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Mercury-Free Equipment

MC

All clinical equipment containing mercury has been replaced with non-mercury alternatives.

“Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible..”

Energy-Efficient Computers Older equipment is being replaced with newer, more energy-efficient equipment.

St. Francis of Assisi

New Mopping System Traditional mop-and-bucket floor cleaning has been replaced with a new, microfiber mopping system that reduces annual water consumption by 50,000 gallons and chemical cleaner usage by 8,000 gallons.

Other Notable Achievements: • Green Cleaners • Medical Waste Reduction • Chemical-Free Window Washing • Cardboard Recycling • Bottle and Can Recycling • Other Recycling Includes: Office paper, Fluorescent Lamps, Used Oil, Batteries, Scrap Metal, Electronic Equipment • Car Pooling

in our community and our env e d i r p e k ironme We ta nt

St. Elizabeth Medical Center 2008 Annual Report www.stemc.org


Medical Staff Officers

Fred Talarico, M.D. President Sudershan Dang, M.D. Vice President Eric Yoss, M.D. Secretary - Treasurer

Foundation Officers

A message from the President and CEO, Sister M. Johanna DeLelys, OSF 2008 was a year of making plans to expand the Medical Center’s services, both on the hospital grounds and in a nearby community. After investigating several possibilities, we purchased the former Hartford Insurance building on Middle Settlement Road in the town of New Hartford in January 2009. Plans for this 80,000-square-foot structure include a new, Outpatient Wound Care Center, relocation of our Adirondack Sports Medicine Rehabilitation services (currently housed on Culver Avenue in East Utica) the New Hartford Medical Group offi ces, Outpatient Laboratory, Urgent Care, and Radiology services, as well as private physician offi ce space. We are pleased to be able to reach out into the community and increase convenience and access to primary care services. We also made plans to renovate and expand the hospital’s Orthopedic Unit and construction began in February 2009. The unit, completed in August ’09, contains 10 private patient rooms and two semi-private rooms, to increase patient comfort and healing. I am grateful to our dedicated employees for their many hours of planning and work to make these projects a reality. Ongoing during the year were changes led by the Nursing staff to decrease hospital-based infections. Particular success was made in the areas of sternal wound infections and donor graft site infections, which are detailed in this report. The Association of Operating Room Nurses recognized our staff ’s achievements in high-quality patient care with a national award for obtaining these results in the area of post-operative infections after open heart surgery. Other ongoing eff orts by our superb staff include numerous environmental achievements. These include medical waste reduction, which was achieved through better waste segregation; a new mopping system, which reduces water consumption by approximately 50,000 gallons annually; and installation of a high-effi ciency boiler at the building owned by the Medical Center at 2206 Genesee Street that will signifi cantly reduce energy consump-

tion for that building. Mohawk Valley Heart Institute (MVHI), St. Elizabeth’s collaboration in cardiac care with Faxton-St. Luke’s Healthcare, opened the new Helen M. Firsching Cardiac Catheterization Lab in March 2008 with four procedure rooms, a tilt room and a nine-bay holding/recovery room. These renovations improved patient access to services that are much needed across our region.

Terrance Mielnicki President William Borrill, Esq. Vice President Stephen Teti Treasurer Barbara Falatico Brodock Secretary

In addition, our primary care services continue to grow through the St. Elizabeth Medical Group and its 13 sites in Oneida and Herkimer counties. The Medical Group plays a vital role in meeting community healthcare needs by providing easily accessible services to women, children and families across the Mohawk Valley region. From Little Falls in the east to Sauquoit, Waterville and other locations across the area, providers and offi ce staff have a daily impact on our neighbors’ lives.

Guild Officers

Margaret Lalonde President

As we continue to extend the mission of our founding Sisters throughout the community we serve, we also endeavor to impart a Spirit of Excellence in all that we do, each day. Thank you for your support, which you demonstrate in many ways: by serving as volunteers, fi nancial donors, members of our Patient & Family Advisory Council – the ways are too numerous to mention.

Maureen Netzband Vice President Mary Humphrey Treasurer Winifred Buehler Assistant Treasurer

God bless you.

Mary Margaret Napoli Recording Secretary Jane Ann Dwyer Corresponding Secretary Joseph Bouse Assistant Corresponding Secretary BOARD OF TRUSTEES Seated from left: Marianne Gaige; Sr. M.

Johanna DeLelys, OSF, President/CEO; Sr. Donna McGartland, OSF; and Catherine Cominsky. Standing from left: Dr. Fred Talarico; Dr. Eric Yoss; Richard Zweifel; Fred Matt; Harrison J. Hummel, III; and Gregory Evans. Not shown: Sister Frances Kowalski, Raymond Meier, Esq., Hon. Norman I. Siegel and Dr. Steven Williams.

ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM President/CEO Sister M. Johanna DeLelys,

center, with her Vice Presidents. Seated from left: Phyllis Ellis, FACHE; Robert Scholefield, Catherine Hanover and Phyllis Hasenauer. Standing from left: Patrick Buckley, Dr. Albert D’Accurzio, Lou Aiello and Varinya Sheppard. Not shown: Traci Boris, Esq.

Marian Luley Marie McQueen Board Members

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Medical Center Financial Statement for Report Year 2008 I.

Table of contents

Revenue Net Patient Services Revenue

$183,399,583

Other Operating Revenue

$5,797,941

Total Revenue

$189,197,524

II. Expenses Depreciation and Interest

$10,242,336

Salaries

$82,794,747

Employee/Fringe Benefits

$20,745,352

Supplies and All Other Expenses

$73,504,526 $187,286,961

Total Expenses III. Details of Specific Revenue/ Expense Items Government Grants Revenue

$341,880

Research & Medical Education Revenue

$1,232,456

Research & Medical Education Expense

$5,483,157

Bad Debt/Uncompensated Care

$6,868,172

Free Care (Charity, Hill Burton, Mother Bernardina)

$2,272,000

Summary Financial Statement Revenue

$189,197,524

Expenses

$187,286,961

Charity Care

$2,272,000

Bad Debt/ Uncompensated Care

$6,868,172

Total Free Care

$9,140,172

Community Benefits Revenue/Expense

201 12,203

Average Length of Stay (LOS) days Case Mix Adjusted LOS (days) Surgical Procedures Inpatient Outpatient Cardiothoracic Coronary Angioplasties Total Surgical Procedures

4.8 3.9 2,737 5,635 355 1,228 9,955

Cardiac Procedures Catheterizations Electrophysiology Procedures Endoscopy Procedures

2,645 1101 8,303

Radiology Studies Medical Center Marian Medical Imaging Laboratory Tests Emergency Room Visits

66,547 23,815 680,648 33,524

Primary Care Office Visits (Patient Visits)

143,400

Rehab Services Patient Visits Medical Center Community Offices Respiratory Therapy Treatments EEG Studies EKG Studies Sleep Center Procedures Wound Management Visits Home Care Visits

36,239 14,121 196,642 386 24,559 1,606 2,844 9,999

Meeting Growing Needs St. Elizabeth Medical Arts

9

10

Targeting 0

OR Updates

11

13-14

Orthopedic Services

St. Elizabeth Medical Group

20 Keeping up with Technology

$9,140,172 25

Just the Numbers Our Financial Information

15

Meet the “Pillow Ladies”

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A New Look

■ Demonstrate exemplary leadership in all decision-making as we support our Mission.

17-19

A Regional Teaching Institution

■ Demonstrate appropriate responsiveness to meet specific community healthcare needs.

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Keeping Up With Technology

■ Our physical environment will demonstrate excellence in customer access, safety, and comfort functions. ■ Enhance our technology initiatives to support our healthcare delivery systems.

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Our Successful Foundation Quality Counts - DNV Accreditation

■ Offer the high quality healthcare services to SEMC patients and respond to future needs (Patient Care).

22 23

Did You Know - Physician Recruitment

24

Awards and Recognition

25

Just the Numbers - 2008 Financial Information

26

Meet Our Leaders

Our Strategies For 2008

■ Demonstrate a continued investment in our most valued resource, our employees (Human Resources). ■ Demonstrate responsible stewardship in all financial matters. ■ Demonstrate a shared vision and commitment to physicians caring for SEMC patients and families. 25

Benefits to our community

$44,668

Statistical Highlights 2008 Discharges

8

$695,424

Courtesy Care

Licensed beds

5


Consumer Choice Award for the 5th consecutive year in 2008-09

The Mohawk Valley Heart Institute received the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines – Coronary Artery Disease Gold Performance Achievement Award

Our Mission

St. Elizabeth Medical Center community, inspired by St. Francis of Assisi and faithful to the teachings of the Roman Catholic

CMS IPRO Certificates Received 2 Certificates of Appreciation from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)/ Island Peer Review Organization

Church, is committed to excellence in healthcare and education. We pledge to do this with compassion and respect for the dignity of all. A “Friend of Heart” Award from the American Heart Association

Genesis Excellence in Education Award St. Elizabeth School of Radiography

Third place as Laboratory of the Year by Advance for Medical Laboratory Professionals magazine

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Did You Know? Physician Recruitment The importance of Physicians to St. Elizabeth Medical Center and the communities we serve cannot be overstated. The growing shortage of physicians, due to retirement and retention diffi culties, has a negative impact on the region. According to the Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS) 2008 Physician Workforce Survey, Central New York had a net gain of 34 physicians in 2007 but needed 366 physicians – the highest regional number for need, statewide. The average age of physicians in New York State was 51 in 2007. According to the University of Albany’s Annual Physician Workforce Profi le in 2008, the ratio of physicians to the population was lowest in the Mohawk Valley region of the state, with 167 physicians per 100,000 people. Herkimer County had 80 physicians per 100,000 people and Oneida County had 211. New York State exports more than half of our NYS trained physicians with a disproportionate number of physicians in downstate compared to upstate NY. In addition, the report “New York Physician Supply and Demand through 2030” by the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the School of Public Health, University at Albany, states that the demand for physicians practicing in the state continues to grow. Between 2002 and 2006, the Mohawk Valley experienced a physician decline of 4 percent. Our methods to address physician shortages include: ■ Annual preparation of a Strategic Physician Needs Assessment ■ Collaborating with experienced recruiters through the Upstate

1,552 The number of hours employees donated

6,445 The number of community attendees

$44,668 The value these hours translate to

New York Physician Recruiter Network to elevate Upstate New York as an ideal region for practicing medicine ■ Outreach to prospective physicians through career fair visits and

website optimization St. Elizabeth is also working with partners cooperatively to address this critical issue and recruit physicians in specifi c specialties to the area.

Committed to Community Service An employee volunteers as “Frosty the Snowman” for our annual children’s Christmas party 23


DNV Healthcare Accredits Medical Center

Benefits to Our Community St. Elizabeth Medical Center’s commitment to community health is refl ected in its employees’ extensive outreach beyond the hospital and Medical Group offi ces into the area communities. Along with other hospitals, St. Elizabeth has begun to monitor how its faithfulness to the Mohawk Valley region meets our local communities’ unique healthcare needs. Therefore, community benefi ts are programs or activities that provide treatment and/or promote health and healing as a response to identifi ed community needs. Our Catholic tradition and Medical Center Mission teach us to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable fi rst. Community benefi t activities include charity care for people unable to aff ord services; health education and illness prevention; special healthcare initiatives for at-risk youths; free or low-cost clinics; and eff orts to advance communities. Such actions are often developed in collaboration with community members and other organizations to improve health and quality of life.

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In support of the Medical Center’s Mission, staff members at all levels of the organization donate time and services to communities across the region. While this has been ongoing since St. Elizabeth’s founding in 1866, only during the past three years has the information been compiled. Total numbers are still being collected. However, we can report with certainty that in 2008, at least 179 Medical Center employees donated 1,552 hours to meet specifi c community requests, interacting with 6,445 community attendees. These hours translate into a value of more than $44,668. Members of the Trauma Center staff not only cared for critically injured patients in our community in 2008; they also conducted numerous outreach programs in area schools and to adults. These include an annual symposium for providers on trauma issues, presentations to 794 students at 6 area schools on head and spinal cord injury prevention and a fall-prevention presentation to 120 individuals at local senior citizen centers.

Continuing to pursue its goal of providing exceptional care to its patients in a safe environment, St. Elizabeth Medical Center was accredited by DNV Healthcare, Inc. in November. This accreditation is important because it confi rms that St. Elizabeth is meeting Medicare and Medicaid’s standards to be a provider of healthcare services to those programs and that the National Integrated Accreditation for Healthcare Organizations (NIAHO) standards and the ISO 9001 Quality Management System standards are met. St. Elizabeth was the fi rst hospital in New York State to achieve this new NIAHO accreditation with DNV Healthcare, Inc. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) delegates inspection of hospital services to several organizations: DNV Healthcare Inc., the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), State Health Departments and the American Osteopathic Association. DNV Healthcare, Inc. is a 145-year-old company based in Norway. It received its authority from CMS in late September 2008. “ This is more than a new accreditation program, it’s a catalyst for our ongoing commitment to patient safety and clinical quality,” said St. Elizabeth Medical Center President and CEO Sister M. Johanna. “With NIAHO we can achieve full ISO compliance and satisfy our annual accreditation requirements at the same time, for no additional cost. We are pleased and proud that our dedicated staff has achieved this certifi cation and continues to strive for excellence in caring for patients across the region.”

This change matters to St. Elizabeth because ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards are the foundation of the Medical Center’s Quality Management System. These standards ensure it is taking all necessary steps to deliver safe and eff ective healthcare services to patients. ISO 9001 is recognized by businesses around the world as the benchmark for continual quality improvement. Innovative hospitals have started embracing ISO as a way to identify and focus on the most successful approaches to patient care, billing and other critical aspects of running a modern hospital. The new DNV NIAHO program is not only a new option for accreditation; it is an entirely new approach to accreditation. NIAHO focuses not simply on auditing the hospital’s business processes but on fi nding better ways to do things in every department. The Medical Center received ISO certifi cation in 2005, so those processes and standards were in place for nearly three years prior to DNV accreditation.

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Our Foundation 2008 was all about successes for the St. Elizabeth Medical Center Foundation. With the generous support of many businesses, foundations and individuals, we successfully completed the largest capital campaign ever undertaken by the Foundation to benefi t the Medical Center’s new Emergency Department and Cafeteria. The Foundation was successful in each of its Signature Events, raising more than $327,843 in support of the many initiatives undertaken by the Medical Center. These Signature Events include the annual Employee Campaign, Leadership and Recognition, Golf Tournament, Dinner Dance, Lights of Love, and An Aff air to Remember. Through the diligence of our Grant Writer, the Foundation successfully raised nearly $650,000 for the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) Project, Language Assistance Program,

“Our continued success would not be possible without your support... thank you.”

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the renovation of the new Cardiac Cath Lab, Mohawk Valley Heart Institute, Women’s and Children’s and East Utica Medical Offi ces, Automatic External Defi brillators (AEDs), Reach Out and Read Program, and the Capital Campaign to benefi t the new Emergency Department and Cafeteria. The Foundation welcomed three new board members this year: Barbara Falatico Brodock, Terry Mielnicki and Stephen Teti. With their support and leadership, the Foundation will continue to reach new milestones and successes. The Foundation thanks Board Member Steeves Devlin, DC for his years of involvement with the Foundation and as co-chair of the annual Golf Tournament. Dr. Devlin resigned from the Board in 2008 to pursue a new career opportunity.

In addition, our Patient Information Guide includes telephone numbers for the patient to call regarding the various programs that are available to assist the patient with paying his or her account. Our Patient Statements contain a message alerting the patient to our Discount Policies. For those patients who are truly unable to pay, the Medical Center off ers the Mother Bernardina Charity Care Program. The Medical Center employs three in-house Patient Account Specialists, as well as a fourth Specialist who deals specifi cally with the Women and Children’s Health Center and Medical Group sites, as needed. The Patient Account Specialists focus on Inpatient and Emergency Department accounts while the patient is still in the hospital. The goal is to determine the patient’s eligibility for state insurance coverage and to obtain coverage, if applicable. During the pre-registration process, accounts that are self pay are automatically forwarded to the Patient Account Specialists, who also assist patients in applying for Unemployment Insurance, Disability Insurance and Social Security. These staff members also work closely with Discharge Planners and the area’s nursing homes and outpatient rehabilitation centers. Additionally, the Mohawk Valley Perinatal Network staff members are on site two days a week and the Medical Center staff works closely with them to obtain insurance coverage for the patient. In 2010, hospitals will fi le a new document called Schedule H with their IRS Form 990. The purpose of Schedule H is to provide the community with some basic information on the ways in which each hospital meets its community benefi t obligations. However, the Schedule can’t convey the depth and breadth of the programs and activities St. Elizabeth provides each year, or the lives touched by them. Further in this Annual Report you will see examples that bring these numbers to life.

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“Increasing the accessibility of outpatient services to people in our area is one of our ongoing goals. St. Elizabeth Medical Arts will help us continue to meet this growing need.”

“Today, computers are an essential part of patient care and need to be the most advanced in the business.” Robert Gillette Director of Information Technology

Bob Scholefield, COO

Information Technology Upgrades St. Elizabeth remains ahead of the curve and committed to enhancing the electronic medical record (EMR). The federal government’s healthcare reform plans include signifi cant investment in EMR. The Medical Center supports this direction to augment EMR, which will provide timely improvements to advance accuracy and patient care. With the implementation of ISO 9001 throughout the Medical Center, the Information Technology Department developed a Quality Plan, which it began implementing to support its mission to provide secure access to timely and accurate information to those at SEMC and its affi liate organizations. Among its achievements in ’08 were upgrading the networking infrastructure for the Hampden Place, East Utica, Little Falls, Mohawk and North Utica Medical Group sites; research and start of implementation of wireless networking and hacker detection system for the hospital; upgrade of the Physician Portal system, which provides local and remote access of patient data to physicians that feed in from numerous SEMC clinical systems; installation of the Barracuda Web Filter, which fi lters incoming and outgoing internet traffi c; implementation of a new Dietary Cash Register System to enhance the payroll deduction benefi t for cafeteria expenses and much more. Numerous specific patient-care technologies were improved for many departments, highlighted by the implementation of new LIS (Laboratory Information Systems), video monitoring system for the Emergency Department and various upgrades to many of our legacy clinical and non-clinical systems to maintain the cutting-edge technology that SEMC is known for. “As the Director of Information Technology, I am very proud of the accomplishments that the department has made,” said Robert Gillette. “The staff is the best, brightest and the most dedicated group I have ever worked with. They understand the mission of the Medical Center and ensure the technology is the best in the area. In the past, computers were a novelty that did word processing and spreadsheets. Today, computers are an essential part of patient care and need to be the most advanced in the business.”

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Regional Teaching Institution 19

St. Elizabeth Medical Arts

Family Medicine Residency Program GYN Surgical Fellowship Nine Family Medicine doctors graduated from St. Elizabeth Medical Center’s Family Medicine Residency this year, bringing the total number of physicians completing the nationally accredited, three-year postdoctoral training program to 190. In addition, three physicians completed osteopathic internship training and one physician completed her two-year GYN Surgical Fellowship, bringing the total number of surgical-fellow graduates to five.

Approximately 53 percent of these graduates remain in the Mohawk Valley area to serve our community. In 2008, four of the nine graduates remained locally and two are still with the Medical Center.

After months of planning in 2008, the Medical Center purchased the former Hartford Insurance building at 4401 Middle Settlement Road in New Hartford in January 2009. Plans for this 80,000-square-foot structure named St. Elizabeth Medical Arts include a new outpatient wound care center called Advanced Wound Care of St. Elizabeth Medical Center, relocation of our Adirondack Sports Medicine Rehabilitation services (currently housed on Culver Avenue in East Utica), Outpatient Laboratory, Radiology, and Urgent Care services, as well as private physician office space. We are pleased to be able to reach out into the community and increase convenience and access to primary care services. Advanced Wound Care of St. Elizabeth Medical Center has been formed in a cooperative arrangement between St. E’s and Diversified Clinical Services. As the building is being renovated in the fall of ’09, plans to establish and operate this comprehensive, integrated wound management program are being finalized. Diversified Clinical Services is a nationwide wound management company focused exclusively on wound care. It is privately held and includes more than 300 programs across the country. As more than 6 million Americans suffer from chronic wounds, from causes such as an aging population, diabetes, vascular insufficiencies and traumatic wounds, the need in our region is real. Problem wounds affect personal mobility and quality of life. Our goal with Advanced Wound Care of St. Elizabeth Medical Center is to expand our continuum of care to enable faster healing and restoration of health and mobility for our patients. Adjunctive therapies will include: pain management, wound debridement, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, diabetic education, infection control, vacuum assisted wound closure compression therapy and nutrition management. Advanced Wound Care will also provide referring community physicians with improved clinical outcomes and greater patient satisfaction.

Our Adirondack Sports Medicine and Physical Therapy Center will move from Culver Avenue to the New Hartford location this fall. Our team of Physical Therapists will continue to provide outpatient rehabilitation and a full range of physical therapies with aerobic and strengthening equipment. Professionals at the new site will include physical therapists certified in athletic training, in the McKenzie methods of mechanical diagnosis and management of spinal injuries and in the Ergoscience method of evaluation of injured workers for pre-employment/post offer screenings and functional capacity evaluations. In collaboration with Genesee Orthopedic and Hand Surgery Associates, athletes and weekend athletes can receive treatment and prevention of athletic injuries. Athletic trainers are knowledgeable in the full range of sports and also provide high school sports game coverage, to provide interim care for athletes who are injured during games. Staff members are also certified in the Sportmetrics® program, developed to prevent ACL injuries in athletes. The McKenzie treatment for neck and back pain and injury, developed by Robin McKenzie of New Zealand, is one of a very few spinal rehabilitation protocols to be critically studied and reported in major journals in the United States. McKenzie has been offering graduate-level instruction to therapists, through his International Institute, for nearly 20 years. Ergoscience screenings and evaluations of injured workers are performed in collaboration with various work sites and insurance companies.

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Staff from St. Elizabeth Medical Center (Mohawk Valley Heart Institute (MVHI) Cardiac Surgery and the Infection Prevention Department) implemented a project in 2004 to reduce post-operative infections after open heart surgery. The a project, entitled Targeting Zero - A Bundle Approach to Reducing Mediastinitis After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery, was the work of a multidisciplinary team of doctors, nurses from various departments including the Cardiothoracic Operating Room, the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care and Progressive Care Units, Holding Area, and the Infection Control/Prevention Department, physician assistants, educators and pharmacists. Staff members implemented the project after an increase in infections was noted in 2003. They reached their goal of zero in the category of donor-site infections in 2006 and zero deep sternal wound infections in 2007. Rates remained low in 2008. These infection reductions represent success in improving clinical outcomes for the Medical Center.

“It is our hope that each and every patient that visits St. Elizabeth Medical Center will benefit from this project of reducing infections,” said Staff Nurse Stacey Misiaszek, RN, BSN. “Patients come to us for medical care and do not expect to acquire an infection. If we can save just one patient from a hospital-acquired infection, the outcomes for the patient and Medical Center are very significant. We treat our patients as though they are family, with the utmost care and compassion that comes from our heart.” “Besides improving patient outcomes, it has allowed us to utilize those saved financial resources in other ways to benefit all patients.” Successful projects are measured by sustained results such as this and are not possible without a team approach. Our dedicated staff is committed to providing safe and quality care to our patients.

“It is our hope that each and every patient that visits St. Elizabeth Medical Center will benefit from this project of reducing infections.” Stacey Misiaszek, RN, BSN 9

Regional Teaching Institution

Infection Reduction Project Results in Success

School of R a d i o g r a p h y The School of Radiography has added collaborative agreements in recent years that bring enhanced opportunities to its students. It has affiliation agreements with Rome Memorial Hospital, Genesee Orthopedic and Hand Surgeons and the Mohawk Correctional Facility. There are also articulation agreements with Mohawk Valley Community College and Herkimer County Community College for those students who wish to pursue an Associate Degree after completion of the program.

The School program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology and registered by the New York State Department of Health. Six new radiologic technologists received diplomas in June ’08, which brings the total number of graduates since 1945 to 282. Plans to upgrade the academic classrooms were completed in 2008.

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Regional Teaching Institution 17

College of N u r s i n g During 2008, the St. Elizabeth College of Nursing (SECON) and the State University of New York Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) established a unique partnership. The 1+2+1 program is geared for high school students who have nursing as a career goal, possess excellent academic achievement and can meet the rigorous admission requirements for the program. During the freshman year, the students complete the general education requirements at SUNYIT. The second and third years, the students will earn an Associate’s Degree while completing the nursing program at the SECON, leading to the Registered Nurse (RN) license. The fourth and fi nal year of the program, students return to SUNYIT where they earn a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Nursing (BSN). This is a great opportunity to earn two degrees in four years.

“The 1+2+1 program allows graduating high school seniors to continue their education locally and remain in the community to earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing,” said Marianne Monahan, President of the St. Elizabeth College of Nursing. “Students are able to receive a sound education at a reasonable cost. This program provides an excellent education and keeps nurses in our local communities.” The college graduated 71 new nurses at its 102nd graduation ceremony at the Church of our Lady of Lourdes, Utica, in May ’08. This makes a total of 3,152 graduates in its history.

OR Updates The Surgery Department purchased a new, highdefinition video system in 2008 to benefi t patients and physicians with its sharper picture quality and improved visibility during surgery. The ConMed Linvatec system was installed in January ’09. In addition, the Medical Center joined forces with Mohawk Valley Community College to participate in a newly formed Surgical Tech Program and has become one of the program’s clinical sites. This provides SEMC the opportunity to participate in the training of surgical techs, which, in turn, could spark these individuals to remain locally at one of the area hospitals. This would help the Medical Center, since fi nding trained scrub technicians can be a diffi cult task. Investments in state-of-the-art equipment supports our commitment to providing high-quality orthopedic and neurological operative procedures.

Among its features are: ■ High defi nition (HD) cameras and monitors ■ HD compatible light sources and scope systems Autoclavable cameras that save operating room staff sterilization time. The Stryker Navigation equipment used for Orthopedic and Neurological surgery: ■ Uses an infrared camera and instruments, along with tracking software to guide surgeons and their instruments through the patient’s anatomy. ■ Has the ability to identify abnormalities before surgery. Provides valuable and accurate information on the relative position of instruments, healthy anatomy and surgical targets, which improves patient outcomes and has shortened recovery time.

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A new look and safer access In an eff ort to provide more free parking spaces for our patients and their families, the Medical Center added two parking areas in front of the hospital building, with construction taking place through the fi rst three quarters of the year. Some of the employees who parked in the on-site parking garage began parking in the new, outside lots, which together consist of 102 new spaces. This freed premium parking spots in our covered garage, which allows direct access to the hospital by a “bridge” from the second fl oor. The new lots were landscaped with 52 trees and 215 shrubs, as well as a wrought-iron fence to enhance the surroundings and shield the parking area from view on Genesee Street and create a park-like appearance. In addition, the on-campus traffi c fl ow was changed. Restricted entrance to the south driveway was instituted in early

October, with the general public asked not to attempt access to the restricted driveway at any time. Security guards were instrumental in assisting drivers with these changes. New signs were installed to mark both the restricted and the main entrances. All traffi c, except offi cial emergency vehicles and delivery trucks, began to access the Medical Center, Marian Professional Building, Convent and College of Nursing through the north driveway on Genesee Street. This driveway was renamed Connors Drive on Oct. 29 in memory of Chris Connors, the Medical Center’s Senior Legal Counsel. A new crossroad in front of the Medical Center was built to accommodate these changes.

Orthopedic Services and Unit Orthopedic services at St. Elizabeth have continued to develop to meet the needs of our community. In 2008, we off ered our patients a continuum of services that included: education about the surgery and process in which they will be involved, staff members who take the time to provide personal attention, high quality procedures, which are evidenced by low infection rates, and plans for a newly renovated Orthopedic Unit in 2009. When patients are diagnosed with a need for total-joint orthopedic surgery, they take part in a method called Total Pathways Planning. Using this approach, patients’ orthopedic and medical needs are identifi ed and assessed before hospital admission. Participation in the Medical Center’s Total Joint Class is recommended. Classes provide pre-surgery education about what will take place throughout the pre-operative and post-operative stages. The nursing and rehabilitation staff members work with physicians to customize each patient’s care and provide an informational packet in advance, to provide assurance.

State-of-the-art technology in the form of image-guided navigation systems now help orthopedic surgeons to gain a comprehensive understanding of the patient’s anatomy before any surgery takes place. A computer and camera system analyzes and graphically displays the alignment and position of implants and tools. Surgeons can make adjustments within 1 or 2 degrees, helping to ensure accuracy of the surgical cut and provide the best fi t of an implant. Patients benefit because pre-operative x-rays or CT scans are not required and the technology may lead to a shorter hospital stay, improved joint stability and fewer complications. Through collaboration between physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists and staff , plans were developed for a renovated Orthopedic Unit, to consist of 14 inpatient, medical/surgical beds in 10 private rooms and two semi-private rooms. The orthopedic center that results will enable the Medical Center to meet the orthopedic needs of local people close to home.

“The staff was so good to me. I would recommend it in a heartbeat.” Peggy Pelnik Knee Replacement 11

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“Pillow Ladies” In 1998, volunteers from the St. Elizabeth Medical Center Guild began making “Heart Pillows” to meet the needs of patients recovering from cardiac surgery. This year, they made 600 pillows. The pillows, shaped like a heart, are used as part of therapy following cardiac surgery. Therapy may include coughing and breathing exercises to prevent fl uid build-up in the lungs. Holding the pillow braces the chest, protects the breastbone and supports the patient’s therapy of coughing exercises. The volunteers meet twice per month to sew, label and stuff the pillows. There are approximately 15 volunteers. The Guild

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purchases the pillow stuffi ng, while fabric is donated or purchased through Guild funds. The Guild also receives pillows, material and monetary donations from the public. “We are very thankful for all the help from the Guild, volunteers and MVHI for all of their support of the pillow group,” said Theresa Jadlowski, the group’s coordinator. This special group of volunteers meets regularly to provide the Medical Center with the benefi ts of its sewing talents – all working together to support our mission.

Thank you to all staff and volunteers who help to carry out the mission of our founding sisters.


“The staff is awesome and the Center is close to my house.” If the kids are not really sick, they can just go back to class.” Kathy Pike Children attend School-Based Health Center at Kernan Elementary School

St. Elizabeth Medical Group St. Elizabeth Medical Group experienced some changes and growth in 2008. With sites in Barneveld, Clinton, Little Falls, Mohawk, New Hartford, Sauquoit, Waterville, and in Central, East, North and South Utica, as well as the Family Medicine Center and School-Based Health Center, there was plentiful activity. In fact, more than half of the practices (seven) increased the numbers of patient visits from 2007. We are grateful for the dedication of our many valued providers. In Little Falls, Julie Perlanski, M.D. continues to reach out to patients with a series of free, public presentations titled Collaborative Healing. These have been held monthly from September to June since 2003 and have a steady public following. Topics have included acupuncture; nutrition, energy and healing; herbal medicine; integrative approaches to diabetes, heart disease, chronic fatigue and arthritis; plus lifestyle topics such as exercise and meal preparation. Dr. Perlanski’s specialty is Family Practice and she also completed a two-year fellowship in Integrative Medicine with Dr. Andrew Weil. She is Board Certifi ed in Holistic Medicine. “I’m now in the process of doing my certifi cation in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine,” she said. “It looks at core imbalances and heals people from the root level up.” The Little Falls Medical Group site also includes an offi ce of Prabhat Ahluwalia, M.D., who hosts annual physician fellowships in Gynecologic Endoscopy. Dr. Ahluwalia has been a practitioner and supporter of advanced, laparoscopic, minimally-invasive surgery for the past 26 years. Laparoscopic surgery diff ers from traditional surgery in that it requires three to four quarter-inch incisions as opposed to a deep eight-inch incision. “The benefi ts are tremendous,” Dr. Ahluwalia said. “The patient suff ers less post-operative pain, less surgical trauma, and fewer complications, while enjoying a speedy recovery, and early return to work, and a better cosmetic result.”

13

Other changes include:

Dr. Debra Lee relocated her practice from New Hartford to the Family Medicine Center and the South Utica practice of Drs. Sperling, Vecchio and Brownstein

• • • • • • • •

moved to 6 Hampden Place Closure of the Barneveld practice and an offer to transfer patients to other sites Dr. Henah Chaudhry joined the New Hartford Faculty Practice Dr. Brij Kumar joined the Waterville office Sally O’Callaghan, FNP rejoined the Medical Group at the New Hartford Faculty Practice Carolyn Smith, PA joined the East Utica office Dr. Albert Lyon, OB/GYN practitioner joined the Women’s Health Center Dr. Leanne Simpson-Tarokh began practicing at the North Utica office Two fellows joined the Laparoscopic Surgical Fellowship: Dr. Samantha Kadiyala and Dr. Shobha Sikka. (Dr. Robert Hennessey left the Sauquoit practice to work with the Medical Center’s Hospitalist program.)

The Family Medicine Center

patients across the full range of a lifespan. Elizabeth Grasso, age 99, uses the Home Visit Program available to Utica resiin Utica serves as the training unit for physicians in the Famdents who are unable to utilize conventional transportation. ily Medicine Residency Program and typically She suff ers from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary serves up to 100 or more a day from a diverse Disease and asthma, said her daughter, RoseAnn population. The facility has multiple suites of “If you qualify, you get your Grasso. Elizabeth doesn’t like to leave her home exam rooms, each operating with their own medications free,” he said. unless weather conditions are ideal, because she assigned staff , patients and faculty. In addi“The program offers a lot and cannot climb stairs easily. tion, the Family Medicine Center has on-site “This has worked very well, because the doctors it’s a huge help.” laboratory and radiology facilities, a proceare very pleasant,” said daughter RoseAnn, noting dure room, library, medical records departthat Elizabeth also has a fear of doctors that is not ment and Residency offi ces. A number of specialty clinics as bad when they visit her at home. “It’s been a godsend for are off ered for patients, including urology, surgery, pulmus. I know it’s diffi cult with the doctor shortage in this area, onology, neurology, pediatrics, infectious disease, ENT and but I wish more doctors would be involved in this.” orthopedics. At the younger age of the life spectrum, Justin and Josh In addition, the Social Service Department on site provides ua Pike of West Utica use the School-Based Health Center health insurance referrals to Child Health Plus, Family Health (SBHC) for daily healthcare needs, according to their mother, Plus, Medicaid and the St. Elizabeth Medical Center Charity Kathy Pike. Care program. It also off ers a Home Visit Program, medical “The staff is awesome and the Center is close to my house,” transportation, a Parents as Partners in Health Education Proshe said. “If the kids are not really sick, they can just go back gram, a School-Based Health Center at Kernan Elementary to class.” School and a Patient Assistance Program. Justin, 10, is in his last year at Kernan and Joshua, 7, has Jeff rey Esper of Whitesboro utilizes the Patient Assistance three more years at the school. The SBHC is a partnership Program for help with obtaining medications. “If you qualify, between St. Elizabeth Family Medicine Center and Kernan you get your medications free,” he said. “The program off ers Elementary School. All students attending the school are a lot and it’s a huge help.” eligible to enroll at the SBHC and have access to its primary Esper commends Dr. William Jorgensen, his family practice healthcare services. physician, for his caring attitude and Social Services Coordi “Everything you can think of, they do. It’s just like a doctor’s nator Nicole Cocomazzi for going out of her way to help him offi ce – immunizations, blood work, check-ups,” Mrs. Pike with required paperwork. said. “I’m grateful for the help they both provide and that this The Family Medicine Center embodies the core mission of program is out there,” he said. St. Elizabeth: serving the underserved. The programs off ered by the Family Medicine Center assist

14


“The staff is awesome and the Center is close to my house.” If the kids are not really sick, they can just go back to class.” Kathy Pike Children attend School-Based Health Center at Kernan Elementary School

St. Elizabeth Medical Group St. Elizabeth Medical Group experienced some changes and growth in 2008. With sites in Barneveld, Clinton, Little Falls, Mohawk, New Hartford, Sauquoit, Waterville, and in Central, East, North and South Utica, as well as the Family Medicine Center and School-Based Health Center, there was plentiful activity. In fact, more than half of the practices (seven) increased the numbers of patient visits from 2007. We are grateful for the dedication of our many valued providers. In Little Falls, Julie Perlanski, M.D. continues to reach out to patients with a series of free, public presentations titled Collaborative Healing. These have been held monthly from September to June since 2003 and have a steady public following. Topics have included acupuncture; nutrition, energy and healing; herbal medicine; integrative approaches to diabetes, heart disease, chronic fatigue and arthritis; plus lifestyle topics such as exercise and meal preparation. Dr. Perlanski’s specialty is Family Practice and she also completed a two-year fellowship in Integrative Medicine with Dr. Andrew Weil. She is Board Certifi ed in Holistic Medicine. “I’m now in the process of doing my certifi cation in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine,” she said. “It looks at core imbalances and heals people from the root level up.” The Little Falls Medical Group site also includes an offi ce of Prabhat Ahluwalia, M.D., who hosts annual physician fellowships in Gynecologic Endoscopy. Dr. Ahluwalia has been a practitioner and supporter of advanced, laparoscopic, minimally-invasive surgery for the past 26 years. Laparoscopic surgery diff ers from traditional surgery in that it requires three to four quarter-inch incisions as opposed to a deep eight-inch incision. “The benefi ts are tremendous,” Dr. Ahluwalia said. “The patient suff ers less post-operative pain, less surgical trauma, and fewer complications, while enjoying a speedy recovery, and early return to work, and a better cosmetic result.”

13

Other changes include:

Dr. Debra Lee relocated her practice from New Hartford to the Family Medicine Center and the South Utica practice of Drs. Sperling, Vecchio and Brownstein

• • • • • • • •

moved to 6 Hampden Place Closure of the Barneveld practice and an offer to transfer patients to other sites Dr. Henah Chaudhry joined the New Hartford Faculty Practice Dr. Brij Kumar joined the Waterville office Sally O’Callaghan, FNP rejoined the Medical Group at the New Hartford Faculty Practice Carolyn Smith, PA joined the East Utica office Dr. Albert Lyon, OB/GYN practitioner joined the Women’s Health Center Dr. Leanne Simpson-Tarokh began practicing at the North Utica office Two fellows joined the Laparoscopic Surgical Fellowship: Dr. Samantha Kadiyala and Dr. Shobha Sikka. (Dr. Robert Hennessey left the Sauquoit practice to work with the Medical Center’s Hospitalist program.)

The Family Medicine Center

patients across the full range of a lifespan. Elizabeth Grasso, age 99, uses the Home Visit Program available to Utica resiin Utica serves as the training unit for physicians in the Famdents who are unable to utilize conventional transportation. ily Medicine Residency Program and typically She suff ers from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary serves up to 100 or more a day from a diverse Disease and asthma, said her daughter, RoseAnn population. The facility has multiple suites of “If you qualify, you get your Grasso. Elizabeth doesn’t like to leave her home exam rooms, each operating with their own medications free,” he said. unless weather conditions are ideal, because she assigned staff , patients and faculty. In addi“The program offers a lot and cannot climb stairs easily. tion, the Family Medicine Center has on-site “This has worked very well, because the doctors it’s a huge help.” laboratory and radiology facilities, a proceare very pleasant,” said daughter RoseAnn, noting dure room, library, medical records departthat Elizabeth also has a fear of doctors that is not ment and Residency offi ces. A number of specialty clinics as bad when they visit her at home. “It’s been a godsend for are off ered for patients, including urology, surgery, pulmus. I know it’s diffi cult with the doctor shortage in this area, onology, neurology, pediatrics, infectious disease, ENT and but I wish more doctors would be involved in this.” orthopedics. At the younger age of the life spectrum, Justin and Josh In addition, the Social Service Department on site provides ua Pike of West Utica use the School-Based Health Center health insurance referrals to Child Health Plus, Family Health (SBHC) for daily healthcare needs, according to their mother, Plus, Medicaid and the St. Elizabeth Medical Center Charity Kathy Pike. Care program. It also off ers a Home Visit Program, medical “The staff is awesome and the Center is close to my house,” transportation, a Parents as Partners in Health Education Proshe said. “If the kids are not really sick, they can just go back gram, a School-Based Health Center at Kernan Elementary to class.” School and a Patient Assistance Program. Justin, 10, is in his last year at Kernan and Joshua, 7, has Jeff rey Esper of Whitesboro utilizes the Patient Assistance three more years at the school. The SBHC is a partnership Program for help with obtaining medications. “If you qualify, between St. Elizabeth Family Medicine Center and Kernan you get your medications free,” he said. “The program off ers Elementary School. All students attending the school are a lot and it’s a huge help.” eligible to enroll at the SBHC and have access to its primary Esper commends Dr. William Jorgensen, his family practice healthcare services. physician, for his caring attitude and Social Services Coordi “Everything you can think of, they do. It’s just like a doctor’s nator Nicole Cocomazzi for going out of her way to help him offi ce – immunizations, blood work, check-ups,” Mrs. Pike with required paperwork. said. “I’m grateful for the help they both provide and that this The Family Medicine Center embodies the core mission of program is out there,” he said. St. Elizabeth: serving the underserved. The programs off ered by the Family Medicine Center assist

14


“Pillow Ladies” In 1998, volunteers from the St. Elizabeth Medical Center Guild began making “Heart Pillows” to meet the needs of patients recovering from cardiac surgery. This year, they made 600 pillows. The pillows, shaped like a heart, are used as part of therapy following cardiac surgery. Therapy may include coughing and breathing exercises to prevent fl uid build-up in the lungs. Holding the pillow braces the chest, protects the breastbone and supports the patient’s therapy of coughing exercises. The volunteers meet twice per month to sew, label and stuff the pillows. There are approximately 15 volunteers. The Guild

15

purchases the pillow stuffi ng, while fabric is donated or purchased through Guild funds. The Guild also receives pillows, material and monetary donations from the public. “We are very thankful for all the help from the Guild, volunteers and MVHI for all of their support of the pillow group,” said Theresa Jadlowski, the group’s coordinator. This special group of volunteers meets regularly to provide the Medical Center with the benefi ts of its sewing talents – all working together to support our mission.

Thank you to all staff and volunteers who help to carry out the mission of our founding sisters.


A new look and safer access In an eff ort to provide more free parking spaces for our patients and their families, the Medical Center added two parking areas in front of the hospital building, with construction taking place through the fi rst three quarters of the year. Some of the employees who parked in the on-site parking garage began parking in the new, outside lots, which together consist of 102 new spaces. This freed premium parking spots in our covered garage, which allows direct access to the hospital by a “bridge” from the second fl oor. The new lots were landscaped with 52 trees and 215 shrubs, as well as a wrought-iron fence to enhance the surroundings and shield the parking area from view on Genesee Street and create a park-like appearance. In addition, the on-campus traffi c fl ow was changed. Restricted entrance to the south driveway was instituted in early

October, with the general public asked not to attempt access to the restricted driveway at any time. Security guards were instrumental in assisting drivers with these changes. New signs were installed to mark both the restricted and the main entrances. All traffi c, except offi cial emergency vehicles and delivery trucks, began to access the Medical Center, Marian Professional Building, Convent and College of Nursing through the north driveway on Genesee Street. This driveway was renamed Connors Drive on Oct. 29 in memory of Chris Connors, the Medical Center’s Senior Legal Counsel. A new crossroad in front of the Medical Center was built to accommodate these changes.

Orthopedic Services and Unit Orthopedic services at St. Elizabeth have continued to develop to meet the needs of our community. In 2008, we off ered our patients a continuum of services that included: education about the surgery and process in which they will be involved, staff members who take the time to provide personal attention, high quality procedures, which are evidenced by low infection rates, and plans for a newly renovated Orthopedic Unit in 2009. When patients are diagnosed with a need for total-joint orthopedic surgery, they take part in a method called Total Pathways Planning. Using this approach, patients’ orthopedic and medical needs are identifi ed and assessed before hospital admission. Participation in the Medical Center’s Total Joint Class is recommended. Classes provide pre-surgery education about what will take place throughout the pre-operative and post-operative stages. The nursing and rehabilitation staff members work with physicians to customize each patient’s care and provide an informational packet in advance, to provide assurance.

State-of-the-art technology in the form of image-guided navigation systems now help orthopedic surgeons to gain a comprehensive understanding of the patient’s anatomy before any surgery takes place. A computer and camera system analyzes and graphically displays the alignment and position of implants and tools. Surgeons can make adjustments within 1 or 2 degrees, helping to ensure accuracy of the surgical cut and provide the best fi t of an implant. Patients benefit because pre-operative x-rays or CT scans are not required and the technology may lead to a shorter hospital stay, improved joint stability and fewer complications. Through collaboration between physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists and staff , plans were developed for a renovated Orthopedic Unit, to consist of 14 inpatient, medical/surgical beds in 10 private rooms and two semi-private rooms. The orthopedic center that results will enable the Medical Center to meet the orthopedic needs of local people close to home.

“The staff was so good to me. I would recommend it in a heartbeat.” Peggy Pelnik Knee Replacement 11

16


Regional Teaching Institution 17

College of N u r s i n g During 2008, the St. Elizabeth College of Nursing (SECON) and the State University of New York Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) established a unique partnership. The 1+2+1 program is geared for high school students who have nursing as a career goal, possess excellent academic achievement and can meet the rigorous admission requirements for the program. During the freshman year, the students complete the general education requirements at SUNYIT. The second and third years, the students will earn an Associate’s Degree while completing the nursing program at the SECON, leading to the Registered Nurse (RN) license. The fourth and fi nal year of the program, students return to SUNYIT where they earn a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Nursing (BSN). This is a great opportunity to earn two degrees in four years.

“The 1+2+1 program allows graduating high school seniors to continue their education locally and remain in the community to earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing,” said Marianne Monahan, President of the St. Elizabeth College of Nursing. “Students are able to receive a sound education at a reasonable cost. This program provides an excellent education and keeps nurses in our local communities.” The college graduated 71 new nurses at its 102nd graduation ceremony at the Church of our Lady of Lourdes, Utica, in May ’08. This makes a total of 3,152 graduates in its history.

OR Updates The Surgery Department purchased a new, highdefinition video system in 2008 to benefi t patients and physicians with its sharper picture quality and improved visibility during surgery. The ConMed Linvatec system was installed in January ’09. In addition, the Medical Center joined forces with Mohawk Valley Community College to participate in a newly formed Surgical Tech Program and has become one of the program’s clinical sites. This provides SEMC the opportunity to participate in the training of surgical techs, which, in turn, could spark these individuals to remain locally at one of the area hospitals. This would help the Medical Center, since fi nding trained scrub technicians can be a diffi cult task. Investments in state-of-the-art equipment supports our commitment to providing high-quality orthopedic and neurological operative procedures.

Among its features are: ■ High defi nition (HD) cameras and monitors ■ HD compatible light sources and scope systems Autoclavable cameras that save operating room staff sterilization time. The Stryker Navigation equipment used for Orthopedic and Neurological surgery: ■ Uses an infrared camera and instruments, along with tracking software to guide surgeons and their instruments through the patient’s anatomy. ■ Has the ability to identify abnormalities before surgery. Provides valuable and accurate information on the relative position of instruments, healthy anatomy and surgical targets, which improves patient outcomes and has shortened recovery time.

10


Staff from St. Elizabeth Medical Center (Mohawk Valley Heart Institute (MVHI) Cardiac Surgery and the Infection Prevention Department) implemented a project in 2004 to reduce post-operative infections after open heart surgery. The a project, entitled Targeting Zero - A Bundle Approach to Reducing Mediastinitis After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery, was the work of a multidisciplinary team of doctors, nurses from various departments including the Cardiothoracic Operating Room, the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care and Progressive Care Units, Holding Area, and the Infection Control/Prevention Department, physician assistants, educators and pharmacists. Staff members implemented the project after an increase in infections was noted in 2003. They reached their goal of zero in the category of donor-site infections in 2006 and zero deep sternal wound infections in 2007. Rates remained low in 2008. These infection reductions represent success in improving clinical outcomes for the Medical Center.

“It is our hope that each and every patient that visits St. Elizabeth Medical Center will benefit from this project of reducing infections,” said Staff Nurse Stacey Misiaszek, RN, BSN. “Patients come to us for medical care and do not expect to acquire an infection. If we can save just one patient from a hospital-acquired infection, the outcomes for the patient and Medical Center are very significant. We treat our patients as though they are family, with the utmost care and compassion that comes from our heart.” “Besides improving patient outcomes, it has allowed us to utilize those saved financial resources in other ways to benefit all patients.” Successful projects are measured by sustained results such as this and are not possible without a team approach. Our dedicated staff is committed to providing safe and quality care to our patients.

“It is our hope that each and every patient that visits St. Elizabeth Medical Center will benefit from this project of reducing infections.” Stacey Misiaszek, RN, BSN 9

Regional Teaching Institution

Infection Reduction Project Results in Success

School of R a d i o g r a p h y The School of Radiography has added collaborative agreements in recent years that bring enhanced opportunities to its students. It has affiliation agreements with Rome Memorial Hospital, Genesee Orthopedic and Hand Surgeons and the Mohawk Correctional Facility. There are also articulation agreements with Mohawk Valley Community College and Herkimer County Community College for those students who wish to pursue an Associate Degree after completion of the program.

The School program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology and registered by the New York State Department of Health. Six new radiologic technologists received diplomas in June ’08, which brings the total number of graduates since 1945 to 282. Plans to upgrade the academic classrooms were completed in 2008.

18


Regional Teaching Institution 19

St. Elizabeth Medical Arts

Family Medicine Residency Program GYN Surgical Fellowship Nine Family Medicine doctors graduated from St. Elizabeth Medical Center’s Family Medicine Residency this year, bringing the total number of physicians completing the nationally accredited, three-year postdoctoral training program to 190. In addition, three physicians completed osteopathic internship training and one physician completed her two-year GYN Surgical Fellowship, bringing the total number of surgical-fellow graduates to five.

Approximately 53 percent of these graduates remain in the Mohawk Valley area to serve our community. In 2008, four of the nine graduates remained locally and two are still with the Medical Center.

After months of planning in 2008, the Medical Center purchased the former Hartford Insurance building at 4401 Middle Settlement Road in New Hartford in January 2009. Plans for this 80,000-square-foot structure named St. Elizabeth Medical Arts include a new outpatient wound care center called Advanced Wound Care of St. Elizabeth Medical Center, relocation of our Adirondack Sports Medicine Rehabilitation services (currently housed on Culver Avenue in East Utica), Outpatient Laboratory, Radiology, and Urgent Care services, as well as private physician office space. We are pleased to be able to reach out into the community and increase convenience and access to primary care services. Advanced Wound Care of St. Elizabeth Medical Center has been formed in a cooperative arrangement between St. E’s and Diversified Clinical Services. As the building is being renovated in the fall of ’09, plans to establish and operate this comprehensive, integrated wound management program are being finalized. Diversified Clinical Services is a nationwide wound management company focused exclusively on wound care. It is privately held and includes more than 300 programs across the country. As more than 6 million Americans suffer from chronic wounds, from causes such as an aging population, diabetes, vascular insufficiencies and traumatic wounds, the need in our region is real. Problem wounds affect personal mobility and quality of life. Our goal with Advanced Wound Care of St. Elizabeth Medical Center is to expand our continuum of care to enable faster healing and restoration of health and mobility for our patients. Adjunctive therapies will include: pain management, wound debridement, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, diabetic education, infection control, vacuum assisted wound closure compression therapy and nutrition management. Advanced Wound Care will also provide referring community physicians with improved clinical outcomes and greater patient satisfaction.

Our Adirondack Sports Medicine and Physical Therapy Center will move from Culver Avenue to the New Hartford location this fall. Our team of Physical Therapists will continue to provide outpatient rehabilitation and a full range of physical therapies with aerobic and strengthening equipment. Professionals at the new site will include physical therapists certified in athletic training, in the McKenzie methods of mechanical diagnosis and management of spinal injuries and in the Ergoscience method of evaluation of injured workers for pre-employment/post offer screenings and functional capacity evaluations. In collaboration with Genesee Orthopedic and Hand Surgery Associates, athletes and weekend athletes can receive treatment and prevention of athletic injuries. Athletic trainers are knowledgeable in the full range of sports and also provide high school sports game coverage, to provide interim care for athletes who are injured during games. Staff members are also certified in the Sportmetrics® program, developed to prevent ACL injuries in athletes. The McKenzie treatment for neck and back pain and injury, developed by Robin McKenzie of New Zealand, is one of a very few spinal rehabilitation protocols to be critically studied and reported in major journals in the United States. McKenzie has been offering graduate-level instruction to therapists, through his International Institute, for nearly 20 years. Ergoscience screenings and evaluations of injured workers are performed in collaboration with various work sites and insurance companies.

8


“Increasing the accessibility of outpatient services to people in our area is one of our ongoing goals. St. Elizabeth Medical Arts will help us continue to meet this growing need.”

“Today, computers are an essential part of patient care and need to be the most advanced in the business.” Robert Gillette Director of Information Technology

Bob Scholefield, COO

Information Technology Upgrades St. Elizabeth remains ahead of the curve and committed to enhancing the electronic medical record (EMR). The federal government’s healthcare reform plans include signifi cant investment in EMR. The Medical Center supports this direction to augment EMR, which will provide timely improvements to advance accuracy and patient care. With the implementation of ISO 9001 throughout the Medical Center, the Information Technology Department developed a Quality Plan, which it began implementing to support its mission to provide secure access to timely and accurate information to those at SEMC and its affi liate organizations. Among its achievements in ’08 were upgrading the networking infrastructure for the Hampden Place, East Utica, Little Falls, Mohawk and North Utica Medical Group sites; research and start of implementation of wireless networking and hacker detection system for the hospital; upgrade of the Physician Portal system, which provides local and remote access of patient data to physicians that feed in from numerous SEMC clinical systems; installation of the Barracuda Web Filter, which fi lters incoming and outgoing internet traffi c; implementation of a new Dietary Cash Register System to enhance the payroll deduction benefi t for cafeteria expenses and much more. Numerous specific patient-care technologies were improved for many departments, highlighted by the implementation of new LIS (Laboratory Information Systems), video monitoring system for the Emergency Department and various upgrades to many of our legacy clinical and non-clinical systems to maintain the cutting-edge technology that SEMC is known for. “As the Director of Information Technology, I am very proud of the accomplishments that the department has made,” said Robert Gillette. “The staff is the best, brightest and the most dedicated group I have ever worked with. They understand the mission of the Medical Center and ensure the technology is the best in the area. In the past, computers were a novelty that did word processing and spreadsheets. Today, computers are an essential part of patient care and need to be the most advanced in the business.”

20


Our Foundation 2008 was all about successes for the St. Elizabeth Medical Center Foundation. With the generous support of many businesses, foundations and individuals, we successfully completed the largest capital campaign ever undertaken by the Foundation to benefi t the Medical Center’s new Emergency Department and Cafeteria. The Foundation was successful in each of its Signature Events, raising more than $327,843 in support of the many initiatives undertaken by the Medical Center. These Signature Events include the annual Employee Campaign, Leadership and Recognition, Golf Tournament, Dinner Dance, Lights of Love, and An Aff air to Remember. Through the diligence of our Grant Writer, the Foundation successfully raised nearly $650,000 for the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) Project, Language Assistance Program,

“Our continued success would not be possible without your support... thank you.”

21

the renovation of the new Cardiac Cath Lab, Mohawk Valley Heart Institute, Women’s and Children’s and East Utica Medical Offi ces, Automatic External Defi brillators (AEDs), Reach Out and Read Program, and the Capital Campaign to benefi t the new Emergency Department and Cafeteria. The Foundation welcomed three new board members this year: Barbara Falatico Brodock, Terry Mielnicki and Stephen Teti. With their support and leadership, the Foundation will continue to reach new milestones and successes. The Foundation thanks Board Member Steeves Devlin, DC for his years of involvement with the Foundation and as co-chair of the annual Golf Tournament. Dr. Devlin resigned from the Board in 2008 to pursue a new career opportunity.

In addition, our Patient Information Guide includes telephone numbers for the patient to call regarding the various programs that are available to assist the patient with paying his or her account. Our Patient Statements contain a message alerting the patient to our Discount Policies. For those patients who are truly unable to pay, the Medical Center off ers the Mother Bernardina Charity Care Program. The Medical Center employs three in-house Patient Account Specialists, as well as a fourth Specialist who deals specifi cally with the Women and Children’s Health Center and Medical Group sites, as needed. The Patient Account Specialists focus on Inpatient and Emergency Department accounts while the patient is still in the hospital. The goal is to determine the patient’s eligibility for state insurance coverage and to obtain coverage, if applicable. During the pre-registration process, accounts that are self pay are automatically forwarded to the Patient Account Specialists, who also assist patients in applying for Unemployment Insurance, Disability Insurance and Social Security. These staff members also work closely with Discharge Planners and the area’s nursing homes and outpatient rehabilitation centers. Additionally, the Mohawk Valley Perinatal Network staff members are on site two days a week and the Medical Center staff works closely with them to obtain insurance coverage for the patient. In 2010, hospitals will fi le a new document called Schedule H with their IRS Form 990. The purpose of Schedule H is to provide the community with some basic information on the ways in which each hospital meets its community benefi t obligations. However, the Schedule can’t convey the depth and breadth of the programs and activities St. Elizabeth provides each year, or the lives touched by them. Further in this Annual Report you will see examples that bring these numbers to life.

6


DNV Healthcare Accredits Medical Center

Benefits to Our Community St. Elizabeth Medical Center’s commitment to community health is refl ected in its employees’ extensive outreach beyond the hospital and Medical Group offi ces into the area communities. Along with other hospitals, St. Elizabeth has begun to monitor how its faithfulness to the Mohawk Valley region meets our local communities’ unique healthcare needs. Therefore, community benefi ts are programs or activities that provide treatment and/or promote health and healing as a response to identifi ed community needs. Our Catholic tradition and Medical Center Mission teach us to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable fi rst. Community benefi t activities include charity care for people unable to aff ord services; health education and illness prevention; special healthcare initiatives for at-risk youths; free or low-cost clinics; and eff orts to advance communities. Such actions are often developed in collaboration with community members and other organizations to improve health and quality of life.

5

In support of the Medical Center’s Mission, staff members at all levels of the organization donate time and services to communities across the region. While this has been ongoing since St. Elizabeth’s founding in 1866, only during the past three years has the information been compiled. Total numbers are still being collected. However, we can report with certainty that in 2008, at least 179 Medical Center employees donated 1,552 hours to meet specifi c community requests, interacting with 6,445 community attendees. These hours translate into a value of more than $44,668. Members of the Trauma Center staff not only cared for critically injured patients in our community in 2008; they also conducted numerous outreach programs in area schools and to adults. These include an annual symposium for providers on trauma issues, presentations to 794 students at 6 area schools on head and spinal cord injury prevention and a fall-prevention presentation to 120 individuals at local senior citizen centers.

Continuing to pursue its goal of providing exceptional care to its patients in a safe environment, St. Elizabeth Medical Center was accredited by DNV Healthcare, Inc. in November. This accreditation is important because it confi rms that St. Elizabeth is meeting Medicare and Medicaid’s standards to be a provider of healthcare services to those programs and that the National Integrated Accreditation for Healthcare Organizations (NIAHO) standards and the ISO 9001 Quality Management System standards are met. St. Elizabeth was the fi rst hospital in New York State to achieve this new NIAHO accreditation with DNV Healthcare, Inc. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) delegates inspection of hospital services to several organizations: DNV Healthcare Inc., the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), State Health Departments and the American Osteopathic Association. DNV Healthcare, Inc. is a 145-year-old company based in Norway. It received its authority from CMS in late September 2008. “ This is more than a new accreditation program, it’s a catalyst for our ongoing commitment to patient safety and clinical quality,” said St. Elizabeth Medical Center President and CEO Sister M. Johanna. “With NIAHO we can achieve full ISO compliance and satisfy our annual accreditation requirements at the same time, for no additional cost. We are pleased and proud that our dedicated staff has achieved this certifi cation and continues to strive for excellence in caring for patients across the region.”

This change matters to St. Elizabeth because ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards are the foundation of the Medical Center’s Quality Management System. These standards ensure it is taking all necessary steps to deliver safe and eff ective healthcare services to patients. ISO 9001 is recognized by businesses around the world as the benchmark for continual quality improvement. Innovative hospitals have started embracing ISO as a way to identify and focus on the most successful approaches to patient care, billing and other critical aspects of running a modern hospital. The new DNV NIAHO program is not only a new option for accreditation; it is an entirely new approach to accreditation. NIAHO focuses not simply on auditing the hospital’s business processes but on fi nding better ways to do things in every department. The Medical Center received ISO certifi cation in 2005, so those processes and standards were in place for nearly three years prior to DNV accreditation.

22


Did You Know? Physician Recruitment The importance of Physicians to St. Elizabeth Medical Center and the communities we serve cannot be overstated. The growing shortage of physicians, due to retirement and retention diffi culties, has a negative impact on the region. According to the Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS) 2008 Physician Workforce Survey, Central New York had a net gain of 34 physicians in 2007 but needed 366 physicians – the highest regional number for need, statewide. The average age of physicians in New York State was 51 in 2007. According to the University of Albany’s Annual Physician Workforce Profi le in 2008, the ratio of physicians to the population was lowest in the Mohawk Valley region of the state, with 167 physicians per 100,000 people. Herkimer County had 80 physicians per 100,000 people and Oneida County had 211. New York State exports more than half of our NYS trained physicians with a disproportionate number of physicians in downstate compared to upstate NY. In addition, the report “New York Physician Supply and Demand through 2030” by the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the School of Public Health, University at Albany, states that the demand for physicians practicing in the state continues to grow. Between 2002 and 2006, the Mohawk Valley experienced a physician decline of 4 percent. Our methods to address physician shortages include: ■ Annual preparation of a Strategic Physician Needs Assessment ■ Collaborating with experienced recruiters through the Upstate

1,552 The number of hours employees donated

6,445 The number of community attendees

$44,668 The value these hours translate to

New York Physician Recruiter Network to elevate Upstate New York as an ideal region for practicing medicine ■ Outreach to prospective physicians through career fair visits and

website optimization St. Elizabeth is also working with partners cooperatively to address this critical issue and recruit physicians in specifi c specialties to the area.

Committed to Community Service An employee volunteers as “Frosty the Snowman” for our annual children’s Christmas party 23


Consumer Choice Award for the 5th consecutive year in 2008-09

The Mohawk Valley Heart Institute received the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines – Coronary Artery Disease Gold Performance Achievement Award

Our Mission

St. Elizabeth Medical Center community, inspired by St. Francis of Assisi and faithful to the teachings of the Roman Catholic

CMS IPRO Certificates Received 2 Certificates of Appreciation from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)/ Island Peer Review Organization

Church, is committed to excellence in healthcare and education. We pledge to do this with compassion and respect for the dignity of all. A “Friend of Heart” Award from the American Heart Association

Genesis Excellence in Education Award St. Elizabeth School of Radiography

Third place as Laboratory of the Year by Advance for Medical Laboratory Professionals magazine

24


Medical Center Financial Statement for Report Year 2008 I.

Table of contents

Revenue Net Patient Services Revenue

$183,399,583

Other Operating Revenue

$5,797,941

Total Revenue

$189,197,524

II. Expenses Depreciation and Interest

$10,242,336

Salaries

$82,794,747

Employee/Fringe Benefits

$20,745,352

Supplies and All Other Expenses

$73,504,526 $187,286,961

Total Expenses III. Details of Specific Revenue/ Expense Items Government Grants Revenue

$341,880

Research & Medical Education Revenue

$1,232,456

Research & Medical Education Expense

$5,483,157

Bad Debt/Uncompensated Care

$6,868,172

Free Care (Charity, Hill Burton, Mother Bernardina)

$2,272,000

Summary Financial Statement Revenue

$189,197,524

Expenses

$187,286,961

Charity Care

$2,272,000

Bad Debt/ Uncompensated Care

$6,868,172

Total Free Care

$9,140,172

Community Benefits Revenue/Expense

201 12,203

Average Length of Stay (LOS) days Case Mix Adjusted LOS (days) Surgical Procedures Inpatient Outpatient Cardiothoracic Coronary Angioplasties Total Surgical Procedures

4.8 3.9 2,737 5,635 355 1,228 9,955

Cardiac Procedures Catheterizations Electrophysiology Procedures Endoscopy Procedures

2,645 1101 8,303

Radiology Studies Medical Center Marian Medical Imaging Laboratory Tests Emergency Room Visits

66,547 23,815 680,648 33,524

Primary Care Office Visits (Patient Visits)

143,400

Rehab Services Patient Visits Medical Center Community Offices Respiratory Therapy Treatments EEG Studies EKG Studies Sleep Center Procedures Wound Management Visits Home Care Visits

36,239 14,121 196,642 386 24,559 1,606 2,844 9,999

Meeting Growing Needs St. Elizabeth Medical Arts

9

10

Targeting 0

OR Updates

11

13-14

Orthopedic Services

St. Elizabeth Medical Group

20 Keeping up with Technology

$9,140,172 25

Just the Numbers Our Financial Information

15

Meet the “Pillow Ladies”

16

A New Look

■ Demonstrate exemplary leadership in all decision-making as we support our Mission.

17-19

A Regional Teaching Institution

■ Demonstrate appropriate responsiveness to meet specific community healthcare needs.

20

Keeping Up With Technology

■ Our physical environment will demonstrate excellence in customer access, safety, and comfort functions. ■ Enhance our technology initiatives to support our healthcare delivery systems.

21

Our Successful Foundation Quality Counts - DNV Accreditation

■ Offer the high quality healthcare services to SEMC patients and respond to future needs (Patient Care).

22 23

Did You Know - Physician Recruitment

24

Awards and Recognition

25

Just the Numbers - 2008 Financial Information

26

Meet Our Leaders

Our Strategies For 2008

■ Demonstrate a continued investment in our most valued resource, our employees (Human Resources). ■ Demonstrate responsible stewardship in all financial matters. ■ Demonstrate a shared vision and commitment to physicians caring for SEMC patients and families. 25

Benefits to our community

$44,668

Statistical Highlights 2008 Discharges

8

$695,424

Courtesy Care

Licensed beds

5


Medical Staff Officers

Fred Talarico, M.D. President Sudershan Dang, M.D. Vice President Eric Yoss, M.D. Secretary - Treasurer

Foundation Officers

A message from the President and CEO, Sister M. Johanna DeLelys, OSF 2008 was a year of making plans to expand the Medical Center’s services, both on the hospital grounds and in a nearby community. After investigating several possibilities, we purchased the former Hartford Insurance building on Middle Settlement Road in the town of New Hartford in January 2009. Plans for this 80,000-square-foot structure include a new, Outpatient Wound Care Center, relocation of our Adirondack Sports Medicine Rehabilitation services (currently housed on Culver Avenue in East Utica) the New Hartford Medical Group offi ces, Outpatient Laboratory, Urgent Care, and Radiology services, as well as private physician offi ce space. We are pleased to be able to reach out into the community and increase convenience and access to primary care services. We also made plans to renovate and expand the hospital’s Orthopedic Unit and construction began in February 2009. The unit, completed in August ’09, contains 10 private patient rooms and two semi-private rooms, to increase patient comfort and healing. I am grateful to our dedicated employees for their many hours of planning and work to make these projects a reality. Ongoing during the year were changes led by the Nursing staff to decrease hospital-based infections. Particular success was made in the areas of sternal wound infections and donor graft site infections, which are detailed in this report. The Association of Operating Room Nurses recognized our staff ’s achievements in high-quality patient care with a national award for obtaining these results in the area of post-operative infections after open heart surgery. Other ongoing eff orts by our superb staff include numerous environmental achievements. These include medical waste reduction, which was achieved through better waste segregation; a new mopping system, which reduces water consumption by approximately 50,000 gallons annually; and installation of a high-effi ciency boiler at the building owned by the Medical Center at 2206 Genesee Street that will signifi cantly reduce energy consump-

tion for that building. Mohawk Valley Heart Institute (MVHI), St. Elizabeth’s collaboration in cardiac care with Faxton-St. Luke’s Healthcare, opened the new Helen M. Firsching Cardiac Catheterization Lab in March 2008 with four procedure rooms, a tilt room and a nine-bay holding/recovery room. These renovations improved patient access to services that are much needed across our region.

Terrance Mielnicki President William Borrill, Esq. Vice President Stephen Teti Treasurer Barbara Falatico Brodock Secretary

In addition, our primary care services continue to grow through the St. Elizabeth Medical Group and its 13 sites in Oneida and Herkimer counties. The Medical Group plays a vital role in meeting community healthcare needs by providing easily accessible services to women, children and families across the Mohawk Valley region. From Little Falls in the east to Sauquoit, Waterville and other locations across the area, providers and offi ce staff have a daily impact on our neighbors’ lives.

Guild Officers

Margaret Lalonde President

As we continue to extend the mission of our founding Sisters throughout the community we serve, we also endeavor to impart a Spirit of Excellence in all that we do, each day. Thank you for your support, which you demonstrate in many ways: by serving as volunteers, fi nancial donors, members of our Patient & Family Advisory Council – the ways are too numerous to mention.

Maureen Netzband Vice President Mary Humphrey Treasurer Winifred Buehler Assistant Treasurer

God bless you.

Mary Margaret Napoli Recording Secretary Jane Ann Dwyer Corresponding Secretary Joseph Bouse Assistant Corresponding Secretary BOARD OF TRUSTEES Seated from left: Marianne Gaige; Sr. M.

Johanna DeLelys, OSF, President/CEO; Sr. Donna McGartland, OSF; and Catherine Cominsky. Standing from left: Dr. Fred Talarico; Dr. Eric Yoss; Richard Zweifel; Fred Matt; Harrison J. Hummel, III; and Gregory Evans. Not shown: Sister Frances Kowalski, Raymond Meier, Esq., Hon. Norman I. Siegel and Dr. Steven Williams.

ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM President/CEO Sister M. Johanna DeLelys,

center, with her Vice Presidents. Seated from left: Phyllis Ellis, FACHE; Robert Scholefield, Catherine Hanover and Phyllis Hasenauer. Standing from left: Patrick Buckley, Dr. Albert D’Accurzio, Lou Aiello and Varinya Sheppard. Not shown: Traci Boris, Esq.

Marian Luley Marie McQueen Board Members

26


Mercury-Free Equipment

MC

All clinical equipment containing mercury has been replaced with non-mercury alternatives.

“Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible..”

Energy-Efficient Computers Older equipment is being replaced with newer, more energy-efficient equipment.

St. Francis of Assisi

New Mopping System Traditional mop-and-bucket floor cleaning has been replaced with a new, microfiber mopping system that reduces annual water consumption by 50,000 gallons and chemical cleaner usage by 8,000 gallons.

Other Notable Achievements: • Green Cleaners • Medical Waste Reduction • Chemical-Free Window Washing • Cardboard Recycling • Bottle and Can Recycling • Other Recycling Includes: Office paper, Fluorescent Lamps, Used Oil, Batteries, Scrap Metal, Electronic Equipment • Car Pooling

in our community and our env e d i r p e k ironme We ta nt

St. Elizabeth Medical Center 2008 Annual Report www.stemc.org


St. Elizabeth Medical Center 2008 Annual Report