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MADE FOR BLISS The untold power of the endocannabinoid system

LET’S NOT MEAT Confessions of a recovering carnivore

CREATIVE VISION

S U M M E R 2020

Miss Art World’s story of beauty against the odds

I LO S A N G E L E S


Eva Littman, MD, F.A.C.O.G.

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LOS ANGELES SENSI MAGAZINE SUMMER 2020

sensimediagroup @sensimagazine @sensimag

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The Eye of the Beholder

The landscape of beauty and art is expanding with one woman’s powerful narrative.

Body Made for Bliss

Did you know you have an endocannabinoid system? You do. So why haven’t you heard about it?

D E PA R T M E N T S

9 EDITOR’S NOTE 20 THE LIFE Contributing to your health and happiness 12 THE BUZZ LET’S NOT MEAT ConfesNews, tips, and tidbits to keep you in the loop

CENTENNIEL CELEBRATION

An ode to 100 years of women’s suffrage PURE APPINESS The app to lift your spirits HIGH FLYING LAX won’t arrest you for cannabis, but travel smart. WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF Experience the Mue-

sum of Dream Space in Hollywood.

GROWING POPULARITY

Why houseplant sales have spiked in the US PEARLY WHITES A new high-tech, at-home whitening product

sions of a carnivore HOROSCOPE What the stars hold for you DRINK UP Two vodka cocktails from some of the best in the business

42 THE SCENE Hot happenings and hip hangouts around town NOT ON THE CALENDAR

What to do now that there’s nothing to do WELLNESS The future of medicine is plant-based.

ON THE COVER

Miss Art World challenges the preconceptions of what a pageant girl and an artist can and cannot be. PHOTO BY TYLER NESTVED

52 THE END Where to catch a wave

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ADVISORY BOARD

118155

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SUMMER 2020

Autumn Brands Cannabis Cultivation CannaSafe Testing Lab CBD Living Water CBD Infusions Clark Howell, LLP Legal Coachella Labs Manufacturing Flourish Software Distribution Management Genius Products T, Inc. Recreational Cannabis Products Hybrid Payroll (Ms. Mary Staffing) Staffing & HR Benefits Ikänik Farms Cannabis Distribution Inclusive Cannabis Marketing Independence Risk Solutions Cannabis Insurance Specialists Integrated Benefit Consultants Employee Benefits LINX Card Merchant Services Lucid Mood Designer Highs

Next Level Prerolls Cannabis Culture ONIT Sciences Cannabis Investments Perennial Whole Plant Products Red Rock Fertility Fertility Doctor Temeka Group Cannabis Retail Construction TKO Products, LLC. Infused Baked Goods TruSolis Technologies Commercial Lighting Undoo Overconsumption Relief Wana Brands Edible Gummies Zanna USA Premium Indoor Cultivation

FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA FAC E B O O K Like Sensi Media Group for the parties, topics, and happenings we’re obsessed with right now.

TWITTER Follow @sensimag to stay up-to-date on the latest news from Sensi cities.

I N S TAG R A M @sensimagazine is home to exclusive photos and content.


Magazine published monthly by Sensi Media Group LLC. © 2020 Sensi Media Group. All rights reserved.

EXECUTIVE

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Ron Kolb Founder, CEO ron@sensimag.com Stephanie Wilson Co-Founder, Editor in Chief stephanie@sensimag.com Mike Mansbridge President mike@sensimag.com Fran Heitkamp Chief Operating Officer fran@sensimag.com Lou Ferris VP of Global Revenue lou@sensimag.com Chris Foltz Director of Global Reach chris@sensimag.com Jade Kolb Director of Project Management jade.kolb@sensimag.com Kristan Toth Head of People kristan.toth@sensimag.com EDITORIAL

Doug Schnitzspahn Executive Editor doug.schnitzspahn@sensimag.com Dawn Garcia Regional Editor dawn.garcia@sensimag.com Leland Rucker Senior Editor leland.rucker@sensimag.com Robyn Griggs Lawrence Editor at Large robyn.lawrence@sensimag.com Helen Olsson Copy Chief Melissa Howsam Senior Copy Editor Meryl Howsam, Bevin Wallace Copy Editors Eli Dupin, Mona Van Joseph, Sat Panesar, Julie Raque Contributing Writers DESIGN

Jamie Ezra Mark Creative Director jamie@emagency.com Rheya Tanner Art Director Wendy Mak, Kiara Lopez, Josh Clark, Jason Jones Designers PUBLISHING

Mark Basser Publisher mark@sensimag.com B U S I N E S S /A D M I N

Amber Orvik Administrative Director amber.orvik@sensimag.com Neil Willis Production Manager neil.willis@sensimag.com

EDITOR’S NOTE

Tired? Stressed? Over Netflix? I know

the feeling. But the one thing you can take solace in is that we’re in this together. First and foremost, let’s address the months of halted Sensi issues. We needed to press pause while we, like everyone, navigated our way through the uncertainties of what can only be referred as The COVID Show. The coronavirus has become that show on repeat that’s desperate for a rewrite—and Californians have been through the wringer! We’ve gone through our fair share of economic devastation as restaurants, bars, hotels, and small businesses close down for good, and we continue to weather the unnecessary debate of to wear a mask or to not wear a mask (to which I say…wear one!). Honestly, the chaos, uncertainty and anxiety has seeped into every part of our lives and let’s be honest…it’s been exhausting. That said, this is the time for a good read, for a creative outlet, for sharing stories that connect us as humans versus those that tear us apart. It’s time to recognize how big our need for community and one another really is. (And I don’t know about you, but damn I miss human interaction and hugging!) I’m not saying reading this month’s issue will change your entire world, but it might give you a laugh, make you smile, teach you a little calm, and invite you to find a safe refuge in the pages to follow. This is our first issue where five months of absence gets neatly accounted for in one issue that unites us once again, and I think it’s safe to say we can all use more togetherness. As you digitally flip through this new Los Angeles issue, I hope you know how valued and appreciated all of you are. It’s true that the world has flipped its lid, but Californians have been doing everything we can to get through this and come through the other side stronger and more united. That’s what we do. May we find our collective voice, not give in to the divineness that can wreak havoc on our state-of-mind, and perhaps while you do read the articles in this particular magazine, you will feel love and hope pouring back out to you. Until the next issue, be well, be healthy, be kind, be patient and most importantly, breathe.

This is the time for a good read, for a creative outlet, for sharing stories that connect us as humans versus those that tear us apart. It’s time to recognize how big our need for community and one another really is

Live passionately, boldly, and bravely,

M E D I A PA R T N E R S

Marijuana Business Daily Minority Cannabis Business Association National Cannabis Industry Association Students for Sensible Drug Policy

Dawn Garcia @dawngarcia S U M M E R 2020

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Cut the Bullsh*t It's time to stop saying "This is how we've always done it."

inclusivecannabis.com


FROM THE EDITOR IN CHIEF

“The new normal” is the slogan

Sensi has been using since its inception. It appeared on every cover prior to our redesign in December 2019—roughly 200 magazines emblazoned with the phrase. We used it to highlight cannabis’s transition into the mainstream, and during the early days of COVID-19, we watched it become the official catchphrase of the pandemic. “The New Normal.” How else could you describe it? With that, I’ll welcome you to Sensi’s new new normal, not to be confused with the old new normal. Much like everything else in this world, our new normal looks a great deal different than it did at the start of this decade, some eight months and a lifetime ago. Way back then, we were printing local magazines in 14 markets across the country, with a 15th (Metro Maryland) slated to launch April 2020. Our creative team was in the midst of sending those editions to print when COVID-19 started to pick up steam. After some hard conversations with our leadership team, we made the call to hit pause on production for a variety of reasons, the main one being that our points of distribution were not going to be distributing during the global pandemic. If there’s a silver lining to this chaos, it may be that it’s forced us to slow down and examine our lives—to really look at what we do and consider the why and how behind it. It provided a chance to stop the constant doing of trying to meet goals and start thinking about whether those are the right goals to be aiming for at all. When we made the call to cancel our April editions, we were optimistic that we’d be back in print by June after giving the already-completed editions a little refresh before sending them out. Then we thought we’d return in July. I’m writing this letter on August 7 as the refreshed April editions are all working their way toward being published in the next few days, if all goes as planned. Little these days is going as planned, for better and for worse, but the past few months have been a bootcamp in staying nimble and having backup plans. Hitting pause allowed us to make a whole lot of plans as we examined our business piece by piece, stripped down to the basics and rebuilt from the ground up using the lessons we stumbled our way through building the Sensi brand. We’re guided by one mission: to serve our readers and our communities by focusing on connection—to information, to each other, to businesses and brands that offer products that meet your needs. But for the first time in Sensi’s history, we won’t be printing magazines—we’re going all in on digital this month, and we’ll be doubling down on digital next. This shift allows us to increase that reach exponentially, crossing boundaries and borders. And we’ll be doing so without compromising the quality of content and design that draws readers to our magazines, to our brand. We hope to return to print in the not-too-distant future, perhaps no one more than me. I believe in the power of print. But I also believe in evolution, and the way people consume information is changing. By limiting ourselves to a print publication, we were limiting the impact Sensi could hope to have. But now, with a fresh digital strategy that entails both dynamic local content as well as fully designed digital magazines created by the award-winning team at Em Agency, we’ve got the best of both worlds, and I’m excited to welcome you into the first phase of Sensi’s new digital universe. We’re almost ready to take the scaffolding off Phase 2, so be sure to check back and see what we’ve got planned in order to continue to bring our new normal into the new new normal of the world. Thank you for being here with us as we rebuild better than we were before.

We’re guided by one mission: to serve our readers and our communities by focusing on connection—to information, to each other, to businesses and brands that offer products that meet your needs.

Stephanie Wilson @stephwilll S U M M E R 2020

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—Nineteenth Amendment of the US Constitution

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all yet had been omitted from the political process. Also obvious: the best way to celebrate this centennial, regardless of gender, is to exercise your right to influence politics by casting a ballot in November in what will be This month marks the 100th anniversary one of the most important elections of women gaining the right to vote. of our lifetimes. Check your voter registration status now—right now. On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amend- ultimately effective, and—imporGo on, we’ll wait, it takes a minute tantly—nonviolent Civil Rights and ment was ratified into law after a on usa.gov/confirm-voter-registration. anti-war movements. long, arduous battle led by some Then text that web address to your To this day, the only right women incredibly badass women who came friends, post it on your socials, to embrace the denigrating “suffrag- are guaranteed equally under the US ette” nickname bestowed upon them Constitution is the right to vote. In fact, share it so much it gets redundant. Volunteer for voter registration by men aghast at the idea of women women were not even included in the participating in the political process. Constitution until the 19th Amendment. drives. Help get people to the polls. Be vocal and denounce any false The ratification of that equalThe suffragettes and their male rights amendment led to the largest statements about voter fraud assocounterparts, collectively known as suffragists (aka people who advocate single one-day increase of potential ciated with mail-in ballots. And then vote like your life depends upon it. for the extension of the right to vote, voters in the history of the United States. Which, duh, obviously: wom- Because this time, more so than ever especially to women), crafted a poen make up half the population and before, lives do depend on it. litical movement that was powerful, SUMMER 2020

ILLUSTRATION BY MARY LONG, ADOBE STOCK / CONSTITUTION IMAGE BY ANDREA IZZOTTI, ADOBE STOCK

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Celebrating a Big Win


C O N T R I B U TO R S

Aaron H. Bible, Dawn Garcia, Stephanie Wilson

COME ON, GET APPY

PHOTO (TOP RIGHT) BY TOMMOH29, ADOBE STOCK / PHOTO (BOTTOM RIGHT) COURTESY OF MUSEUM DREAM SPACE

Going through something? We all experience moments when we could use some support. Some of those moments are life-changing, while others are a part of everyday life. If you need to get it off your chest, you need to get Happy, the app. Described by Vice as “like Uber but for ‘Happy Givers,’” Happy connects you to one of more than 2,000 trained listeners who aren’t there to offer advice or give feedback. They’re just there to support you and make you feel heard. They’ll give you the space to speak openly, anonymously, for as long as you’d like. For every individual caller referred by the American Heart Association through May 31, 2021, Happy will donate a free first-time call valued at $24 to the American Heart Association’s Support Network, for a minimum donation of $50,000. So download the App now. Call, get support, and be happy. Available on the Apple App Store and Google Play happythemovement.com

BY THE NUMBERS

18% Of the 5,116 cannabis cultivation licenses issued in California are held by just 20 companies.

SOURCE: New Frontier Data

29% Of consumers said there was an increase in their personal cannabis consumption as a response to COVID-19.

High Flying

Times are a changin’, and LAX is among those on board with cannabis consumers taking their green with them. “Based on our policy, we’re not going to arrest you or confiscate marijuana,” said LAX airport police spokesperson Alicia Hernandez in a phone interview with McClatchy in 2018. “We’re not going to be taking any action against you for having that marijuana.” And that all seems amazing, but those blue cannabis amnesty bins located in the airport send mixed signals. Plus, travelers need to be concerned about the TSA—a federal agency. Basically, it’s best not to travel with cannabis unless you have a prescription and it’s under the legal amount wherever you’re traveling to. If not? Don’t chance it. Check current updates on traveling with cannabis at tsa.gov and flylax.com prior to departure.

SOURCE: New Frontier Data

$1.1

BILLION The size of 2020 cannabis sexual lubricant global market.

41.8% Of US consumers surveyed reported consuming THC for pain management. SOURCE: New Frontier Data

Inspired by Dreams Creative expression is humanity’s most glorious contribution. You’re invited to heed the call with the coming-soon-COVID-willing launch of the Museum of Dream Space in Hollywood. The first all-digital art museum in the nation, Museum of Dream Space is inspired by art designer Yayoi Kusama and encompasses the ideology that technology doesn’t have to be restricting—instead it can liberating. Come bathe your senses in light, movement, and dreams. modshollywood.com

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THE BUZZ

VOX POPULI

MOVE OVER TESLA

GM just launched an innovative long-range electric car battery. For years, the world has watched as Elon Musk cornered the market on electric cars with the innovation of Tesla Motors. And rightfully so; up until now the competition was far behind. But American automobile maker GM is rising to the occasion with a sleek new electric battery that will give Tesla a run for its money. “GM is building toward an all-electric future because we believe climate change is real,” GM CEO Mary Barra said during a presentation for media and investors in early March. GM’s new single-charge, 400-mile-range battery capability exceeds Tesla’s—including the new Tesla Model S Long Range, which caps out at a distance of 390 miles. GM engineers are already working on next-generation battery cells with driving ranges of up to 600 miles. This is big news for electric car enthusiasts and could be a game changer for the industry.

PHOTO OF TESLA BY TRAM TRAN

gm.com, telsa.com

Question: What can you commit to doing to lower your carbon footprint?

GIGI G.

BOB CRANSTON, JR.

Personal Assistant Santa Cruz, CA

Managing Director Vintex Bordeaux, Las Vegas, NV

___________________

___________________

Walk more, drive less, recycle, plant flowers and trees for the birds and bees.

Getting rid of my gas-only car and buying a hybrid.

PATTI HACKLEMAN WILLIAMS Lover of History Bluffton, SC

___________________

Choosing to go vegan and successfully eating a 100 percent plantbased diet.

1:3 Releaf Body Lotion Papa & Barkley’s Releaf body lotion is the latest addition to the company’s skin-care products. The moisturizer is said to be the first THC lotion in the California cannabis market made using fresh-pressed rosin (rather than THC distillate or isolate). It combines the powerful effects of THC-rich rosin and the hydrating agents of jojoba oil, shea butter, and mango seed oil. By using full-spectrum cannabinoids, phytonutrients, terpenes, and chlorophyll, the lotion gives skin the major benefits of powerful anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antibacterial agents—ultimately helping promote skin vitality. S U M M E R 2020

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THE BUZZ

I LOOK FORWARD TO BEING OLDER, WHEN WHAT YOU LOOK LIKE BECOMES LESS AND LESS AN ISSUE AND WHAT YOU ARE IS THE POINT.” —Susan Sarandon, actress

My Plant Understands Me Houseplant sales are on the rise, and researchers believe millennials are to thank for the recent boom in the bloom economy. It’s 18- to 34-year-olds who now occupy 29 percent of all gardening households, according to the annual National Gardening Survey. One theory about all of the houseplant hype is that it’s a new form of self-care. Tending to plants helps those who live in urban jungles or those who are overwhelmed with technology to feel more connected to nature. In the age of social media, millennials are said to have surpassed Generation X and baby boomers as the loneliest generation, according to a poll by YouGov. Owning a plant gives people an opportunity to nurture, providing a sense of fulfillment and purpose without the extra costs of caring for a pet. There could also be new additions to the plant culture craze with cannabis plants. According to the National Gardening Survey, 33 million households (27 percent) say it should be legal to grow for personal use, and 19 million households (15 percent) say they would grow cannabis if it were legal to do so. As the trend continues to grow, perhaps the use of having indoor plants to help boost wellness won’t just be a short-lived fad, but, rather, a new lifestyle for those dealing with stress and anxiety. 16

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I Am Not Okay with This is a Netflix original series that gives a refreshing new look at superheroes. Veering from traditional storylines, this new series follows the teenage awakening of Sydney Novak (played by Sophia Lillis) as she discovers she has superhuman abilities. A far cry from the campy feel of the entertaining but overly saturated world of Marvel and DC Comics movies and TV shows, Syd’s story is a coming-of-age tale. As she explores her newfound powers, repressed rage, and sexuality, her two besties, Stanley (Wyatt Oleff) and Dina (Sofia Bryant), figure out exactly how to help her—all while keeping Syd’s secret from her mom, Maggie (Kathleen Rose Perkins), and brother, Liam (Aidan Wojtak-Hissong). Now streaming on Netflix

PHOTO (LEFT) BY CHANSOM PANTIP, ADOBE STOCK

Not Your Average Superhero


THE BUZZ

BILITIES BY STEPHANIE WILSON, EDITOR IN CHIEF

1 IN CASE YOU MISSED THE IRONY of all the Great Gatsbythemed New Year’s Eve parties thrown to welcome in the second coming of the Roaring 20s, let me remind you how that decade ended: not much worse than this one is starting.

2 IN CASE YOU NEED A REMINDER: whatever you’re feeling is valid. There is no right or wrong way to process what we’re going through right now. There is a right way to interact with others right now, though: with care, through a mask, and from a distance.

3 IN CASE YOU’RE FEELING LIKE GOING OUT in public without a mask: stop watching Fox News, you’re being brainwashed. Be a good human, you’re better than that.

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT

BRIGHT IDEA It’s incredible how white some people’s teeth are. Those bright smiles might be the result of costly in-office dental procedures, but NovaShine takes a different approach. Invented by three University of Michigan grads, NovaShine uses a smart technology that combines a hydrogen peroxide gel with a USB-enabled mouthpiece fitted with LED blue lights. “We’ve created a truly unique teeth-whitening system found to work eight times faster than other leading products, cause little to no sensitivity, and cut treatment times from one hour to as little as 10 minutes,” says the brand’s website. NovaShine / $100 / novashinesmile.com, @novashinesmile

4 IN CASE YOU NEED A PICK-ME-UP: pick up a bouquet of blooms the next time you’re at the grocery store. Yes, funds are tight and flowers may seem like a frivolous purchase, but a $6 bouquet can brighten up rooms and moods alike. A 2018 study from the University of North Florida’s Department of Public Health finds that living with flowers “significantly alleviates daily stresses.” And we’re all a little bit stressed right now. Or we’re in denial, which is a stressful state to be in. Flowers will help. Pro tip: for the best flowers at the lowest prices, look for wholesale florists open to the public in your area. 5 IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: Denver’s mayor reversed his decision to leave recreational cannabis dispensaries and liquor stores off the list of essential businesses just three hours after the city’s stay-athome order was issued in March. Denverites were clear: flowers— the kind ones with THC—are definitely essential.

“There is no evidence proving marijuana can cure coronavirus.” — Reuters Fact Check. Where did some people get the idea that it did, you ask? They read it on a meme that they deemed a worthy source of news about a global pandemic. Moral of this story is two-fold: 1) cannabis can’t cure COVID, sorry. The World Health Organization lists smoking as one of the things that’s ineffective against the virus and might cause harm. (For some people, inhaling cannabis smoke can damage the lungs and have a negative effect on the immune system and its ability to fight off diseases.) 2) Fact check everything, from multiple sources if so compelled. Knowledge is power.

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Confessions of a Carnivore A former meat eater goes lean and green.

PHOTO CREDIT

TEXT DAWN GARCIA

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SUMMER 2020


PHOTO BY JOEL CLAYTON

I’ve been eating meat since I was a toddler. Burgers, steaks, Chef Boyardee, Hamburger Helper, tuna melts, meatloaf, pork loin, bacon, ham, turkey, chicken, spaghetti bolognese, carne asada, shrimp, chorizo, and hot dogs. It’s safe to say I consumed full farms over the span of my youth. We didn’t have a lot of money, and there were a lot of mouths to feed. Growing up in the ’80s, we ate Wonder Bread, canned and frozen goods, and processed foods because they were cheaper. Middle-class families like us did the best we could to keep us all fed and not go broke. Eating fresh foods or vegetarian fare never occurred to my parents—or me—until much later. I went to Saugus High, where my preference of school cafeteria food consisted of nachos, fries, or grilled cheese sandwiches. But that’s also when I began taking an environmental studies class with Mr. Olsen. The course was experimental for the state and would focus on environmental issues, including how meat and dairy are produced. A video that showed how cows are butchered did it for me, and a vegetarian I gladly became. For about three

years. Until the smell of a steak and A1 sauce wafted through the air at a boyfriend’s house. His dad was barbecuing filet mignon and New York strip, and I caved—hook, line, and sinker. One bite into that succulent red meat and I was officially off the vegetarian bandwagon. Fast forward a decade. As an independent young woman living on my own in Los Angeles, I went grocery shopping at health food stores and went to the gym faithfully four days a week. My lifestyle habits started to change considerably. Something about the produce section was endearing to me; all the colors and variety of fruits and vegetables lured me like a chef to a global spice market. I started experimenting with healthier meats like poultry and seafood until eventually, I was gorging on salads, freshcut carrots, and jicama. I really loved eating smart. It left me feeling abundant in energy. Five years later and officially entering into my 30s, pregnant and thinking very differently about food and how it’s produced, I cut out poultry. The thought of handling raw meat while a baby grew inside my belly was massive-

You don’t have to cut out all meats and fish to do something good for our earth. Choosing to cut back on your weekly consumption can make an enormous difference.

ly unappealing. When my daughter was born, eating clean and healthy was the only option. I had to be in perfect health to be the best mother to her. I am fortunate to have eaten some of the most exquisite food in the world prepared by some of the greatest chefs alive, but I also love to cook at home and prepare food for my daughter and myself. That’s part of single parenting: making smart eating choices and adopting a healthy lifestyle indefinitely. In doing so, I’ve researched so many things about food, including how eating certain foods impacts the environment. That has led me to the past five months of transitioning to eating a plant-based diet. I live in Southern California, and while being vegan is what the cool kids do, I’ve made the choice to eat that way because it’s one meaningful thing I can do to positively affect the environment. According to an article in National Geographic, “producing beef uses 20 times the land and emits 20 times the emissions as growing beans, per gram of protein, and requires more than 10 times more resources than producing chicken.” And the blog Green S U M M E R 2020

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Fighting for freedom is Join the revolution at norml.org


PHOTO BY TYLER KAHILL

THE LIFE

Eatz reports that livestock farming produces from 20 to 50 percent of all manmade greenhouse gas emissions. With brands like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat making waves in the mainstream burger marketplace, there are smart alternatives that use less water and gas emissions than traditional meat production, lending to a happier planet and a healthier you. Getting down to the nitty-gritty of it, I simply love this planet. I love that we live in a world where oceans and forests, deserts and lakes all coexist in harmony. Yet we humans tend to overuse far too much of our natural resources. All of this is to say, you don’t have to cut

out all meats and fish to do something good for our earth. Choosing to cut back on your weekly consumption can make an enormous difference (see Footprints by Diet Type chart below). Eating meats that are grass-fed or seafood that is sustainably sourced ensures your personal choices make an impact. Making small changes in your everyday life isn’t as difficult as it sounds, and in today’s foodie-centric world, the plant-based choices of truly good tasting alternatives are plentiful. Thanks to companies using nuts instead of dairy (Violife, Lisanatti Foods, Miyoko’s), or jackfruit instead of meat (The Jackfruit Company, No Evil Foods), or grocers

such as Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, Sprouts, Bristol Farms, and even Vons and Ralphs, there’s no shortage of places to buy smarter meat alternatives. While I do crave a grass-fed cut of filet mignon grilled perfectly medium rare or my utter indulgence, foie gras, making the transition

to a plant-based diet has changed how I feel mentally and physically. My once frequent headaches are nonexistent (unless I don’t sleep, but that’s an article in and of itself), my joints and bones hurt much less, I no longer have swelling or stomachaches, and I have more clarity and energy than ever before. Going vegan isn’t for everyone, and that’s totally okay. Making subtle changes in how you eat and what you eat, however, can mean a world of difference—including improving the health of the current planet we reside on. This month, take the challenge to eat more greens and beans and less processed foods, meats, and dairy-based cheeses. See how you feel, and maybe, just maybe, you’ll not only lower your carbon footprint, you may actually enjoy eating a little smarter.

FOOD FOOTPRINT A meat lover has the highest carbon footprint at 3.3 tons of greenhouse gas emissions. SOURCE: Shrink That Footprint

Note: All estimates based on average food production emissions for the US. Footprints include emissions from supply chain losses, consumer waste and consumption. Each of the four example diets is based on 2,600 kcal of food consumed per day, which in the US equates to around 3,900 kcal of supplied food.

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THE LIFE

A B O U T T H E AU T H O R

Mona Van Joseph has been an intuitive since 2002. She is an author, columnist, and host of Psychic View Radio. She created dicewisdom.com, which also has a smartphone app. mona.vegas

HOROSCOPE

AUGUST HOROSCOPE What do the stars hold for you? TEXT MONA VAN JOSEPH

laxing into the feminine viLEO bration) will benefit you in Stress is caused by your ex- many ways. Allow yourself pectations of other people to be recognized for your this month. If you just accept uniqueness. the fact that you’ll have to do all the work without resent- OCT. 23–NOV. 21 ing or expecting anything, SCORPIO everything will be fine. No other sign has the ability to get as deep into a soul AUG. 23–SEPT. 22 like you. You will experience VIRGO some epiphany-like insights No coasting, you will miss this month. The most draout on a major opportunity. matic of which will be your Follow up with anything that intimate connection to the secures your future comknowledge of the Universe. fort. Awareness to detail will avoid any misunderstandNOV. 22–DEC. 21 ings with those who will con- SAGITTARIUS tribute to your success. You’ve been working hard and feeling unappreciated. The isSEPT. 23–OCT. 22 sue is not the work you’re proLIBRA ducing; it’s that your heart is Be prepared to get attention not in it. That’s why you’re not from people you don’t know getting the acclaim and recnow. The vibration of conognition you want. It’s not the necting with women (and re- place; it’s you. JULY 23–AUG. 22

DEC. 22–JAN. 19

CAPRICORN

August calls for joyful seriousness of the things important to you. It doesn’t matter if you’re building tables for squirrels or changing the world. A casual awareness for your love of life draws more loving. JAN. 20–FEB. 18

AQUARIUS

A happy did-the-work breakthrough month for you! That project or idea is ready to go full fledge out there right now. What’s so cool is that you get to do this in a relaxed, “I know it’ll be fabulous” vibration…and it will! FEB. 19–MARCH 20

PISCES

So last month was sort of sucky because you had to resolve to honor your worth

LEO, IF YOU JUST ACCEPT THE FACT THAT YOU’LL HAVE TO DO ALL THE WORK WITHOUT RESENTING OR EXPECTING ANYTHING, EVERYTHING WILL BE FINE.

and dump what wasn’t working. A sign from the Universe this month validates why you had to set this new standard.

thing. The Universe is speaking to you. MAY 21–JUNE 20

GEMINI

Do not allow yourself to MARCH 21–APRIL 19 be short-changed, comproARIES mised, or cheapened. Stay Be aware that you are always strong in your worth and connected to spiritual purauthenticity. The right oppose and guidance. Take noth- portunity is about to presing for granted and be delight- ent itself. fully ready when coincidence JUNE 21–JULY 22 prompts you to action.

CANCER

APRIL 20–MAY 20

TAURUS

As soon as you relax into your direct connection with Spirit, everything shifts for you. You do not need (or want) to do things the way anyone else does some-

This is not an action month. What is meant for you will just come to you. No chasing after what you want. It’s a time of concentrating on what brings you a sense of peace, harmony, and contentment.

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THE LIFE RECIPE

Vodka Soda Servings: 1

Drink Up

Kick off a gorgeous new month with these refreshing spring cocktail recipes. TEXT ELI DUPIN

INGREDIENTS

2 ounces Headwind vodka 4 ounces club soda Bitters to taste (try something fun like cardamom bitters) Slice of lime Edible floral (optional) INSTRUCTIONS

The history of vodka dates back to 1405 in Eastern Europe and Scandinavia. Vodka is a diminutive form of the Slav-

ic word voda (meaning “water”). “Little water” first appeared in Eastern Europe, and in 1553 it was used as medicine

in Russia. Traditionally, vodka is made by distilling liquid from potatoes, but its manufacturing has since evolved to include

• In a glass full of ice, combine vodka and soda, and stir. • Add bitters and slice of lime or an edible floral. S U M M E R 2020

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G E T YO U R S

THE LIFE

Headwind Vodka headwindvodka.com @headwindvodka

RECIPE

Headwind Bloody Mary Servings: 4

PHOTO: JORDAN HUGHES, J. ANNIE WANG

INGREDIENTS For the drink

other grains such as corn, rice, and oats. It’s a drink best served icy cold, and Portland brand Headwind Vodka, founded by Jason Dyke, is crafting cocktails that go down easy. “The brand distills its Craft FWD Pacific Northwest Vodka six times and filters it twice, removing that ethanol burn,” says Dyke.

“Rest assured its 40 percent alcohol by volume is tried and true.” Headwind shares recipes for some tasty cocktails as we wrap the summer season. All cocktails can be made with the vodka of your choice, but this month we’re celebrating the Pacific Northwest with Headwind.

2 parts Headwind vodka 4 parts tomato juice 2 dashes Tabasco sauce (or your favorite hot sauce) 1 teaspoon prepared creamy horseradish 2 dashes Worcestershire sauce 1 pinch black pepper 2 lime wedges 1 sliced cucumber 1 olive 1 cocktail onion Sliced chorizo salami (optional; exclude if vegetarian/vegan)

For the glass rim

1 pinch celery salt 1 pinch garlic salt 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon Kosher salt INSTRUCTIONS

• Mix first six ingredients in a pitcher. Stir until combined. • Add juice of one lime wedge. • For the glass rim, mix all ingredients and place onto a plate. Dip the top of each glass in water, then place the rim in the salt mixture. • Fill each glass with ice and pour in drink mix. • For garnish, skewer lime, cucumber, olive, cocktail onion, and salami.

ABOUT HEADWIND Headwind starts with high-quality, gluten-free, cornbased grain distilled and filtered through Pacific Northwest timber. The result is a smooth, crisp sip of the Northwest. Each bottle of Headwind vodka is wrapped in birch wood and hand-labeled with individual batch numbers, bottle numbers, and bottling date.

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The

EYE OF THE

BE

HOL DER The landscape of beauty and art is expanding with one woman’s powerful narrative. TEXT DAWN GARCIA

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MISS ART WORLD

A

rt and beauty have often been seen as a duality, as if one defines the other, but one artist aims to change our perception of both. Miss Art World, a title Katherine Cooksey created for herself, has transformed the space between social conformity and beauty norms with her creations and boundary-pushing performance art exhibitions. Born and raised in California by a tomboy mom and dream supporting father, Cooksey was 10 years old when she first expressed an interest in beauty pageants and cheerleading. Much to her mother’s chagrin, Cooksey got what she wanted and started competing in pageants. Although she was acutely aware of Hollywood’s applied unattainable standard of beauty and physical perfection, she wasn’t totally prepared for the toll that being judged on appearance would take on her. “Being a pageant girl has always come with judgment. Most people don’t get the appeal, while your fellow pageant queens completely embrace the culture of all things glittering and glamorous. It is a strange club to be in because it comes with shame or embarrassment at times and complete vindication—depending on the moment,” Cooksey says. “I wish there were different outlets without competition, so that people like me could be their fabulous feminine selves without the harsh expectations. Creating the Miss Art World art platform has given me permission to embrace the ultra-feminine without having to be in a pageant.” Cooksey eventually formulated more challenging views of beauty that give young girls and wom-

en the freedom to dictate beauty for themselves. “I developed my own harsh body image, along with eating disorders because I felt I couldn’t live up to the pressures of beauty defined by others,” she says. “I recognize a pageant girl’s heartbreak of feeling ugly or not always taken seriously. The women in the beauty industry propagate this perpetual cycle of being skinnier and skinnier, pressuring these women to be perfect, causing a ripple effect of messaging that filters through society. It’s time to celebrate real beauty that isn’t attached to body image.” Cooksey was enrolled in the Pratt Institute’s Masters of Fine Arts program, and as she began developing her own feminist ideals, she stopped competing. One of her professors told her pageant queens can’t be feminists. You have to make a choice, and she did. But her desire to combine both beauty and art only grew. “I am both pageant queen and feminist. I am stuck in the middle of this love-hate relationship with beauty,” Cooksey says. “I realized that my artwork had to be honest, no matter what the stereotypes of feminism or pageant girls were. I am both an insider and outsider of mainstream beauty and feel the pull between both worlds. I’ve learned to embrace the feminine and the feminist as one. I take ownership of this mindset in my art practice, which critiques the unrealistic display of the perfected physical form and the pressures to attain it.” While in grad school, Cooksey created her first interactive narrative visual art piece called Thirty Seconds. The premise was to present the question: If you had to

choose between being smart and not attractive or attractive but not smart, which would you choose and why? Given a golden microphone and 30 seconds to respond, the audience was shocked at the question itself, and even more so at their inability to answer. This was her first realization that pageantry could absolutely be part of thought-provoking art. Obtaining this new voice hasn’t been without its own internal pull. The pressures to be both liberating and true to the feminine form has allowed Cooksey to see things from a refreshing and socially necessary lens. “Art has been a freeing yet demanding director, hell-bent on forcing new perspectives through research, experiences, and challenges.” Her performance in February at the LA Art Show Diversity Walks & Talks facilitated an immersive and interactive experience that played to that mindset. “The idea [of the show] was to interview at least 30 people. Each person was asked two questions: Who are you and what does diversity mean to you? Everyone who answered was then invited to walk the runway during the show in whatever clothing they felt represented who they were,” Cooksey says. “This performance was about celebrating individuals from throughout LA. However, after I started interviewing, I realized the scope of the project had to change because 30 interviews couldn’t possibly showcase the broad diversity in our community. By the end of the project, I had done over 80 interviews. I would have kept doing more, but time ran out.” S U M M E R 2020

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“You don’t need to have perfect vision to be an artist. In fact, seeing the world differently can bring a new perspective to the artwork.”

That’s one of Cooksey’s most admirable traits: flexibility and a willingness to adapt. Artists often begin a project with one primary objective, but as a project evolves, the art and intention often evolve as its creation is born and given life, taking on its own forms that dictate the original artist vision. “My perception evolves in order to enhance the concept’s impact. Because of art, my perceptions are continuously changing, encouraging me to constantly question the —Katherine Cooksey, a.k.a. Miss Art World world around me.”

In a world where women have to not only battle standards of beauty but those who prey on them (sexual predators such as Harvey Weinstein), campaigns like Be a Lady, They Said push the boundaries of rediscovering what beauty means in a socially acceptable dialogue. Cooksey is a valuable part of that conversation. “This moment in history is extremely important. Women’s identities are evolving. It is important for me to stand up for women and help educate men through my artwork. I use the Miss Art World title to question the dominating ideologies of beauty fused with the disturbing and obsessive struggle to obtain it,” she says. “It is not a pleasant issue to tackle, but my hope is it will pave the way for our generation and future generations to question the rules and ideas society dictates.” Body image will always be a part of the human experience because we are physical and visual beings. The problem develops when we start putting restrictions and values on body image. “In pageantry, it is apparent that there is an acceptable body image that is celebrated, and even though 2019 was the first time in history that three reigning titles were held by black women, our narrative of what beauty looks like should be representative of the beauty in diversity,” Cooksey says. “The 2019 pageant was a beginning, but we have a long way to go.” Cooksey longs to present artwork that challenges viewers to think about their relationship with their bodies and consider how these relationships restrict and constrain when compared to

Miss Art World’s performance piece defies the standards of beauty and the restriction of perceived potential.

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Miss Art World missartworld.com @missartworld

What’s Next? When she was pregnant with her now newborn baby, Cooksey was working on a piece surrounding pregnancy. While female artists tend to have a more difficult time working once they become mothers, she plans to challenge that mindset and negative stigma by proving women can be both artists and mothers. “I have a husband who is very supportive of my art and knows how hard I have worked to make it this far, so I am excited about introducing new concepts within my artwork.”

traditional standards of beauty— sometimes without even realizing it, thanks to social conditioning. Cooksey’s performance piece called Personal Vacation speaks to how extreme body image is altered in pageantry. For the performance, she brought her own living room couch into the gallery

space. During the reception, she arrived in full pageant makeup. “It involved hours of putting on hair extensions, a corset, Spanx, fake eyelashes, five-inch heels, and an evening gown,” says Cooksey. She put on headphones so she couldn’t hear anyone or interact with those around her. “I took off everything: my makeup, my extensions, dress, and heels,” she says. “These actions are usually only done in privacy, but doing it in public taps into the fear of the public seeing women without the veil of makeup.” Changing out of the ball gown and into a onesie shifted the world of pageantry into a state of normalcy within seconds. “In the pageant world, you would never let anyone see you not ‘pageant ready’ even if you were working out. This created a huge fear of being in public without my face on. This performance forced me to tackle my own fears and take ownership, in a very public setting, of my own body and my relationship to self.” While Cooksey’s work is undeniably powerful, many fans may not realize she has been challenged with progressive loss of sight. At 10, she was diagnosed with an incurable eye disease. Her father introduced her to art as a form of expression; one she is eternally grateful for. “As my vision started to deteriorate, my father decided to teach me how to paint since we didn’t know how long my sight would last. Unfortunately, my eighth-grade art teacher told me, ‘You can’t be an artist if you can’t see.’ Being at a vulnerable age, I gave up art for years until my late teens, when I discovered adults can be wrong.”

Cooksey may not have 20/20 vision, but the visual creations she shares prove that there are no limitations to inspiration or creation. “You don’t need to have perfect vision to be an artist. In fact, seeing the world differently can bring a new perspective to the artwork.” She’s among the incredible company of those whose disabilities never stopped them, including Beethoven, who lost his hearing and yet still composed Ode to Joy. Cooksey’s disability makes it difficult to clearly make out people’s faces. When she’s in public, she often can’t recognize people or see that they’re waving to her. “I have had countless conversations with people who said they thought I was very stuck up and snobby because they felt I ignored them. The challenge perpetuates the stereotype of pageant contestants being conceited, which is one element I never want to exude.” Sensitive to how beauty is perceived, Miss Art World aims to be seen as more than, “another stupid pretty girl with nothing important to say.” She is actively advocating to change the standards of beauty. “I can’t change my physical appearance, but I can change my behavior and what I advocate for.” Miss Art World is more than a culmination of creative expression. It is Cooksey’s lifelong performance piece that will continue to speak out through a variety of mediums. “The goal is to blend the feminine and feminist into one,” she says. “Age, unladylike behavior, body changes, pregnancy, marital status, and health have no effect on this title. Unlike all other titles, I am Miss Art World until death.” S U M M E R 2020

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lis s b BODY MADE FOR

Do you know you have an endocannabinoid system? You do. Your self is full of cellular receptors that bind with the active ingredients in cannabis known as cannabinoids. So why have we just now started to hear about it? TEXT LELAND RUCKER PHOTO ILLUSTRATIONS JOSH CLARK

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O

ne thing I’ve noticed over the years, when talking with my cannabis-using friends, is that they are more likely to say it makes them feel “normal” rather than “stoned.” I generally answer that “it keeps me balanced” or something


ORIGINAL PHOTO BY CHARLIE, ADOBE STOCK

s along those lines. I would never say that about other mind-altering substances (alcohol, for instance), and it’s at least one reason millions of us keep coming back for more. But why do so many people who use cannabis feel that way? A couple of years ago, I began reading about

something called the endocannabinoid system, a regulating procedure within the body that works in much the same way cannabis does. My bs detector turned bright red. Yeah, right. Even for an advocate, that seemed a little too much to swallow, a little too good to be true.

There is much evidence that cannabis, or what’s in cannabis, has been used to treat symptoms of human illnesses, disorders, and diseases in many cultures for centuries and that it was a standard pharmaceutical product in the United States. Today, after decades of lies

This article was originally published in Sensi Denver/Boulder August 2017 edition

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FREEDA MICHAUX, ADOBE STOCK

from the government and popular culture’s continuing depiction of marijuana users as inept “stoners,” we’re finding that ordinary people are using cannabis for pain, arthritis, and muscle relief and—surprise—just to relax. But why? Cannabinoids are chemical compounds found in cannabis plants, more than a hundred different ones so far. For the most part, no other plant accumulates them quite like cannabis, and these cannabinoids provide the plant with everything from pest resistance to relief from the sun’s UV rays. The most recognized are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), known for its psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol (CBD), recognized for its medical applications. “Many people have tried THC and CBD. Those are called phytocannabinoids,” says biochemist Samantha Miller, founder of Pure Analytics, a cannabis testing facility in California. Scientists have also discovered cannabinoids that are produced naturally in the body. Called endocannabinoids, they have structures similar to phytocannabinoids. Raphael Mechoulam, William Devane, and Dr. Lumir Hanus found the first endocannabinoid and called it anandamide after the Sanskrit word for bliss, in 1992, and later found another, called 2-arachidonoylglycero, or 2-AG. So far, so good. In 1988, scientists found receptors in all mammals that respond to cannabinoids, CB-1 receptors found in the brain and CB-2 receptors found throughout the body. These endocannabinoids hook up with these receptors. In biochemistry, it’s called the “lock-and-key” model, where the cannabinoid molecules act like

this natural architecture to interact with cannabinoids,” Miller says. “You find these all over the body, in the nervous system, the immune system, everywhere. The endocannabinoids control and influence a lot of different things, like sleep, appetite, anxiety, addiction, the cardiovascular system, immune system—everything to do with quality of life.” Perry Solomon is the former chief medical officer at HelloMD, a popular wellness website with a growing number of patients using cannabis. He describes the endocannabinoid system as a feedback mechanism that helps keep the body in equilibrium. “When you get excessive stimulation, pain, emotions, or bad experiences, chemicals are released that can overwhelm the body,” he says. “Endocannabinoids are a way to keep the body in balance.” There are literally thousands of —Perry Solomon, HelloMD research papers and studies around the world on cannabinoids. But cannabis research remains a somewhat arcane branch of science in the United States, which, under the “keys” that fit into the CB receptor auspices of the National Institute of Drug Abuse, until recently would “locks.” When the CB receptor is fund only projects that were aimed “unlocked” by a particular cannaat the abuse side of the equation. binoid, it changes its shape, and US researchers still encounter how it changes shape determines how it regulates cell signaling (how bureaucratic hassles, lack of adequate study product, and the fact cells communicate within themthat cannabis remains a Schedule selves and how they communicate I drug, which by definition means with other cells). From a chemical standpoint, THC is structurally it has no medical purpose. “Consimilar to anandamide, and CBD is ventional medicine traditionally has concentrated on opioids,” says comparable to 2-AG. THC “unDr. Selma Holden, a physician and locks” the CB-1 receptor in almost assistant clinical professor at the the same way anandamide does, and CBD “unlocks” the CB-2 recep- University of New England. But even US scientists and doctors are tor much like 2-AG. beginning to recognize that some“The reason we interact with cannabis so strongly is that we have thing’s going on.

“WHEN YOU GET EXCESSIVE STIMULATION, PAIN, EMOTIONS, OR BAD EXPERIENCES, CHEMICALS ARE RELEASED THAT CAN OVERWHELM THE BODY. ENDOCANNABINOIDS ARE A WAY TO KEEP THE BODY IN BALANCE."

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ORIGINAL PHOTO BY JAMES MOSLEY, ADOBE STOCK

“Historically, people just thought cannabis was something that got you high and concentrated on the THC. Because of medical-marijuana efforts and a little increase in evidence, they’re starting to come around,” she explains. “And more patients are turning to their medical doctors and saying, ‘this stuff works for me.’” As recently as 2017, the University of Vermont was the only medical school in the country with an accredited course on the endocannabinoid system in its curriculum. “The people who should know about it aren’t taught it in medical school,” says Solomon, and he understands some doctors’ initial reluctance to deal with the endocannabinoid system. “Until doctors come out and become familiar with what’s involved in the system, there’s a hesitancy.” Oncologists, who already know it helps relieve the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, are among the leading edge of physicians beginning to take cannabis seriously, and other specialists are looking into cannabinoid alternatives, Solomon says. “A recent National Academies of Science study found that cannabinoids are being used to treat chronic pain in adults, and it does work,” he says. “So anesthesiologists are saying, ‘Maybe this is something we should look at.’” Holden says that some of the most exciting research today concerns cannabinoids’ anti-inflammatory qualities. “When you think of it, a lot of diseases, not all of them, have an inflammation component,” she says. “In dementia, in asthma, it’s all inflammation. That’s what’s interesting about the endocannabinoid system. It’s influencing these inflammation markers.”

“WE CAN'T FALL TOO MUCH INTO THE BELIEF SYSTEM THAT HAVING AN ALTERED STATE OF CONSCIOUSNESS IS BAD." —Dr. Selma Holden, University of New England

Much of the research is being done at the behest of drug companies eager to create new products from cannabinoids and able to afford the expensive re-search needed for approval. GW Pharmaceuticals has developed a couple of cannabidiol products to combat epilepsy, and its Epidiolex was approved by the FDA in 2018 for the treatment of seizures—the first cannabis plant-derived medicine ever approved by the FDA. Arizona company Insys Therapeutics recently received preliminary DEA approval for a synthetic cannabis drug called Syndros. (The company also contributed to the successful effort to stop a marijuana legalization initiative in that state last year.) Much of the emphasis on cannabis healing these days is concentrated around CBD and marketed for its non-psychoactive effects. Hold-

en cautions that if someone is using cannabis for a chronic condition like back pain or Crohn’s disease, the feeling of elevation can be an important part of the therapy, too. “We can’t fall too much into the belief system that having an altered state of consciousness is bad.” And that gets us back to where we began. That altered state of consciousness that has offered me and so many people a feeling of relaxation, of being in a place where they can be creative and focused or as a way to deal with common maladies. “Our brains are ideally suited for cannabis,” Chris Kilham, an author and ethnobiologist who studies plant-based remedies as the Medicine Hunter on Fox News, told me. “There’s no substance other than water that has the health benefits and continued significance of those benefits.” S U M M E R 2020

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Empty Calendar What to do when there’s nothing to do.

The dog days of summer are upon us. In our modern lexicon, that popular term has dual meanings: 1) the period between early July and early September when the hot sultry weather of summer occurs in the Northern Hemisphere; 42

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2) a period of stagnation or inactivity. In 2020, the dog days of summer were mauled by the pandemic, which continues to force people around the globe to endure lengthy periods of inactivity. But just because travel dreams were

dashed this year doesn’t mean you can’t take your mind to new places. Here are some quick suggestions about ways to fill the long days ahead. Get Lost in a Good Book Because your brain can’t take any. more. Netflix.

And you can’t take any more…well, anything. As the Book of Disquiet author Fernando Pessoa wrote, “Literature is the most agreeable way of ignoring life.” Not much of a reader? No problem. Trevor Noah, Jamie Lee Curtis,

PHOTO BY LOLOSTOCK, ADOBE STOCK

TEXT SENSI EDITORS


PHOTO CREDITS (FROM TOP): SOMEMEANS, ADOBE STOCK / ALFA27, ADOBE STOCK

Mariah Carey, Kevin Bacon, Alicia Silverstone, James McAvoy, and so many other leading performers can do the reading. All you’ve got to do is listen, which you can do while going about your day. Or while not going anywhere: your call. A 2018 University College London study showed that listening to audiobooks is more emotionally engaging than watching TV and movies—findings consistent across all demographics regardless of the genre. Audible is your go-to source for premium offerings available on demand

If you haven’t already done the Audible free trial, what better time than now to take advantage of the deal: 60-day free trial plus two free audiobooks, then $14.95 for one credit per month, good for any book regardless of price, and you can cancel anytime . Got a library card? Download the Libby app, which allows you to borrow and read ebooks and audiobooks from your local public library for free. Don’t have a library card? Well now you have something else to do right now when there’s not a whole lot to do.

Make (Bad?) Art The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City may be temporarily closed (as of press time), but its website, moma.org, invites you to experience the world through its artistic lens. Take in the Virtual Views by exploring NYC architecture online. Listen to hours of art-inspired music on summer playlists curated by MoMa staffers. From artists’ musical inspirations to cinema soundtracks to the “alien” sounds of the avant-garde, the museum’s Spotify playlists include one dedicated

to the music of Miró; The “Rosanne Cash, the River, and the Thread” includes some thoughts the singer-songwriter shared about weaving, making art, and writing music—and made a playlist to accompany the exhibition. The set featuring songs about and inspired by works of art sets the perfect soundtrack to an afternoon spent engrossed in any of the museum’s free online courses, including “Fashion as Design” and “Postwar Abstract Painting,” taught through online portal Coursera (coursera.org/moma).

QUARANTINE LISTENING PARTY Our editor in chief Stephanie Wilson ranks the seven novels she “read” during shutdown.

7. Trust Exercise by Susan Choi 6. Men Without Women by Huraki Murakami 5. Writers & Lovers by Lily King 4. Normal People by Sally Rooney 3. Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld 2. All Adults Here by Emma Straub 1. Weather by Jenny Offill

“We have art so that we shall not die of reality.” —Friedrich Nietzsche

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THE SCENE WELLNESS

Only Natural Medicine’s future is plant-based. TEXT JULIE RAQUE

The evolution of medicine dates back thousands of years and spans many continents and belief systems. From ancient Ayurvedic medicine to the most modern developments in pharmaceuticals, medicine

has changed and shifted drastically over the past 5,000 years. With the mass availability of information, humans have become educated in the world of medicine and empowered to choose the practices to which

they wish to subscribe. We’ve relied primarily on Western medicine and pharmaceuticals, but we can expect plant-based remedies to play a role in health trends in the year to come as people incorporate holistic healing

practices into their daily regimens as preventative and retroactive measures. People will look to the root cause of disease, not just symptoms. Often when people fall ill, they look to treat S U M M E R 2020

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THE SCENE WELLNESS

what they consider the worst part of their illness—the symptoms they’re experiencing— as quickly as possible. People are starting to understand that they need to solve the root cause of a disease rather than superficial symptoms. With information readily accessible, people can understand why they may be feeling a certain way and what they can do to prevent an illness moving forward. More than ever, people are looking toward how active they are, vitamins and minerals, nutrients, and diet to uncover what’s causing their symptoms. They will, in turn, be invested in learning about how different plant-based

remedies address both symptoms and root causes, and how these can lead them on a path to better health and wellness overall. People will look to natural remedies before pharmaceuticals. Botanic remedies have been providing relief for thousands of years. While the pharmaceutical industry has focused on isolating, synthesizing, and patenting specific chemicals and molecular compounds, alternative remedies employ natural treatments stemming from the plant kingdom. People now understand the harm an antibiotic can do to your gut flora, digestive sys-

tem, and kidneys, especially if it is interacting with another antibiotic in your system. Many will look to herbs, spices, fruits, and vegetables to ease symptoms and issues such as anxiety, sleeplessness, mood swings, and adrenal fatigue before reaching for the medicine cabinet. Consumers will experiment with different methods. There are less invasive ways to treat things like pain and sore muscles than popping Ibuprofen or acetaminophen, including cannabinoid-based topicals, lotions, tinctures, and inhalants. Over-thecounter pain relievers

can interact adversely with your kidneys and liver, a difficult trade-off for someone looking to alleviate a headache. Topicals allow you to target a certain area and reapply as necessary, making them a more appropriate treatment for acute pain.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Julie Raque is vice president of marketing for The Root of It All, which makes cannabis-based remedies, and Cannabistry, a leading cannabis research and development organization. She has helped launch highly valued pharmaceutical products, including Harvoni.

People will look toward other cultures. More people are looking to ancient Eastern and Ayurvedic principles to figure out why they may be feeling the way they are and how to treat it. Both ancient Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine practices utilize plants in their healing strategies and emphasize balance between mind, body, and spirit.

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Two Women. One Major Goal. Clark Howell LLP is inspired to help the cannabis industry succeed.

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ffering insight and expertise—and ensuring clients stay at the forefront of regulation, compliance, and business practices— Clark Howell LLP is a women-owned and operated legal firm that’s there to help clients every step of the way. We talked to attorneys Ariel Clark and Nicole Howell to get to know and understand the business better. How did the firm get its start? We formally created the firm in 2014,

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What piqued your interest in the cannabis industry? We are energized by the independent entrepreneurial spirit of our clients. They are traveling down their own path, realizing their own vision. Our job is to help them succeed in meeting and exceeding their goals. We recognize ourselves in them and are inspired every day.

What services do you offer? Corporate, regulatory, B2B supply chain, but really Clark Howell (originally Clark commercial real estate, and hemp. We Neubert LLP) started in Joshua Tree, have a full-service corporate practice, California, in 2011. We met on a yoga advising new and existing cannabis and retreat and instantly recognized each hemp businesses at all critical points: other as soul mates. When we formed start-up, financing, securities, corporate the firm, we had a vision to bring sound, governance, business transactions, and strategic advice and counsel to clients mergers and acquisitions. who really needed it, especially as We work with cultivators, manufacCalifornia was transitioning into a new turers, distributors, testing labs, and environment—away from the nonprofit retailers on local permitting, state licollective model—and into a for-profit, censing, and B2B supply chain contracts. regulated, mainstream competitive We handle a full range of real estate market with all the challenges that matters, including purchases and sales, legal and emerging businesses face. commercial leases, lease-backs, and oth-


P R O M O T I O N A L F E AT U R E C L A R K H OW E L L L L P

businesses and brands. Not satisfied with “what everyone else is doing,” our lawyers do not rest until our clients have the best, most strategic advice to navigate them through the next How do you ensure clients mainchallenge or opportunity, whether it’s tain compliance? a bet-the-company deal, a regulatory Our mission is to make certain clients show-stopper, or a brand-new product have all the tools they need in order to in a just-born market. That means not meet and maintain compliance by help- What is your overall mission? just closing the deal, but crafting and ing them understand why it’s important We empower our clients to launch, fund, leverage, and grow the industry’s closing the right deal for our clients. to follow the rules from the start. most successful cannabis and hemp Those who do will have a significant We are women-owned and womadvantage when other businesses are en-steered, and we know what it’s like struggling with regulatory enforcement to chart your own course. You must stay around time-consuming or cumbersome alert, strong, and flexible. No one works issues like ownership and financial harder or knows this landscape better. We are here to help you get there. interest holder disclosures. That said, each client prefers a MEET THE MASTERMINDS different level of involvement with their “We are Ariel Clark, attorney at law, has more lawyers. Some of our clients have us very energized than 10 years of experience leading the involved and listen to our advice very charge in cannabis law and policies. carefully. Other clients come to us when by the Recognized by Rolling Stone magazine they have issues and problems. It’s up to independent as a woman changing the culture the client, but we like to work with people entrepreneurial of tomorrow, Clark’s commitment to who want to do it right from the start. spirit of our pushing the industry forward in the most successful way possible fuels her Do you collaborate with other firms? clients. They passion and her ability to ensure all her We have a large network of amazing are traveling Ariel Clark, Partner clients are successful. Clark founded attorneys across the country. The down their the Los Angeles Cannabis Tax Force cannabis bar is one of the most profesown path, (which was instrumental in the passage sional, friendly, and collegial bars you realizing their will find. Our relationship and history in of Measure M) and is a prominent and the industry provides our clients a netwell-respected industry leader. own vision. work of the most experienced counsel. Nicole Howell, a leader in cannabis We recognize business and regulation, is an attorney ourselves in How can you educate the public who has been an activist and policy them and are on cannabis consumption, regulachangemaker over the course of her tions, avoiding illegal black-marcareer, from high stakes, parallel civil, inspired every Nicole Howell, Partner ket practices, and other obstacles? criminal, and regulatory matters to canday.” Consumers make choices based on nabis law and policy. Her know-how and cost and trust. In order to create brand —Ariel Clark and tenacity make her a leader in the field. loyalty, you need well-run companies Nicole Howell, partners at that are making quality, consistent Clark Howell LLP products at a fair price. In order to make all of that possible, the business needs a solid legal framework. Clark Howell LLP By helping our clients form a solid legal Lawyers for the Green Frontier foundation for their business and supply clarkhowell.com er vehicles. And we advise hemp farmers, manufacturers, and product-makers on permitting and compliance.

chain relationships, we are helping to create longer-lasting and healthy businesses. This inspires consumers to look for strong brands and creates consumer loyalty for regulated products instead of going to the illegal market. That’s why it matters to do things the right way.

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P R O M O T I O N A L F E AT U R E TRUSOLIS TECHNOLOGIES

Replicating the Sun for Better Cannabis Grows A commercial lighting manufacturer created the right LED recipe for its cannabis grow product line.

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gricultural lighting technology has come a long way over the past few years, in part inspired by the needs of the cannabis industry and the demands of a complicated plant. TruSolis Technologies, a commercial lighting company with products for agriculture spaces, large industrial operations, and gyms, saw the need for better lights for growers in this new industry, and it got to work on engineering a line of LEDs (light-emitting diodes), a semiconductor light source. “We had already developed a horticultural line for growing green beans and leafy greens,” says John Johnston, founder and president of TruSolis Technologies. “So, the challenge was to create a light that would go head-to-head with some of the big

The advantages of using LEDs is threefold: light energy savings; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) savings, because less heat is generated; and maintenance. “Maintenance is really big,” Johnston says. “It’s very expensive in any operation and especially in growing. The high-pressure sodium bulbs last maybe two growth cycles, and then they have to be replaced. Our LEDs have a fiveyear life expectancy.” Another advantage is the canopy height that LEDs can work in. “We are able to fit more lights into smaller spaces,” says Ken Sintchak, vice president of business development for TruSolis Technologies. “We can go much lower with our lights, because a lot of people are doing smaller indoor grows. They can actually double-stack tier their grow.” Some of the growers who use the company’s indoor grow LED lights are reporting back that the lights are positively affecting the actual flavor of the finished flower. “The flavor of the plant is so much better than under conventional lights, because the lights are not burning up those flavors,” Johnston says.

sodium vapor lights that the growers are comfortable with. But those use a lot of energy. We wanted to make an LED version of that.” About three years ago, TruSolis Technologies worked with different LED providers and came up with the “right recipe” to match what is currently available for growers. “If you want to create a real solid agriculture product, you have to replicate what the sun provides,” Johnston says. “We found that there were not any LEDs out there that would provide the full spectrum wavelength we needed.” It’s easy to get leafy greens to go through their cycle, he says. But when you get into flowering and budding, that requires more lighting intensity. “There TruSolis Technologies are different [lighting] recipes used for Commercial Lighting each stage of the flower’s growth.” trusolis.com

“To create a real solid agriculture product, you have to replicate what the sun provides. We found that there were not any LEDs out there that would provide the full spectrum wavelength we needed.” —John Johnston, founder and president of TruSolis Technologies

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THE END

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SUMMER 2020

TEXT SAT PANESAR

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Profile for Sensi Magazine

Sensi Magazine—Los Angeles (Summer 2020)  

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Sensi Magazine—Los Angeles (Summer 2020) Digital Edition

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