork 119,418 Limerick 52,539 Waterford 45,748 (2006)

CSO, Census of Population (2006)

Public Transport Usage (000s) (Bus, Train & Luas)

298,183 (2005)

307,504 (2206)

CSO, Transport 2006

Priority 1

Priority 2

Updated Indicators (as at April 2009) €40,319 (2006) 1,531,200 (2008)

Priority 3

(2004-2006) Ireland

33

Census of Industrial Production 2006, Table 2 The latest figures are not provided at a regional level from the 2006 survey, the S&E Regional Assembly is actively seeking that this be readdressed in the next Community Innovation Survey. 35 This refers to the innovation rate for companies with 10 or more employees. 36 This is a sum of Total Early Stage Entrepreneurs & Established Firm Entrepreneurs. 37 This is the average of the 22 administrative areas in the S&E Region 38 This refers to the Industrial Energy Efficiency in Ireland Rating 34

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Annex 1 Project Level Report Sector (NACE R2) Provenance of Assisted Business 1993 to 2009 No of Companies / Individuals % 1.80% 0.01%

Sector Accommodation and Food Service Activities Activities of Extraterritorial Organisations and Bodies Activities of Households as Employers; Undifferentiated Goods and Services Producing Activities of Households for Own Use 0.04% Administrative and Support Service Activities 10.66% Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 2.68% Arts, Entertainment and Recreation 5.56% Construction 2.41% Education 1.11% Electricity, Gas, Steam and Air Conditioning Supply 0.14% Financial and Insurance Activities 0.23% Human Health and Social Work Activities 6.80% Information and Communication 10.12% Manufacturing 33.90% Mining and Quarrying 0.18% Other Service Activities 15.18% Professional, Scientific and Technical Activities 4.56% Public Administration and defence; Compulsory Social Security 0.09% Real Estate Activities 0.87% Transportation and Storage 0.82% Water Supply; Sewerage, Waste Management and Remediation Activities 0.99% Wholesale and Retail Trade; Repair of Motor Vehicles and Motorcycles 1.84% Source: E.I. PMS Figures relate to all CEB grant approved and paid clients up until the 31/12/2009 (1993 to 2009) Business Survival Rate The below information was sourced from the CEB PMS using the following indicator: Business Surviving This report selects the number of companies/individuals that got a grant • On/before ‘31/12/2009’ • And have an employment survey year date on or after ‘2009’ (i.e. live companies) • The clients have not ceased trading (currently trading). 15

Number of Businesses Surviving by Gender of Promoter (Report Year: 2009)

5,857

15.1

Male

4,055

15.2

Female

1,584

15.3

Other

218

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Annex 2 Horizontal Principle Report In accordance with Article 16 & 17 of the General Regulation No.1083/2006, the Southern & Eastern Operational Programme contains information on the steps taken to demonstrate that the objectives of the Funds are pursued in the framework of sustainable development and also to prevent any discrimination on the basis of gender, race or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation during the various stages of implementing the Funds and, in particular, access to them. Significant learning emerged during the implementation of the NDP/CSF 2000-2006 in relation to the embedding of horizontal principles into the design of operations and resulted in improvements in the quality of meaningful reporting on the impact of the investment programmes. The “Review of Relevance Exercise of the Horizontal Principles” which was an exercise undertaken across the NDP/CSF as a result of recommendations of the Mid-Term Review, resulted in more targeted approaches to the integration of horizontals principles across all Operational Programmes. With the development of specific horizontal principle indicators and a restructuring of the reporting requirement the quality of reporting improved during the course of the previous Programme. The resultant learning informs the approach to the integration of cross cutting themes into the design of this Operational Programme. Meetings were held with the specialist Horizontal Units in June and July 2007 to preview the treatment of the following horizontal principles: • Environment – Environment Policy Unit, Department of the Environment • Social Inclusion – Office of Social Inclusion and Combat Poverty Agency • Gender Equality – Gender Equality Unit, Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform • Broad Equality – Equality Authority It was agreed that while all operations co-financed had to respect national and EU rules and guidelines in respect of all horizontal issues, the principle of prioritization which was established following the mid-term evaluation of the NDP/CSF in 2004, as mentioned above, would apply whereby all themes/sub-themes would be prioritized for at least one and not more than two of the principles which would be most relevant. Each of the horizontal principle units provided specific text which was incorporated into the guidance issued in respect of the Implementation Plans for each relevant theme/sub-theme. In addition, the Managing Authority prepared a generic guidance document on the treatment of horizontal principles which was issued to all Intermediary Bodies. It was set out that text should be provided in relation to one or more of the ‘prioritised’ horizontal themes: Environmental Sustainability, Broad Equality Grounds, Gender Equality and Social Inclusion, which could include commitments in relation to: - inclusion of the principle as a specific objective of the intervention/theme; - inclusion of the principle in project selection criteria - capturing of horizontal impacts via performance indicators - undertaking impact assessments to ensure that the needs of different groups (e.g., men/women) will be met - engaging with specialist units to develop best practise - consultation with client groups - ring-fencing of specific budgets to support pro-active measures - inclusion of the principle in evaluations and reviews - inclusion of horizontal representatives on selection/advisory committees on a partnership basis - enhancement of expertise within the Intermediary/Beneficiary body in relation to the principle - promoting equality of access and removing barriers to participation (gender, equality, social inclusion) - steps that will be taken to ensure that the proposed intervention complies with EU and national legislation and public policy in relation to the principle e.g., access for people with disabilities. The responsibilities of Intermediary Bodies with regard to the horizontal principles include ensuring the integration of the prioritized horizontal principle(s) into the implementation and monitoring of the themes for which the Department or the public beneficiary bodies operating under their aegis are responsible. These are detailed in section 16.2 of the agreement signed by all Intermediary Bodies, requiring, inter alia that Intermediary Bodies ensure that the applicable prioritised horizontal principles are fully integrated into the implementation and monitoring of the projects/operations under their responsibility or under the responsibility of public beneficiary bodies under their aegis, respecting EU and national policies. Intermediate Bodies are required to report annually, to the Monitoring Committee in the format specified, on the implementation of the horizontal principle and to liaise with the Managing Authority and the specialist Horizontal Units on the integration of the prioritised horizontal principle and the reporting of horizontal impacts. A review of the horizontal reports received is a separate item on the agenda for the Spring Monitoring Committee meetings.

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A further meeting took place with the four horizontal units in June 2008 at which the reporting template for annual progress reports to the OP Monitoring Committee was agreed, along with the process for assessment of these reports. This template was issued to all Intermediary Bodies. The table below sets out the prioritized principles for each co-funded theme/sub-theme Horizontal Principles Priority Theme Sub Theme Environment Gender Broader Social Sustainability Equality Equality Inclusion Applied Research GE Enhancement Commercialisation GE Fund Development of Innovation & Incubation Centre Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RTDI the GE Development Capacity Knowledge Building Research Economy Capacity & Capability ES GE within HEI Entrepreneurship in Microenterprises GE BEP

Environment & Accessibility

Sustainable Urban Development

CHP & Bioheat (ReHeat) Programme Energy for Business Programme Renewable Renewable Energy Energy Development & Deployment Strategic Development Zones Rural Water Source Risk Prevention Protection* & Water Village Sewerage Protection Systems* Information and Communication Technology Accessibility Broadband Gateway Grants Scheme Urban Regeneration * The Gateway & Public Transport Hub Challenge Arts Capital Fund* Theme: Sports Capital Programme* Swimming Pool Programme* Inter Gateway Collaboration Fund

Technical TA Assistance *Implementation has not yet commenced on this theme

ES ES ES ES ES ES SI

ES ES

SI GE

SI SI

BEP GE

SI BEP

SI

ES ES

SI GE

BEP

SI

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Environment Sustainability Horizontal Principle The EU’s Sustainable Development Strategy aims, in tandem with the Lisbon Strategy for growth and jobs, for a more prosperous, cleaner and fairer Europe. Sustainable Development is an overarching concept. The EU Treaty requires the integration of sustainable development into all European policies, so that they contribute in an integrated way to meeting economic, environmental and social objectives. The EU Sustainable Development Strategy, adopted by the European Council in Gothenburg in June 2001, and renewed in June 2006, aims to reconcile economic development, social cohesion and protection of the environment. Monitoring progress towards this overarching goal is an essential part of the Strategy. 39 Environmental issues are a key dimension of Cohesion Policy in the 2007 - 2013 period, while promoting sustainable growth is a cornerstone of the Lisbon and Gothenburg Agenda. For the first time in the history of Structural Funds Programmes the Operational Programme was subjected to a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA.). The SEA Directive was transposed in to law in Ireland in July 200440 and its objective is to provide for a high level of protection of the environment and to contribute to the integration of environmental considerations into the preparation and adoption of specified plans and programmes with a view to promoting sustainable development. The results of the application of the SEA process to this Programme and details of how the Managing Authority proposes to address them are available. A nontechnical summary of the Environmental report is also available. While Ireland’s environment is generally of a high standard, pressure on the Irish environment is increasing. These pressures result from rapid economic growth, particularly in the transport and energy sectors, rising population and urbanisation, changing agricultural practices and land use and increased waste generation. Climate change has also significantly added to the pressures on the environment. Awareness and vigilance are needed if this asset is to be protected, and where necessary enhanced, for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations. Significant challenges are posed if Ireland is to improve eco-efficiency and maintain a more sustainable approach to development. The concept of environmental integration is now more fully accepted as a feature of legislation, Government policy and national development programmes; there is greater appreciation of the importance of shared responsibility for the environment on the part of all sectors of society and public access to information in relation to the environment has been extended. In line with this the Council Regulation 1083/06 states that actions taken under the Funds shall incorporate, at national and regional level, the Community’s priorities in favour of sustainable development by strengthening growth, competitiveness and employment, social inclusion, as well as protecting and improving the quality of the environment41. The objectives of the Funds are to be pursued in the framework of sustainable development and the Community promotion of the goal of protecting and improving the environment as set out in Article 6 of the Treaty42. Sustainable development – to meet the needs of the present generation without compromising those of future generations – is a fundamental objective under the Treaties. That requires dealing with economic, social and environmental policies in a mutually reinforcing way. Failure to reverse trends that threaten future quality of life will steeply increase the costs to society or make those trends irreversible. The commitment to the sustainable development principle both in the design of operations and in the measuring of their impact on the environment is a central underpinning of the Regional Operational Programme. The development of environmental policy in Ireland and the Region is influenced by EU policy and law. The EU now has more than 140 environmental directives and these provide the framework for Irish law and policy43. With headquarters in Co. Wexford, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has primary responsibility for environmental research, planning and guidance, licensing, monitoring and reporting on 39

Ireland’s Environment 2004, EPA Third State of the Environment Report Statutory Instrument No. 435 of 2004 European Communities (Environmental Assessment of Certain Plans and Programmes) Regulations 2004 and Statutory Instrument No. 436 of 2004 Planning and Development (Strategic Environmental Assessment) Regulations 2004 40

41

Council Regulation 1083/06 Art. 3 Council Regulation 1083/06 Art.17 43 Ireland’s Environment 2004, Environment Protection Agency 42

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environmental status and enforcement of environmental law. The Waste Management Act was passed in 1996. In 1997, the Government published “Sustainable Development: A Strategy for Ireland”, addressing all areas of Government policy, and economic and societal activity which impacts on the environment. Comhar, the National Sustainable Development Partnership, was established in 1999. Subsequent important developments include the National Climate Change Strategy (2000), the National Biodiversity Plan (2002), the National Heritage Plan (2002) and the Protection of the Environment Act (2003). The NDP 2000-06 was framed taking into account the need for balance between environment and development embodied in the concept of sustainable development. Integration of environmental considerations into other policies was then, and still is now, seen as a key means of securing sustainable development especially in terms of the NDP 2007-13. The difficulties of adopting, implementing and enforcing effective environmental policies will present challenges for the S&E Region and the country as a whole over the 2007-13 period. In terms of the broader policy context, the concept of environmental sustainability remains a “horizontal principle” under the NDP/NSRF 2007-13. This clearly signals the importance of environmental sustainability at regional programme level and will enhance the integration of environmental considerations into making and implementing policies in general. The Managing Authority is committed to tracking the impact on the sustainable development Horizontal Principle at implementation level to ensure compliance with the Regulation. In addition, the project selection criteria ensure that the projects will be assessed on the basis of their compliance and their promotion of sustainable development. In this regard, the Managing Authority work closely with the Intermediate Bodies and the national environmental authorities during the preparation of the implementation plans initially and on an on-going basis over the course of the implementation of the Operational Programme.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Development of Region’s RTDI Capacity Building Research and Capacity and Capability within the HEI Department of Education and Science.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme In relation to general environmental sustainability, currently projects deriving capital supports that require local authority planning consents are required to comply fully with all conditions prescribed in the consent. These would usually address some environmental issues including integrating the design of the new facility with the existing built environment, the treatment of surface water and management of waste. Over the period of the measure, consideration will be given to detailing emerging innovative measures that support and promote environmental sustainability. These include employing energy efficiency designs that maximise natural light and ventilation, encouragement of the use of renewable energy sources and reduction in CO2 emissions. (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle Under PRTLI Cycle 4, a total of €11.5 million will be invested in the area of the Environment under the Environment & Climate Change: Impacts and Responses Graduate Programme. Led by NUI Galway, this project will develop a specific Graduate Research Education Programme in Environment and Marine research. South and East partners within the consortium include CIT, NUIM, TCD, UCC and UL, and will receive a total of €5.7m. under the project. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

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Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Risk Prevention and Water Protection Rural Water Source Protection Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: The Department, in partnership with the National Federation of Group Water Schemes has implemented a national pilot source protection scheme with the objective of putting in place a national strategy for the protection of surface and ground water sources from agricultural pollution, commercial/industrial and residential sources. The pilot programme is being co-ordinated through the Science Dept, Dundalk Institute of Technology. This involves the ongoing assessment and monitoring of the entire Milltown lake catchment area in Churchill/Oram, Monaghan. It also involved farmyard surveys, investigations into septic tanks and soil status. To date three interim reports on progress and findings so far have been prepared. It is intended to have the final report ready in September 2010 and that this report be accompanied by a guidance document covering the intention that the methodologies, structures and systems to be employed in the conduct of this exercise be such as to create a model of best practice, suitable for replication nationally as a key element of the national strategy on community-based drinking water source protection throughout Ireland. (b) New Actions: It is expected that liaison with local authorities on the identification and selection of schemes, as appropriate, for inclusion in this intervention will commence later this year. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Baseline

Final Target

Output Result

12 17% BOD reduction

Number of Group Water Schemes Biochemical Oxygen Demand

0

Outturn to 31st December 2009 0 0

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Risk Prevention and Water Protection Village Sewerage Scheme Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: The Wastewater Treatment Pilot Projects advanced by the Department, the National Rural Water Monitoring Committee and the local authorities was completed in 2007. Following full commissioning of the plants, performance monitoring commenced in 2008 and continued in 2009. Substantial progress has been made on preparation of reports on the pilot project with just one remaining element, relating to septic tanks effluent drainage systems (see below), remaining to be fully reported on before completion of an overall final report in 2010. The objective of the pilot project is to assess new cost effective ways of providing a wastewater collection and treatment systems for small rural villages and to test a range of innovative technologies for collecting and treating domestic wastewater and include conventional and membrane based package treatment plants as well as vacuum sewers as opposed to traditional gravity and pumped systems. As part of a programme to evaluate new technologies for providing cost-effective and efficient wastewater collection and treatment for small rural villages, a Septic Tank Effluent Drainage System (STEDS) was also assessed.

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The STEDS approach is based around the retention of the septic tank on the householder’s property and the collection of the effluent only for subsequent treatment and disposal. It is expected, in cases where the outcome of the pilot schemes, or individual pilot schemes as the case may be, prove effective and of value under Irish conditions, that liaison with local authorities on the identification and selection of schemes (where appropriate conditions apply) will take place later this year. (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Baseline Output Result

Number of Schemes Population equivalent served

Final Target

0

12 2,800

Outturn to 31st December 2009 0 0

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Renewable Energy CHP & Bioheat (ReHeat) Programme Sustainable Energy Ireland.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme The principle of Renewable Energy is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production, through the Sustainable Energy Intervention. Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. Renewable energy activities were clearly identified in this report to Government as stated actions required to deliver on Ireland’s green economy. (a) Ongoing Actions: The CHP and Reheat Programme is delivering the CHP Strategy for Ireland and will ultimately have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. From an environmental sustainability perspective this Programme is measured in terms of the number of gas-fired CHP and Reheat installations. Renewable energy, such as wind, ocean and biomass technologies, contributes significantly to environmental and rural development. The Renewables R, D&D Programme is measured in terms of the deployment of renewable and alternative energy technologies in residential, commercial, public, and community buildings through a combination of grant and regulatory interventions and their contribution in terms of energy in electricity supply. SEAI, through its Sustainable Energy Zone Programme, is committed to providing a number of SEZs that each comprise typically a mix of social and private houses, industry, institutional buildings and transport facilities. The impacts from each of the SDZs will be measured in terms of the building improvement in energy efficiency performance, their contribution from renewable electricity, and their penetration of renewable heat. SEAI, through its Business and Industry Programme, is delivering energy cost- and carbon-reduction services to all sectors of business through networking, training, and advisory programmes. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum.

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SEAI’s business activities will ultimately lead to the reduction in CO2 emissions arising from the use of fossil fuels. This Programme will be measured in terms of the Cumulative Total Primary energy Equivalent (PEE) Savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services. These savings will be monitored in terms of GWh and the resulting savings from carbon emissions. SEAI has estimated up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. (b) New Actions: The expanding remit of SEAI has enabled the organisation to shape the development and delivery of a number of core initiatives, additional to the ones foreseen at the commencement of the National Strategic Reference Framework. In the submission of its Implementation Plan to the Regional Assemblies and Government, SEAI stated its intention to outline future programme complements upon receipt of indications from government on the funding of sustainable energy priorities. One of the additional developments under the Energy in Business programme is a focus on energy efficiency in the public sector. SEAI proposes to include the activities relating to “Support For Exemplar Energy Efficiency Projects” (SEEEP) under the Energy in Business initiative. This inclusion is subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. Further details on these projects are available. The Ocean Energy Development Unit has been included (since 2009) subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. The programme deliver activities on a national basis (i.e. both BMW and SE regions). The financial profile associated with each programme is limited to the capital requirements for effective delivery. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Baseline Final Target Output

The development of a CHP and Bioheat Boiler Deployment Programme to assist in the deployment of small-scale fossil fired CHP, and biomass CHP and heating systems in industrial, commercial and public sectors.

50-80 new gas fired CHP installations; 450 - 600 wood fuelled boilers supported by end 2010 12,000 m2 of installed solar panels. 15 - 20 heat pumps systems

Result

Leveraged investment

The development of a CHP and Bioheat Boiler Deployment Programme to assist in the deployment of small-scale fossil fired CHP, and biomass CHP and heating systems in industrial, commercial and public sectors.

Leveraged investment of €30M in CHP in Ireland; Leveraged investment of approximately €85 million in ReHeat by 2010. 1.5 - 2 MWth of installed capacity from heat pumps systems

Outturn to 31st December 2009 Reheat 37 biomass projects were completed in 2009. 72 solar thermal projects were completed in 2009 with a total installed aperture area is 1141 square meters. 30 heat pump projects were completed in 2009. CHP Assisted market penetration by approving 20 investment projects across fossil and biomass technologies. Support was provided for the development of 7 feasibility studies. Every €1M invested in the ReHeat Programme generates €6.6M of savings to the economy.

Every €1m invested in the ReHeat Programme generates 6,000 tonnes of CO2 savings and displaces 22,000 MWh of fossil fuel.

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4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The Programmes that SEAI is delivering will ultimately contribute significantly to environmental and rural development and many will have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. The new programmes added to the Implementation Plan will have significant impact in terms of the contribution to the reaching of renewable energy heat and electricity targets. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Renewable Energy Energy For Business Sustainable Energy Ireland.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme The principle of Renewable Energy is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production, through the Sustainable Energy Intervention. Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. Renewable energy activities were clearly identified in this report to Government as stated actions are required to deliver on Ireland’s green economy. (a) Ongoing Actions: The CHP and Reheat Programme is delivering the CHP Strategy for Ireland and will ultimately have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. From an environmental sustainability perspective this Programme is measured in terms of the number of gas-fired CHP and Reheat installations. Renewable energy, such as wind, ocean and biomass technologies, contributes significantly to environmental and rural development. The Renewables R, D&D Programme is measured in terms of the deployment of renewable and alternative energy technologies in residential, commercial, public, and community buildings through a combination of grant and regulatory interventions and their contribution in terms of energy in electricity supply. SEAI, through its Sustainable Energy Zone Programme, is committed to providing a number of SEZs that each comprise typically a mix of social and private houses, industry, institutional buildings and transport facilities. The impacts from each of the SDZs will be measured in terms of the building improvement in energy efficiency performance, their contribution from renewable electricity, and their penetration of renewable heat. SEAI, through its Business and Industry Programme, is delivering energy cost- and carbon-reduction services to all sectors of business through networking, training, and advisory programmes. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum. SEAI’s business activities will ultimately lead to the reduction in CO2 emissions arising from the use of fossil fuels. This Programme will be measured in terms of the Cumulative Total Primary energy Equivalent (PEE) Savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services. These savings will be monitored in terms of GWh and the resulting savings from carbon emissions. SEAI has estimated up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. (b) New Actions:

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The expanding remit of SEAI has enabled the organisation to shape the development and delivery of a number of core initiatives, additional to the ones foreseen at the commencement of the National Strategic Reference Framework. In the submission of its Implementation Plan to the Regional Assemblies and Government, SEAI stated its intention to outline future programme complements upon receipt of indications from government on the funding of sustainable energy priorities. One of the additional developments under the Energy in Business programme is a focus on energy efficiency in the public sector. SEAI proposes to include the activities relating to “Support For Exemplar Energy Efficiency Projects” (SEEEP) under the Energy in Business initiative. This inclusion is subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. Further details on these projects are available. The Ocean Energy Development Unit has been included (since 2009) subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. The programme delivers activities on a national basis (i.e. both BMW and SE regions). The financial profile associated with each programme is limited to the capital requirements for effective delivery. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Baseline Final Target Output

Deliver a range of support programmes and services across the business sector, progressively servicing more businesses (measured in terms of energy spend by those businesses).

0 Engagements Baseline established for energy efficiency of business against which to measure improvement

Result

To establish high efficiency as the norm in the public and commercial sectors through tailored advice, training and mentoring and assistance in structured energy management systems

0 Advice mentoring /assessments registrations

Level of energy spend in businesses targeted for energy management

Zero businesses involved in energy management in business support services

Demonstrate progress to NEEAP Targets (335 by 2020)

0 Energy MAP training programmes delivered 0 Best Practice initiatives delivered

Provision of energy management advice and support services to businesses with

Outturn to 31st December 2009 Large Industry Increased penetration of SEAI programmes. Currently 139 Companies accounting for 70% of industrial energy use participate in LIEN and Agreements. SMEs Engagement with over 1000 firms (505 in 2007, 540 in 2008 and 615 new companies) by end of 2009. Over 1660 SME companies (since 2007) registered for energy efficiency supports with savings captured in 2009) 345 Advice mentoring and assessments registrations 11 Energy MAP training programmes Delivered 18 Best Practice initiatives (including Lighting guide series – 8 guides , 3 groups in Water Services, 4 Energy Efficient design (EED) reviews, and Energylink) Commenced work on the Monitoring and Reporting System (M&R system) for Energy Services Directive regulations44 44 companies accredited to international energy management standards.

44

One of the additional developments under the Energy in Business programme is a focus on energy efficiency in the public sector. SEAI proposes to include the activities relating to “Support For Exemplar Energy Efficiency Projects” under the Energy in Business initiative. This inclusion is subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance.

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advice and support services

Cumulative energy savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services Cumulative Total Primary energy Equivalent (PEE) Savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services To lead, inspire and support the public sector in adopting and maintaining exemplary standards of energy management and the achievement of aggressive NEEAP targets.

energy spend of €1,300m Business sector is 20% more efficient than baseline. €306m

Large Industry Cumulative 2007 – 2009 Estimated energy savings of €140M SME Services, Cumulative 2007 – 2009

Estimated energy savings of €5.7M 6370 GwH

0 exemplar energy saving actions 0 Local Authorities and Additional Public sector bodies implementing world class structured energy management systems.

Large Industry Cumulative 2007 – 2009 Estimated energy savings: 4000GWh SME Services, Cumulative 2007–09 Estimated energy savings of 100GWh Provided financial support to 74 exemplar energy saving actions based on replication, saving and labour-intensity criteria through SEEAP. Six Local Authorities and 5 Additional Public sector bodies implementing world class structured energy management systems.

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The Programmes that SEAI is delivering will ultimately contribute significantly to environmental and rural development and many will have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. The new programmes added to the Implementation Plan will have significant impact in terms of the contribution to the reaching of renewable energy heat and electricity targets. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Sustainable Energy Ireland.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme The principle of Renewable Energy is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal

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development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production, through the Sustainable Energy Intervention. Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. Renewable energy activities were clearly identified in this report to Government as stated actions required to deliver on Ireland’s green economy. (a) Ongoing Actions: The CHP and Reheat Programme is delivering the CHP Strategy for Ireland and will ultimately have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. From an environmental sustainability perspective this Programme is measured in terms of the number of gas-fired CHP and Reheat installations. Renewable energy, such as wind, ocean and biomass technologies, contributes significantly to environmental and rural development. The Renewables R, D&D Programme is measured in terms of the deployment of renewable and alternative energy technologies in residential, commercial, public, and community buildings through a combination of grant and regulatory interventions and their contribution in terms of energy in electricity supply. SEAI, through its Sustainable Energy Zone Programme, is committed to providing a number of SEZs that each comprise typically a mix of social and private houses, industry, institutional buildings and transport facilities. The impacts from each of the SDZs will be measured in terms of the building improvement in energy efficiency performance, their contribution from renewable electricity, and their penetration of renewable heat. SEAI, through its Business and Industry Programme, is delivering energy cost- and carbon-reduction services to all sectors of business through networking, training, and advisory programmes. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum. SEAI’s business activities will ultimately lead to the reduction in CO2 emissions arising from the use of fossil fuels. This Programme will be measured in terms of the Cumulative Total Primary energy Equivalent (PEE) Savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services. These savings will be monitored in terms of GWh and the resulting savings from carbon emissions. SEAI has estimated up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. (b) New Actions: The expanding remit of SEAI has enabled the organisation to shape the development and delivery of a number of core initiatives, additional to the ones foreseen at the commencement of the National Strategic Reference Framework. In the submission of its Implementation Plan to the Regional Assemblies and Government, SEAI stated its intention to outline future programme complements upon receipt of indications from government on the funding of sustainable energy priorities. One of the additional developments under the Energy in Business programme is a focus on energy efficiency in the public sector. SEAI proposes to include the activities relating to “Support For Exemplar Energy Efficiency Projects” (SEEEP) under the Energy in Business initiative. This inclusion is subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. Further details on these projects are available. The Ocean Energy Development Unit has been included (since 2009) subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. The programme deliver activities on a national basis (i.e. both BMW and SE regions). The financial profile associated with each programme is limited to the capital requirements for effective delivery. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Baseline Final Target Output Acceleration of Delivery of 100 the development R&D projects to and deployment accelerate the in the Irish deployment of marketplace of renewable energy competitive renewable energy products, processes and systems. Result Enabling 6.8% (2005) 8.6 Wind equates to

Outturn to 31st December 2009 SEAI delivered 14 research reports/ studies to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy

Total final consumption from

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technical and other barriers to market uptake and/or modal switching to be overcome.

% (2006) of electricity consumption from renewable energy

15% of national electricity demand in 2010 and 40% demand by 2020.

The number of RE RD&D projects delivered under the following areas

Shared cost Demonstration Shared cost R&D Commissioned public good activities

30 RE RD&D Shared Cost projects 54 RE RD&D demonstration projects 20 RE RD&D Shared cost R&D / Public Good activities

renewable energy was 10%. There was 1002MW of wind generation connected to the grid at the end of 2008 and it provided 2298GWh or 12% of national electricity demand in 2008. SEAI delivered 14 reports across a variety of technologies including • Seismic Acquisition on the Southern Margin of the Dublin Basin • The development and mobilisation of the Wood Fuel Quality Assurance scheme • Development of a 500 kW Fluidised Bed Boiler through to market release • Innovative Demonstration of an Electric Vehicle, EV Accelerator and Electric Vehicles in a Captive Fleet 14 RE RD&D Shared Cost projects (cumulative from 2007) 9 RE RD&D demonstration projects (cumulative from 2007) 7 RE RD&D Shared cost R&D / Public Good activities (cumulative from 2006)

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The Programmes that SEAI is delivering will ultimately contribute significantly to environmental and rural development and many will have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. The new programmes added to the Implementation Plan will have significant impact in terms of the contribution to the reaching of renewable energy heat and electricity targets. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Renewable Energy Strategic Development Zones Sustainable Energy Ireland.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme The principle of Renewable Energy is a key component of sustainable development, a principle reflected in the Government’s White Paper, “Delivering a Sustainable Energy Future for Ireland” and the National

130


Climate Change Strategy. Energy remains a key factor in ensuring economic growth and societal development and SEAI continues to promote the decoupling of economic growth from the adverse effects of energy consumption and production, through the Sustainable Energy Intervention. Energy research is a key component of the National Strategic reference Framework and the Irish Government’s Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (2006 – 2013). Both recognise that high levels of investment in research and innovation are essential, both for economic competitiveness, and to yield innovations in areas such as healthcare and environmental technologies which make tangible improvements to our quality of life. The High Level Action Group on Green Enterprise was established in May in line with a commitment in the Framework for Economic Renewal, Building Ireland’s Smart Economy. It was tasked with identifying the series of actions required to enable Ireland realise the potential of developing an innovation-based green enterprise sector as part of its enterprise portfolio. Renewable energy activities were clearly identified in this report to Government as stated actions are required to deliver on Ireland’s green economy. (a) Ongoing Actions: The CHP and Reheat Programme is delivering the CHP Strategy for Ireland and will ultimately have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. From an environmental sustainability perspective this Programme is measured in terms of the number of gas-fired CHP and Reheat installations. Renewable energy, such as wind, ocean and biomass technologies, contributes significantly to environmental and rural development. The Renewables R, D&D Programme is measured in terms of the deployment of renewable and alternative energy technologies in residential, commercial, public, and community buildings through a combination of grant and regulatory interventions and their contribution in terms of energy in electricity supply. SEAI, through its Sustainable Energy Zone Programme, is committed to providing a number of SEZs that each comprise typically a mix of social and private houses, industry, institutional buildings and transport facilities. The impacts from each of the SDZs will be measured in terms of the building improvement in energy efficiency performance, their contribution from renewable electricity, and their penetration of renewable heat. SEAI, through its Business and Industry Programme, is delivering energy cost- and carbon-reduction services to all sectors of business through networking, training, and advisory programmes. SEAI has estimated that the Industry and Business Initiative is increasing the cost competitiveness to Irish business covering over 50,000 jobs per annum. SEAI’s business activities will ultimately lead to the reduction in CO2 emissions arising from the use of fossil fuels. This Programme will be measured in terms of the Cumulative Total Primary energy Equivalent (PEE) Savings resulting from SEAI’s business energy management and advice services. These savings will be monitored in terms of GWh and the resulting savings from carbon emissions. SEAI has estimated up to 5,000 jobs will be created/ sustained through activities that are directly related to the delivery of some of its core programmes in 2010. (b) New Actions: The expanding remit of SEAI has enabled the organisation to shape the development and delivery of a number of core initiatives, additional to the ones foreseen at the commencement of the National Strategic Reference Framework. In the submission of its Implementation Plan to the Regional Assemblies and Government, SEAI stated its intention to outline future programme complements upon receipt of indications from government on the funding of sustainable energy priorities. One of the additional developments under the Energy in Business programme is a focus on energy efficiency in the public sector. SEAI proposes to include the activities relating to “Support For Exemplar Energy Efficiency Projects” (SEEEP) under the Energy in Business initiative. This inclusion is subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. Further details on these projects are available. The Ocean Energy Development Unit has been included (since 2009) subject to a review by the Regional Assemblies and the Department of Finance. The programme deliver activities on a national basis (i.e. both BMW and SE regions). The financial profile associated with each programme is limited to the capital requirements for effective delivery. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Baseline Output

Demonstrate and promote integrated community approaches to sustainable energy via a network of Sustainable Energy Zones

No SEZ in Ireland

Final Target Three Zones fully operational

Outturn to 31st December 2009 One zone in progress in Dundalk. Local Authorities were engaged in a dialogue on SEZ programme in SEZ. Framework Energy Supply Contract (ESC) developed

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Result

Number of sustainable energy zones that each comprise of a mix of social and private houses, industry, institutional buildings and transport facilities. Contribution from renewable electricity within SDZ Penetration of renewable heat into the SDZ Improvement in energy efficiency performance of the buildings within the SDZ

The Provision of models and lessons to motivate and guide regulators, developers and consumer choice

10,000 MWh contribution from renewable electricity within the 3 SEZ per annum

20% contribution from renewable electricity within SDZ in 2010 10% penetration of renewable heat into the SDZ in 2010 40% improvement in energy efficiency performance of the buildings within the SDZ in 2010

Development of a research platform within Dundalk SEZ Technical data from Dundalk collected and analysed. Cumulative savings of approx 2,500 tonnes of CO2 over all projects. One zone in progress in Dundalk involving public sector, businesses and consumer population 5% (cumulative) contribution from renewable electricity within SDZ by 2009 1% penetration of renewable heat into the SDZ by 2009 >40% improvement in energy efficiency performance of the buildings within the SDZ by 2009

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The Programmes that SEAI is delivering will ultimately contribute significantly to environmental and rural development and many will have the effect of making electricity production more environmentally sustainable and decrease CO2 emissions. The new programmes added to the Implementation Plan will have significant impact in terms of the contribution to the reaching of renewable energy heat and electricity targets. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Information and Communication Technology Accessibility Broadband Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: Economic and social benefits can be achieved by widening and increasing broadband availability. The NBS will enable rural Ireland to move into the digital age ubiquitous broadband access is important in providing ready access to national and international markets for enterprises in remote locations as well as improving businesses processes. Enabling existing companies to grow and new businesses to set up in the NBS area will reduce the pressure to relocate to urban areas.

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In addition, quality of life is improved and the economic, social and environmental benefits (e.g. from teleworking, e-commerce, e-government, and online research for educational purposes), may be enjoyed by broadband users, regardless of geographic location. (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator No. of initiatives to enable broadband infrastructure and service provision Additional businesses with broadband available

Baseline Position

Latest Position

0

1

0

14,577

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme / Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle All businesses in Rapid or Cl谩r areas currently without broadband will have broadband available to them as a result of the NBS. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template. The company continues to progress its network roll-out and services have gone live in almost half of the designated areas to be covered under the Scheme. The entire NBS coverage area, comprising of 1,028 Electoral Divisions must be covered by end of September 2010.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge Fund Public Transport Department of Transport and Marine.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme This work is part of the Removal of Speed Restrictions Programme which Iarnr贸d Eireann is undertaking and which aims to improve speeds on the rail network to support the increased frequency on the intercity services. The objectives in respect of the rationalisation of Limerick Junction are to facilitate an increase in the use of public transport on rail services through Limerick Junction and ensure a decrease in journey times in respect of services through Limerick Junction. (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: Some of the elements of the work had started but there has been a delay due to demand on resources. Physical work in respect of the Limerick Junction rationalisation project is anticipated to recommence during 2010 with a view to completion in 2011. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority:

Sustainable Urban Development

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Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Gateways & Hub Challenge Fund ERDF Gateways Grant Scheme Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: Cork City – Construction work has commenced on both sites. Waterford City – In terms of environmental sustainability the project was designed to the criteria set out in the “Reference Document on Best Available Techniques in Glass Manufacturing – E.U. IPPC Bureau 2000” and will be operated according to E.P.A. best practice standards. In saving the future of the traditional skill sets involved in crystal glass manufacturing, by providing skilled employment opportunities and by stimulating growth in tourism in the city, the project will contribute to the promotions of social inclusion. Limerick City – The Lisbon Strategy and The EU Sustainable Development Strategy, adopted by the European Council in Gothenburg in June 2001, and renewed in June 2006 place a key emphasis on providing targeted interventions that address inter alia the horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability. Article 8 of the ERDF regulations (EC No 1080/2006) provides that the funds can support integrated and sustainable strategies to tackle high concentrations of economic, environmental and social problems affecting urban areas. The activities which are specifically horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability, many of these specified activities form a core component of The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project thereby providing specific actions that address these horizontal principles. These specific actions are addressed further hereunder. In accordance with the Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013 for the Southern and Eastern Regional Assembly the prioritised horizontal principles of environmental sustainability and promotion of social inclusion are integrated into the implementation and monitoring of The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project as follows - The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project proposal contains a number of specific actions that will specifically contribute to the horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability. The horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability form an intrinsic part of the overall project implementation. This project forms part of an overall multi-phased Public Realm strategy for Limerick City. The completed deliver of this public strategy over the coming years (subject to funding) will provide a City Centre environment that delivers on the horizontal principle of social inclusion and environmental sustainability in a holistic and integrated manner in the immediate City Centre area. The key actions that have taken place over the last year to incorporate the horizontal principles into the theme (The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme) and the Sub Theme (Urban Regeneration) would largely have taken place at the pre-planning and planning stage where due analysis and consideration would have been given to specific actions that could be incorporated into the overall project that would address and be supportive of the horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability. The specified horizontal principles will form a key deliverable of the actual implementation of the project which is due to commence in early May 2010. More specifically the implementation of The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project will deliver on the specified horizontal principles through the implementation of the following actions which flow from the analytical and deliberative process that was undertaken at the pre-planning and planning stages of the project over the course of the past year. Local employment and community development - The ‘Crossroads’ Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project proposal provided an economic cost benefit analysis for the overall project proposal which projected that the project would provide annual employment for 49 people. The creation of these jobs as a direct consequence of this project is especially important at combating social exclusion in the current economic downturn by providing employment for people that may currently be unemployed or at risk of unemployment. In addition it is projected that the net financial gain arising from the creation of 49 annual jobs will provide an overall fiscal contribution of €2,565,516.56 of disposable income for local reinvestment. This will provide a significant contribution to the community thereby enhancing community development. Improving access to transport and ICT. Two key deliverables of The ‘Crossroads’ Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project are (1) the provision of a dedicated Green Route (bus lane/cycle lane) and (2) the extension of the States Regional Broadband Infrastructure in the Urban Core of the Limerick Shannon Gateway by the provision of ducting and cabling on the specified streets to enable broadband connectivity. It is recognised that social exclusion can occur through the lack of provision of services for low income families that are necessary for active participation in a modern and competitive economy. A recent analysis of the 2006 census figures for Limerick (McCafferty & O’Keefe,

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Facing the Challenge of Change: A Spatial Perspective on Limerick45) shows that there is a low level of car ownership and Internet Access amongst low income families and city centre residents. In order to combat social exclusion and provide targeted social inclusion interventions it is necessary that improved access to public transport and ICT infrastructure are supported. Providing improved access to public transport and ICT infrastructure are key deliverables of this project thereby addressing the horizontal principle of social inclusion. Contribution to improved health of local population. It is envisaged that the provision of a Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works will contribute to the overall Public Realm Strategy for the City Centre which focuses on prioritising pedestrians through the targeted pedestrianisation of key streets. These works will encourage a modal shift from the car to walking and cycling through the provision of an enhanced public realm and green routes thus providing improved health for all citizens that is socially inclusive for all citizens. This is consistent with the Recreational Strategy for Limerick City which identifies the contribution that an enhanced public realm can make to the health of all citizens. Addressing quality of life issues. The provision of an attractive public realm which enhances the image of Limerick City as a place to live, work and invest in is a key quality of life issue that is addressed in the delivery of this project. An analysis of 2006 census figures for Limerick (McCafferty & O’Keefe, Facing the Challenge of Change: A Spatial Perspective on Limerick1) demonstrates that many low income and non-national families are predominantly resident in the City Centre whilst many Irish residents reside in the suburbs. This trend will contribute to social segregation and thereby social exclusion if it is not addressed. If our city centre is to be perceived as a positive place to live it is critical that it has an attractive public realm which will provide improved quality of life for all residents and thereby encourage greater social inclusion. Dublin City – To date a significant level of discussion has taken place with the public representatives, event organisers, residential and business communities through the following mechanisms:• Central Area Committee • Monitoring Committee, HARP (Historic Area Rejuvenation Plan) IAP 1996 - 2008 • Smithfield Area Business Association • The Smithfield Working Group 2004 Dublin City Council (Central Area Office and the Events Unit) have met Local Residents and Community Groups regularly over the last eight years. The City Council held a workshop with Event Organisers in April 2009 at which the latter expressed their views on using the Smithfield plaza as an event space. The Project Team in place for this development is made up of representatives from the City Council departments who have a remit in Smithfield (Roads, Traffic, Public Lighting, Electrical Services, Parks, Public Domain Officer, Manager of the Events Unit and the Central Area office. It has consulted widely on the proposals and continues to do so. After the project is completed the City Council will put in place a more structured approach to managing the Smithfield space. This will involve liaising with the residents, businesses, event organisers and other agencies such as the Gardai. The new play equipment, seating and landscaping will provide greater opportunities for both the local communities and visitors to interact together and enjoy the space. The elimination of car parking spaces will help to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the area. It should encourage the use of public transport. in particular the LUAS which has a stop at Smithfield. The Council is encouraging cycling as a healthy and sustainable alternative to cars and the Dublin Bikes scheme introduced in September 2009 has been hugely successful. The provision of another Dublin Bike station accommodating thirty bikes and regular bicycle stands at the northern end of the plaza will further help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and traffic congestion. The landscaped areas will be designed in such a way that they will be irrigated by natural rain water. The trees release oxygen, absorb carbon dioxide, filter and absorb pollutants and provide habitats for wildlife. They will in time contribute immeasurability in their own right as part of the urban setting and will contribute to peoples quality of life and well being. The new lighting will be more efficient than the existing lighting. The new lighting on the east side will consume 1060 watts compared to the existing load of 2,904 watts. New power points which will be installed will eliminate the need for generators and the associated local emissions. (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle

45

McCafferty, Des & O’Keefe Brendan (auth) (2009) Facing the Challenge of Change: A Spatial Perspective on Limerick

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Cork City – Christchurch is a national monument and protected structure and there is an adjoining graveyard. The project seeks to restore the building using environmentally sustainable products in keeping with the existing structure of the buildings. The emphasis is on restoration and not upgrading. The existing graveyard is being protected and maintained as is. St. Luke’s Church is also a historical significant property and the refurbishment works are also being carried out with environmental sustainable products where possible. The project has been initiated to restore the fabric of the building and to make internal repairs to floors, stairs etc. to ensure the building meets satisfactory health and safety requirements to allow the public access the building. In December 2008 the European parliament adopted an EU directive on the promotion of Renewable Energy Sources, which expanded its definition of renewable energy sources to include air and water source heat pumps, in addition to ground source heat pumps. In both Christ Church and St. Luke’s Church we are installing Air Source Heat Pumps. In both Christ Church Refurbishment and St. Luke’s Urgent Remedial Works we are conserving the existing structure where ever possible and only replacing existing structure with new materials when absolutely necessary. This is in keeping with good conservation principles as both buildings are Protected Structures. The approach taken by the Design Team was to restore and conserve where possible. In Christ Church we have been able to salvage some existing timber which was being removed from floor and re-use to re-instate window seats / window boards which had perished and decayed. Where new plaster was required in both building, a breathable lime plaster is being used, which is critical to allow any water vapour which penetrates the stone rubble walls to evaporate therefore reducing the risk of dampness and decayed internal finishes. Where new floors are being introduced we are using “green” ecocem concrete with ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS), a recycled material. Window specialist have been employed by the main contractor to conserve and restore for example the existing pine windows and existing door and joinery are being upgraded where required to comply with fire. Limerick City - It is considered that the Theme/Sub Theme positively addresses the horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability on many facets with the delivery of targeted actions in each of the horizontal principle areas. Please see Section 2 where the overall contribution that the Theme/Sub Theme is making to the promotion of the horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability is addressed in greater detail. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. Cork City – there are no issues to be brought to attention at this stage. Limerick City - It is considered that the Theme/Sub Theme positively addresses the horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability on many facets with the delivery of targeted actions in each of the horizontal principle areas. Please see progress report where the overall contribution that the Theme/Sub Theme is making to the promotion of the horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability is addressed in greater detail. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme The activities funded under the Technical Assistance measure are aimed at ensuring that the measures and the OP generally are achieving their objectives, which include the horizontal priorities of environmental sustainability, equality, including gender equality and social inclusion. (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Output Result

Number of Monitoring Committee meetings held Number of evaluations & Studies conducted Verification Audits & Closure Audits

Baseline 0 0 0

Final Target 7 3 Annual

Outturn to 31st Dec 2009 3 0 0

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Number of Annual Publicity events % Achievement of Physical & financial targets

0 0

7 100%

2 %

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

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Gender Equality Horizontal Principle Linking with the EU Lisbon Strategy and with the Europea Pact for Gender Equality adopted in 2006, the Community Strategic Guidelines require Member States and Regions to pursue the objective of equality between men and women at all stages of the preparation and implementation of Programmes and projects. This may be done through specific actions to promote gender equality as well as by taking careful account of how other projects and the management of the funds may affect women and men (gender mainstreaming). The Managing Authority is committed to tracking the impact on the Equal Opportunities Horizontal Principle at implementation level to ensure compliance with the requirement. The promotion of gender balance on the monitoring committees will also be supported together with the incorporation of a gender equality perspective at all stages of Programme implementation. These commitments are additional to legal obligations which apply in relation to gender equality. The National Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Strategy will contain mechanisms to foster gender mainstreaming at all policy formation and implementation levels in the NDP 2007-2013 and under this Programme. Gender Equality means that women and men should enjoy the same rights and opportunities and that the different behaviour, aspirations and needs of women and men are equally valued and favoured. Government policy in this area includes a double strategy consisting of a legal framework which provides for equal treatment for women and men and legislative backing for positive action initiatives for women and men including positive action in particular circumstances and commitments to apply a gender equality perspective in all areas (gender mainstreaming). The mainstream approach, gives the responsibility to address gender equality to the lead Department which is responsible for implementing the particular measure/activity.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Applied Research Enhancement Applied Research Enhancement Enterprise Ireland

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme This initiative is a competitive programme whereby awards are made on the merits of individual applications. The gender split within the programme is reflective of the existing gender split within the colleges in respect of the Principle Investigators whose responsibility it is to prepare and submit an application. Applicant colleges are required to consider equality issues in line with the Equality Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guidelines when applying for funding as stated in the programme guide documentation. Enterprise Ireland has put in place a number of initiatives to track the participation of female participants in the Programme namely the number of female Centre Managers and the number of female scientists and engineers. In 2009 the first female ARE Centre Manager was recruited by Dundalk Institute of Technology in the BMW region. (a) Ongoing Actions: Maternity cover policy: Should the issue of maternity leave arise during the course of a project, Enterprise Ireland will cover the additional costs for a replacement staff member unless these costs can be met from within the existing budget. Enterprise Ireland has developed indicators to track gender participation in the ARE Programme at both Principle Investigator and researcher level. These statistics are recorded on a quarterly basis. Enterprise Ireland promotes gender balance in the makeup of relevant project evaluation panels and committees. The ARE New Centre Starts and ARE+ Evaluation Panels are chaired by Dr. Jenny Melia, Manager of Research & Technology Programmes, Enterprise Ireland. (b) New Actions: None planned for 2010. Programme activities for 2010 will be reduced significantly due to budgetary restrictions. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position No of ARE Centres in place/extended 4 No of industrially focussed projects 4

Latest Position 9 49

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4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The EU principle of gender mainstreaming applies and applicant colleges are encouraged to support female researchers. However, evaluation of the project is based on both the regional and national needs of the companies in the relevant sectors as weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll as the technical quality of the proposals. Enterprise Ireland monitors progress and activities in the ARE Centres on an ongoing basis and the Centres submit quarterly reports. These reports capture the number of researchers employed in each Centre and the gender breakdown. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. Activities for 2010 will be reduced significantly due to budgetary restrictions. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Applied Research Enhancement Commercialisation Fund Enterprise Ireland

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme This initiative is a competitive programme whereby awards are made on the merits of individual applications. The key criterion for success is the potential to exploit the proposed technology in Ireland and in turn create new jobs and exports. The gender breakdown within the programme is reflective of the existing gender breakdown of the Principle Investigators within the colleges. The paperwork for the Commercialisation Fund for 2010 is being finalised and funded projects will be asked to report on the breakdown of male/female researchers recruited. (a) Ongoing Actions: Maternity cover policy: Should the issue of maternity leave arise during the course of a project, Enterprise Ireland will cover the additional costs for a replacement staff member unless these costs can be met from within the existing budget. We also consider applications to extend the project timeline if a key researcher will be taking maternity leave and is requiring additional time to complete deliverables on returning to the workplace. (b) New Actions: Enterprise Ireland is introducing indicators to track gender breakdown in the Commercialisation Fund Programme at both Principle Investigator and researcher level once the projects are up and running. These statistics will be recorded on an annual basis. Enterprise Ireland promotes gender balance in the makeup of relevant project evaluation panels and committees. We have six evaluation panels operating in this Programme; two under each of the three Technology Directorates â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Industrial Technologies, Informatics and Life Sciences - Food. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Number of approvals by IRCC -Proof of Concept, Technology Development, Commercialisation Plus Licenses achieved as a result of funded research Start-up Enterprises arising from funded research

Baseline Position

Latest Position

0

332

0 0

79 24

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The EU principle of gender mainstreaming applies and applicant colleges are encouraged to support female researchers. However, evaluation of the project is based on the commercial potential and impact and the technical quality of the proposals. The paperwork for the Commercialisation Fund is being updated for 2010 and funded projects will be asked to report on the breakdown of male/female researchers recruited. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments.

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Activities for 2010 will be reduced significantly due to budgetary restrictions. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Applied Research Enhancement Incubation Centre Development Enterprise Ireland

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme This initiative is a competitive programme whereby awards are made on the merits of individual applications namely the unmet enterprise need in the region and the capability of the host institution plus their commitment to the incubation agenda. Enterprise Ireland tracks the participation of female employees leading and employed in the companies located in the supported Incubation Centres. Consideration of horizontal principles is undertaken between the Campus Incubation Unit, the Policy Department and the host institution. (a) Ongoing Actions: Enterprise Ireland has developed indicators to track gender participation in the Incubation Programme at both promoter and employee level. These statistics are recorded on a quarterly basis. Enterprise Ireland promotes gender balance on the relevant project evaluation panels and committees. The Campus Incubation Evaluation Panels are chaired by Dr. Jenny Melia, Manager of Research & Technology Programmes, Enterprise Ireland. Two of the supported Incubation Centres, one BMW and one SE, are managed by female Managers. At the end of 2009, 447 personnel were employed of which 73 are female including 16 female promoters. (b) New Actions: None planned for 2010. Activities for 2010 will be reduced significantly due to budgetary restrictions. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator No. of business incubation centres in place/ extended No of companies in centres No of employees in these companies

Baseline Position 9 57 236

Latest Position 11 129 447

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The EU principle of gender mainstreaming applies and incubation centres are encouraged to support female entrepreneurship. However, evaluation of tenant selection for incubation is based purely on the business and commercial merit of the applications. Incubating companies are asked to report on the breakdown of male/female employees employed. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. Activities for 2010 will be reduced significantly due to budgetary restrictions. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Development of Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RTDI Capacity Building Research and Capacity and Capability within the HEI Department of Education and Science.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme There is a commitment to ensuring that the independent selection committee appointed to adjudicate on the research proposals is gender balanced. Likewise, institutions are encouraged to have regard to gender equality in the composition of internal assessment boards tasked with formulating institutions proposals.

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Similarly institutions are encouraged to promote gender equality in the recruitment of researchers and are required to report on the gender breakdown of positions filled. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position Latest Position No. of researchers appointed- male 385 No. of researchers appointed- female 301 Approx 44% of the head count of positions in the S&E institutions have been filled by women. 4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle The EU principle of gender mainstreaming applies and applicants are encouraged to take action to encourage female leads on research projects and shall be required to report the ratios of males to females working on projects. However, evaluation of research proposals is based purely on the scientific and technical merit of proposals. Funded projects are asked to report on the breakdown of male/female researchers engaged in funded research. Postdoctoral and postgraduate researchers are appointed on the basis of academic excellence and research proposals are awarded funding on their quality. Each institution recruits its researchers under their policies of equal opportunity. As can be seen from the returns as at 31st December 2009 nearly half of all of the positions have been filled by females. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Entrepreneurship in Microenterprise Enterprise Ireland

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme All CEBs generally seek to proactively gender-mainstream their operational activities and structures, particularly in regard to gender balance requirements, with a view to achieving optimum levels of gender equality. (a) Ongoing Actions: Women in Business: Many of the CEBs support women in business through dedicated business and networking events. Such initiatives generally focus on how to address the particular issues facing women entrepreneurs and comprise business owners/managers coming together to meet and exchange views and information on being in business. An important aspect of the programme is the way in which CEBs promote successful female entrepreneurs as role models and the use of mentoring and networking opportunities which meet the confidence-building needs of newly emerging female entrepreneurs. These networks bring together women who are already successfully running their own businesses and women who aspire to emulate them for the purpose of information and experience exchange between them. The networks provide an ongoing programme of activities on business-related topics such as insurance, taxation, etc. High profile women entrepreneurs frequently appear as guest speakers at the network events. National Women’s Enterprise Day: The County & City Enterprise Boards organised the National Women’s Enterprise Day which took place on Friday 20th November 2009, in Mullingar. National Women’s Enterprise Day aims to inspire, motivate and support women across the country in running their own business. The day consisted of a variety of developmental support actions, including inspiring speakers, information provision, exhibition of state supports for enterprise, facilitated business networking and one to one business mentoring. The benefit for female entrepreneurs attending is that they can access everything they need to know about setting up a business or expanding a business in one day under one roof. There are opportunities to get one-to-one business advice from the exhibitors and mentors. This event, hosted by the County & City Enterprise Boards, is funded under the National Development Plan (NDP) Gender Equality Section in the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform “Services to promote Women in Business / Entrepreneurship”. Partner agencies in the event are the Department of Justice Equality & Law Reform, Gender Equality Section (prime sponsor) and Enterprise Ireland.

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Cork City and South Cork Enterprise Boards: have been operating a successful “Women in Business Network” as a joint initiative over the last number of years. Re-launched as NEW (Network of Enterprising Women) in 2009, it is a dynamic and vibrant network of Enterprising Women. NEW is a positive opportunity for Cork businesswomen to make effective business contacts, develop new ideas and to be inspired and motivated by interactions with fellow members and by inspirational speakers at meetings. NEW meets for four events per year. Clare CEB: In 2009 Clare CEB organised a Women in Business Development Programme. Three women network events were held in 2009 for 142 Clare business women. West Cork Enterprise Board: The National Women’s Enterprise Day is promoted to WCEB clients. WCEB also provides a small subsidy for those who attend. Wexford CEB: The County Wexford Women in Business Network is an invaluable resource for business women in the county to meet on a regular basis and learn about best practice in running a small business from experts in various fields. The network is a support mechanism encouraging women in developing new skills, promoting each others products and services and learning from the experiences of others. Generally, network meetings are held on a monthly basis and each member receives an electronic newsletter. Members are also encouraged to submit information/articles on various business topics, including marketing events in relation to their own businesses, for inclusion in the newsletter. The Women In Business network was very active in 2009. A total of 92 women attended one or more of the six events held during the year. Waterford City Enterprise Board: All of the Board’s grants, courses and initiatives are open to any person or sector which satisfies the criteria attached to them. • 48.4% of participants on Measure 2 (Entrepreneurial and Capability Development) activities were females. • 30% of Measure 1 (Selective Financial Intervention) supported projects had a female promoter. • The Board sponsors “Network” the Organisation for Women in Business in Waterford. • The Board co-funded and organised a South East Women in Business Conference. • The Board sponsored the FEIW (Female in Entrepreneurship in Ireland and Wales) Women in Business Conference organised by Waterford Institute of Technology. Tipperary South Enterprise Board: ongoing actions include: Policies on Equality and Employment were reviewed and updated in 2009. Staff Training on equality and diversity took place in 2009 Tipperary North Enterprise Board: ongoing actions include: • Positive discrimination in favour of female promoters and women trying to re-enter the workforce • Gender balance where practical on Committees etc • Gender Proofing all initiatives Limerick County Enterprise Board: To address gender issues, LCOEB run a very successful Women In Business networking group. To strengthen and develop the group, 2009 saw the joining of the Limerick City CEB network and the County Women In Business network. Over 500 women participated – including those currently in business, considering start ups and retired business women. Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Board: The Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Boards Enterprising Women Network has been running since 1999. Enterprising Women is a monthly network for all female entrepreneurs in Dun Laoghaire Rathdown. The network meets on the 1st Tuesday of each month. It represents a valuable Peer-to Peer Learning Forum for Small Business Owners & Entrepreneurs, an excellent source of business leads and a solid support to like-minded women who can, as a group, benefit each other. Members are invited to keep in touch with each other via their own private social networking site between meetings and avail of opportunities to promote their own business via the network. At the moment DLR CEB have approximately 63 active members of this Network. On Friday, June 12th 2009, Dun Laoghaire Rathdown’s ‘Enterprising Women Network’ celebrated its 10th Anniversary and held a lunch for its members with Miriam O’Callaghan as guest of honour. Wicklow County Enterprise Board: Wicklow CEB continues to operate and develop the “Network of Entrepreneurial Women”. The Network is open to female owner-managers of small businesses in County Wicklow. Network meetings are organised by Wicklow CEB and takes the form of either an address by a guest speaker, a skills-based training workshop or a pure networking evening. There were 8 meetings during 2009, with an average attendance of 37 per meeting. Topics ranged from marketing & PR to managing change. Members of the Network are encouraged to put their information up on the Wicklow CEB website. Wicklow CEB continued to support National Women’s Enterprise Day and arranged for a group of Wicklow based female entrepreneurs to attend. Kilkenny CEB partnered with Carlow, Tipperary South, Waterford City and Wexford CEB to organise the South East Women in business Conference held in Carlow on 15th & 16th September, 2009, with almost 200 participants attending. The Board also proactively promoted and encouraged clients to attend the National Women’s Enterprise Day Conference held in Mullingar on 20th November 2009. The Board has set definitive targets on achieving a gender balance in the provision of Measure 1 (Selective Financial

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Intervention) and Measure 2 (Entrepreneurial and Capability Development) supports (e.g. at least 50% of all participants on the Board’s enterprise training and management development programmes must be women). This is measured and reported upon at each Board Meeting. For example by the end of last year, • 38% of all those availing of a business advisory session from the Board were women; • 57% of all those attending enterprise and management development training were women; • 33% of all start-ups assisted with financial support by the Board were promoted by women; and • 49% of all existing businesses supported by the Board financially to expand were promoted by women. Kerry CEB ran a “Women in Business” network in 2009 (held circa 8 meetings throughout the year) and they will continue to support a women in business network in 2010 although they will reduce the amount of support they can provide due to financial restraints. Kerry CEB also committed staff resources to the organisation of the National Women’s Enterprise Day Cork North CEB promotes the “National Women’s Enterprise Day” to their clients and this CEB provides a small subsidy for those who attend. Fingal CEB: With 10 events taking place through 2009 and an overall attendance of 385 women the Fingal Women in Business Network is a dynamic and inspirational network which supports existing and upcoming women entrepreneurs in the Fingal area. The network allows members to learn about business from both their peers and recognised successful entrepreneurs, grow their contact base and develop strategic awareness in all critical areas of business, thus creating a greater opportunity for success. Carlow CEB: There were 3 special initiatives in 2009 which specifically targeted women • The Women in Business Enterprise Development programme, an 8 week level 6 FETAC accredited programme (9 participants). • The South East Women in Business conference and Awards (66 female delegates from County Carlow attended this event which was held in conjunction with CEBs in Kilkenny, Wexford and South Tipperary, 200 delegates in total) • CCEB also held 2 networking events targeting female entrepreneurs early in 2009 South Cork CEB: All South Cork CEB training programmes have a general mix of gender e.g. in 2009 603 people participated in training programmes, over 50% were women. South Cork CEB operate a specific network dedicated to Women in Business with quarterly events attended by almost 100 women each time (NEW – network of enterprising women) South Dublin CEB: The Enterprising Women Network which was operated on behalf of South Dublin CEB by the South Dublin Chamber is now terminated as South Dublin CEB is not in a position to renew its support due to a reduction in its funding. (b) New Actions: West Cork Enterprise Board: The launch of a new network “Network West Cork” took place on the 24th September 2009 at Fernhill House Hotel, Clonakilty. It was a dynamic business to business networking event with up to 100 owner/managers and entrepreneurs of small to medium sized businesses, across all sectors, in attendance. Network West Cork is a new dynamic network for all entrepreneurs, owner/managers and business people of West Cork. Business networking is a vital marketing tool. The Network is funded and managed by the West Cork Enterprise Board. The Board has been running and managing a Small Business Network and a Woman in Business Network since October 2007. Now two years later, the Networks have been re-branded as Network West Cork. The Network aims to run regular networking events during the year, in addition to quarterly women in business events. Waterford City Enterprise Board: The ACT Management Development Programme for female entrepreneurs was piloted during the year and when reviewed will be modified for a similar programme during 2010. Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Boards: DLRCEB Assistant CEO, was the Chairperson of the Organising Committee for National Women’s Enterprise Day which took place 19th – 20th November 2009. Meath County Enterprise Board: Meath CEB provided a networking event to members of the Women in Business network in Killeen Castle Golf Club, Dunsany on Monday, 21st September. The purpose of the event was to offer female entrepreneurs an opportunity to connect with other businesswomen and with specialised speakers on business topics. They were provided with an opportunity to have a one-to-one consultation with one of the Board’s mentors to assess their business needs and 40 of the 90 attendees availed of the service. The mentors in turn then recommended supports that they may be able to avail of from Meath CEB, financial institutions or other agencies. Wicklow County Enterprise Board: In order to ensure greater access to Board services for both men and women, one to one business advisory sessions are now available in the Boards offices until 7pm and on site mentoring services operate outside of normal office hours. Kilkenny CEB: In 2009 Kilkenny CEB made provision for the ‘Kilkenny Women’s Network’ to nominate one of their members (i.e. female entrepreneur) to the Board to help achieve a better gender balance on the

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Board and more importantly to ensure that there was a more enhanced channel of communication between the Board and female entrepreneurs in the County. Fingal CEB: In 2009 there was a celebratory event for the 10 year anniversary of the Fingal Women in Business Network. The 2010 calendar includes topics such as “Women in Business – Shaping the Future” which takes place on International Women’s Day and there are also plans for an exhibition during the year where members can exhibit their products and services. Carlow CEB: Carlow County Enterprise Board is currently recruiting members for its Female Enterprise Development Programme, targeting women who are operating a business, focussing on strategies in sales and marketing. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator No. of enterprises supported /created Total promoters Of which are Male promoters Of which are Female promoters Of which promoter is company/ partnership/ other No. of feasibility studies supported; Total46 Male Female Other No. of feasibility studies approved and paid since Jan 2004 Total Male Female Other No. of recipients of training Total Male Female Other No. of training days provided Total Male Female Other No. of colleges/schools annually engaged in enterprise education initiatives Percentage of training participants who are satisfied with training broken down by gender Total47 Male Female Other No. of businesses supported surviving in region broken down gender of promoter reported annually48 Total Male Female Other

Baseline Figures Out-turn to Dec 2006

Latest Position 31st December 2009*

4,029 2,647 1,202 180 (Jan 04 – Dec 06) 842 641 164 37 (Jan 04 – Dec 06) 194 144 40 10

5,342 3,609 1,521 212 (Jan 04 – Dec 09) 1,227 940 236 51 (Jan 04 – Dec 09) 473 354 99 20

57,178 22,353 34,474 351 (Jan 04 – Dec 06) 74,294.1 30,808 43,365.6 120.5 425

108,446 44,432 63,546 468 (Jan 04 – Dec 09) 165,462.5 71,409.3 93,867.0 186.10 773

(Jan 04 – Dec 06)

(Jan 04 – Dec 09)

93.3% 39.9% 60.2% 0.3% Report Year 2006

92.8% 41.3% 58.3% 0.2% Report Year 2009

6,161 4,280 1,633 248

5,857 4,053 1,585 219

46

Figure represents total to Dec 2009. Feasibility Study figures in brackets represent Jan 2004 -Dec 2009. ‘Total’ figure represents overall percentage of those satisfied. Gender figures represent the breakdown of that percentage satisfied, e.g.: if 95% satisfied, 55% male, 45% female, it means that of the 95% who said they were satisfied, 55% were male and 45% were female. 48 Incorporates pre 2000 businesses supported 47

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No. of jobs (FT/PT) created in supported businesses reported annually. 49 Male F/T Female F/T Male P/T Female P/T

14,012 7,786 2,178 3,942

12,801 7,466 2,445 4,240

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle Clare CEB: In 2009 the number of women participating on training programmes has increased. From a total of 730 participants on training programmes, 313 participants were female. Wexford CEB: The Women in Business network promotes entrepreneurship amongst women and provides a support mechanism for female entrepreneurs. Waterford City Enterprise Board: Increasing the participation of female entrepreneurs in self employment. Tipperary South Enterprise Board: All materials and services promoted and delivered by the Board are consistently reviewed for gender Equality Promotion of women in Business Networks. Limerick County Enterprise Board: LCOEB are promoting women in business through their network and also on their various courses. Approx. 60% of the participants are women. Meath CEB: MCEB have a positive discrimination in favour of female entrepreneurs and this is reflected in the 2% more participation in Start Your Own Businesses. Wicklow CEB: There were 8 Network of Entrepreneurial Women meetings with on average 36 attendees at each and 6 Owner Manager Network meetings again with an average of 31 attendees at each. Participation levels of men and women on Wicklow County Enterprise Board’s general business and I.T. training courses are encouraging – the overall female participation rate in 2009 was almost 50%. The specific needs of women are being addressed at each Women in Business Network meeting, and are amalgamated into the Network’s aims and objectives on a continual basis. Kilkenny CEB: The perspective of women entrepreneurs is now actively represented and articulated on the Board. The Kilkenny CEB sets targets and measures performance in attaining targets on gender balance. Cork North CEB: The participation of women in business training and management development programmes encourages their participation in enterprise and entrepreneurship. Their participation in Women Only Networking events encourages and provides a support structure for women running their own business. Fingal CEB: Enabling females to access self employment opportunities. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. Clare CEB: Provide subsidised crèche facilities for women with children wishing to attend business training. Provide more individual mentoring on work/life balance; time management; assertiveness, etc. for women re-entering the workforce. Waterford City Enterprise Board: The progressive reduction of budgets allocated over the past year will seriously inhibit the ability of CEBs to address the issues raised by the economic down turn and provide the level of service expected by our customer base. There will be a corresponding fall in the numbers assisted under Measure 1 (Selective Financial Intervention) and Measure 2 (Entrepreneurial and Capability Development) in a time when the support offered by CEBs is critical in assisting micro-businesses to sustain and survive the current recession. The current Government recruitment embargo forbids the replacement of staff losses via retirement etc. Since CEBs operate with very limited staff numbers there is a corresponding impact on service levels. Kerry CEB: Limited funding issues to engage in new programmes outside of core actions. Staff embargo and restrictions on recruitment current workload South Cork CEB: Budget constraints limiting innovation and new initiatives that could be driven by the board staffing constraints 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge Fund

49

Incorporates pre 2000 Jobs created, based on Annual Employment Survey, therefore figures provided are up to November 2009.

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Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Public Transport Department of Transport and Marine.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme This work is part of the Removal of Speed Restrictions Programme which Iarnr贸d Eireann is undertaking and which aims to improve speeds on the rail network to support the increased frequency on the intercity services. The objectives in respect of the rationalisation of Limerick Junction are to facilitate an increase in the use of public transport on rail services through Limerick Junction and ensure a decrease in journey times in respect of services through Limerick Junction. (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: Some of the elements of the work had started but there has been a delay due to demand on resources. Physical work in respect of the Limerick Junction rationalisation project is anticipated to recommence during 2010 with a view to completion in 2011. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge Fund Sports Capital Programme Department of Arts, Sport & Tourism.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions:

3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle.

5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments.

6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

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Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Regional Assembly

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme. The activities funded under the Technical Assistance measure are aimed at ensuring that the measures and the OP generally are achieving their objectives, which include the horizontal priorities of environmental sustainability, equality, including gender equality and social inclusion. (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Output Result

Number of Monitoring Committee meetings held Number of evaluations & Studies conducted Verification Audits & Closure Audits Number of Annual Publicity events % Achievement of Physical & financial targets

Baseline 0 0 0 0 0

Final Target 7 3 Annual 7 100%

Outturn to 31st Dec 2009 3 0 0 2 %

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

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Broader Equality Horizontal Principle The Council Regulation of 11 July 2006 laying down general provisions for the European Regional Development Fund and the European Social Fund require Member States to take steps to prevent discrimination on the basis of the grounds of gender, race, ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age and sexual orientation. It stipulates that accessibility for disabled persons shall be one of the criteria to be observed in defining operations co-financed by the Funds and to be taken into account during the various stages of implementation. The Community Strategic Guidelines further define the prevention of discrimination on the basis of gender, race or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation as basic principles of cohesion policy and require that these broad equality grounds be incorporated into all levels of the strategic approach to cohesion. The Equality Authority is an independent body set up under the Employment Equality Act 1998 with an expanded role in relation to the Employment Equality Act, 2004 and the Equal Status Acts, 2000 to 2004. These Acts outlaw discrimination in employment, vocational training, education, advertising, collective agreements, accommodation, the provision of goods and services and other opportunities to which the public generally have access on nine distinct grounds: Gender, Marital Status, Family Status, Age, Disability, Race, Sexual Orientation, Religious Belief and Membership of the Traveller Community. Progress has been made in pursuing the equality agenda in Ireland. However, inequality continues to persist across all 9 grounds, all areas of service provision and also access to and achievements in the workplace. Inequality is also strongly linked to exclusion, as groups that tend to be subject to inequality also tend to be socially excluded, and have higher levels of deprivation. The Managing Authority will take appropriate steps to prevent discrimination in relation to the following categories which are protected by equality legislation: Gender, Marital Status, Family Status, Age, Disability, Race, Sexual Orientation, Religious Belief and Membership of the Traveller Community. Intermediary bodies may use positive action, as appropriate, to achieve full equality in practice for these categories in the activity funded under the Programme. In addition, the project selection criteria will ensure as appropriate, that the projects will be assessed on the basis of their compliance with equal opportunity requirements and their promotion of gender equality. Intermediary bodies will be required to incorporate accessibility for disabled persons as a criterion to be observed in co-funded public facilities. This is to be included in project specifications, as appropriate. The Equality Authority, which has a statutory responsibility to promote equality, is available to offer support to intermediary bodies in assessing the impact of their measures on the nine equality grounds and incorporating an equality dimension, as appropriate, in project design and delivery.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Innovation and the Knowledge Economy Entrepreneurship in Microenterprise Enterprise Ireland

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme All CEBs help promote equal diverse and socially inclusive societies and help combat poverty and inequality through co-operation with local and rural development structures and facilitation of job creation. (a) Ongoing Actions: Student Enterprise Awards: Organised by the County and City Enterprise Boards, the Student Enterprise Awards offer students the opportunity to take a business from the idea stage right through to completion. Over 10,500 students all over the country take part in the Awards every year which culminates in a spectacular finale at the National Finals held in April. The main aim of the Student Enterprise Awards is to encourage Entrepreneurship in young people. This Awards allow students to have an opportunity to gain first hand experience of what it is really like to run a business - from the initial planning stage, through financing the set up, to selling their products or services. Through this process, they learn both success and failure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both inevitable features of doing business. Bi Gnothach Enterprise Programme: On foot of the success of programmes at second level a new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bi Gnothachâ&#x20AC;? Enterprise Programme has been developed for use with Primary School Students. The aim of this programme is to promote enterprise education in 5th and 6th class at primary level by introducing students to many aspects of setting up and running an enterprise while also learning about the world of work.

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Emphasis is on active participatory learning and teamwork. This programme was piloted in 2005-2006 by South Dublin Enterprise Board with 19 schools participating and very positive feedback was obtained from participating teachers and students. This programme is now run annually with the number of participating enterprise boards and participating primary schools continuing to increase. Enterprise Encounter: a programme designed to introduce students to local entrepreneurs, has been developed by the County & City Enterprise Boards in partnership with the Second Level Support Service (SLSS) of the Department of Education and Science. The aim of this particular programme is to give students a very real insight into what is required to set up and run a business and to inculcate an entrepreneurial mentality in their way of thinking about their future career options. Enterprise is now a leaving Certificate Curriculum subject. The Small Business Game is an online educational game sponsored by the County & City Enterprise Boards, Ulster Bank and Microsoft where players run their own football retail store. Students learn: • What it is like to manage a small business. • What works in business-and what doesn’t work. • Experiment with different strategies and tactics to see the impact of your decisions. Cork City Enterprise Board have a policy to support back to work entrepreneurs and long term unemployed. Clare CEB participated in a Traveller’s Enterprise Committee. This committee obtained funding through FAS to help travellers set up their own business or gain employment. To date, one traveller has started her own business and 2 have gained employment through this initiative. Clare CEB co-operates with the Clare Supported Employment Agency which aims to help people with disabilities gain employment. The Board encourages employers who are clients of the Board to employ, where possible, people with disabilities. Clare CEB has assisted a number of non-nationals who have participated in training courses during 2009. Clare CEB creates an enterprise culture awareness among second level students. In total 756 students attended at 3 Student Enterprise Days in Spanish Point, Bunratty and Ennis in September & October 2009 and of these 126 students took part in the Schools Enterprise Awards in 2008/2009 school year. West Cork Enterprise Board: In 2007/ 2008 the WCEB ran a Succession Planning, Family Business Programme, which was very successful. This programme was run in conjunction with PLATO Cork. In 2009 WCEB tried to run this programme again but unfortunately they did not have sufficient numbers to run the programme. Instead, WCEB developed a PLATO Networking group for West Cork businesses in 2009. Tipperary South Enterprise Board: The Board continues to work with the South Tipperary Disability Forum to monitor compliance. The Board works closely with South Tipperary Development Co., South Tipp Supported Employment Project Ltd. (supporting persons with a disability to achieve and maintain employment) and Rehab with regard to gender equality, disability and race. In compiling its Employment Equality Manual the Board through its Equality team; have based its policies and structures on the nine grounds of Discrimination and the ten steps to equality as applies to the Board. Limerick County Enterprise Board: (LCOEB) actively promote corporate social responsibility and incorporate the ideas in to their daily work practices while encouraging their clients to do so also, for example they offer training courses in employment legislation and health and safety at work. In January 2009, the Dell Facility in Raheen, Co. Limerick announced over 2000 redundancies. LCOEB worked closely with Dell to roll out 9 Start Your Own Business courses in-house to provide options and support to those facing redundancies. LCOEB encouraged any member of the public facing unemployment to participate in their training with no charge for attendance. Working relationships were made with many of the Dell workers and we continue assisting ex Dell employees and any unemployed person to develop business ideas and start a business with as much support as possible. Limerick County Enterprise Board was an organising member of a collaborative project with University of Limerick, Enterprise Ireland, Limerick Institute of Technology, FAS and Mid West VEC for Tus Nua event at Thomond Park in March 2009. Over 500 people attended this event. The FAS Traveller Initiative in Abbeyfeale and Rathkeale requested a number of sessions on Starting a Business for traveller groups. This was following on from sessions provided in 2008 to similar groups. Feedback from the organiser was excellent, and the groups attended and sold produce at a market stall in the University of Limerick. It is an important part of the Limerick County Enterprise Board function to provide young persons with entrepreneurial information, and to encourage youth to think of the future and possible self-employment. Limerick County Enterprise Board targeted 3 sectors: 1. Second level students in Transition year - Limerick County Enterprise Board encourages entrepreneurial development from an early age, through the Student Enterprise Award schemes. Over 500 students participate in this, resulting in approximately 130 students presenting high quality business plans and products or services at the county Final. To support the teachers involved in this project, a LCOEB representative visits the schools to provide business planning advice and assistance in areas required. We

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also actively support emerging SMEs at third level through mentoring and courses provided in the institution. 2.Youth Clubs with age group 14-17 - In 2009 LCOEB ran a pilot project with Limerick Youth Service called “Doing the Biz”, to promote idea of business as a career option through the Youth Service Network in County Limerick. Groups from youth centres in County Limerick put forward ideas for running an event and generating funds for the local youth centre. Over 40 teenagers were involved. The winners were Kileedy Youth Club, with runners up Knockainey and Abbeyfeale Youth Club. 3. Third level students - Limerick County Enterprise Board was directly involved in the rollout of business led programmes at third level: • Limerick Institute of Technology : Market Link programme • Limerick College of Art & Design –Professional Practice Programme • University College Cork – Food Development Programme • Tus Nua – A mid west collaborative project with UL, LIT, Enterprise Ireland and FAS Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Board: Membership of the Traveller Community: DLRCEB Business Advisor is on the Board of St. Kiernan’s Enterprise Centre which supports traveller employment. Disability: The Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Enterprise Board continues to ensure that all supports and services they provide are fully accessible to everyone. DLRCEB website contains the option to change the text size so that the contents can be read by people with visual impairments. DLRCEB have developed procedures for dealing with requests from clients for information and supports in various accessible formats, including sign language interpreters, Braille, loop systems etc. Meath County Enterprise Board: provides a general service to all sectors of community, but they don’t positively discriminate in Broad equality terms. A review of the Start Your Own Business Programmes run by the Board since 2000 indicates that of the 1,056 people who participated: • 51% were female and 49% were male • 10% were non-nationals Wicklow County Enterprise Board: • The Information Officer at Wicklow CEB acts as Disability Officer and co-ordinator. • Staff of Wicklow CEB are cognisant at all times of the nine grounds: Gender, Marital status, Family, Age, Disability, Race, Sexual orientation, Religion and Membership of the Traveller Community, when delivering services to clients • A Network for women in business exists and a number of times in 2009 (Network of Entrepreneurial Women, Wicklow) • An internal Equality Policy is in place (part of the FAS Excellence Through People Award attained by WCEB) • The provision of mentoring and business advisory sessions at the client premises or any location that facilitates access by the client. • Active outreach is provided through the Enterprise Bus and Enterprise Clinics. Kerry CEB were involved in 2009 and continue to be involved in the Traveller Employment Workgroup which aims to target unemployment amongst the travelling community, through job placement and promotion of self-employment Kerry CEB were involved in the Tus Nua, committing staff resources to the initiative Referral to enterprise supports and specific mentor support for clients with language difficulties etc Fingal CEB: Management Development Training, Start Your Own Business and E-Commerce Programmes, Business Information Seminars, Exhibitions, Fingal Day of Enterprise, Business Mentoring – all of these programmes and initiatives are aimed at the broad community in Fingal. Carlow CEB: • In 2009, CCEB provided free seminars (Fresh Start and New Start) highlighting issues surrounding economic downturn • CCEB continues to participate at rural based information evenings • In 2009, in association with other local agencies, CCEB hosted an open forum in Bagenalstown to discuss infrastructural development, enterprise supports and social inclusion • During 2009, CCEB initiated the “Moving On Programme” which targeted single/lone parents who wished to move into the workplace or self employment. • Programme/ information delivery and venues are accessible to various levels of disability. South Cork CEB: had applied for national funding to expand on previous Ethnic Minority Entrepreneur programme but no funding is available nationally to support this programme. South Cork CEB is currently considering an EU partnership Interreg related programme (working with Ethnic Minority Entrepreneurs) with Wales. (b) New Actions:

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West Cork Enterprise Board WCEB continue to promote a Family Business programme and should WCEB receive sufficient numbers, they will run the programme again. WCEB are also currently providing business advice and training to a number of clients who have been recently been made redundant and who are looking at the option of starting their own business. Waterford City Enterprise Board • A Fresh Start Conference was organised during 2009. The theme of this conference was investigating self-employment as an option and focused on the unemployed, recent redundant persons, those facing redundancy and third level graduates recently graduated and due to graduate in 2009. Over 120 persons attended this conference. • A number of information sessions were held during the year which specifically targeted redundant employees from Waterford Crystal, TEVA etc. • Ideas Generation work shops were held in conjunction with the above programmes to assist those with an interest in self-employment but without a business idea. • A range of workshops focusing on themes relevant to problems associated with the current economic downturn were organised. The themes covered included marketing on a shoe string, cutting & reducing costs, selling to the Public Sector, innovation etc. Tipperary South Enterprise Board The Community and Enterprise section in the South Tipperary County Council are members of the Traveller Interagency Committee. They have made an application to FAS for a special initiative for travellers - the application involves the employment of a jobs coach to work with the travelling community on placing travellers in work or helping them to become self employed (usually bringing existing businesses out of the black economy). Tipperary South Enterprise Board will support this initiative by providing business start up information and Advice. Tipperary North Enterprise Board North Tipperary County Enterprise Board in conjunction with a range of partners co-ordinated a Tus Nua Opportunities Fair in the Abbey Court Hotel, Nenagh in May 2009 to identify the needs of recently redundant and unemployed persons. Limerick County Enterprise Board In 2009 LCOEB ran a pilot project with Limerick Youth Service called “Doing the Biz”, to promote the idea of business as a career option through the Youth Service Network in County Limerick. Groups from youth centres (Youth Clubs with age group 14-17) in County Limerick put forward ideas for running an event and generating funds for the local youth centre. Over 40 teenagers were involved. The winners were Kileedy Youth Club, with runners up Knockainey and Abbeyfeale Youth Club. Wicklow County Enterprise Board Wicklow CEB took part in a number of exhibitions arranged by the Wicklow Social Inclusion groups to promote entrepreneurship to all target groups including people in disadvantaged groups. Kerry CEB In 2010 Kerry CEB participated in an “Options for Adult’s” event which showcased educational, employment, training and enterprise opportunities for the unemployed. Fingal CEB • With a focus on the unemployed, “Start-Up Supports Briefings” were introduced to assist people who had been made redundant and were looking for information on supports available both from the Enterprise Board and other organisations and agencies. There were 339 attendees in 2009 and the briefings are now being run on a fortnightly basis. • Initiatives were set up with employees of SR Technics who were facing redundancy to assist them with practical advice and information on setting up a new business. • A new Management Development training programme - “Social Media and Digital Marketing” has been scheduled for March and May. This programme has been designed to: ⇒ provide participants with the skills to make the most of sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, IGO people and Twitter ⇒ Show them how to create online profiles for themselves and their business and connect with existing and potential customers ⇒ Learn how to take full advantage of viral marketing i.e. referrals from online word of mouth The interactive nature of Internet marketing in terms of providing instant response, is a unique quality of the medium. Internet marketing is sometimes considered to have a broader scope because it not only refers to the Internet, e-mail, and wireless media, but it includes management of digital customer data and electronic customer relationship management systems • Introduction of Primary Level students into the Student Enterprise Awards initiative.

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Carlow CEB As a response to economic downturn there were 3 initiatives: 1. New Start Carlow 2. Fresh Start (Targeting those recently unemployed, these initiatives included modules on personal finances, marketing, training, banks approach to lending and the issues involved in starting a business in Ireland 3. An Economic Conference, “Is the Glass Half Full?”, targeting SMEs throughout the County, in association with the local Chamber of Commerce, provided details of successful strategies and business case studies in an economic downturn. In 2009 CCEB increased its use of social networking sites, including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator No. of enterprises supported /created Total promoters Of which are Male promoters Of which are Female promoters Of which promoter is company/ partnership/ other No. of feasibility studies supported; Total50 Male Female Other No. of feasibility studies app. & paid since Jan 2004 Total Male Female Other No. of recipients of training Total Male Female Other No. of training days provided Total Male Female Other No. of colleges/schools annually engaged in enterprise education initiatives Percentage of training participants who are satisfied with training broken down by gender Total51 Male Female Other No. of businesses supported surviving in region broken down gender of promoter reported annually52 Total Male Female Other

Baseline Figures /Out-turn to Dec 2006

Latest Position 31st December 2009*

4029 2647 1202 180 (Jan 04 – Dec 06) 842 641 164 37 (Jan 04 – Dec 06) 194 144 40 10

5342 3609 1521 212 (Jan 04 – Dec 09) 1227 940 236 51 (Jan 04 – Dec 09) 473 354 99 20

57,178 22,353 34,474 351 (Jan 04 – Dec 06) 74,294.1 30,808 43,365.6 120.5 425

108,446 44,432 63,546 468 (Jan 04 – Dec 09) 165,462.5 71,409.3 93,867.0 186.10 773

(Jan 04 – Dec 06)

(Jan 04 – Dec 09)

93.3% 39.9% 60.2% 0.3% Report Year 2006

92.8% 41.3% 58.3% 0.2% Report Year 2009

6,161 4,280 1,633 248

5857 4053 1585 219

50

Figure represents total to Dec 2009. Feasibility Study figures in brackets represent Jan 2004 -Dec 2009. ‘Total’ figure represents overall percentage of those satisfied. Gender figures represent the breakdown of that percentage satisfied, e.g.: if 95% satisfied, 55% male, 45% female, it means that of the 95% who said they were satisfied, 55% were male and 45% were female. 52 Incorporates pre 2000 businesses supported 51

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No. of jobs (FT/PT) created in supported businesses reported annually. 53 Male F/T Female F/T Male P/T Female P/T

14,012 7,786 2,178 3,942

12,801 7466 2445 4240

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle Clare CEB: The Board approved grant aid towards 37 projects in 2009. The employment potential from this grant aid was 44. Waterford City Enterprise Board: Targeting of unemployed and recently redundant persons has resulted in 80% of Measure 1 (Selective Financial Intervention) approvals being new start-ups and 66% of grant recipients coming from the unemployed. Tipperary South Enterprise Board: All materials and services promoted and delivered by the Board are consistently reviewed for Broad Equality. Limerick County Enterprise Board: The programme for Travellers and early school leavers gives them the opportunity to consider self employment as an option. It also gives them the confidence to explore other avenues of employment. Fingal CEB: All training programmes, seminars etc., are open to everyone. The Management Development Training takes place in the training room in the FCEB offices, as does the Swords Start your own Business course. There is wheelchair access to the training room and where it is necessary to use a different venue Fingal CEB ensure that these are wheelchair accessible also. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. Clare CEB: Provide subsidised crèche facilities for women with children wishing to attend business training. Provide more individual mentoring on work/life balance; time management; assertiveness, etc. for women re-entering the workforce. Waterford City Enterprise Board: The progressive reduction of budgets allocated over the past year will seriously inhibit the ability of CEBs to address the issues raised by the economic down turn and provide the level of service expected by our customer base. There will be a corresponding fall in the numbers assisted under Measure 1 (Selective Financial Intervention) and Measure 2 (Entrepreneurial and Capability Development) in a time when the support offered by CEBs is critical in assisting micro-businesses to sustain and survive the current recession. The current Government recruitment embargo forbids the replacement of staff losses via retirement etc. Since CEBs operate with very limited staff numbers there is a corresponding impact on service levels. Kerry CEB: Limited funding issues to engage in new programmes outside of core actions, Staff embargo and restrictions on recruitment current workload. South Cork CEB: Budget constraints limiting innovation and new initiatives that could be driven by the board staffing constraints. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge Fund Arts Capital Fund Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism.

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: 53

Incorporates pre 2000 Jobs created, based on Annual Employment Survey, therefore figures provided are up to November 2009.

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3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Regional Assembly

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme The activities funded under the Technical Assistance measure are aimed at ensuring that the measures and the OP generally are achieving their objectives, which include the horizontal priorities of environmental sustainability, equality, including gender equality and social inclusion. (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions:

3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Output Result

Number of Monitoring Committee meetings held Number of evaluations & Studies conducted Verification Audits & Closure Audits Number of Annual Publicity events % Achievement of Physical & financial targets

Baseline 0 0 0 0 0

Final Target 7 3 Annual 7 100%

Outturn to 31st Dec 2009 3 0 0 2 %

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

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Social Inclusion Horizontal Principle Social Inclusion is an important horizontal theme in the Government’s priorities. The Community Strategic Guidelines also stress the importance of social cohesion and social inclusion in order to help promote socially inclusive societies and combat poverty. The strategic framework for social inclusion in Ireland is now being significantly enhanced through: • the new partnership agreement, Towards 2016; • the recent National Report on Strategies for Social Protection and Social Inclusion (NSSPI), submitted to the EU in September 2006; • the new National Action Plan for Social Inclusion (NAP inclusion) which will be published shortly; • the Social Inclusion and Human Capital Chapters and other relevant elements of the NDP (2007 – 2013). For the first time, the systems and structures that contributed to the overall strategy for promoting social inclusion will be brought together in an integrated framework that will ensure that economic and social development go hand in hand. The Operational Programmes will as far as possible incorporate measures to ensure Social Inclusion and minimise the effects of Social Exclusion in the development and implementation of the Operational Programmes. The Managing Authority is committed to tracking the impact of social inclusion at implementation level on relevant operations within the Programme, and will work with the Intermediate Bodies in devising appropriate detailed implementation plans.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Environment & Accessibility Information and Communication Technology Accessibility Broadband Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: All businesses in Rapid or Clár areas currently without broadband will have broadband available to them as a result of the NBS. (b) New Actions: MANs project delivering high-speed broadband across various locations nationwide. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator No. of initiatives to enable broadband infrastructure and service provision Additional businesses with broadband available

Baseline Position

Latest Position

0

1

0

14,577

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle All businesses in Rapid or Clár areas currently without broadband will have broadband available to them as a result of the NBS. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template. The company continues to progress its network roll-out and services have gone live in almost half of the designated areas to be covered under the Scheme. The entire NBS coverage area, comprising of 1,028 Electoral Divisions must be covered by end of September 2010.

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Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge fund Public Transport Department of Transport and Marine

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme This work is part of the Removal of Speed Restrictions Programme which Iarnr贸d Eireann is undertaking and which aims to improve speeds on the rail network to support the increased frequency on the intercity services. The objectives in respect of the rationalisation of Limerick Junction are to facilitate an increase in the use of public transport on rail services through Limerick Junction and ensure a decrease in journey times in respect of services through Limerick Junction. (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: Some of the elements of the work had started but there has been a delay due to demand on resources. Physical work in respect of the Limerick Junction rationalisation project is anticipated to recommence during 2010 with a view to completion in 2011. 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge fund Arts Capital Fund Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

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Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge fund Sports Capital Fund Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: (b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme/Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Sustainable Urban Development Gateways & Hub Challenge Fund ERDF Gateways Grant Scheme Southern & Eastern Regional Assembly

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme / subtheme (a) Ongoing Actions: Cork City – As the projects are at construction stage there are no social inclusion actions so far for either project. Waterford City – In terms of environmental sustainability the project was designed to the criteria set out in the “Reference Document on Best Available Techniques in Glass Manufacturing – E.U. IPPC Bureau 2000” and will be operated according to E.P.A. best practice standards. In saving the future of the traditional skill sets involved in crystal glass manufacturing, by providing skilled employment opportunities and by stimulating growth in tourism in the city, the project will contribute to the promotions of social inclusion. Limerick City – The Lisbon Strategy and The EU Sustainable Development Strategy, adopted by the European Council in Gothenburg in June 2001, and renewed in June 2006 place a key emphasis on providing targeted interventions that address inter alia the horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability. Article 8 of the ERDF regulations (EC No 1080/2006) provides that the funds can support integrated and sustainable strategies to tackle high concentrations of economic, environmental and social problems affecting urban areas. The activities which are specifically horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability, many of these specified activities form a core component of The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project thereby providing specific actions that address these horizontal principles. These specific actions are addressed further hereunder. In accordance with the Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013 for the Southern and Eastern Regional Assembly the prioritised horizontal principles of environmental sustainability and promotion of social inclusion are integrated into the implementation and monitoring of The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project as follows - The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project proposal contains a number of specific actions that will specifically contribute to the horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability. The horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability form an intrinsic part of the overall project implementation. This project forms part of an overall multi-phased Public Realm strategy for Limerick City. The completed deliver of this public strategy over the coming

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years (subject to funding) will provide a City Centre environment that delivers on the horizontal principle of social inclusion and environmental sustainability in a holistic and integrated manner in the immediate City Centre area. The key actions that have taken place over the last year to incorporate the horizontal principles into the theme (The Gateway and Hub Challenge Theme) and the Sub Theme (Urban Regeneration) would largely have taken place at the pre-planning and planning stage where due analysis and consideration would have been given to specific actions that could be incorporated into the overall project that would address and be supportive of the horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability. The specified horizontal principles will form a key deliverable of the actual implementation of the project which is due to commence in early May 2010. More specifically the implementation of The Crossroads Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project will deliver on the specified horizontal principles through the implementation of the following actions which flow from the analytical and deliberative process that was undertaken at the pre-planning and planning stages of the project over the course of the past year. These are as follows:- Rehabilitation of the physical environment. The ‘Crossroads’ Public Transport Hub & Public Realm Enhancement Works project will provide a renewed and rejuvenated public realm in the existing city centre through the targeted provision of public transport infrastructure and public realm enhancement works. This will contribute to the rehabilitation of the existing physical environment and supports the horizontal principle of environmental sustainability through renewing the existing public realm and thereby leading to the subsequent renewal and redevelopment of brown-field sites that form part of the immediate public realm. Improved access to transport The provision of a Green Route (bus/cycle lane) is a key deliverable of this project. The provision of this infrastructure will contribute to a more efficient public transport system with improved journey times and will thus encourage a modal shift from the car to public transport. This will lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and thereby contribute to a more sustainable and healthier environment. This further demonstrates the contribution of this project to environmental sustainability. The provision of the Green Route that forms part of this project forms part of a larger Green Route that will be a key component of a new Orbital Route for the City Centre which will contribute to improved traffic flow and reduced traffic congestion. The overall integration of the Green Route that forms part of this proposal with a larger Green Route will consolidate the provision of improved public transport and thereby expands and integrates in a holistic manner the overall contribution of this project to the horizontal principle of environmental sustainability. Brownfield redevelopment It is anticipated as has been the case to date where public realm enhancement works have taken place (Bedford Row, Thomas Street and Upper Thomas Street) that the project will facilitate the redevelopment of both brown-field and derelict sites within the urban core of the City Centre thereby re-enforcing the quality and environmental sustainability of the proposed works in terms of urban design. This will provide the impetus for supporting and prioritising a City Centre first based approach (which is consistent with the overall Retail Strategy for the Mid-West Region 2010 – 2016) and will lead to the targeting of renewed investment in commercial and retail based activities in the existing City Centre, which in turn will combat urban sprawl and address the leakage of retail development from the City Centre to out of town sub-urban locations and thereby contribute to a dynamic City Centre which is ultimately more environmentally sustainable. This is consistent with national policy which articulates the need for vibrant, attractive Cities which will drive the potential of Gateways in contributing to the overall competiveness of the Region. This is consistent with the horizontal principle of environmental sustainability. Environmentally sustainable travel The provision of infrastructure to allow for electric charge points for electric cars complements the horizontal principle of environmental sustainability through the reduction of green house emissions and providing the infrastructure that will facilitate an uptake in environmentally friendlier cars. Dublin City - To date a significant level of discussion has taken place with the public representatives, event organisers, residential and business communities through the following mechanisms:• Central Area Committee • Monitoring Committee, HARP (Historic Area Rejuvenation Plan) IAP 1996 - 2008 • Smithfield Area Business Association • The Smithfield Working Group 2004 Dublin City Council (Central Area Office and the Events Unit) have met Local Residents and Community Groups regularly over the last eight years. The City Council held a workshop with Event Organisers in April 2009 at which the latter expressed their views on using the Smithfield plaza as an event space. The Project Team in place for this development is made up of representatives from the City Council departments who have a remit in Smithfield (Roads, Traffic, Public Lighting, Electrical Services, Parks, Public Domain Officer, Manager of the Events Unit and the Central Area office. It has consulted widely on the proposals and continues to do so. After the project is completed the City Council will put in place a more structured approach to managing the Smithfield space. This will involve liaising with the residents, businesses, event organisers and other agencies such as the Gardai. The new play equipment, seating and landscaping will provide greater opportunities for both the local communities and visitors to interact together and enjoy the

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space. The elimination of car parking spaces will help to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the area. It should encourage the use of public transport. in particular the LUAS which has a stop at Smithfield. The Council is encouraging cycling as a healthy and sustainable alternative to cars and the Dublin Bikes scheme introduced in September 2009 has been hugely successful. The provision of another Dublin Bike station accommodating thirty bikes and regular bicycle stands at the northern end of the plaza will further help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and traffic congestion. The landscaped areas will be designed in such a way that they will be irrigated by natural rain water. The trees release oxygen, absorb carbon dioxide, filter and absorb pollutants and provide habitats for wildlife. They will in time contribute immeasurability in their own right as part of the urban setting and will contribute to peoples’ quality of life and well being. The new lighting will be more efficient than the existing lighting. The new lighting on the east side will consume 1060 watts compared to the existing load of 2,904 watts. New power points which will be installed will eliminate the need for generators and the associated local emissions. (b) New Actions: Limerick City - A post evaluation phase will monitor on an ex ante/ex post quantifiable evidence based approach (through the establishment of specific indicators) how the project has contributed to the horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability. It is intended that these ex ante/ex post quantifiable evidence based indicators will possibly monitor the following:ƒ Footfall analysis pre and post project implementation and delivery ƒ Increased uptake in ICT technology ƒ Analysis of uptake in public transport usage pre and post provision of green routes ƒ Analysis of retail development uplift following works leading to improved and concentrated city centre area ƒ Survey of how perception of improved streetscape contributes to overall attractiveness of City ƒ Measurement of air quality pre and post project implementation and delivery 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Indicator Baseline Position

Latest Position

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme / Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle Cork City – Once completed the Christchurch Project will be managed by Triskel Arts Centre, to provide an auditorium for concerts which don’t have a suitable venue in Cork at the moment. St. Luke’s is to be used for community based activities which will provide a resource for all sections of the local community. Limerick City - It is considered that the Theme/Sub Theme positively addresses the horizontal principles of Social Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability on many facets with the delivery of targeted actions in each of the horizontal principle areas. Please see Section 2 where the overall contribution that the Theme/Sub Theme is making to the promotion of the horizontal principles of social inclusion and environmental sustainability is addressed in greater detail. 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. Cork City – There are no issues to be brought to attention at this stage. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

Priority: Theme: Sub-Theme: Intermediate Body:

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Regional Assembly

2. What actions have taken place over the last year to incorporate the principle into the theme/ subtheme The activities funded under the Technical Assistance measure are aimed at ensuring that the measures and the OP generally are achieving their objectives, which include the horizontal priorities of environmental sustainability, equality, including gender equality and social inclusion. (a) Ongoing Actions:

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(b) New Actions: 3. Progress against Indicators (where established): Class Indicator Output Result

Number of Monitoring Committee meetings held Number of evaluations & Studies conducted Verification Audits & Closure Audits Number of Annual Publicity events % Achievement of Physical & financial targets

Baseline 0 0 0 0 0

Final Target 7 3 Annual 7 100%

Outturn to 31st Dec 2009 3 0 0 2 %

4. Taking account of the material presented under 2 and 3 above, what contribution is the Theme / Sub-Theme making to the promotion of the principle 5. Identify any issues arising that need to be drawn to the attention of the Managing Authority or other Departments. 6. Please feel free to attach any relevant additional material to this reporting template.

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Annex 3 Membership of Monitoring Committee Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme Monitoring Committee Membership. Managing Authority Cathaoirleach and 5 Elected Members of the S&E Regional Assembly Director of the S&E Regional Assembly Government Departments Department of Finance (2) Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment Department of Education and Science Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism Department of Transport & Marine Department of Community, Rural & Gaeltacht Affairs Department of Agriculture Fisheries & Food Regional Interests Regional Authorities Directors(5) City & County Managers Association Social Partners 2 representatives of Employers 2 representatives of Trade Unions 2 representatives of Farming organisations 2 representatives of Community and Voluntary Sector Horizontal Interests Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government (Env. Policy) Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform (Equality & Gender Equality) Department of Social and Family Affairs (Office of Social Inclusion) North-South Co-operation Special EU Programmes Body Advisors to the Monitoring Committee EU Commission (2) Regional Authority Cathaoirligh (5) ERDF Certifying Authority Information and Publicity Unit Enterprise Ireland (Intermediary Body) Higher Education Authority (Intermediary Body) Sustainable Energy Ireland (Intermediary Body) Equality Authority Comhar, Sustainable Development Partnership Environmental Protection Agency

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Annex 4 Financial Tables Programme Total, Dimension Code 1= 01, 02, 08, 15, 43, 52, 61, 85, 86. Dimension Code 2= 01, 02. Dimension Code 3= 00, 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total Annual Expenditure 2009 As % of Annual Forecast 2009

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €62.451 €123.261 €124.477 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €310.189

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €24.980 €49.308 €49.793

3 €37.471 €73.606 €73.105

4 €0.000 €0.347 €1.579

€124.081

€184.181

€1.926

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €30.494

6 €3.590 €4.921 €0.297

7 €66.041 €128.182 €124.774

€30.494

€8.808

€318.997

5

€310.189 45.55%

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Innovation & The Knowledge Economy Priority Total, Dimension Code 1= 01, 02, 08. Dimension Code 2= 01, 02. Dimension Code 3= 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Annual Expenditure 2009 As % of Annual Forecast 2009

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €60.118 €107.642 €99.865 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €267.626

2 €24.051 €43.057 €39.946

3 €36.077 €64.585 €59.919

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5 €0.000 €0.000 €22.633

€107.054

€160.581

€0.000

€22.633

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €60.118 €107.642 €99.865

€0.000

€267.626

€267.626 96.62%

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PRTLI, Dimension Code 1= 01, 02. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01.

Year.

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €45.740 €92.848 €85.374 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €223.963

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

2 €18.300 €37.139 €34.150

3 €27.450 €55.709 €51.225

€89.589

€134.384

Total Matching Other Public 4

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009 5

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure 6

€0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure 7 €45.740 €92.848 €85.374 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €223.963

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Micro Enterprise, Dimension Code 1= 08. Dimension Code 2= 02. Dimension Code 3= 01.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €14.378 €14.794 €14.491 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €43.663

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €5.751 €5.918 €5.796

3 €8.627 €8.877 €8.695

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€17.465

€26.198

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non coFinanced Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €22.633

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €14.378 €14.794 €14.491

€22.633

€0.000

€43.663

5

165


Environment & Accessibility Priority Total, Dimension Code 1= 15, 43. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total Annual Expenditure 2009 As % of Annual Forecast 2009

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €2.288 €14.945 €21.801 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €39.033

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.915 €5.982 €8.722

3 €1.373 €8.963 €13.079

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€15.619

€23.414

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €7.715

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €2.288 €14.945 €21.801

€7.715

€0.000

€39.033

5

€39.033 18.15%

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Renewable Energy Total, Dimension Code 1= 43. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €2.224 €7.340 €9.368 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €18.932

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.890 €2.940 €3.749

3 €1.334 €4.400 €5.619

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€7.579

€11.353

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €2.224 €7.340 €9.368

€0.000

€0.000

€18.932

5

167


CHP & ReHeat, Dimension Code 1= 43. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €1.275 €4.520 €2.485 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €8.280

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.510 €1.810 €0.994

3 €0.765 €2.710 €1.491

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€3.314

€4.966

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €1.275 €4.520 €2.485

€0.000

€0.000

€8.280

5

168


Energy For Business, Dimension Code 1= 43. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €3.968 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €3.968

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

2 €0.000 €0.000 €1.587

3 €0.000 €0.000 €2.381

€1.587

€2.381

Total Matching Other Public

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

4

5

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure 7 €0.000 €0.000 €3.968

€3.968

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

169


Renewable Energy Development and Deployment, Dimension Code 1= 43. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.949 €2.820 €2.915 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €6.684

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.380 €1.130 €1.168

3 €0.569 €1.690 €1.747

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€2.678

€4.006

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €0.949 €2.820 €2.915

€0.000

€0.000

€6.684

5

170


Information and Communication Technology Accessibility Broadband, Dimension Code 1= 15. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01, 05.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.064 €7.605 €12.433 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €20.101

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.025 €3.042 €4.973

3 €0.038 €4.563 €7.460

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€8.040

€12.061

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €7.715

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €0.064 €7.605 €12.433

€7.715

€0.000

€20.101

5

171


Sustainable Urban Development Priority Total, Dimension Code 1= 52, 61. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total Annual Expenditure 2009 As % of Annual Forecast 2009

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.578 €2.632 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €3.210

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.000 €0.231 €1.053

3 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

4 €0.000 €0.347 €1.579

€1.284

€0.000

€1.926

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €3.590 €4.921 €0.297

7 €3.590 €5.499 €2.930

€0.000

€8.808

€12.018

5

€3.210 1.81%

172


Gateways Grant Scheme, Dimension Code 1= 61. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.578 €2.632 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €3.210

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.000 €0.231 €1.053

3 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

4 €0.000 €0.347 €1.579

€1.284

€0.000

€1.926

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €0.000 €0.042 €0.062

7 €0.000 €0.620 €2.695

€0.000

€0.104

€3.314

5

173


Transport, Dimension Code 1= 52. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 01.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

3 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.000

€0.000

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.000

6 €3.590 €4.879 €0.235

7 €3.590 €4.879 €0.235

€0.000

€8.704

€8.704

5

174


Technical Assistance Priority Total, Dimension Code 1= 85, 86. Dimension Code 2= 01. Dimension Code 3= 00.

Year

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Cumulative Total

Total Eligible Public Expenditure 1=2+3+4 €0.036 €0.096 €0.178 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000 €0.310

Total ERDF

Total Matching Exchequer

Total Matching Other Public

2 €0.014 €0.039 €0.071

3 €0.021 €0.058 €0.107

4 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

€0.124

€0.186

€0.000

Cumulative Eligible Expenditure declared to Managing Authority to year end 2009

Other Non co-Financed Expenditure

Cumulative Co Fund + Non Co fund Expenditure

€0.000 €0.000 €0.146

6 €0.000 €0.000 €0.000

7 €0.036 €0.096 €0.178

€0.146

€0.000

€0.310

5

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Annual Implementation Report 2009  

This is the third Annual Implementation Report for the Southern & Eastern Regional Operational Programme for 2007-2013. This report relates...