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2021

Peanut Variety Guidebook

A communication service of the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation.


CONTENTS//

January/February 2021

In This Issue 6 / New Shelling Plant

Coastal growers plan $87 million plant in Atmore, Alabama.

14 / Winter Nursery Breeding

Corley Holbrook speeds up variety development by using a winter nursery in Puerto Rico.

16 / Peanuts Go Mobile

Georgia Foundation for Agriculture creates mobile experience to educate children about agriculture.

18 / Balancing Act

Production and global trade continue to demonstrate a balancing act between their growth rate and overall demand.

Departments 8 / Checkoff Report Alabama Peanut Producers Association, Florida Peanut Producers Association, Georgia Peanut Commission and Mississippi Peanut Growers Association 24 / Washington Outlook 26 / Southern Peanut Growers Update

Joy Carter Crosby Editor joycrosby@gapeanuts.com 229-386-3690 Director of Advertising Jessie Bland jessie@gapeanuts.com Contributing Writers Abby Himburg abby@alpeanuts.com Southeastern Peanut Farmer P.O. Box 706, Tifton, Ga. 31793 445 Fulwood Blvd., Tifton, Ga. 31794 ISSN: 0038-3694

10 2021 Peanut Variety Guidebook

Selecting a variety is a key management step for farmers. SEPF’s 2021 Variety Guidebook highlights varieties available to growers in the Southeast and provides growers with the results of state variety tests. Cover Photo Peanut seed in a planter in Miller County, Georgia. Photo by Joy Crosby.

Southeastern Peanut Farmer is published six times a year (Jan./Feb., March, April, May/June, July/Aug., and Oct./Nov.) by the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation. The publisher is not responsible for copy omission, typographical errors, or any unintentional errors that may occur, other than to correct it in the following issue. Any erroneous reflection which may occur in the columns of Southeastern Peanut Farmer will be corrected upon brought to the attention of the editor. (Phone 229-386-3690.) Postmaster: Send address changes (Form 3579) to Southeastern Peanut Farmer, P.O. Box 706, Tifton, Georgia, 31793. Circulation is free to qualified peanut growers and others allied to the industry. Periodical postage paid at Tifton, Georgia and additional mailing office. Editorial Content: Editorial copy from sources outside of the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation is sometimes presented for the information and interest of our members. Such material may, or may not, coincide with official Southern Peanut Farmers Federation policies. Publication of material does not necessarily imply its endorsement by the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation. For editorial concerns call 229-386-3690. No portion of this or past issues of the Southeastern Peanut Farmer may be reproduced in any form whatsoever without the written consent of the editor. By-lined articles appearing in this publication represent views of the authors and not necessarily those of the publisher. Advertising: The Publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertisement. Corrections to advertisements must be made after the first run. All billing offers subject to credit review. Advertisements contained in this publication do not represent an endorsement by the Southeastern Peanut Farmer or the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation. Use of trade names in this publication is for the purpose of providing specific information and is not a guarantee nor warranty of products named. For advertising concerns call 229-386-3472.

January/February 2021 Southeastern Peanut Farmer

3


Editorial

Calendar of Events

A New Year of Virtual Meetings

The following meetings have been postponed or canceled for 2021.

t is a new year and time to once again reflect on the past year and set those resolutions or goals for 2021. This past year could not have ended fast enough. I believe the majority of individuals I have talked to were so glad to see the year 2020 come to an end. So, whether you are ready or not, 2021 is here. Of course, the start of 2021 feels similar to 2020. Many meetings and conventions have been canceled or moving to a virtual format. The wintertime has always provided farmers an opportunity to learn about the latest in peanut research, new products to use on the farm or how their checkoff dollars are being used through county and state-wide meetings. Some of those meetings will not happen and others will be available online. I encourage you to check with your state peanut organization on the latest updates for meetings or with your local Extension service. Virtual formats can’t replace the one-on-one conversations with farmers or the ability to ask questions. However, organizations and the Extension service are doing the best they can in an unfortunate situation. They are taking the time to make presentations available for you so you will have the knowledge you need in 2021. I encourage you to take the time to watch the presentations online if you can and even if you don’t necessarily like using a computer. Near the end of 2020, members of Georgia Farm Bureau and the Alabama Farmers Federation elected presidents for their organizations. Congratulations to Tom McCall who was elected in December as the the president of Georgia Farm Bureau. McCall replaces Gerald Long, who retired from the position after serving as GFB president since 2016. In Alabama, Jimmy Parnell was elected to a fifth two-year term during the Alabama Farmers Federation’s 99th annual meeting. He will serve the organization during their 100th anniversary. Congratulations! As always, I wish you a Happy New Year and a wonderful season with your crops in 2021! t

u Georgia Peanut Farm Show Originally scheduled for Jan. 21, 2021. Has been postponed until January 2022. For more information call 229-386-3470.

I

Joy Carter Crosby Editor

2021 Ag Forecast Virtual Seminar Jan. 29 beginning at 9:30 a.m. Register online at: www.georgiaagforecast.com

Keynote Topics: Agritourism COVID-19’s Impact on Agriculture

4

Breakout Session Topics: Livestock & Poultry Cotton, Peanuts, Grains & Oilseeds Green Industry & Vegetables, Fruits & Tree Nuts Forestry and Land Taxation

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

u Mississippi Peanut Growers Association Annual Meeting The meeting originally scheduled in January 2021 has been canceled. Annual meeting may be rescheduled for February or March 2021. For more info call 601-606-3547 or visit misspeanuts.com. u South Carolina Peanut Growers Annual Meeting & Trade Show, 2021 Annual Meeting has been canceled. For more information call 803-734-0338. u Alabama/Florida Peanut Trade Show, Originally scheduled for Feb. 4, 2021, has been postponed until 2022. u National Peanut Buying Points Association Annual Meeting Originally scheduled for Feb. 12-15, 2021, has been canceled. For more info call 229-3860216 or visit peanutbuyingpoints.org.

The following events are either virtual or still taking place at the time of printing. u Georgia Young Farmers Association Virtual Annual Meeting, Jan. 29-30, 2021. For more information call 229-386-3429 or visit gaaged.org/youngfarmers/. u Alabama Peanut Producers Annual Meeting, Feb. 4, 2021, National Peanut Festival Fairgrounds (Showbarn Building #7), Dothan, Ala. For more info call 334-792-6482 or visit alpeanuts.com. u Georgia Peanut Commission Research Report Day, Feb. 10, 2021, National Environmentally Sound Production Laboratory (NESPAL), Tifton, Ga. For more info visit gapeanuts.com or call 229-386-3470. u American Peanut Shellers Association Industry Spring Conference, March 2-3, 2021. For more information call 229-888-2508 or visit peanut-shellers.org. (Let us know about your event. Please send details to the editor at joycrosby@gapeanuts.com.


Coastal Growers Plan $87 Million Plant

Members of Coastal Growers LLC, Joe Parker and Mark Kaiser assess the construction site and review the shelling plant blueprints.

C

oastal Growers LLC plans to build an $87 million peanut shelling and storage plant in Atmore, Alabama. The plant, targeted to open up in December of 2021, will bring at least 100 jobs to the area with more temporary workers being needed during peak shelling times. The idea of the cooperative shelling plant for Southwest Alabama began two years ago when several grower leaders approached a group of buying points from east and west Alabama and made it clear that this is something they wanted to pursue. The “why” behind the company was very simple, growers want to maximize farm profits. “With commodity prices at such depressing levels, we as growers have been open to consider anything that might give us a better opportunity to financially survive,” says Joe Parker, owner and general manager of Summerdale Peanut in Baldwin County and a member of Coastal Growers.

6

The cooperative shelling plant model gives growers the opportunity to collectively sell on the shelled goods market rather than the traditional farmers stock market. “This, our investors believe, will give them the best chance to enhance earnings and have a sustainable family farm,” Parker says. “Independent buying points go where their customers want to go in order to not lose tonnage. Therefore, this is a win-win for the growers and the buying points.” The company was able to receive more than $20 million in grants and incentives through federal, state and local governments. In addition, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, recently approved a USDA loan guarantee for a substantial part of the project funding. Economic Development agencies from the State of Alabama and Escambia County, Alabama, also provided support. Parker commented that the support from Governor Kay Ivey, Senator Richard Shelby, Senator- Elect Tommy Tuberville,

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

Atmore Mayor Jim Staff, as well as the Alabama Farmers Federation have all been incredibly helpful. Baldwin County farmer Mark Kaiser said the new shelling plant will allow local farmers to capture more of the profit off of their crops by becoming vertically integrated. “This facility will be owned by the farmers who use it, and they’ll keep those profits themselves,” says Kaiser who serves as the Alabama Peanut Producers Association vice president. “That’s good for both the farmers and for the immediate area, because the money will just keep turning over locally.” Directed by a board, Coastal Growers is owned by a cooperative of 90 farm families and will work with 6 buying points. Most of the farmers reside in Alabama but there are members from the Mississippi River to the Chattahoochee River. The company is still accepting new members, however will be limiting it soon due to capacity constraints. t By Abby Himburg


Checkoff Report Investments Made by Growers for the Future of the Peanut Industry.

FPPA Selects 2020 Scholarship Winners The Florida Peanut Producers Association Scholarship Committee recently awarded four students with $1,200.00 scholarships. Fourteen applications were received and reviewed by the Committee. “While all applications were very good, the four winners demonstrated excellence in scholastic achievement, each receiving numerous honors and awards,” says Michael Davis, FPPA president and chairman of the Scholarship Committee. “Each winner also demonstrated leadership qualities through their involvement in extracurricular activities in school organizations, clubs and churches as well as their responsibilities on their family farms,” Davis says. Florida Peanut Producers Association congratulates these outstanding students.

Madelyn Cozart Santa Rosa County

Travis Godwin Santa Rosa County

Ansley Yoder Calhoun County

Adam Hall Walton County

GPC celebrates Peanut Butter Lovers Month in November The Georgia Peanut Commission, in partnership with The Peanut Institute, hosted a Twitter Party on Nov. 16 with #FoodieChats. The one hour, online event garnered more than 13 million timeline deliveries and reached more than 600,000 people. The party promoted peanut nutrition, recipes fun facts and more.

GPC also sponsored 10 digital billboards in the Atlanta-area throughout the month of November. Rotating peanut butter messages were shared with interstate travelers delivering appoximately 1.9+ million impressions per week.

Banks and Financial Institutions Celebrate Peanuts during Georgia Peanut Bank Week

The Georgia Peanut Commission and the Georgia Bankers Association joined forces Oct. 12-16, 2020, in an effort to promote Georgia’s peanut industry during the 44th annual Georgia Peanut Bank Week. Financial institutions and local banks across the state offered a tribute to Georgia’s 4,500 peanut farm families and the sustainability they provide to Georgia’s state and local economies. The 2020 theme, “Georgia Peanuts. The Superfood to Bank On!” showcases the affordable and nutritious peanut. Through the promotion, 107 banks participated and distributed recipe brochures and 156,900 packs of Georgia peanuts.

GPC promotes peanuts through sporting events across the state Throughout the fall, the Georgia Peanut Commission sponsored peanut promotional advertisements with the Atlanta Braves baseball and the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech football. Thirty-second and 10-second promotional messages aired on the Atlanta Braves Radio Network through 680 The Fan, which has approximately 3.5 million listeners per week throughout the Southeast from July to October. Also, a 30-second promotional message airs during the UGA and Georgia Tech football season through IMG, where up to 56 radio affiliates broadcast the message. GPC also promoted peanuts in the Statesboro area on the campus of Georgia Southern through radio ads, website and in-game promotions on the video board and a tailgate for their Ag Day event prior to the Nov. 16 football game.

8

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

Atlanta-area digital billboard advertisement sponsored by the Georgia Peanut Commission.

Georgia Peanuts debut on Small Town Big Deal Georgia Peanuts were highlighted on a Nov. 12 episode of Small Town Big Deal. The segment, which was filmed in 2019 and 2020, highlighted the Plains Peanut Festival and the humble peanut it represents. The 30-minute show gave viewers a glimpse into the festival, but also took them to the peanut field for planting, harvest and even to a peanut butter manufacturing facility. To view the epsisode, visit the GPC Youtube page.


Reports from the: Alabama Peanut Producers Association Florida Peanut Producers Association Georgia Peanut Commission Mississippi Peanut Growers Association

Alabama Peanut Producers promotes peanuts at Landmark Park

Jacob Davis, APPA executive director, shares peanuts and other giveaways with visitors to the APPA tent.

Landmark Park is Alabama’s agriculture museum, and peanuts take center stage. APPA provided roasted peanuts and other peanut materials at the inaugural Peanut Boil on Sept. 26, 2020. More than 250 people attended to get free boiled peanuts and listen to blue grass music. On Oct. 17, 2020, Landmark Park held their Fall Farm Day. More than 1,500 attendees from multiple states viewed peanut harvest before machinery, and other historical agriculture-related harvest methods. APPA was there to share roasted peanuts, recipes, coloring books, peanut allergy information and more.

APPA Partners with AL.com and iHeart Media The Alabama Peanut Producers Association partnered with AL.com and iHeart Media to promote peanuts and peanut butter through digital awareness and sound campaigns. The digital awareness campaign with AL.com was held during August-October in North Alabama and consisted of digital ads and three blogs focused on peanut nutrition and peanut allergies. Over 100,000 impressions per month were garnered with the campaign. APPA digital ad for AL.com The sound campaign with iHeart Media ran Nov. 2-22 and targeted adults, ages 25-54 with children in the home, in Huntsville and Birmingham areas of the state. APPA ran a series of high impact 15 second Total Traffic and Weather commercials. By adding the iHeart Radio-Streaming Network to the mix, APPA was able to extend their reach and frequency as moms and dads engaged the network. A total of 88,336 streaming audio impressions were served.

Mississippi Peanut Growers takes to the radio and digital display ads to promote peanuts in November

The Mississippi Peanut Growers Association promoted Peanut Butter Lovers Month Nov. 2-22, 2020, with iHeart Media. This advertising project was made possible through co-promotion funds from the National Peanut Board. The promotion included radio stations covering the Northern half of Mississippi. Additionally, the promotion attracted a variety of listerners by airing the spots on urban, gospel, country, R&B and oldies stations along with traffic and weather announcements. During the 20 day promotion, the commercial aired 244 times. The promotion also included digital network audience reaching 166,667 viewers. The viewers were specifically targeted by using categories such as health conscious moms, expectant/infant moms and sustainable foodies. The radio spots and digital ads were used to tell consumers how peanuts can help them provide healthy options for their family, help the environment by using a sustainable food source, and how affordable peanut products are. The advertising plan was presented in 41 counties including higher population counties in the state.

Mississippi Peanut Growers sponsor ad at nurses convention The Mississippi Peanut Growers Association and the National Peanut Board were able to place a color picture in the 2020 Mississippi Nurses’ Association Annual Convention virtual program since the scheduled in-person convention was canceled. The promotional photo showed a parent holding a baby in her lap and a nurse checking the baby. The caption for the picture stated, “You have the power to help prevent a potential peanut allergy!” The nurses were encouraged to visit- PreventPeanutAllergies.org for more information by a caption at the bottom of the photo. The convention program was sent to some 2,000 nurses plus nursing students.

Mississippi Peanut Growers promotes peanuts at visitor centers in the state

The Mississippi Peanut Growers Association provided peanuts and literature at four visitor centers in key locations coming into Mississippi. The locations were on I-55 South coming out of Tennessee, I-20 at Vicksburg coming from Louisiana, I-59 North from New Orleans, and I-10 East from Louisiana/ Texas. A color sign indicating FREE Peanuts was displayed at the centers and the staff handed out the peanuts along with literature on Peanut Allergy Myths and Heart-Healthy Peanuts. Response was tremendous with 2,000 bags of peanuts given out in two days. MPGA has received requests asking how to get more peanuts and the center staff replied they had gone “NUTS.”

January/February 2021 Southeastern Peanut Farmer

9


2021 Peanut Variety

Guidebook

S

tate, federal and private peanut breeding programs are actively involved in the development of improved varieties with desirable traits for increasing dollar value, yield, grade, disease resistance, insect resistance, virus resistance, nematode resistance, aflatoxin resistance, drought tolerance, better shelling characteristics, longer shelf-life and enhanced flavor and nutritional qualities. In the U.S., there are four peanut market types (runner, virginia, spanish and valencia), and within each market type, there are different varieties. The varieties contained in this guidebook reflect those varieties commonly planted in the Southeast and those varieties recommended by agronomists for this area due to resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Variety selection is an important process in the overall management of the farm. This guidebook serves as a resource for growers when they select a variety for the 2021 crop year.

Runner Type ACI 3321 is a large seeded, high-oleic runner peanut. ACI 3321 is a top yielding variety for ACI Seeds and in

10

State Variety testing in Alabama, Florida and Georgia. ACI 3321 has a high level of TSWV resistance, best in class white mold resistance and very good leaf spot resistance. ACI 3321 has demonstrated stability across diverse U.S. peanut production areas. ACI 3321 is well adapted to irrigated and dry-land production. ACI 3321 was developed by Kim M. Moore of ACI Seeds, a privately funded peanut research and development company based in South Georgia with ongoing research and development across all U.S. peanut growing regions. ACI 3321 seed will be commercially available for the 2021 planting season. ACI 789 is a high oleic runner variety with a high percentage of medium kernels. The variety matures in about 135 days in South Georgia and has good resistance to TSWV. This variety has very good peg strength giving flexibility during harvesting when weather condition delay digging and/or picking. ACI 789 was released in 2015 by ACI Seeds under the Plant Variety Protection Act. ACI 789 was developed by Kim M. Moore of ACI Seeds, a privately funded peanut research and development company based in South Georgia with ongoing research and development across all U.S. peanut growing regions. ACI 789

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

has demonstrated stability and success across many U.S. peanut production areas. AU-NPL 17 is a runner type peanut with high-yielding and medium maturity, very good resistant to TSWV, highly tolerant to leaf spot, very good resistant to white mold and superior shelling characters. AU-NPL 17 has a prostrate growth habit with main stem and with large vines. It has high oleic fatty acid content and excellent flavor. AU-NPL 17 is well adapted to irrigated and non-irrigated lands across diverse U.S. peanut production area. AU-NPL 17 has a very decent grade. The seeds have pink testa and medium large runner seed size, which is a little smaller than Georgia-06G. AU-NPL 17 was released by Auburn University and USDA-ARS National Peanut Research Laboratory in 2017. FloRunTM ‘331’ is a high-yielding, medium maturity, disease tolerant runner-type variety released from the University of Florida, North Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna, Florida, in 2016. It has medium runner seed size with very good grades. FloRunTM ‘331’ has had excellent pod yield in both irrigated and non-irrigated


trials over several seasons of testing across several locations in Florida. Of the runner-type varieties tested for resistance to leaf spots and white mold, FloRunTM ‘331’ has had among the best pod yield and lowest disease scores and it is moderately resistant to TSWV. FloRunTM ‘331’ has high oleic oil chemistry beneficial for extended shelf-life and marketability of peanuts and peanut products. Georgia Greener is a high-yielding, TSWV-resistant, typical-seeded, runner-type peanut variety that was released in 2006 by the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia. Georgia Greener has a high level of resistance to spotted wilt disease caused by TSWV and CBR. In multi-location tests conducted in Georgia during the past several years, Georgia Greener was found to have among the lowest disease incidence, highest pod yield, highest TSMK grade and highest dollar value return per acre compared to other runner-type varieties tested each year. Georgia Greener has darker green foliage, a typical runner seed size, and a medium maturity similar to Georgia Green.

Alabama State Variety Test Results Runner Variety

2018

2019

2020

Irrigated

Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

6917

6579

5705.8

4900.5

6244

5989

-

-

5778.3

5227.3

5958

5685

FloRun™ ‘331’

6917

6542

5144

4864.3

4494

5059

Georgia Greener

6915

6190

6624.5

6012.8

5458

4977

Georgia-06G

6933

6724

6461.5

6031.3

5919

5333

Georgia-07W

6843

6636

5354.3

5499.5

5493

4959

Georgia-09B

6426

6921

5426.8

5444.5

5706

5441

Georgia-12Y

6484

6820

6418.5

5480

5884

5758

Georgia-14N

5965

5856

4564.8

4234.5

4855

4995

Georgia-16HO

7168

7028

5844.5

6306.3

5954

5476

Georgia-18RU

-

-

6376

5154.8

5812

5048

Tifguard

6101

6457

5808

5316

5721

5792

TifNV-High O/L

6300

6047

5126.5

4791.8

5350

5256

TUFRunner™ ‘297’

7096

5892

5868.8

5408.8

6009

5399

ACI 3321 AU-NPL 17

resistance with medium maturity and excellent yield, grade and dollar value return per acre.

Georgia-06G is a high-yielding, TSWV-resistant, large-seeded, runner-type peanut variety that was released in 2006 by the University of Georgia, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia. Georgia-06G has a high level of resistance to TSWV. In multilocation tests conducted in Georgia during the past several years, Georgia06G was found to have among the lowest disease incidence, highest pod yield, highest TSMK grade and highest dollar value return per acre compared to other runner-types tested each year. Georgia06G combines high TSWV resistance with medium maturity and excellent yield and high TSMK grade which results in greater dollar value return per acre.

Georgia-09B is a high-yielding, high-oleic, TSWV-resistant, medium-seeded, runner-type peanut variety that was released in 2009 by the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, Georgia. Georgia-09B has a high level of resistance to spotted wilt disease caused by TSWV. Georgia-09B also has the high-oleic and low-linoleic fatty acid ratio for improved oil quality and longer shelf-life of peanut and peanut products. Georgia-09B originated from the first backcross made with Georgia Green as the recurrent parent. It has an intermediate runner growth habit and medium maturity, similar to Georgia Green. Georgia-09B has a medium runner seed size as compared to the larger-seeded, high-oleic, runner-type variety, Florida-07. Georgia09B combines the excellent roasted flavor of Georgia Green with the high-oleic trait for longer shelf-life and improved oil quality of peanut and peanut products.

Georgia-07W is a high-yielding, TSWV-resistant and white mold-resistant, runner-type peanut variety that was released in 2007 by the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, Georgia. Georgia-07W has a high level of resistance to TSWV and to white mold or stem rot. Georgia-07W combines high TSWV and white mold

Georgia-12Y is a high-yielding, TSWV-resistant, white-mold resistant, medium-seeded, runner-type peanut variety that was released in 2012 by the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations. It was developed at the University of Georgia, Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, Georgia. Georgia-12Y is similar to another runner-type variety

‘Georgia-10T’ in having low TSWV disease incidence and total disease incidence. However, during several years averaged over multilocation tests in Georgia, Georgia-12Y had significantly higher pod yield and higher dollar value return per acre compared to Georgia-10T. Georgia-12Y also has a smaller seed size (greater number of seed per pound) than Georgia-10T. Georgia-12Y should be an excellent variety for an earlier planting (April) option in the Southeast because of its high TSWV and white mold-resistance and later maturity. Georgia-14N is a new highyielding, high-oleic, TSWV-resistant, and RKN-resistant, small-seeded, runnertype peanut variety that was released in 2014 by the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations. It was developed at the University of Georgia, Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton. Georgia14N is similar to other high-oleic, runner-type varieties in having high-oleic and low-linoleic fatty acid profiles. However, during three-years averaged over multilocation tests in Georgia, Georgia-14N had significantly less TSWV and total disease incidence and higher yield, grade and dollar value return per acre compared to Tifguard. Georgia-14N combines high-yield, TSWV resistance and root knot nematode resistance with smaller seed size, and the high-oleic trait for longer shelf-life and improved oil quality of peanut and peanut products.

January/February 2021 Southeastern Peanut Farmer

11


Georgia-16HO was again found to have less TSWV and total disease incidence and higher yield, grade and dollar value return per acre compared to TUFRunnerTM ‘297’ and TUFRunnerTM ‘511’. Georgia16HO was also found to have a large runner seed size similar to TUFRunnerTM ‘511’, but not as large of seed size as TUFRunnerTM ‘297’. Georgia-16HO combines high-yield, TSWV resistance with large runner seed size, and the high-oleic trait for longer shelf-life and improved oil quality of peanut and peanut products.

Georgia-16HO is a high-yielding, high-oleic, TSWV-resistant, largeseeded, runner-type peanut variety that was released in 2016 by the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations. It was developed at the University of Georgia, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia. Georgia-16HO is similar to other high-oleic, runner-type varieties in having the high-oleic and low-linoleic fatty acid profile. However during several years averaged over multilocation tests in Georgia, Georgia-16HO had less TSWV and total disease incidence and higher yield, grade and dollar value return per acre compared to Florida-07, FloRun ‘107’, and TUFRunner ‘727’. Georgia16HO was also found to have a large runner seed size similar to two of these other large-seeded, high-oleic, runner varieties, Florida-07 and TUFRunnerTM ‘727’. During the past few years averaged over multilocation tests in Georgia,

Georgia-18RU is a new highyielding, normal-oleic, TSWV-resistant and leaf scorch-resistant, medium-large seeded, runner-type peanut variety that was released by the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station in 2018. It was developed at the University of Georgia, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia. During five-years averaged over multiple location tests in Georgia, Georgia-18RU had the highest percent TSMK grade and the lowest number of seed per pound compared to the Georgia06G runner-type variety. Georgia 18RU was also found to have a similar low percent TSWV and total disease incidence, high yield and dollar value return per acre as Georgia-06G. Georgia18RU combines high yield, high grade, high dollar value and TSWV and leaf scorch resistance with the desirable

normal-oleic trait requested by peanut butter manufacturers. It also has similar roasted flavor, blanchability and maturity as Georgia-06G. Tifguard is a high-yielding, medium-maturity, runner market-type peanut variety. It was jointly released by the USDA-ARS and the University of Georgia. It was the first peanut variety with a high level of resistance to both the peanut root-knot nematode and TSWV. Tifguard has a runner-type growth habit with dark green foliage and a prominent main stem. It has demonstrated very good yields and grades when tested with no nematode pressure in tests in Georgia, Alabama, Florida and South Carolina. When tested in fields with high nematode pressure it has demonstrated very good yields and grades without the use of nematicides. Tifguard also has a moderate level of resistance to leaf spot. TifNV-High O/L is a high oleic peanut variety developed and released by USDA-Agricultural Research Service peanut breeder Corley Holbrook. It’s a new high oleic version of the nematode resistant Tifguard that Holbrook released several years ago. The new variety offers high yields, nematode resistance, a high concentration of oleic acid, resistance to spotted wilt virus, moderate resistance to leaf spot and medium maturity. TifNVHigh O/L resulted from a cross between

Florida State Variety Test Results 2017 Runner Variety

AC3321

2018

2019

2020

Marianna, Gainesville, Live Oak

Marianna, Gainesville, Jay

Marianna, Gainesville, Live Oak

Marianna & Gainesville

Marianna, Gainesville, Live Oak

Gainesville

Marianna & Gainesville

Marianna

Irrigated

Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

-

-

-

-

6889

4847

6636

5154

AU-NPL 17

6362

4166

7315

6161

6259

5058

6267

5078

FloRun™ ‘331’

5925

5283

6907

6118

7017

5270

7041

5746

Georgia-06G

6076

4119

7189

5107

6603

5293

6247

5470

Georgia-09B

5700

3655

7126

5663

6473

4964

6669

5121

Georgia-12Y

6167

4647

7512

5629

6455

4089

6875

5547

Georgia-14N

5148

4244

6837

5720

-

-

-

-

Georgia-16HO

6680

4601

7942

5914

6887

4970

6764

5278

Georgia-18RU

-

-

-

-

6660

5526

6969

5175

Tifguard

5454

3807

5721

4309

5754

5214

6081

5090

TifNV-High O/L

5633

4533

7175

5625

5905

3461

6220

5071

TUFRunner™ ‘297’

6437

4205

7221

5844

7020

5256

6574

5497

TUFRunner™ ‘511’

5977

4589

6795

4972

6668

5008

6597

5184

12

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021


Tifguard and the Florida-07 varieties. Holbrook worked with University of Georgia researchers Peggy Ozias-Akins and Ye Chu in using molecular markers for nematode resistance and the high O/L trait. Using the molecular markers, they were able to greatly speed up the process of developing the new variety.

Research and Education Center, Marianna, Florida. It was released in 2014. TUFRunnerTM ‘297’ has demonstrated very good resistance to white mold, good resistance to TSWV and is susceptible to leaf spots. Yield and grade of TUFRunnerTM ‘297’ have been excellent. It has a prominent center stem with a semi prostrate growth habit.

TUFRunnerTM ‘297’ is a high yielding, extra-large seeded, medium maturity runner-type peanut with high oleic oil chemistry developed by the University of Florida, North Florida

Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna, Florida released TUFRunnerTM ‘511’ peanut in 2013. It has very good resistance to white mold, moderate resistance to TSWV, and is susceptible to leaf spots. Yield and grade of TUFRunnerTM ‘511’ have been excellent. The seed size is similar to Georgia06G with a similar out-turn of medium, number one and jumbo kernels. The growth habit of TUFRunnerTM ‘511’ is prostrate. t

TUFRunnerTM ‘511’ is a large seeded, medium maturity runner-type peanut with high oleic oil chemistry. The University of Florida, North Georgia State Variety Test Results 2018

Runner Variety

Tifton

2019

Midville

Plains

Tifton

2020

Midville

Plains

Irrigated

Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

AC3321

5372

4308

5530

3243

4846

3666

-

-

-

-

-

AU-NPL 17

5082

4308

5590

3273

4628

3328

6449

5899

7006

2057

FloRun™ ‘331’

5935

4574

7054

4253

5790

4574

6879

6207

7786

2577

Georgia Greener

6014

4949

5971

3715

4580

3285

6867

5009

6480

Georgia-06G

6183

5403

6921

3878

4646

3600

6716

5953

Georgia-07W

5469

4538

6371

3981

5705

4011

6716

5699

Georgia-09B

5832

4525

6782

3787

5136

3757

6437

Georgia-12Y

6159

5003

6601

4090

5034

3939

7109

Georgia-14N

4997

5360

6044

3642

5257

4011

Georgia-16HO

6002

5330

6056

3775

4961

Georgia-18RU

6068

5421

6861

4060

5651

Tifguard

5663

5639

5506

3557

TifNV-High O/L

5590

5687

6123

TUFRunner™ ‘297’

5838

5100

5887

TUFRunner™ ‘511’

5463

4737

4961

Tifton

Irrigated Dryland Irrigated Dryland Irrigated Dryland

Irrigated

Dryland

-

-

-

5560

4435

2975

3513

5905

5034

3652

4587

2626

4205

4646

3929

4018

7363

2753

5034

4683

3395

3867

6667

2335

4870

4961

3634

4135

5572

7659

2323

5130

4501

3434

3599

5711

7883

2505

6262

4979

4030

3696

6177

5052

7097

2099

4501

3860

3362

3706

3539

6933

6195

7145

2626

5106

4961

3932

4415

3957

6867

6062

7314

1936

5808

4731

3921

4286

4689

2904

6510

5572

5826

2232

3781

4223

3392

4007

3533

4628

3642

6244

5136

6002

1960

5058

4622

3770

4178

3545

4743

3563

6516

6346

6709

2087

5530

5003

3668

4351

3152

4628

3703

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Due to COVID-19 shutdowns and restrictions, variety trials were not able to be planted in Midville and Plains for the year 2020.

Mississippi State Variety Test Results Runner Variety

2018

2019

2020

Beaumont Raymond Stoneville Verona Beaumont Raymond Stoneville Verona Beaumont Raymond Stoneville Verona

AU-NPL 17

5543

6706

6730

5635

6197.3

3045

2369.3 4896.9 6735.8

5512

6627.8 4763.6

FloRun™ ‘331’

5357

7082

7150

6560

5506.6

3533.2

2728.6 6086.2 6349.3

6716.7

7611.2 5328.4

Georgia-06G

5965

6437

7739

6300

5657.9

3393.4

3568.9 5664.1 5791.6

4627

Georgia-09B

4179

6751

5712

5742

5610.7

2963.3

1637.4

Georgia-12Y

5011

7101

7338

5597

6398.3

3431.2

3903

Georgia-14N

4105

5813

5323

4162

5074.3

Georgia-16HO

5328

6755

7731

6298

Georgia-18RU

-

-

-

-

TifNV-High O/L

4737

6527

5495

TUFRunner™ ‘297’

5358

5904

6838

TUFRunner™ ‘511’

4901

6684

7197

5046.1

5724.2

3625.8

7676.3 4759.2

5664.4 6300.6

5908.1

7012.2

2711.8

1796.6 5099.4 5431.3

3619.7

5251.9 3927.3

6261.7

3877.4

1583.9 6330.6 7150.7

5840.4

7881.3 5613.2

5696

3550.5

1372.2 6343.4 5543.8

5271.6

6079

5667.3

3506.9

2224.1 5996.3 6271.1

5250.4

6293.8 4364.5

6115

6481

3761.9

1942.9 5854.7 6320.2

5806.6

7107.8 5368.9

6388

-

-

6194.2

6099.6

7096.7 4928.5

-

5660

6687

-

7332

4940

5207.9

January/February 2021 Southeastern Peanut Farmer

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Winter Nursery Breeding Winter nursery helps speed up variety development

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peanut breeder strives to develop new varieties that are high yielding, diseases resistant and taste good for the consumer. In some cases, the development can take many years. However, with the help from the Puerto Rico Winter Nursery, breeders can speed up the process. Corley Holbrook, U.S. Department of Agriculture peanut breeder based in Tifton, Georgia, is one breeder who takes advantage of the benefits from the winter nursery. Holbrook has been using the winter nursery for 35 years. Holbrook utilizes a winter nursery farm outside of Ponce operated by the Illinois Crop Improvement Association. There are several winter nurseries on the island where several private seed companies utilize them to help with seed development. Some of the peanut varieties grown in the Southeast bred at the winter nursery include Tifrunner, Tifguard and TiftNV HiOl. The TiftNV HiOl variety released in 2014 is the second largest acreage variety grown in Georgia at this point with Georgia 06G leading production. “We just recently released TifJumbo and TifNV-HG in 2019,” says Corley Holbrook. “Farmers haven’t had experience with these two varieties yet, but they are coming. They would not

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be here this soon without the winter nursery.” Peanut breeders in North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico also utilize the winter nursery in Puerto Rico. “This facility allows the breeders to develop cultivars faster than they would be able to do without the winter nursery since they can get two generations per year rather than one generation per year.” Holbrook says. “So a breeder can shave several years off of the development time.” However, breeders must have everything lined up to make the timing work between variety plots grown in the U.S. during the summer and in Puerto Rico through the winter. Holbrook plants his seed in the summer in Georgia and then harvests the seed in October to ship to Puerto Rico in November. Prior to shipping, Holbrook must get the seed shelled, take the seed to the Georgia Department of Agriculture Seed Lab to break the seed dormancy and then have the seed inspected. Once the seed receives a phytosanitary certificate then it is shipped overnight to Puerto Rico. “It is a challenge to flip the seed that fast,” Holbrook says. “I’m very fortunate to be close to the seed development lab so I can get my seed ready to ship quickly.” Holbrook tries to ship enough seed

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

for 250 to 300 research plots annually. The seed is usually planted around the second week of November. That seed is then harvested in Puerto Rico approximately 130 to 135 days after planting. Once the seed is harvested in Puerto Rico, the soil is washed off the outer hull, dried and inspected before returning to the U.S. Once the peanut seed arrives back in the U.S, the seed is shelled and then delivered to the Georgia Department of Agriculture Seed Lab so they can break the seed dormancy again. Then the seed is planted in the summer in the U.S. In terms of TifNV HiOl, Holbrook believes the winter nursery has saved him three to four years in the breeding process. This has allowed him the ability to get the new variety faster to the farmer’s hands. TifNV HiOL was developed to combine high oleic with nematode resistance. Holbrook used marker assisted selection to do that. “Overall, the winter nursery accelerates the cultivar development process,” Holbrook says. “By using the winter nursery, I’m able to increase seed development faster through field-grown plants instead of growing the variety in a greenhouse in the U.S.” t By Joy Crosby


PEANUTSGOMOBILE

T

Georgia Peanut Commission sponsors Georgia Ag Experience

here is a growing need to educate the general public and those who are not familiar with agriculture about how their food is produced and where it comes from. Recognizing this need, the Georgia Foundation for Agriculture set out to create a mobile experience to educate children in grades 3 through 5, as well as other individuals who want to learn more about agriculture. “Realizing that the majority of Georgia’s residents are more than three generations removed from living on a farm and have little to no firsthand knowledge of how farmers grow their food, cotton for clothes, or timber for paper and lumber, the Georgia Foundation for Agriculture wanted to create a mobile classroom that would give students and adults who have never visited a farm a chance to experience Georgia agriculture,” says Lily Baucom, GFA executive director. Beginning in January 2021, the Georgia Ag Experience will travel to elementary schools and agricultural events across the state. Housed within a 36-foot trailer, the experience includes eight stations: horticulture, beef & dairy, cotton, fruit, vegetables and pecans, poultry, peanuts, forestry and agricultural careers.

Each station includes colorful photos, interactive technology and product displays for learning about Georgia agriculture and the role it plays in daily life. All exhibits and lessons included with the Georgia Ag Experience have been professionally designed to meet science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) standards. The peanut station is sponsored by the Georgia Peanut Commission. Here, individuals can hop in a real tractor seat and learn all about the “Superfood with super powers.” Three different augmented reality experiences are included in the station. The first AR experience allows individuals to hold a tablet over the image of a peanut plant, the plant appears on the screen and facts about how peanuts grow are shown. The second AR experience takes place in a peanut field. Individuals hold the tablet over the provided field photo and the screen virtually transports them to a tractor where harvesting takes place. The third experience follows the peanut from the farm to further processing where it ends up in a variety of peanut products. Careers such as a peanut agronomist, food safety inspector and research engineer are also on display with

information about each. “This was an enormous undertaking for our foundation, and we are so grateful to the many sponsors who have partnered with us to make the Georgia Ag Experience a reality,” Baucom says. The Georgia Ag Experience school visits will begin in South and Middle Georgia and continue to travel statewide throughout 2021. Georgia Farm Bureau county offices will be partnering with the Georgia Ag Experience to arrange local visits. Those interested in booking a visit for a school or community event in Georgia should visit www.gfb.ag/experienceplanavisit for instructions on scheduling and a list of available dates. Georgia school representatives interested in working with their local county Farm Bureau to arrange a visit, should contact the county office first. Visit www.gfb.ag/contact to access local Farm Bureau contact information. For more information about the Georgia Ag Experience and a list of the organizations who are generously supporting the mobile ag classroom, visit www.georgiaagexperience.org. Visit www. gfb.ag/GAEclassroomvirtualtour to tour the classroom. t By Jessie Bland

Above: The Georgia Ag Experience is a 36-foot trailer, housing eight education stations. Below: The peanut station includes augmented reality experiences from planting to peanut butter.

Above: The peanut station features a Fendt tractor seat with augmented reality and career exploration.

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Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

Above: The peanut station highlights careers in peanuts with pull-out information tabs detailing each one.


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he balancing act between production and global trade of the peanut is one that has been studied for more than 40 years by Stanley Fletcher, professor Emeritus with the University of Georgia and currently a research economist and professor of policy with Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. Generally, Fletcher has noticed an increase in production of U.S. peanuts. In fact, since the 1980s the United States has had a growth rate of 137 percent on peanut production while the rest of the world has increased at 186 percent. “The world is out pacing the United States,” Fletcher says. Other countries showing an increase in production is due to their yield increase, such as Argentina at 187 percent, China at 147 percent, Brazil at 163 percent and India at 73 percent. In contrast, the U.S. yield increase since 1980 was only 139 percent. “The United States has human capital and management capability. Our peanut and cotton farmers know how to manage things and do it right,” Fletcher says. “However, the other countries use our knowledge and we actually export our knowledge to them through seed.” When reviewing overall demand for peanuts, Fletcher says there are three components to observe which include domestic consumer purchases, domestic

18

government purchases and exports. “On edible use, we have had pretty good growth,” Fletcher says. “Especially starting in 2002 when the peanut program changed.” However, one problem area is government purchases of peanut products. When reviewing data since the 1990s, government purchases totaled around 15,000 farmer stock tons on average in a calendar year since 2002. However, in calendar year 2020, so far, the government has only purchased approximately 5,000 tons of total peanut product which is the lowest level in 34 years. Fletcher suggests a significant reason for the low level can be attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic. “Peanut butter was flying off the grocery store shelves. With consumer sales soaring, there was a lack of peanut butter and peanut products available for sale to the U.S. government,” Fletcher says. “To compound the problem, contract prices to peanut farmers were stagnant. Thus, when the U.S. government requested bids for peanut butter, there was a lack of interest. This points to the topic of whether the peanut supply chain can handle significant increases in demand.” When observing trade issues for forty years, Fletcher has observed two critical areas that hamper the United States, including what he calls the free

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

rider problem and transfer of technology. “One constant issue has been our general promotion of peanuts around the world; other countries come in on our coattails, undercut our price and capture the market share,” Fletcher says. Transfer of technology has not been a major problem in the past, but it is becoming a critical issue that is going to change what is going to happen, as well as the United States being able to compete in the global market. The main United States trade competitors are China, Argentina and Brazil, along with potential future competitors including Africa and India. “We are in a unique situation with our major competitors (i.e., China, Argentina and Brazil) and our potential competitors, Africa and India, since those countries are classified as developing countries and sometimes get a free pass,” Fletcher says. “They do not have the same stringent rules the United States has to follow dealing with the World Trade Organization.” Fletcher admits that when you review export numbers on a calendar year comparison, everything looks great especially if you go from a low year of exports to a high year. Therefore, he prefers to look at the overall trend line when reviewing export data. “Export data is consistently up and down,” Fletcher adds. “So, I review a continued on page 20


Balancing Act continued from page 18 trend line that removes that variability, a three-year simple average and a five-year Olympic average. These are all moving averages.” In a comparison from 1980 to 2020, there is a 2.23 percent growth when looking at the trendline, Fletcher adds. “We had a downward trend with export market share until we changed the peanut program in 2002,” Fletcher says. “The United States is still down at the 15 to 17 percent level of total world peanut export market share.” In the 1980s, the United States had 25 to 35 percent of the world peanut export market share. Exports to the European Union have seen recent large-scale decreases due to the criteria the EU has on aflatoxin, plus price competitiveness of other countries. The EU only allows peanuts in with less than four parts per billion of aflatoxin. One issue is the potential variation in testing of peanuts in the EU. The United States samples peanuts prior to being exported and the peanuts pass the required tests based on independent, 3rd party sampling and testing per USDA established protocols. But after arrival in the EU, tests are run again, often without the same level of oversight and consistency as done in the U.S., and the samples fail the aflatoxin requirements. “The EU sets a strict domestic manufacturing food safety criteria, which a trade agreement does not have jurisdiction over,” Fletcher adds. While reviewing trends with exports in other countries, Canada has been basically flat, while Mexico has had an uptrend since 2002. Approximately, 40

to 50 percent of Mexico’s domestic imports are coming from the United States. Japan has fluctuated with a high of over 20 percent market share, which dropped down to the 5 percent level and is now back to the 10-12 percent range. According to Fletcher, China continues to be erratic when it comes to exports. If the United States has a surplus where peanuts are cheap, China will buy them, he adds. “The United States is only capturing two to three percent of the rest of the world peanut imports outside of those five countries mentioned above,” Fletcher says. “There are a lot of peanuts out there we have not captured in these other markets.” According to Fletcher, the future of the export market depends on several items. One of those includes an enhanced relationship with CODEX Alimentarius. Fletcher references a situation back in the 1990s when the African countries were trying to push aflatoxin limits at 25 parts per billion. Europe wanted the regulations changed to four parts per billion. There were various scientific groups that reviewed data and suggested leaving the regulations at 15 parts per billion, which CODEX did. “CODEX is more than an aflatoxin regulatory body,” Fletcher says. “CODEX covers all the food safety requirements allowed with trade.” Moving forward, Fletcher does not think the United States can compete in the bulk market driven by price. However, he believes there needs to be more discussion on value-added exports and work with domestic manufacturers to enhance the United States export market. t By Joy Crosby

The CODEX Alimentarius international food standards, guidelines and codes of practice contribute to the safety, quality and fairness of this international food trade. Consumers can trust the safety and quality of the food products they buy and importers can trust that the food they ordered will be in accordance with their specifications. Purpose of the Codex Alimentarius The Codex Alimentarius is a collection of internationally adopted food standards and related texts presented in a uniform manner. These food standards and related texts aim at protecting consumers’ health and ensuring fair practices in the food trade. The publication of the Codex Alimentarius is intended to guide and promote the elaboration and establishment of definitions and requirements for foods to assist in their harmonization and in doing so to facilitate international trade. Removing Barriers to Trade The reference made to Codex food safety standards in the World Trade Organization’s Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary measures (SPS Agreement) means that Codex has far reaching implications for resolving trade disputes. WTO members that wish to apply stricter food safety measures than those set by Codex may be required to justify these measures scientifically. Since its foundation in 1963, the Codex system has evolved in an open, transparent and inclusive way to meet emerging challenges. International food trade is a 2,000 billion dollar a year industry, with billions of tons of food produced, marketed and transported.

Learn more at: www.fao.org/fao-who-codexalimentarius/en/ u

Conservation Reserve Program General Signup Ends February 12

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gricultural producers and private landowners interested in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) can sign up for the popular program until Feb. 12, 2021. The competitive program, administered by USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA), provides annual rental payments for land devoted to conservation purposes. Through CRP, farmers establish long-term, resource-conserving plant species, such as approved grasses or trees, to control soil erosion, improve water

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quality and enhance wildlife habitat on cropland. Farmers who participate in CRP help provide numerous benefits to their local region and the nation’s environment and economy. CRP general signup is held annually and is competitive; general signup includes increased opportunities for wildlife habitat enrollment through the State Acres For Wildlife Enhancement (SAFE) initiative. New cropland offered in the program must have been planted for four out of six crop years from 2012 to 2017. Additionally, producers with land

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

already enrolled but expiring on Sept. 30, 2021, can re-enroll this year. The acreage offered by producers and landowners is evaluated competitively; accepted offers will begin Oct. 1, 2021. Signed into law in 1985, CRP is one of the largest private-lands conservation programs in the United States. The program marked its 35-year anniversary in December 2020. All USDA Service Centers are open for business but an appointment should be made in advance. More information can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus. t


National Peanut Board Elects Officers

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ndy Bell, a peanut farmer from Climax, Georgia, was elected chairman of the 12-member National Peanut Board recently during the National Peanut Board’s quarterly meeting in December. Last year, Bell served as vice chairman. He begins his one-year term as chairman January 1, 2021. Peter Froese Jr. of Seminole, Texas, is immediate past chairman. Also, the National Peanut Board elected Les Crall of Weatherford, Oklahoma, as vice chairman; Paul Rogers of Wakefield, Virginia, as treasurer; and Greg Baltz of Pocahontas, Arkansas, as secretary. Officers will serve one-year terms beginning January 1. USDA appointed new and returning members and alternates to serve for three years beginning in 2021. The Missouri appointees and At-Large alternate appointee terms begin immediately and will end Dec. 31, 2022.

Tom Corcoran of Eufala is the reappointed member from Alabama. Thomas Adams of Newville is the reappointed alternate. William Carte of Live Oak is the reappointed member from Florida. Nick Marshall of Baker is the new alternate. Lonnie Fortner of Port Gibson is the new member from Mississippi and previously served as alternate. Alan Atkins of Hamilton is the new alternate. Clay Deane of Sikeston is the inaugural member from Missouri. Russ Hoggard of Portageville is the inaugural alternate. Ray Garner, Jr. of Roanoke Rapids is the new member from North Carolina and previously served as alternate. Julie M. Ward of Clarkton is the new alternate. Paul Rogers, III of Wakefield is the reappointed member from Virginia. Westley Drake of Newsoms is the reappointed alternate.

Alabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show has been postponed

Georgia and Louisiana Peanut Organizations Seek National Peanut Board Nominees

The Alabama Peanut Producers Association and the Florida Peanut Producers Association have made the decision to postpone the Alabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show scheduled for Feb. 4, 2021, until February 2022. The postponement comes after Alabama’s Safer at Home mandate was extended until Jan. 22, 2021. If the mandate is extended past Jan. 22, the trade show staff has concern about regulating social distancing and mask guidelines with the number of growers normally in attendance at the show. t

eorgia and Louisiana state peanut organizations are seeking eligible peanut producers who are interested in serving on the National Peanut Board. Nominations election meetings will be held to select two nominees each for member and alternate from each area to serve on the National Peanut Board. All eligible producers are encouraged to participate. Eligible producers are those who are engaged in the production and sale of peanuts and who own or share the ownership and risk of loss of the crop. The Georgia Peanut Commission will hold a nominations election to select two nominees each for member and alternate to the National Peanut Board during a meeting Thursday, March 11, at 1:30 p.m. at the commission headquarters, 445 Fulwood Blvd., Tifton, Georgia. For more information on the meeting contact Don Koehler at 229-386-3470. Andy Bell of Climax is the current Georgia National Peanut Board member and Casey Cox of Camilla serves as the current alternate. The Louisiana Farm Bureau Federation will hold a nominations election to select two nominees each for member and alternate to the National Peanut Board during a Zoom Virtual Conference Call meeting Wednesday, January 27, at 1:00 p.m. Central Standard Time (CST). Please contact Brian Breaux at brianb@lfbf.org or by telephone at 225-603-0924 for Zoom log in or call-in instructions. Micah Barham of Oak Ridge is the current At-large National Peanut Board member and Lucy Shackelford of Bonita serves as the current alternate. The terms for the current Georgia and Louisiana members and alternates expire Dec. 31, 2021. USDA requires two nominees from each state for each position of member and alternate. The National Peanut Board will submit the slate of nominees to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, who makes the appointments. t

Alabama Peanut Producers Association Annual Meeting The Alabama Peanut Producers Association plans to hold its Annual Meeting Feb. 4, 2021, at the National Peanut Festival in Dothan, Alabama. The meeting will be held in the Showbarn Building #7 beginning at 10 a.m. Lunch will follow. For more information on the APPA Annual Meeting, please contact Jacob Davis at 334-792-6482 or jdavis@alpeanuts.com. t

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Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021

Lucy Lacey Shackelford of Bonita, La. is the new alternate for At-Large. The Board is comprised of 13 producer members and their alternates. Twelve members and alternates are from the primary peanut producing states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. An at-large member and alternate represent the minor peanut producing states. For more information on the promotions and activities of the National Peanut Board, visit their website at www.nationalpeanutboard.org. t


Washington Outlook by Robert L. Redding Jr. Peanut Industry Responds to European Union Tariffs

In addition to the non-tariff barriers the European Union (EU) has imposed on U.S. peanut exports to Europe, the EU is now requiring a 25 percent tariff on peanut imports. The U.S. Peanut Federation has asked U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue to assist the U.S. peanut industry in resolving these trade issues with the EU. Southeast growers, shellers and buying points stated in their letter to Ambassador Lighthizer and Secretary Perdue: We are writing you with reference to the recent tariffs placed on U.S. imports to the European Union (EU). The U.S. Peanut Federation (USPF) represents the U.S. peanut industry and consists of the National Peanut Buying Points Association, The American Peanut Shellers Association and the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation. Effective November 10, 2020, the EU imposed 25 percent tariffs on imports of U.S. peanuts in retaliation over the Boeing subsidy dispute. This action will eliminate U.S. peanuts from the EU and United Kingdom markets. We recognize that this action is tied to the dispute over the EU’s subsidies to Airbus. As leaders of the U.S. peanut industry, we urge you to expeditiously negotiate a solution to these disputes and eliminate the EU’s retaliatory tariffs on U.S. peanuts. The European Union and United Kingdom (UK) historically are one of the largest export markets for U.S. peanuts. In 2019, the EU imported nearly $180 million of U.S. peanuts and peanut products. Nearly all of these exports are in-shell and shelled peanuts (HS Codes 1202.41 and 1202.42), U.S. exports of which equaled $168 million in 2019. Because the EU can source in-shell and shelled peanuts from other countries, the U.S. peanut industry will not be able to compete in the EU and UK markets with an additional 25 percent tariff, and we will lose this market just as our crop is being harvested. U.S. peanuts are grown in 13 states and the economic impact of this production is important to rural communities. We hope that you can urgently resolve this trade dispute. The 2020 crop of U.S. peanuts is high quality, compared to last year’s crop, and we are optimistic that we can further expand our exports of high quality, high value peanuts to the critical markets of the EU and the UK. Thank you for your consideration.

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U.S. House Locks in Ag Leadership

U.S. Senate Appointments Delayed The U.S. House of Representatives has begun organizing for the 117th Congress. Several House seats are yet to be determined, delaying committee assignments for new members til Congress returns in 2021. U.S. Congressman David Scott, D-Georgia, will serve as the new chairman of the House Agriculture Committee. Chairman-elect Scott has been a longtime supporter of the peanut industry. Ranking Member of the Committee will be Congressman G.T. Thompson, R-Pennsylvania. Congressmen Austin Scott, R-Georgia, and Rick Allen, R-Georgia, are senior members of the Committee. In addition, Congressman Sanford Bishop, D-Georgia, will serve as chairman of the House Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, FDA and Related Agencies. The Democratic Caucus selected Rosa DeLauro, D-Connecticut, as chair of the House Appropriations Committee. Chairwoman DeLauro has been active on food safety and nutrition issues for many years. With several new members vying for House Agriculture Committee slots, including two Alabama congressmen, the outcome for these assignments will not be known until January. The Georgia Senate run-offs will delay U.S. Senate agricultural leadership appointments until after the elections as these races will determine the control of the U.S. Senate. For the Senate Agriculture Committee, if republicans maintain control of the Senate, Senator John Boozman, R-Arkansas, will be chairman. If democrats control, Senator Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan, will chair the Committee. Peanut state members serving on the Committee are Boozman, Kelly Loeffler, R-Georgia, and Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Mississippi. Senator-elect Tommy Tuberville, R-Alabama, is seeking a slot on the Committee.

116th Congress Wraps Up for the Year

As Congress wraps up for the year, two important issues remain in play for the peanut industry. Included in the Fiscal Year 2021 Appropriations legislation is Peanut Aflatoxin Research funding for $1.5 million at the USDA Agricultural Research Service’s Dawson Laboratory. In addition, Congress has sent an end of year COVID-19 economic stimulus package that provides $13 billion in total to support the agricultural sector to the President for signature. This includes $11.2 billion to the Office of the Secretary to support agricultural producers, processors, and contract growers impacted by coronavirus. Specific provisions include a payment in the amount of $20 per planted acre for row crops and a second Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

FSA Amends Payment Limit Regulations

The Farm Service Agency (FSA) has published, in the Federal Register, amendments to previously filed payment limit and eligibility regulations on August 21, 2020. The correction restores the previous definitions of: n active personal management n significant contribution n significant contribution of active personal management n significant contribution of the combination of active personal labor and active personal management. The U.S. Peanut Federation and other commodity organizations had met with FSA leaders to discuss the negative impact of specific changes, in the August regulation, on family farms. FSA’s amended version returns the payment limit regulations to their previous requirements.

Southeastern Peanut Farmer January/February 2021


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January/February 2021 Southeastern Peanut Farmer

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Southern Peanut Growers Southern Peanut Growers Sponsors Online Cooking Classes Home cooks have rediscovered or newly discovered an interest in cooking great meals at home in 2020 and they want to learn new techniques from the experts! Southern Peanut Growers sponsored three online cooking classes at the end of 2020. Participants get the recipes and any instructions for preparation that should be done prior to the class so they can cook along with the chef if desired. They also can ask the chef questions live for an interactive experience. The Southern Food and Beverage Museum (SoFAB) did a Peanut Butter Cup class for kids in October. Jennie Merrill, SoFAB’s education director, led the class which 146 people have viewed. SoFAB also did an online cookalong with Chef Serigne Mbaye of Dakar NOLA in December. Chef Serigne, originally from Senegal, trained at the

New England Culinary Institute and has experience in restaurants in New Orleans, San Francisco, and New York. Chef Serigne taught viewers how to prepare Spicy Southern Boiled Peanuts and Senegalese Peanut Butter Soup. This class has been viewed by 322 people. Eat Y’all and Find Family Farms did an online cooking class with Chef Dwayne Ingraham. Recently named America’s best baker, Chef Dwayne also has won TV Food Network’s Chopped Sweets and has a big fan base. Chef Dwayne taught viewers to make a Peanut Butter Buttercream Frosting and then demonstrated how to decorate the Ultimate Decadent Chocolate Peanut Butter Cake. Live participation in this class was more than 350 people via Zoom and Facebook Live. The recording will be posted to YouTube for further viewing.

Chef Dwayne Ingraham showcases a Ultimate Decadent Chocolate Peanut Butter Cake with a Peanut Butter Buttercream Frosting to 350 consumers during a online class. rector, visit with consumers during the Southern Women’s Show in Birmingham, Ala.

Peanuts and Peanut Butter Perfectly Positioned for New Year’s Resolutions You Can Keep An estimated 188.9 million adult Americans (74 percent of the population) will resolve to learn something new, make a lifestyle change or set a personal goal to better themselves in 2021. About 45 percent have health-related resolutions and 35 percent have self-improvement resolutions. While most people believe they will achieve their goal, research in previous years shows that only about 10 percent of New Year’s resolutions are kept. Lack of willpower and laziness are the most cited reasons for letting those resolutions go, but the problem may lie more with how we frame our resolutions. For example, ‘eat healthier’ may be too vague while ‘eat three plant-based meals per week’ might be more achievable because it has a specific metric. ‘Lose 30 pounds’ may become frustrating when that scale doesn’t move quickly, but ‘exercise three times per week to improve my health’ gives a metric and a purpose to weight loss goal.

If you have some health-related goals this year, here are some specific ways peanuts and peanut butter can help you stick to them. Eating more plant-based meals can help you get more fiber and nutrients. Did you know that peanuts have the most protein of any nut? And that peanut butter is one of the most versatile ingredients you can find? PeanutButterLovers. com has some great plant-based meal options for you like Veggie Sammies, Peanut Butter Banana Oatmeal, and Vegetarian Nourish Bowl. You don’t have to become a vegetarian to reap the benefits of a plant-forward diet! Think peanuts for crunch in a stir-fry or salad or a peanut butter sauce for noodles or vegetables. Eat peanuts daily to improve your health. Recent research from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health shows

Southern Peanut Growers

that participants eating two ounces of lightly salted peanuts per day for 12 weeks were twice as likely to reverse metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke and diseases related to fatty buildups in artery walls and affects 23 percent of American adults. Snack smarter with peanuts and peanut butter. Rather than eliminating sweets or treats from your diet, look to improve the nutrition of your treats! A Peanut Butter Chocolate Smoothie made with a frozen banana is a great replacement for a more decadent milkshake. Frozen Peanut Butter Banana Power Bites dipped in chocolate make for a delicious sweet treat which is perfectly portion controlled.

1025 Sugar Pike Way · Canton, Georgia 30115 Phone: (770) 751-6615 email: lpwagner@comcast.net Visit our website at http://www.peanutbutterlovers.com


Southern Peanut Growers Conference EDGEWATER BEACH & GOLF RESORT July 15-17, 2021 Panama City Beach, Florida

l a u n n A 23rd nt! Eve

Key topics: Legislation, Research and Promotion For more information contact: Alabama Peanut Producers Association P.O. Box 8805 Dothan, AL 36304 334-792-6482 Florida Peanut Producers Association 2741 Penn Avenue, Suite 1 Marianna, FL 32448 850-526-2590 Georgia Peanut Commission P.O. Box 967 Tifton, GA 31793 229-386-3470

Brought to you by the: Alabama Peanut Producers Association Florida Peanut Producers Association Georgia Peanut Commission Mississippi Peanut Growers Association

Mississippi Peanut Growers Association P.O. Box 284 Petal, MS 39465 601-606-3547

Registration opens April 1, 2021. www.southernpeanutfarmers.org

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January/February 2021 - Southeastern Peanut Farmer  

The January/February 2021 issue of the Southeastern Peanut Farmer includes the 2021 Peanut Variety Guidebook. Additional articles focus on t...

January/February 2021 - Southeastern Peanut Farmer  

The January/February 2021 issue of the Southeastern Peanut Farmer includes the 2021 Peanut Variety Guidebook. Additional articles focus on t...