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DANIEL FRANK SEDWICK presents…

MAIL-BID

TREASURE AUCTION #2 closing Tuesday, October 30, 2007, at 5:00 p.m. EST

Daniel Frank Sedwick P.O. Box 1964 Winter Park, FL 32790 U.S.A. (407) 975-3325 • Fax (407) 975-3327

www.sedwickcoins.com Special email bidding address:

treasurebids@gmail.com Daniel Frank Sedwick, licensed Florida auctioneer #AU3635, AB2592  Copyright Daniel Frank Sedwick, 2007. All rights reserved. 1


ORDER OF SALE closing Tuesday, October 30, 2007, at 5:00 p.m. EST Section __________________________________________________________ Lots_______ Pages Biographies .................................................................................................................................. 6-10 Shipwreck (and hoard) histories ....................................................................................................... 11-20 Gold cobs .......................................................................................................... 1-10 ............... 21-22 Other gold coins........................................................................................................ 11-16 ............. 22-23 Shipwreck ingots ...................................................................................................... 17-20 ............. 23-24 Shipwreck silver coins .............................................................................................. 21-296 ........... 25-61 Medals pertaining to ships and shipwrecks .............................................................. 297-299 ......... 61 Silver cobs .......................................................................................................... 300-388 ......... 62-72 Other coins .......................................................................................................... 389-433 ......... 72-78 Artifacts .......................................................................................................... 434-505 ......... 79-94 Media: Prints ................................................................................................. 506-507 ......... 94 Film ................................................................................................... 508 ................ 95 Documents ........................................................................................ 509-510 ......... 95 Books ................................................................................................ 511-727 ......... 96-108 Magazine .......................................................................................... 728 ................ 108 Auction catalogs ............................................................................... 729-764 ......... 109-111

REFERENCES CITED

SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS FOR BOOK LISTINGS

Where possible, in the description for each lot we supply one or more numbers in reference to acknowledged publications in the field. References used in this catalog include the following: A=

CT = C=

Fr = KM =

RL =

S= Sp =

This auction contains extensive book listings, which require data that are customarily abbreviated, as follows:

Crooks’ Bibliography of Important Shipwreck Auction Catalogs and his website (www.sunkentreasurebooks.com). Note that his auction-catalog listings only cover catalogs that are devoted exclusively to shipwrecks or have major sections on shipwrecks. Calicó-Trigo’s Numismática española, 9th edition (1998). Crooks’ Bibliography of Sunken Treasure Books and his website (www.sunkentreasurebooks.com). Note that his book listings admittedly do not cover all land treasures and pirates and/or fiction. Friedberg’s Gold Coins of the World, 7th edition (2003). Krause-Mishler’s Standard Catalog of World Coins, various editions, including Spain, Portugal and the New World. Restrepo’s and Lasser’s books on Colombian cobs, including Macuquinas de Colombia (1998), The Cob Coinage of Colombia (2000), and Monedas de Colombia (2006). Sedwick’s The Practical Book of Cobs, 4th edition (2007). Spink’s (formerly Seaby’s) Coins of England and the United Kingdom, 41st edition (2006).

HC = hard cover SC = soft cover DJ = dust jacket illus = illustrated ed. = edition pp = pages PR = Prices Realized (auction results) XL = ex-library (with stampings and/or card-holders pasted in) Also we have not assigned grades to the books, which should all be assumed to be complete and in lightly used condition (most booksellers’ grade of “Fine”) except where noted otherwise.

COIN GRADING From best to worst, UNC is Uncirculated, AU is Almost Uncirculated, XF is Extra Fine, VF is Very Fine, F is Fine, VG is Very Good, and G is Good, with Fair and Poor below that. (“About” or “A” means the coin is just shy of the indicated grade. “Mint State” refers to lustrous, choice UNC coins.) We do not always assign numismatic grades to sea-salvage and land-burial coins, which were usually Uncirculated (or close to it) before the effects of corrosion and/or cleaning. Corrosion is usually assessed, from least to most, as follows: none, minimal, light, moderate, and heavy.

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1)

This is a traditional “mail bid” auction, meaning that all items will be sold to the highest bidder and bids will be accepted up to the closing date and time. Bids may be submitted by mail, phone, fax, email, or in person. We cannot be responsible for errors in your bidding or the loss or delay of any bids that do not reach us by the closing date and time. All bids submitted will be considered in U.S. dollars.

2)

Bidders are advised to make full use of the MIN/MAX BID system. In case of tie MAXIMUM bids, we do NOT automatically award the lot to the earlier bidder but instead award the lot to the bidder with the higher MINIMUM bid. If there is no tie, then the high bidder will win the lot at his MINIMUM bid OR approximately 10% above the next-highest MAXIMUM bid. Any bidder who does not supply a MINIMUM bid will NOT have his winning bid reduced to 10% above the next-highest MAXIMUM bid. Please see the explanation of our MIN/MAX BID system on the back of the bid sheet.

3)

A winning bid is considered a formal contract between the buyer and the consignor. The winning bidder, by submitting his bid, agrees to purchase the lot(s) he/she has won and further agrees to pay the Buyer’s Premium and any shipping, sales tax, customs duties, or other surcharges involved in delivering the lot(s) to the buyer. Winning bidders will be notified immediately after the sale with an invoice reflecting the total amount due and shall remit payment within 10 business days of notification. If payment has not been received after 10 days, then we reserve the right to re-open the lots to second- and third- (etc.) highest bidders. Title to each lot does not pass until the item is paid for in full.

4)

Unless other arrangements are made, all lots will be sent to winning bidders via U.S. Mail when the invoice has been paid in full. All domestic shipments will carry full insurance, but foreign shipments are made at the buyer’s risk (insurance available in some cases).

5)

A Buyer’s Premium of 20% will be added to the winning bid for the total purchase price before any applicable tax or surcharges. Winning bidders who pay by cash, check, money order, wire transfer or direct deposit are eligible for a reduction of the Buyer’s Premium by 5%. Winning bidders who pay by credit card (not through PayPal) are eligible for a reduction of the Buyer’s Premium by 2%.

6)

Payment is accepted by cash, check, money order, wire transfer, direct deposit, PayPal, Visa/MC, American Express and Discover. All payments by check or money order should be payable to Daniel Frank Sedwick. Payments by direct deposit or wire transfer should be made to the Daniel Frank Sedwick Auction Escrow Account, Bank of America account #008981014683, ABA #026009593, SWIFT code BOFAUS6S. Payments by PayPal should be made to aworkman@tampabay.rr.com. All payments shall be in U.S. dollars drawn on a U.S. bank.

7)

New bidders who do not have established credit with us must supply references and/or a 25% deposit. Credit cards are acceptable in lieu of a deposit. If your bids are unsuccessful, your deposit will be refunded, but if you are a winning bidder, your deposit will be applied to your purchase.

8)

You may opt for “either/or” bids and/or total budgets on your bid sheet. “Either/or” bids are used when you want just one (or whatever number you specify) of two or more lots but it does not matter which of those lots you get. Total budgets are used when you are bidding on more lots than you expect to win and do not wish to spend more than a specified amount. Mail-bid sales are uniquely flexible for these situations.

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9)

Most lots are unreserved, but some lots do have a reserve or minimum bid that the consignor will allow. Any reserve will be at or below the stated low estimate. All estimates are given in U.S. dollars.

10)

Even when there is not a reserve, bidders are advised that Daniel Frank Sedwick is an active dealer in this material and will buy any and all items at a wholesale level; therefore any bids below reasonable wholesale will not be considered. Furthermore we reserve the right to reject any bids that we have reason to believe are not submitted in good faith.

11)

All items are guaranteed genuine and as described. Returns will NOT be accepted UNLESS there was an error in the listing. (Note that grading and estimation of corrosion are subjective and differences of opinion thereof cannot be considered errors.) Any returns must be agreed upon BEFORE shipment back to us, and any applicable refunds will be made immediately upon receipt of the returned item(s). All returns must be submitted back to us in unaltered condition no later than 30 days after the sale, as that is generally when consignors are paid. Any refunds for returns paid for by credit card or PayPal will be subject to a 3% (credit card) or 5% (PayPal) return fee.

12)

Lots may be inspected at our bank vault in Winter Park by appointment only during our office hours of Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. High-quality photos of all items are viewable on our website 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

13)

Florida sales tax (6% to 7.5%, depending on your county) will be added to all purchases of items that are NOT coins or bullion. Coins and bullion are also taxed if the total coin and/or bullion purchase is less than $500.

14)

The winning bidder pays for all costs of shipping or delivery of his/her lots. In some cases special delivery must be arranged between the consignor and the winning bidder. There are no surcharges for packing or handling in this sale.

15)

This auction is conducted in accordance with the auction laws of the State of Florida. The licensed auctioneer is Daniel Frank Sedwick, AU#3635, AB#2592.

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DANIEL FRANK SEDWICK presents… Treasure Auction #2 A Mail-Bid Sale, closing October 30, 2007 Many thanks to all the consignors and bidders who made Treasure Auction #1 a success! It is hard to believe the second auction is already here, and it is just as packed with goodies as the last one was! In this auction we feature the shipwreck silver-cob collection of Louis Ullian, original Real Eight Co. member and longtime “treasure guru” in Florida. Lou had a chance to sock away some beautiful coins over the years, mostly rarities, from the Capitana (1654), Maravillas (1656) and “Jupiter wreck” (1659), as well as the 1715 Fleet (of course) and San Martín (1618). We hope to offer his even more impressive collection of gold cobs in the future—Lou and his family still enjoy them too much for now! The next major coin consignment comes from ROBCAR, S.A., the Ecuadorian company responsible for the salvage of the Consolación (1681). The marketing of these coins got off to a bit of a rocky start, first with an underachieving auction in New York and then with a short-lived “slabbing” venture in Florida, but in more recent years there has been a more sensible wholesale marketing of these coins. But as you will see in this auction, the salvagers have been saving some nice coins for our new venue, with opportunities for collectors and retailers alike. The artifact section of this auction is probably the most impressive part, with over 70 different items from many different wrecks and other sources. This is where our auctions stand out—where else can you find such things? The highlight of the bunch is a heavy gold chain from the Santa Margarita wreck of 1622 (lot #438), but also note a couple gemstone rings and the variety of cannons and other armaments. One of the largest parts of this auction, however, is the section on treasure books, mostly from the libraries of Dave Crooks and Bruce Prior. The Crooks consignment is the first of what we hope will be many from Dave’s library of over 2000 treasure books, but the Prior consignment is a total liquidation, including many items pedigreed to the library of Kelly Tarlton’s Museum of Shipwrecks in New Zealand. In many cases the books are harder to find than the coins and artifacts they describe! As before, this catalog is being presented simultaneously on our website as well. At present we are not able to offer secure bid-sheet submission or real-time high-bid updates through our website, but we intend to do so in subsequent auctions as our manpower and resources increase. You are welcome to phone in your bids and inquire as to whether you are currently the high bidder, but please understand that the closer to the closing time, the less chance you have of getting through by phone, which is why we recommend email or fax instead. If you send your bids by postal mail, please call to confirm that we have received them. Above all, we hope you have fun with this sale. Please feel free to contact us at any time if we can help make the experience more enjoyable for you!

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CONSIGNORS’ BIOGRAPHIES Louis Ullian (a long overdue interview) 1961, on the coldest day of the year, down at the cabin, Kip could see cannon offshore there and we got in the boat and put on wetsuits…with the cannons were…two chests with clumps weighing about 70 lb each. We determined they were full of coins, and we tried to carry them both back to the boat but we couldn’t do it, and had to leave one on the bottom…we uncovered about 2400 coins that day, first day on the wreck! DFS: That was “Cabin Wreck,” right? LU: Yes, Cabin Wreck. DFS: What were your accomplishments and duties under Real Eight Co.? Did you have a specific role with Real Eight, or just diving? LU: Just a diver. DFS: Did you make—personally—some finds that were significant for Real Eight at that time? LU: I did. I found K’ang Hsi china…down at the bottom using a sand dredge…all of a sudden intact china cups came out of the dredge…30-40 cups. Soon as we went On July 27 we finally had the good fortune to be able to back to the inlet that night, the engine quit, but Kip put interview Lou at his home in Merritt Island, and this was what he the china in the life preservers…said [the china was] had to say: more important than we were! DFS: I bet that was a pretty sight! What was it like finding DFS: For those who have not read about you in Pieces of gold on these wrecks? Eight and other important references, please give me a Found a lot of gold. First gold we found was 23 coins brief overview of your life up to and including your first LU: on the Cabin Wreck. That was affiliations with Kip the day we brought Mel Fisher Wagner and Real Eight Co. “…we uncovered about 2400 coins that to Florida. DFS: Before we get to LU: I was raised in Ft. day, first day on the wreck!” … Mel Fisher, though, what was Lauderdale, Florida, the largest number of coins or graduated high school artifacts found in one day in the and went to Purdue 1960s? University…received a degree in mechanical LU: Two and a half tons of silver. engineering…went into the Navy as an ordnance engineer for 3½ years, in Yorktown, Virginia, worked on DFS: Was that the two chests you said you found? LU: No, this was over the keel of the ship. the first guided missile cruiser…married to my wife in DFS: Cabin Wreck still? 1954, have two children, boy and girl, three LU: Yes. About two and a half tons of silver. grandchildren. I met Kip through Del Long. I started DFS: How many chests do you figure that was? diving in 1948 once I got in the Navy. Out of the Navy LU: Oh, 15 or 20. in 1955, I went to work at Cape Canaveral as an DFS: Wow. Then maybe a couple thousand coins per chest? ordnance engineer, still diving. Met Del through the LU: Three thousand coins per chest. Three bags, each bag diving club, and he told me about a man by the name of with a thousand coins. Kip Wagner who was finding coins on the beach. He DFS: So that’s what? Fifty thousand coins or so that you took me down there and introduced me to Kip. Kip was found all at once? just about ready to start putting together a salvage LU: Yes. company. Since I was a diver, I was one of the first DFS: That’s pretty amazing! But all silver, right? divers to get involved with Kip. Two Air Force officers, LU: All silver. Harry Cannon and Dan Thompson, ran Real Eight. But DFS: What was your most harrowing experience diving or me… Harry didn’t know how to dive but he had a boat. searching on these wrecks? One January, one of the coldest days in January, we LU: In 1962, in the middle of the winter, dead…I got to threw Harry in the swimming pool at the officer’s club work the wreck…couldn’t get the boat in past the third and taught him how to dive. In 1959 and 1960, we reef, so Dan and I swam in to the area between the first worked at the first 1715 wreck, Urca de Lima, two and second reef…Dan came up to me, tapped me on the miles north of Ft. Pierce inlet. Kip had leases from the shoulder…said he just bumped into a shark, decided to State of Florida for all of the 1715 wrecks. In January, In the treasure world known as Florida we dwell with living legends, such as Sir Robert Marx, Bob “Frogfoot” Weller, Capt. Carl Fismer and many others. But as each year passes, another respected treasure man leaves us: Art McKee, Kip Wagner, Mel Fisher…. Perhaps the most recent “big name” was Dan Thompson, one of the original members of the famous Real Eight Co. formed by Kip Wagner in the late 1950s to salvage the 1715 Fleet, easily one of the most significant treasure finds in our lifetime. Another Real Eight member was Lou Ullian, a major consignor in this sale and a longtime friend of ours who unfortunately has suffered with Parkinson’s disease for the past several years now. For a long time we have wanted to interview Lou and get his perspective on a number of treasure issues. In some ways we waited too long, as Lou’s physical condition does not allow him to speak with 100% clarity; but Lou’s mind is as sharp as ever, and his thoughts and emotions are clear. He even has a surprisingly strong handshake!

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go back to the boat. I don’t know who was more scared, DFS: But also, if I remember correctly, one of his associates him or the shark! Sharks used to mate there at was Fay Feild who brought the magnetometer to work “Cabin”…I got some pictures of three or four sharks in on the wrecks, I’m sure that changed it. a wave. LU: That helped a lot. So you’d routinely see sharks, then, at Cabin Wreck. DFS: But Mel had not met Kip until you invited him to come Yes. Didn’t seem to bother us, though. meet with you, is that correct? Still, that had to be nerve-wracking to be working with LU: Right. sharks in the vicinity. But no attacks, then? DFS: How did he and Kip get along? One time we had probably a 25-foot tiger shark…come LU: Pretty well. off the bottom out of the water, swam under the boat, DFS: Did everyone with Real Eight get along well with Mel? nearly as long as the boat. We didn’t do any more diving LU: Harry didn’t get along with him, but everyone else did. that day. DFS: What eventually happened between Mel and Real Eight I guess not! Again before I get to Mel Fisher, let me ask and how did Real Eight eventually dissolve? you this: Until relatively recently, at least in my LU: Mel found out about the Atocha, wanted to look for it, experience, it wasn’t standard for collectors to really spent more time in the Keys, less time on the 1715 keep track of which exact 1715 site their coins came Fleet. So he was down in the Keys quite a bit, that’s why from, but over the years I, at least, have relied upon you we dissolved the relationship, he wanted to work in the to help me figure out which wrecks certain items came Keys and we wanted to work 1715. Real Eight stayed from. Can you give any general tips as to how you probably till about 1972 then it dissolved…Kip had determine the origins? died, so the glue that held us together was no longer Well, there. basically DFS: So I kept it was pretty “One time...a 25-foot tiger shark…swam under the boat, nearly records, much when as long as the boat. We didn’t do any more diving that day.” in a Kip died that little Real Eight notebook. ended? I wrote down each day what was found. LU: Yes, plus the fact that we were used to going out on the You seem to have a lot of it committed to memory as Cabin Wreck and getting 1000-2000 coins a day. well. DFS: And that wasn’t happening any more? True. I got interested in the coins very early, knew they LU: That wasn’t happening any more. were worth some money. Bob Nesmith came down, DFS: How did Mel Fisher end up with all of the leases on looked at them and said “right now you think they’re those wrecks? just like oyster shells but these coins will be worth a lot LU: When Real Eight Co. dissolved, we let Mel come in and of money some day. You need to keep good records.” take over the leases. And he convinced me to do that, showed me how. DFS: Well, of course, most of the Real Eight people have And you still have these records, right? since passed away; of those, who were your closest Sure do. associates, and what are your favorite memories of your Were these records ever anything the State was association with them? interested in, or did you ever assist the State in recordLU: We were always good friends. I still spend a lot of time keeping? with Rex Stocker, Kip’s nephew. I see Del Long once in I helped them, but they didn’t seem too interested. a while, John Jones; but Harry [Cannon] and Dan Right, that’s been my impression. How did Mel Fisher [Thompson] and Doc [Dr. Kip Kelso] all passed away. change Real Eight when he came along, and 1715-Fleet We were always good friends. salvage in general? DFS: Did they all stay in this area? I was working for the Air Force at the time, made a lot LU: Yes. of trips to the west coast and every time I went to the DFS: That’s amazing that you could stay friends throughout west coast I would go to dive shops. I walked into Mel’s all of that. It’s not the usual thing for treasure divers to dive shop and he was out diving. Dee Fisher was stick together and stay friends after finding things. What there…showed me silver cob pieces Mel was carrying do you think is the future of 1715-Fleet salvage? in his store…I told her she had half reals…I showed her LU: I think most of the wrecks have been found…most of some 8 reals…Mel was diving on the Silver Shoals the treasure has been found…still getting a little bit of wreck off Puerto Rico…I told her he should stop by to stuff. see Kip on the way down…he agreed, started to come DFS: So you don’t think that new sites will be found? work with us. The week after the holidays Mel’s crew LU: Rex Stocker may have found one in 42 feet of water. I worked five days a week, ten hours a day. He made it don’t think it will be a major ship. The two capitanas more of a business. and two almirantas we worked carried most of the Changed the face of it, I guess? treasure. Yes. DFS: Everything else is just a boat that would not have had anything on it in the first place.

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Yeah, not much on them. is that of the nearly 100,000 coins we picked up, it’s Do you think any of the current sites will yield any new hard to find 1715[-Fleet] coins. They disappeared into finds, or do you think they’ve all been pretty well collectors’ hands. worked, both the capitanas and the almirantas? DFS: What was your role, then, in the auctions that took I think maybe there’s still a partial chest, there’s some place? jewelry to be found, but I don’t think major finds of LU: I helped attribute the coins. Also I found…different silver or gold coins will be made. ways to clean coins, learned how to clean coins (I think) Not the cargo, in other words. better than anyone else. That’s right. DFS: Did you have numismatic interests before the coins You are also known for your involvement with various were found on the 1715 Fleet? important salvage operations on the Pacific coast of LU: I used to collect American large cents. I had some South America, particularly Ecuador; what is your role numismatic interest in American type-coins and large in the operations down south? pennies. Provide money. DFS: Do you still collect anything besides the shipwreck So it’s just the financial support? coins? I’ll work the coins, clean them, treat them, once they LU: Not really. find the main part of the wreck. DFS: What do you see as the future of shipwreck salvage in So you do provide numismatic assistance with that and general, particularly concerning government expertise? involvement and deepwater salvage with robotics? Yes. LU: Well, I And you do think deepwater “the wreck we’re looking for, sunk in 1612, should your own salvage is cleaning? here…[S.S.] have 6 or 7 million pesos of silver and gold on it.” Yes. Central America What do you [1857] is a good predict for the future regarding these operations down in example of that. I think the government sees it as a new South America? source of money. They’re going to try to grab control of Well, the wreck we’re looking for, sunk in 1612, should it. Spain has competed with the United States over have 6 or 7 million pesos of silver and gold on it. warships here to the north of us. Six or 7 million pesos?! DFS: What do you think that means for collectors? That’s what they claim. The Spanish couldn’t salvage it, LU: They just want to collect coins. What’ll happen is it’ll some boxes were ruined…little too much mud there. go underground. What depth of water is it? DFS: When it becomes a situation, though, where you have to Twenty to 30 feet. salvage in deep water and spend a lot of money to run a But the mud overburden is a lot more? robot and crew and that kind of thing, these days we Nine or 10 feet of mud. seem to be seeing companies that spend a lot of money Is that the only promising site that’s being looked at and have big companies to manage and do things very down there? promotionally to make up for it—do you think that’s the Four or 5 other sites. future of it, or do you think it will go underground, as But that one’s getting the main attention. you say, with that type of operation? That’s the first, yes. LU: The governments…will put unreasonable rules and How about the Capitana [of 1654]? Has that been restrictions on them and it will go underground. If they worked out, do you think? don’t, they will go out of business. I think it’s been worked out. DFS: That leads into your experience with Ecuador. Did you Where I want to go now is into your numismatic partake in any of the negotiations with the government interests over the years. You’ve been accurately known of Ecuador? as an accomplished numismatist among divers, kind of a LU: Joel Ruth did most of that. Now we have a good rare breed; could you please describe some of the things relationship with that government. you’ve had an interest in over the years. DFS: I see that as an example of a government that is doing Thanks to Bob Nesmith, soon as we started finding all things properly and constructively, working with the the silver coins, we decided we needed to keep a record divers and the salvage company. of them. When we first found them, we’d take them in LU: True. The Ecuadorians feel the Spanish stole from them to coin shops, but they never saw them [before], didn’t anyhow. know what they were. So we decided we needed to put DFS: Good point. Are there any other governments that seem them up for auction. Henry Christensen and Harvey to have a good mindset like Ecuador? Stack set up auctions, started selling the coins, trying to LU: Cuba does. get people interested in them. When we first started DFS: Cuba does? That’s surprising. You never see shipwreck selling the coins, they’d sell for $25-$30 apiece. Today coins from Cuba, though. Do they just stay in Cuba? a good 1715[-Fleet] coin, undated, will bring $125. A LU: Mostly stay in Cuba. full dated coin will bring $400 or $500. What’s amazing

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Do you see a future for shipwreck salvage in Cuban waters? I think once the United States gets its head out of the sand, then it’ll become a very fertile ground. Well then at that point do you think Cuba will allow the coins to go elsewhere? I think so. To bring in revenue for their country? I think so. That’s interesting. What about the Bahamas? Do you see any future for the Bahamas? They’ve been kind of off and on. I’m not sure what’s going to happen there. What was your relationship with the Maravillas salvagers, Humphreys and them? Did you assist them in any way numismatically? I attributed the coins and cleaned them. Very interesting story, how I got involved with them. Herbo Humphreys sent John de Bry a box of jewelry coins they were going to sell for about $100 apiece. John gave them to me to attribute. I found one coin there worth about $5000. I called Herbo Humphreys and said “do you really want to sell these for $100 apiece? I’ll buy them all. I got one coin in here that is worth four or five thousand dollars.” He says “you’re kidding!” He flew me up there, and I sold the coin for him the next day. [Laughing] So did you get to buy the whole box for $100 each? No. About 40 coins, half of them were worth two-three hundred dollars. What role have you taken in marketing over the years for the various shipwreck coins you’ve handled. I’ve worked with Stack’s, Henry Christensen, Ponterio, Frank and Dan Sedwick. Of course! It pays to know what you’re doing and know the right people to deal with, I guess. That’s for sure. I’m sure a lot of divers over the years have depended on your connections. I’ve enjoyed it. Still work with Dan Sedwick a lot [laughs]. Do you miss the diving much? Was that one of your favorite aspects? Yeah I do miss the diving. It sounds like camaraderie with the Real Eight gentlemen was also quite enjoyable. Sure was. Can you think of anything else you want to add, any other stories? Coins are the history of mankind. Every South and Central American cob tells an interesting story of our early history. It’s been a very interesting adventure, more than most people get to do. I was lucky. I met Kip…we had a lot of fun diving on the wrecks. Back in those days…when Kip and the others were involved…made it very pleasant. For four of five years we just enjoyed our weekends diving. Our wives put up with a lot. My parents lived down in Sebastian. We’d drop my wife off with two kids…then we went diving,

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LU: DFS: LU: DFS:

and we’d come back and they’d have supper all ready for us. Did your children ever have any interest in diving? Not really. It’s interesting, my daughter says “wish I’d have been interested,” she’s interested now! One other story I’ll tell you: National Geographic came to us to do an article, and we pulled about a million dollars’ worth of stuff out of the bank. And Helen’s [Lou’s wife] brother, Jimmy, visited us, and we put him the spare bedroom and we didn’t tell him that underneath the bed we put a million dollars’ worth of gold and silver. The next morning when he woke we said, “was the bed lumpy?” “A little bit.” I said, “well, it was all the gold bars and silver coins….” He still talks about that! A new twist to the Princess and the Pea! He couldn’t believe we had all this gold and silver stuck around the house. Yeah. It’s hard for people to conceive, sometimes, the staggering value of the material that has come up over the years. Another time, at Dan’s [Thompson] house, we found about 1500 gold coins one day, and it was too late to put them in the bank…so Dan got out a card table in his and his wife’s bedroom, piled all the coins on the bed and on the card table. I told him “let’s go to my home and get some supper,” I was hungry. Went home, ate supper. Jane, Dan’s wife, went into the bedroom, turned on the light, and a pile of gold was glistening at her! She couldn’t understand how I could go home and eat supper and leave all the gold coins lying around. Well, that is kind of risky! What have you done for security over the years? Keep quiet. Keep quiet and low profile? Yes. And big dogs, I guess [laughing]. True. [Lou and his wife have two big German shepherds, who mingled with us throughout the interview.] I have an associate who told me his method of security is that he lives with his family only at the top of a mountain in Oregon and they have large dogs and that’s all they’ve ever needed for security. I keep everything in the bank. Yeah, that’s the best thing. Enjoyed talking to you. I’ve enjoyed having the pleasure of the interview. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a long time.

Lou Ullian (left) with Dan Sedwick

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Dave Crooks This auction presents the first of what we hope will be many consignments of duplicates from the vast treasure library of David S. Crooks, whose Bibliographies (Bibliography of Sunken Treasure Books and Bibliography of Important Shipwreck Auction Catalogs) and website (www.sunkentreasurebooks.com) have been invaluable resources for collectors of treasurerelated media.

The Key West stint lasted two years, but in that time Dave got quite a start on his personal library of treasure-related books. Since then, his holdings have surpassed some 2000 books! Since the Key West days, Dave found his niche in business, after working for various large companies here and in Australia. In 1997 Dave began Easy Pay Solutions, Inc., a credit card-processing company, and is currently its president. He lives with his family in the suburbs of Chicago, where he is the Illinois admissions representative for the College of William and Mary, from which he graduated with a law degree and MBA. He is also a scoutmaster and an avid backpacker.

Dave’s interest in treasure began in 1974, when a post-collegiate dive-trip to the Florida Keys turned into an enviable jump-start in the business world. It was at the Half Shell Raw Bar in Key West that Dave found himself conversing with none other than Mel Fisher, who soon offered him a job. By the end of that year, Dave would become Vice President of Treasure Salvors, Inc.

Bruce Prior / Kelly Tarlton In our last sale we featured the shipwreck coin collection of Australian numismatist Bruce Prior, whose biography can be found in that catalog. For this sale we were honored to accept Bruce’s wonderful treasure library for consignment. This library, consisting of some 200+ books and auction catalogs, was assembled with a perspective you don’t see over here, that of a native Australian! Many of the books are from authors and publishers who are literally on the other side of the world from us here in the States—in some cases these books are harder to get than coins or artifacts from the shipwrecks they describe!

as a diver came from several projects around New Zealand, particularly the salvage of the Elingamite (1902) in 1968 in collaboration with Wade Doak and others. Kelly also worked with divers in other parts of the world, including (briefly) Mel Fisher in the 1970s. In 1985 Kelly died from heart problems. He was 57.

A major and noteworthy portion of Bruce’s library came from the Museum of Shipwrecks in Paihia, New Zealand, run by that country’s most famous salvager, the late Kelly Tarlton. Kelly’s fame

Kelly had opened his museum in 1970 in an old sailing ship that was beached near the Waitangi River. After his death the museum continued until his family sold it and the ship in 2002, at which point Kelly’s library quietly went up for auction, an opportunity Bruce Prior could not resist! Curiously, most of the books from Kelly’s museum were inscribed (presumably by Kelly himself) with “Please return to Kelly Tarlton Shipwreck Museum” with a mailing address, as it appears his library was more public than private.

Bruce Prior

Kelly Tarlton, ca. 1968 (from The Elingamite and its Treasure, lot #551 in this sale)

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SHIPWRECK (AND HOARD) HISTORIES Throughout this catalog we offer coins and artifacts from dozens of different shipwrecks—“treasure” in the truest sense! While we did not want to break up the flow of the catalog in the listings, we did want to offer a bit of history behind each wreck concerned, so we present these histories here on the following pages in chronological order. Please feel free to contact us for more information about any of these wrecks or about shipwrecks or treasure in general. “Tumbaga wreck,” sunk ca. 1528 off Grand Bahama Island Before there were coins, before there were Spanish Treasure Fleets, and even before there were any kind of colonies in the Spanish Main, the conquistador Hernán Cortés and his men discovered treasure in the form of native-American gold and silver artifacts. While it is a shame that these artifacts no longer exist, at least their onetime presence is confirmed by what have become known as “tumbaga” bars: a group of over 200 silver and gold ingots discovered in the remains of an unidentified ca.-1528 shipwreck off Grand Bahama Island. The artifacts that composed these bars were apparently lumped together in two piles—one for gold-colored artifacts and the other for silver-colored artifacts—with great amounts of impurities (predominantly copper) in each pile. The piles were then melted as much as possible (not thoroughly) and poured into crude molds that in some cases were no more than depressions in the sand. The resulting ingots, called “tumbaga” bars, were then stamped with four types of markings: 1. Assayer, many in the form of BV with “~” over the B and “o” over the V, possibly signifying Bernardino Vasquez, one of Cortés’ fellow conquistadors. 2. Fineness, marked in Roman numerals as a percentage of 2400. 3. Serial number, usually in the form of the letter R followed by Roman numerals. 4. Tax stamp, part of a circular seal whose legend (pieced together) reads CAROLVS QVINTVS IMPERATOR for Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1995 we had the great fortune to purchase 133 silver bars from this wreck, which divers had excavated in 1992. These 133 silver bars represented a corner on the market, as the rest of the bars found (including all the gold bars) were either sold at auction or doled out to company officials and contractors well before we made our large purchase. Each bar is described in detail in the 1993 book Tumbaga Silver for Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire, by Douglas Armstrong, a professional conservator hired by the salvage company to clean and preserve all the silver “tumbaga” bars.

“Golden Fleece wreck,” sunk ca. 1550 in the northern Caribbean This wreck was nicknamed for a royal stamping (“Golden Fleece”) on several of the gold “finger” bars (ingots) it yielded. Except for a handful of extremely rare Santo Domingo pieces, all the coins from this wreck were Mexican Carlos-Juana silver coins (all assayers prior to S), including several rarities, the most important being three specimens of the Rincón “Early Series” 8 reales of 1538, the very first 8 reales ever struck in the New World (the best of which achieved a record in 2006 for the highest amount ever paid at auction for a Spanish colonial coin: $373,750!). To date the finders of the wreck have not identified the wreck or disclosed its exact location, but they have gone on record as stating it was in international waters in the northern Caribbean. Though it was a relatively small find (a few thousand coins at most), it has been the primary source for Mexican Carlos-Juana coins on the market since the mid-1990s. Perhaps more impressive than the coins from this wreck are the few dozen gold and silver ingots it has yielded, all of which have entered the market exclusively through Daniel Frank Sedwick. The varying purities of these bars are reminiscent of the “tumbaga” bars (see above), although the later gold ingots do seem to have been cast in somewhat standard shapes (“fingers”) and sizes. The silver ingots from this wreck, popularly known as “splashes,” were simply poured onto the ground, leaving a round, flat mound of silver that was subsequently stamped with a tax stamp (in the form of a crowned C for King Charles I) and/or a fineness in the usual block Roman numerals in parts per 2400, much like the karat system we use today. The gold ingots also show a fineness marking (but no tax stamps or other markings) in parts per 24, with a dot being a quarter karat. Silver or gold, many of the ingots from this wreck were cut into two or more parts, presumably to divide into separate accounts. We believe these “Golden Fleece wreck” ingots are the only known examples made in the colonies between the “tumbaga” period of the 1520s and the specimens found on the 1554 Fleet at Padre Island, Texas (note, in fact, that the very few gold bars recovered from the Texas wrecks were marked with the same punches as some of the gold bars from this slightly later wreck).

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San Martín, sunk in 1618 off Vero Beach, Florida Known locally as the “Green Cabin wreck,” the San Martín, sunk in a storm on its way to Spain from Havana, was the almiranta of the Honduran Fleet of 1618. As that Fleet was nowhere near the size of the fleets from Mexico and South America, the San Martín was not carrying a large amount of coins or other treasure, most of which was salvaged by the Spanish after the sinking anyway. Modern salvage efforts on the site since the 1960s, as well as finds on the beach opposite the wreck, have yielded a few Mexican and Potosi cobs in generally poor condition. Atocha, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida Arguably the most famous of all Spanish galleons salvaged in our time, the Atocha was the almiranta of the 1622 Fleet, which left Havana several weeks late and soon ran into a hurricane. Eight ships of the 28-ship fleet were lost, wrecked on the reefs between the Dry Tortugas and the Florida Keys or sunk in deeper water. Five people survived the sinking of the Atocha and were saved by another vessel, but the wreck itself was scattered after another hurricane hit the site exactly one month later, so the Spanish were never able to salvage what was one of the richest galleons ever to sail. The cargo of the Atocha did not see light again until 1971 when the first coins were found by the nowfamous salvager Mel Fisher and his divers, who recovered the bulk of the treasure in 1985 and thereby unleashed the largest supply of silver cobs and ingots the market has ever seen. Well over 100,000 shield-type cobs were found in all denominations above the half real, the great majority of them from Potosí, as were also the approximately 1,000 silver ingots (most the size of bread loaves). A handful of gold cobs (1 and 2 escudos only) were also recovered, mostly from mainland Spanish mints but also a few from Colombia—officially the first gold coins ever struck in the New World. The Atocha was also the source for most (if not all) of the first silver cobs struck in Colombia, as well as a few early coins from Mexico, Lima and Spain, and even Panama. Even more significant were the many gold ingots, jewelry items, emeralds and other artifacts. Because of Mel Fisher’s huge publicity, and because much of the treasure was distributed to investors at high ratios compared to their investment amounts, the coins from the Atocha have always sold for much more— anywhere from two times to ten times—than their nonsalvage counterparts, even in the numismatic market. (The “glamour market” in tourist areas, by contrast, elevates these coins to as much as twenty times their base numismatic value!) Individually numbered certificates with photos of each coin are critical to the retention of an Atocha coin’s higher value. Accompanying barcode-tags with the coins also make it possible to replace lost

certificates through a database system at the Fisher operations in Key West. Each certificate (with some exceptions) also specifies the coin’s Grade, from 1 (highest) to 4 (lowest), a highly subjective evaluation of corrosive damage and overall quality. Most Atocha silver coins are also recognizable by their shiny brightness, the result of a somewhat controversial cleaning and polishing process catering more to jewelry demand than to serious numismatists. Santa Margarita, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida From the same hurricane-stricken 1622 Fleet as the Atocha (above), the Santa Margarita sank on a reef within sight of the Atocha and was found in 1626 by Spanish salvagers, who recovered only roughly half its treasure. The other half was found by Mel Fisher and company in 1980. Margarita’s treasures were similar to those found on the Atocha, yet with fewer coins in comparatively worse condition overall (yet not as harshly cleaned). As with Atocha coins, original Fisher certificates are critical to the premium value for these coins, which is on par with Atocha coins. Early-1630s hoard in southern Peru Earlier this year (2007) a well-known numismatic supplier from Peru started bringing hundreds of Potosí cobs (mostly 8R but also some 4R and a smattering of smaller denominations) that had a tell-tale patina in common with each other and similar dates, a sure sign of a hoard. The latest date in this hoard was 1632, but most of the coins date to 1626-1629, a very interesting period in Potosí’s numismatic history, as the 1626’s and 1627’s are rare and in 1629 there was a transition in style. The supplier admits that they all come from one source in southern Peru, but unfortunately that is all we know. Like most hoard coins, all of these cobs are in high grade. Concepción, sunk in 1641 off the northeast coast of Hispaniola The Concepción was one of the most significant Spanish wrecks of all time, serving the Spanish with a loss of over 100 tons of silver and gold treasure. The almiranta of a 21-ship fleet, the Concepción was already in poor repair when the Europe-bound fleet encountered a storm in September, leaving her disabled and navigating under makeshift sails amid disagreement among its pilots about their location. Weeks later, she grounded on a reef in an area now named the Silver Shoals, just to the east of another shoal known as the Abrojos, which the pilots were trying to avoid. After another storm hit the wrecked ship and the admiral and officers left in the ship’s only longboat, the remaining crew resorted to building rafts from the ship’s timbers. Survivors’ accounts pointed to

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drowning, starvation and even sharks for the loss of around 300 casualties. In the fallout that ensued, none of the survivors could report the wreck’s location with accuracy, so it sat undisturbed until New England’s William Phipps found it in 1687 and brought home tons of silver and some gold, to the delight of his English backers. The Concepción was found again in 1978 by Burt Webber, Jr., whose divers recovered some 60,000 silver cobs, mostly Mexican 8 and 4 reales but also some Potosí and rare Colombian cobs (including more from the Cartagena mint than had been found on any other shipwreck). Unlike the Maravillas of just 15 years later, however, the Concepción did not give up any gold cobs in our time, and any significant artifacts found were retained by the government of the Dominican Republic, who oversaw the salvage. The bulk of the silver cobs found on the Concepción were heavily promoted, even in department stores! The site is still being worked from time to time with limited success.

cobs of 1653-1654, many in excellent condition and expertly conserved. As an interesting footnote, the very coins salvaged from the Capitana by the Spanish in 1654 were lost again on the Maravillas wreck of 1656 (see next), and some of those coins salvaged from the Maravillas were lost again in the wreck of the salvage vessel Madama do Brasil off Gorda Cay (Bahamas) in 1657. Furthering Spain’s woes was the destruction of another treasure fleet in 1657 by English marauders (fresh off a victory in the Bay of Cádiz) off Santa Cruz on the island of Tenerife in the Canary Islands. Maravillas, sunk in 1656 off Grand Bahama Island As the almiranta (“admiral’s ship,” or rear guard) of the homebound Spanish fleet in January of 1656, the Nuestra Señora de las Maravillas was officially filled with over five million pesos of treasure (and probably much more in contraband, as was usually the case). That treasure included much of the silver salvaged from the South Seas Fleet’s Capitana of 1654 that wrecked on Chanduy Reef off Ecuador (see above). The ill-fated treasure sank once again when the Maravillas unexpectedly ran into shallow water and was subsequently rammed by one of the other ships of its fleet, forcing the captain to try to ground the Maravillas on a nearby reef on Little Bahama Bank off Grand Bahama Island. In the ensuing chaos, exacerbated by strong winds, most of the 650 people on board the ship died in the night, and the wreckage scattered. Spanish salvagers soon recovered almost half a million pesos of treasure quickly, followed by more recoveries over the next several decades, yet with over half of the official cargo still unfound. The first re-discovery of the Maravillas in the 20th century was by Robert Marx and his company Seafinders in 1972, whose finds were featured in an auction by Schulman in New York in 1974. Included among the coins in this sale were some previously unknown Cartagena silver cobs of 1655 and countermarked Potosí coinage of 1649-1651 and 1652 Transitionals, in addition to many Mexican silver cobs and a few Bogotá cob 2 escudos. The second big salvage effort on the Maravillas was by Herbert Humphreys and his company Marex in the late 1980s and early 1990s, resulting in two big sales by Christie’s (London) in 1992 and 1993, featuring many Bogotá cob 2 escudos, in addition to more Mexico and Potosí silver cobs and several important artifacts. The most recent sale of Maravillas finds, presumably from one of the many salvage efforts from the 1970s and 1980s, took place in California in 2005, again with a good quantity of Bogotá cob 2 escudos. The wreck area is still being searched today, but officially the Bahamian government has not granted any leases on the site since the early 1990s. It is possible the bulk of the treasure is still to be found!

Capitana (Jesús María de la Limpia Concepción), sunk in 1654 off Chanduy, Ecuador This wreck was the largest loss ever experienced by the Spanish South Seas (Pacific) Fleet, of which the Jesus María de la Limpia Concepción was the capitana (“captain’s ship,” or lead vessel) in 1654. Official records reported the loss of 3 million pesos of silver (2,212 ingots, 216 chests of coins, and 22 boxes of wrought silver), augmented to a total of as much as 10 million pesos when contraband and private consignments were taken into account. By comparison, the entire annual silver production in Peru at that time was only about 6-7 million pesos! Obviously overloaded, technically the Capitana sank due to pilot error, which drove the ship onto the reefs south of the peninsula known as Punta Santa Elena, a geographic feature the pilot thought he had cleared. Twenty people died in the disaster. For eight years afterward, Spanish salvagers officially recovered over 3 million pesos of coins and bullion (with probably much more recovered off the record), leaving only an unreachable lower section for divers to find in our time. Ironically, the main salvager of the Capitana in the 1650s and early 1660s was none other than the ship’s silvermaster, Bernardo de Campos, whose fault it was that the ship was overloaded with contraband in the first place! The wreck was rediscovered in the mid-1990s and salvaged (completely, according to some) in 1997. After a 50-50 split with the Ecuadorian government in 1998, investors placed most of their half of the more than 5,000 coins recovered up for sale at auction in 1999. Almost exclusively Potosí 8 and 4 reales, the coins were a healthy mix of countermarked issues of 1649-1652, transitional issues of 1652, and post-transitional pillars-and-waves

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Vergulde Draeck (“Gilt Dragon”), sunk in 1656 off Western Australia Much has been written about the loss and salvage of this Dutch East India Company trading vessel (known as an East Indiaman), which some consider to be Australia’s counterpart to Florida’s 1715 Fleet in terms of availability of reasonably priced cobs for collectors. In contrast to the Spanish treasure wrecks, however, the Vergulde Draeck carried only a modest amount of just silver cobs (eight chests totaling 45,950 coins), mostly Mexican but also some cobs from Potosí and Spain as well as some Colombian rarities. The ship was on its way from the Netherlands to Batavia (modern-day Jakarta, Indonesia) when suddenly it found itself wrecked on a reef some three miles from land in the early morning hours of April 28, 1656. Only 75 of the 193 people on board were able to reach the shore, and seven of them soon left in the ship’s pinnace to seek help in Batavia. When authorities there learned of the wreck, several attempts were made to rescue the other survivors and, more importantly, the eight chests of treasure, but no sign of the wreck or survivors was ever found. The wreck remained undiscovered until 1963, when spear-fishermen stumbled upon it and began to recover coins and artifacts. Salvage efforts to date, mostly under the supervision of the Western Australian Museum, whose certificates often accompany the coins (and carry a small premium), have yielded only about half of the total coins officially recorded to be on board this ship.

been modest, mostly low-end silver cobs of Mexico and Potosi, plus a good amount of the rare 1659 “Star of Lima” coinage, but also a couple Bogotá gold cobs and some rare Cartagena silver cobs, all sold through various dealers and private transactions. If the hull of the ship is ever found, as the salvagers think it will be, the market may finally see some of the gold cobs of the “Star of Lima” issue of 1659. Unidentified ca.-1671 wreck in Seville harbor, Spain The city of Seville is situated on the Guadalquivir River, about 50 miles inland from the ocean port of Cádiz, where treasure from the New World arrived on sea-going galleons. From there the treasure went on to Seville, up the river by boat. Sometime in 1671 it is believed one of these boats outside Seville sank, or at least its treasure was lost there somehow in the river, for in the mid-1990s a large hoard of obviously salvaged silver cob 8 and 4 reales of Potosi, none dated later than 1671, and mostly in decent condition, began to emerge from markets in Spain without provenance but reportedly found in Seville Harbor during the installation of a fiber-optic cable across the river. It should be noted that the same type of coins (with characteristics identical to those from the Seville wreck) have been sold in recent years as having come from the “Señorita de Santa Cristina” of 1672 off Cádiz, but we can find no record of this ship or its salvage. Consolación (“Isla de Muerto shipwreck”), sunk in 1681 off Santa Clara Island, Ecuador When salvage first began on this wreck in 1997, it was initially believed to be the Santa Cruz and later called El Salvador y San José, sunk in August of 1680; but research by Robert Marx after the main find in subsequent years confirmed its proper name and illuminated its fascinating history. Intended to be part of the Spanish “South Seas Fleet” of 1681, which left Lima’s port of Callao in April, the Consolación apparently was delayed and ended up traveling alone. At the Gulf of Guayaquil, off modern-day Ecuador, the Consolación encountered English pirates, led by Bartholomew Sharpe, who forced the Spanish galleon to sink on a reef off Santa Clara Island (later nicknamed “Isla de Muerto,” or Dead Man’s Island). Before the pirates could get to the ship, the crew set fire to her and tried to escape to the nearby island without success. Angered by the inability to seize the valuable cargo of the Consolación, Sharpe’s men killed the Spaniards and tried in vain to recover the treasure through the efforts of local fishermen. Spanish attempts after that were also fruitless, so the treasure of the Consolación sat undisturbed until our time. When vast amounts of silver coins were found in the area starting in the 1990s, eventually under agreement between local entrepreneurs Roberto Aguirre and Carlos

San Miguel el Arcángel (“Jupiter wreck”), sunk in 1659 off Jupiter, Florida As well known as this wreck has become among the Florida treasure community and shipwreck collectors around the world, surprisingly little has been written about it, and not one major auction has been dedicated to its finds. The San Miguel was not a big treasure galleon in a huge convoy; rather, she was a lone aviso, a smaller ship for carrying letters and other communications quickly back to Spain. But unlike most avisos, the San Miguel did end up carrying some important treasure, as it was in the right time and place to take on samples of the unauthorized “Star of Lima” coinage of 1659 for the King to see. In October, off the southeast coast of Florida, the San Miguel encountered a hurricane, grounded on a sandbar, and broke apart rapidly, leaving only 34 survivors among the 121 people originally on board. Those survivors were all quickly captured by natives (Ais) and therefore had no opportunity to salvage the scattered wreck. Today only parts of the wreck of the San Miguel have been found, discovered by lifeguard Peter Leo in 1987, in about 10 to 20 feet of water and under as much as 20 feet of sand. Salvage is ongoing. Besides a couple of gold ingots and one large silver ingot, the yield to date has

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Saavedra (“ROBCAR”) and the government of Ecuador in 1997, the exact name and history of the wreck were unknown, and about 8,000 of the coins (all Potosí silver cobs) were subsequently sold at auction by Spink New York in December, 2001, as simply “Treasures from the ‘Isla de Muerto’”. Most of the coins offered were of low quality and poorly preserved but came with individually numbered photo-certificates. Later, after the provenance had been properly researched, and utilizing better conservation methods, a Florida syndicate arranged to have ongoing finds from this wreck permanently encapsulated in hard-plastic holders by the authentication and grading firm ANACS, with the wreck provenance clearly stated inside the “slab”; more recent offerings have bypassed this encapsulation. Ongoing salvage efforts have good reason to be hopeful, as the manifest of the Consolación stated the value of her registered cargo as 146,000 pesos in silver coins in addition to silver and gold ingots, plus an even higher sum in contraband, according to custom.

thin and nearly featureless, but without the heavy encrustation and pitting that characterize Caribbean finds. Association, sunk in 1707 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England The sinking of this ship and four others in a fleet of 21 returning from the Mediterranean was one of the worst British naval disasters of all time. The Association sank on October 22 under stormy conditions after what can only be described as guesswork navigation that led the ships straight onto the rocks of the Scilly Isles, where as many as 2,000 sailors lost their lives as a result. The admiral of the fleet, Sir Cloudisley Shovell, whose ten chests of personal wealth (in addition to several others) were rumored to be aboard the Association, was one of the casualties of the sinking, although legend has it he reached shore alive, only to be murdered there by a local woman for a ring on his finger. The wrecksite was located in 1967 by British Navy divers, touching off a frenzy of activity on the site for years to come. Cannons and a few coins were raised in the 1960s, but it was not till 1973 that a significant amount of coins were found (8,000 in that year alone). These coins, mostly British silver and gold but also many Spanish and Spanish-American silver cobs, were sold at auction beginning in 1969 and into the early 1970s. The cobs presented an eclectic mix, mostly 8 reales from the 1650s forward (even a “Royal” presentation issue from 1676!), but from nearly all mints (especially Lima and Potosí), some even left in as-found conglomerate form combined with British coins. It is interesting to note that parts of this wreck, like others in the area, were flattened hard to the muddy sea floor by huge boulders that still roll around with the currents, making for dangerous and difficult salvage!

“Porto Bello wreck,” sunk in 1681 or 1682 off Porto Bello, Panama According to Robert Marx, a storm in 1681 sank three ships of the Spanish Caribbean Fleet: Chaperón (sunk in the mouth of the Chagres River), Boticaria (sunk off Isla de Naranjas), and an unidentified galleon (sunk off Punta de Brujas). More recent articles, however, give the date of the disaster as 1682. There is also confusion about which wrecksite belongs to which ship of the Fleet; for example, the sword blades in this current auction supposedly came from Chaperon, but our records indicate that the source was probably the Boticaria. Most often the artifacts are attributed to simply the 1681 Fleet or the “Porto Bello wreck.” Joanna, sunk in 1682 off Cape Town, South Africa An English East Indiaman on her way to Surat on the west coast of India, the Joanna separated from her convoy and sank in rough seas on a reef off the southernmost tip of South Africa on June 8, 1682, sending 10 people to their death. Eventually, 104 survivors reached the Dutch colony of Cape Town, from which a salvage party was soon dispatched. The Joanna’s cargo consisted of 70 chests of silver coins, of which the salvage party reported having recovered only about 28,000 guilders’ worth. In 1982 the wreck was re-discovered by a group of South African divers led by Gavin Clackworthy, who brought up silver ingots (discs) and over 23,000 silver cobs, most of them Mexican 4 and 8 reales of Charles II in generally low grade, but a few showing bold, formerly very rare dates 1679-1681. Over the past two decades these cobs have entered the market from both private dealers and auctions, but always in relatively small quantities at a time. Almost all the coins are in very worn condition, usually

1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida The Spanish 1715-Fleet disaster was probably the greatest to befall any of the Spanish treasure fleets in terms of casualties and money, with reports of a loss of 14 million pesos (plus an equal or greater amount in contraband) and as many as 1,000 or more lives. The modern salvage of this fleet, begun in the early 1960s and ongoing today, has been the largest single source of gold cobs ever in the numismatic market, turning former rarities and unknown issues into collectible and popular (albeit still expensive) commodities. In typical fashion, the 1715 Fleet was a case of overloaded Spanish galleons foundering in a hurricane after delayed departure, but on a larger scale than anything before. The principal elements of the fleet, known as the Nueva España (New Spain, i.e., Mexico) Fleet, had gone to Veracruz in Mexico to deliver mercury (an essential substance in the refining of silver cobs), sell merchandise,

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and pick up quantities of Mexican-minted bars and cobs. An unfortunate series of complications kept the fleet in Veracruz for two whole years before it could rendezvous in Havana with the vessels of the Tierra Firme (Mainland) Fleet, bearing the Peruvian and Colombian treasure brought from Panama and Cartagena. After still more delays in Havana, what was ultimately a twelve- or thirteen-ship convoy (depending on which account you prefer) did not manage to depart for Spain until July 24, 1715, well into hurricane season. The trip back to Spain was to be the routine one: up the coast of Florida on the Gulf Stream, which gradually turns outward into and across the Atlantic at about the location where the fleet was lost. On the 30th of July, the fleet encountered a hurricane, driving the ships shoreward. Some of the ships sank in deep water, some broke up in shallower water, and others ran aground close to the beach, while a lone vessel, the tag-along French ship Grifón, sailed onward without incident. Hundreds of the crews and passengers lost their lives while other hundreds of survivors improvised a camp on shore to await aid from the Spanish fort at St. Augustine, to which a party was sent. Ultimately news of the disaster reached Havana, whence salvage ships were dispatched to the scene. The Spaniards undertook salvage operations for several years, with the help of Indians, and they recovered nearly half of the vast treasure (at least the registered part), from the holds of ships whose remains rested in water sufficiently shallow for breath-holding divers. Gradually the salvagers enlarged their encampment and built a storehouse on the spit of dune land just behind the beach that bordered a jungle. In 1716 a flotilla of British freebooters under Henry Jennings appeared on the scene, raided the storehouse, and carried off some 350,000 pesos of the treasure to Jamaica. The Spaniards, however, resumed operations until they could salvage no more and quit in 1719. The rest of the treasure remained on the ocean floor until our time. Modern salvage on the 1715 Fleet began in the late 1950s, when local resident Kip Wagner found a piece of eight on the beach after a hurricane and decided to pursue the source. With the help of a 1774 chart and an armysurplus metal detector, he located the original Spanish salvage camp and unearthed coins and artifacts. Then using a rented airplane to spot the underwater wrecksite from the air and check the location again by boat, Kip found the source of the coins and soon formed a team of divers and associates backed by a salvage permit from the State of Florida. All of this took place over a period of years before it evolved into the Real Eight Company, the origin of whose name is obvious. To salvage the wreck, the Real Eight divers originally used a dredge and suction apparatus; only later did they adopt the use of a propwash-blower (known as a

“mailbox”) developed by their subcontractor Mel Fisher. Eventually they found gold jewels, Chinese porcelain, silverware, gold and silver ingots, and as many as 10,000 gold cobs of the Mexico, Peru, and Colombia mints; and, mostly in encrusted clusters, well over 100,000 silver cobs of all denominations. The salvaged coins were all cobs, both gold (Mexico, Bogotá, Lima, and Cuzco) and silver (mostly Mexico but also some Lima and Potosi), minted primarily between 1711 and 1715, although numerous earlier dates were represented too, some of the dates extending well back into the 1600s. Many of the dates and types of the 1700-1715 period had been either rare or unknown prior to the salvage of the 1715 Fleet. The gold coins, as can be expected, have been generally pristine, as have been some of the silver coins, but most silver cobs from the 1715 Fleet are at least somewhat corroded, some no more than thin, featureless slivers. Every denomination of cob made in silver and gold, with the exception of the quarter real (which was not minted past the very early 1600s), has been found on the 1715 Fleet, as well as several different denominations of round “Royal” presentation issues. Promotions of the coins by Real Eight and others have spanned the decades, in addition to auctions by Henry Christensen (1964); Parke-Bernet Galleries (1967) and Sotheby Parke Bernet (1973); the Schulman Coin and Mint (1972 and 1974); Bowers and Ruddy Galleries (1977); and even the U.S. Customs Service (2003). The demand for these coins over the years has steadily risen while the supply of new finds has dwindled. As the salvage operation on the 1715 Fleet reached diminishing returns, some of the associates like Mel Fisher headed for Key West and other areas to search for new wrecks. Do not believe, however, that the 1715-Fleet search is over. As many as five or six of the twelve or thirteen galleons remain undiscovered, search areas are still leased from the state, and even the old wreck sites continue to relinquish a few coins to an insatiable numismatic market. Even the beaches themselves yield fabulous finds (one gold “Royal” 8 escudos—a six-figure bonanza in our day—was found on the beach by a metal detectorist in 1989), especially after direct-hit hurricanes like Frances and Jeanne, which devastated the treasure beaches in rapid succession in the summer of 2004. Much of the finds stays in the hands of locals throughout the State of Florida—divers, beachcombers, and old-time collectors who love their cobs and sell only when they must. The one collector that never sells is also the one with the largest collection of them all—the museum of the State of Florida. Spain lost it all to America, whence it came. Despite a wealth of publications pertaining to the 1715 Fleet with names of the ships and the known locations of some of the wrecks, there is no universal agreement as to the identity of the vessel at each wrecksite.

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In many cases, in fact, it is possible that separate wrecksites represent different parts of the same ship. As a result, salvagers over the decades have resorted to nicknames for the sites based on landmarks, local individuals, and even features from the wrecks themselves, such as (from north to south): “Pines” (Sebastian), “Cabin” (Wabasso), “Cannon” (Wabasso), “Corrigan’s” (Vero Beach), “Rio Mar” (Vero Beach), “Sandy Point” (Vero Beach), “Wedge” (Fort Pierce), and “Colored Beach” (Fort Pierce). (Case in point: In this very catalog you will see items alternately certified as from the “Corrigans site” and the “Regla site,” which are one and the same.) Traditionally the range of sites extends from south of Fort Pierce up to just south of Melbourne in the north, but rumors of 1715-Fleet finds as far north as Cape Canaveral, New Smyrna Beach and even Fernandina Beach (near Jacksonville) may have merit. Regardless of the exact site of origin, a great majority of the coins are sold simply as “1715 Fleet.” “Ca Mau wreck,” sunk ca. 1723-35 off Ca Mau Island, Vietnam This unidentified Chinese wreck in the South China Sea yielded thousands of Ch’ing Dynasty export porcelain manufactured under the Emperor K’ang Hsi. The finds were first offered at auction by Christie’s in 1998, but anonymously; more recently the government of Vietnam has auctioned off a major portion of the porcelains. These porcelains are quite popular among collectors of Spanish Fleet items because they are identical to the K’ang Hsi material from the Florida wrecks of 1715 and 1733.

Angustias, El Sueco de Arizón, San Fernando, and San Ignacio. This last ship, San Ignacio, is believed to be the source of many silver coins (and even some gold coins) found in a reef area off Deer Key known as “Coffins Patch,” the southwesternmost of all the 1733-Fleet wrecksites. In addition, many other related sites are known, mostly the wrecks of tag-along ships that accompanied the fleet proper. The first and arguably most famous of the wrecks of the 1733 Fleet to be located in modern times was the Capitana El Rubí, which was discovered in 1948 and salvaged principally in the 1950s by Art McKee, whose Sunken Treasure Museum on Plantation Key housed his finds for all to see. Throughout the next several decades, however, the wrecksites in the Keys became a virtual freefor-all, with many disputes and confrontations, until the government created the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary in 1990. The removal of artifacts from any of the sites is prohibited today. In contrast to the 1715 Fleet, and because of the extensive Spanish salvage in the 1730s, the finds by modern divers have been modest, especially in gold coins, of which there are far more fakes on the market than genuine specimens! Nevertheless, the 1733 Fleet has been a significant source for some of the rare Mexican milled “pillar dollars” of 1732-1733 as well as the transitional “klippe”-type coins of 1733. Vliegenthart, sunk in 1735 off Zeeland, the Netherlands The East Indiaman Vliegenthart (“Flying Hart” in Dutch) had just departed Rammekens for the East Indies when the deadly combination of a northeast gale, a spring tide and pilot error sent her into a sand bank behind her sister-ship Anna Catharina. The latter ship broke apart in the storm while the Vliegenthart, damaged and firing her cannons in distress, slipped off the bank and sank in 10 fathoms of water. All hands on both ships were lost. Contemporaneous salvage under contract with the Dutch East India Company was unsuccessful, but it did provide a piece of evidence—a secret map—that did not emerge from obscurity until 1977. Stemming from that, divers under the former London attorney Rex Cowan discovered the wreck in 1981, and in 1983 they found their first coins, one of three chests of Mexican silver and Dutch gold coins (totaling 67,000 guilders or dollar-sized units) for the East India trade aboard the Vliegenthart. The second chest was smashed on the seabed and its contents partially salvaged, while the third chest, intact like the first, came up in 1992. The divers also recovered several smaller boxes of large Dutch silver coins known as “ducatoons,” illegally exported and therefore contraband. Among the silver coins found were thousands of Mexican cobs, predominantly 8 reales, many with clear dates in the early 1730s and in excellent condition.

1733 Fleet, Florida Keys Much like the 1715-Fleet disaster mentioned above, the 1733 Fleet was another entire Spanish convoy (except for one ship) lost in a hurricane off Florida. The lesser severity of the 1733 hurricane (which struck the fleet on July 15) and the shallowness of the wrecksites in the Keys, however, made for many survivors and even left four ships in good enough condition to be re-floated and sent back to Havana. A very successful salvage effort by the Spanish soon commenced, bringing up even more than the 12 million pesos of precious cargo on the Fleet’s manifest (thanks to the usual contraband). The wrecks themselves are spread across 80 miles, from north of Key Largo down to south of Duck Key, and include the following galleons (but note there is not universal agreement as to which wrecksite pertains to each galleon, and also note that each name is a contemporaneous abbreviation or nickname): El Pópulo, El Infante, San José, El Rubí (the capitana, or lead vessel of the fleet), Chávez, Herrera, Tres Puentes, San Pedro, El Terri (also spelled Lerri or Herri), San Francisco, El Gallo Indiano (the almiranta, or rear guard of the fleet), Las

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Rooswijk, sunk in 1739 off southeast England Off the southeastern tip of England, just north of the Straits of Dover, the sea hides a most unusual feature known as the Goodwin Sands, where sandbanks appear and disappear unpredictably and move with the tides. Many ships over the centuries have sunk here and silted over, and occasionally one of the wrecks will surface and be discovered. Such is the case with the Rooswijk, a Dutch East Indiaman that foundered on the Goodwin Sands in a storm on December 19, 1739, with all hands and 30 chests of treasure, virtually gone without a trace. By chance in December, 2004, the sands that had swallowed the wreck of the Rooswijk parted and allowed diver Ken Welling to retrieve two complete chests and hundreds of silver bars. Operating in secrecy, salvage continued in 2005 under the direction of Rex Cowan and in agreement with the Dutch and British governments and is ongoing today. So far, several hundred Mexican silver cobs of the 1720s and early 1730s and transitional “klippes” of 1733-1734, as well as many more hundreds of “pillar dollars” and a smattering of cobs from other mints, have hit the market from this wreck, mostly through auction.

Hollandia, sunk in 1743 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England Blown off course on her way to the East Indies, the Hollandia struck Gunner Rock and sank in about 110 feet of water about 1½ miles east of it on July 13, 1743. There were no survivors. The first sign of the wreck came in 1971, when divers under Rex Cowan located the wrecksite and within a couple years salvaged over 35,000 silver coins among the nearly 130,000 guilders (dollar-sized units) recorded to be on board the Hollandia. A great majority of the coins were Mexican “pillar dollars,” but there were also some silver cobs, including the scarce Mexican transitional “klippes” of 1733-1734 and a few Guatemala cobs, in mixed condition. “Ronson wreck,” sunk(?) ca. 1750 off Manhattan (New York City) This unidentified ship was discovered at 197 Water Street (two blocks from the East River) in lower Manhattan (New York City) and named for the owner of the site, Howard Ronson (also known as the “Water Street wreck”). Its excavation for the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1982 showed that the ship was a mid-18th-century British frigate—in fact, the only known British trading vessel from that era ever to be salvaged in North America. With three masts, about 100 feet long and 25 feet wide and at least 200 tons, this ship was probably built in Virginia or the Carolinas between 1710 and 1720 and used in the tobacco trade between the Chesapeake and England in the early 1700s before being buried in Manhattan for reasons unknown around 1750. Only the bow of the ship was preserved and can now be seen at the Mariner’s Museum in Newport News, Virginia. For more information, we recommend this website: http:// ina.tamu.edu/waterstreet/waterstreet.htm

Nuestra Señora de los Milagros, sunk in 1741 off the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico This merchant nao, whose nickname was El Matancero (due to the fact that she was built at Matanzas, Cuba), hit rocks and was smashed to pieces in minutes on February 22, 1741, near Acumal, Quintana Roo. The Milagros was not treasure wreck but did yield some 200,000 small artifacts to divers with CEDAM (Mexican Underwater Exploration Society) and Robert Marx in the late 1950s. Princess Louisa, sunk in 1743 off the Cape Verde Islands, west of Africa Laden with 20 chests (69,760 ounces) of Spanish silver, the East Indiaman Princess Louisa fell victim to surprise currents and inaccurate charts and struck a reef and sank off Isla de Maio in the early morning hours of April 18. 42 of the 116 people aboard floated to safety on the nearby island, but nothing on the ship could be saved. Contemporaneous salvage never came to fruition. In 1998 and 1999 the wrecksite was located and salvaged by the Arqueonautas firm, whose finds from this wreck have been largely marketed by a Houston coin and jewelry dealer ever since, but some coins were also sold at auction in 2000-2001. Most of the coins were New World silver cobs from all the mints that were operating in the early 1700s (including rare Bogotá cobs), predominantly minors (smaller than 8 reales), in average condition, with quite a few preserved in as-found multiple-coin clusters.

Geldermalsen (“Nanking Cargo”), sunk in 1752 in the South China Sea The Geldermalsen was a Dutch East India Company ship returning to Amsterdam with a cargo of over 160,000 porcelains and 145 gold ingots (in addition to tea and textiles) when she hit a reef and sank on January 3, 1752. In 1985 the wreck was found by Michael Hatcher, and the salvaged material was sold at auction by Christie’s Amsterdam in 1986 as the famous “Nanking Cargo.” Nuestra Señora del Rosario, sunk in 1753 off Montevideo, Uruguay The Rosario was reportedly carrying over 800,000 pesos of treasure on her way to Buenos Aires when she sank close to shore at the mouth of the Río de la Plata on June 30, 1753. All hands were saved, but the fate of the cargo is unknown. Recent finds of utilitarian items like

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spoons and buckles have trickled onto the market, but no high-value treasure so far. Dodington, sunk in 1755 off Port Elizabeth, South Africa (also “Clive of India treasure”) This shipwreck presents an amazing tale of survival and buried treasure, with a modern twist! Following the customary East India route, the Dodington outpaced her consorts and therefore was alone when her pilot followed an erroneous chart too closely and in the middle of the night she suddenly struck rocks and sank off present-day Bird Island off the east coast of South Africa. Of 270 people on board, 23 made it to the island, where they subsisted mostly on seagull eggs for over seven months while the ship’s carpenter crafted a rescue vessel. Meanwhile, at least a couple of the 10 chests of silver coins and the one chest of wrought silver on board the ship were recovered and buried, and the fate of each of those chests is not thoroughly known. There was also a chest of gold coins on behalf of the English military hero Lord Clive—more about that later. The survivors set off for Delagoa (Mozambique) and left behind an island that later became known for treasure-hunters and ghost stories. In the summer of 1977 the wreck of the Dodington was discovered by South African divers, who proceeded to bring up cannon and coins…but no gold. In the early to mid-1990s the wreck was revisited by another set of divers and yielded more silver coins and a smattering of gold, but nowhere near the 653+ oz. recorded to be in the chest when it was loaded onto the Dodington in 1755. What is believed to be the actual Clive’s gold (by composition and total weight) was supposedly recovered a few years later in a different area entirely, reportedly in the wreckage of a pirate ship somewhat further along the East India route. Nobody knows why Clive’s chest of gold was not on the Dodington site—either it was found by the survivors and buried on Bird Island to be picked up or absconded with later, or it was salvaged and taken away later in the 18th century. Because the link could not be proven entirely, and due to a protracted legal battle with the government of South Africa, this last group of gold coins was sold at auction in 2000 as simply the “Clive of India Treasure.” The composition of the silver-coin finds from the Dodington was mostly Mexican “pillar dollars” but with a good amount of Potosí and Lima cobs (predominantly smaller denominations) as well, mostly sea-worn and at least moderately corroded, sold through dealers and smaller auctions in the U.S. and Australia. The gold was all Portuguese/Brazilian. Tilbury, sunk in 1757 off Nova Scotia, Canada In an expedition against the French fortress at Louisbourg, the Tilbury was one of four ships (in a fleet of twenty) that were carrying a total of 34 chests of silver

coins when the fleet encountered a hurricane off the southeast coast of Cape Breton. The Tilbury and one of the non-coin-bearing ships, the smaller sloop Ferret, sank in the middle of the night on September 25, 1757. Two hundred eighty of the 400 men on board the Tilbury survived to become French prisoners; the other ship and its crew were lost without a trace. Famous diver and author Alex Storm (with Adrian Richards) located the bow section of the Tilbury in 1969 on a stretch of coastline known, appropriately enough, as “Tilbury Rocks,” where until the 1980s there was even a cannon from the wreck lying on shore for all to see. In 1986 divers Pierre LeClerc and Gilles Brisebois found what is believed to be the midsection of the ship farther offshore, and these divers recovered several hundred coins, many of which were auctioned in 1989. Most of the coins were silver pillar dollars, but there were also several silver cobs and even at least one gold cob among the finds. The missing stern section of the ship, where the bulk of the treasure was stored, is still to be found. Tounant, sunk in 1779 off Haiti Not much is known about this French ship except that she had fought for the United States in the Revolutionary War. She was not carrying treasure; most of the finds by wildcat divers over the years have been utilitarian items. HMS Bounty, scuttled by mutineers in 1790 off Pitcairn Island Perhaps no greater tale of mutiny at sea is more famous than that of the HMS Bounty in 1789. With a crew of 45 men she set sail in 1787, under Captain William Bligh, bound for Tahiti to collect breadfruit plants for planting in the West Indies as inexpensive sustenance for slaves. On the way back home in 1789, mutineers led by Fletcher Christian seized the Bounty and turned the ship back to the paradise they had just left in Tahiti (where, in fact, Christian had already been married to a native named Maimiti). Captain Bligh and 18 crewmembers were set adrift in an open boat but miraculously made it to civilization on Timor, a distance of over 3600 miles. After reaching Tahiti, the mutineers absconded with 18 natives (6 men and 12 women) and took the ship to the isolated Pitcairn Island, where their descendants still live today. On January 23, 1790, the Bounty was stripped, burned and sunk there in 3 meters of water in what became known as Bounty Bay. The remains of the Bounty were found and salvaged in 1957 by Luis Marden, who later counseled Marlon Brando for his role as Fletcher Christian in the 1962 film Mutiny on the Bounty. (Marden was also known to have worn cufflinks made from brass nails—just like the one in this auction!—that he had recovered from the Bounty.) The Bounty was also salvaged by an Australian group in 1998.

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Piedmont (“Lyme Bay wreck”), sunk in 1795 in Lyme Bay, south of England One of a huge fleet of 300 ships on their way to the West Indies to suppress a French uprising, the Piedmont was forced into Lyme Bay during a hurricane on November 18, 1795, that scattered and sank the ships of the fleet all along the Dorset coast. The Piedmont and five other ships (Aeolus, Catherine, Golden Grove, Thomas and Venus) broke apart on Chesil Beach and came to be known collectively as the “Lyme Bay wrecks.” About 1,000 men lost their lives in the disaster, including well over a hundred from the Piedmont alone. In the early 1980s the wrecks were salvaged by divers Selwyn Williams and Les and Julia C. Kent, who discovered many silver cobs of the late 1600s on the wrecksite of the Piedmont. It is presumed that the coins had been captured or recovered from a 17th-century wreck and stored in the vaults of the Bank of England for about a century before being transported and subsequently lost again. These coins are usually recognizable by their uniformly dark-gray coloration, a bit sea-worn but not overly corroded. A significant group of extremely rare Colombian silver cobs from the Piedmont (but not identified as such) was offered at auction in 1995.

Leocadia when she departed Paita, Peru, bound for Panama in a convoy of merchant vessels. On November 16, 1800, the Leocadia struck a shoal and broke apart 100 yards from the beach at Punta Santa Elena, with a loss of over 140 lives in the disaster. Within the next year the Spanish salvaged about 90% of the registered treasure, leaving more than 200,000 pesos (not to mention the expected contraband) behind to tempt divers in our time. Judging from the paucity of coins from this ship on the open market, it is reasonable to assume that many more are still to be found. S.S. Central America, sunk in 1857 in deep water off North Carolina Sunk in a hurricane on September 12, 1857, the mail steamer Central America took with her over 400 lives and over three tons of gold. The wreck lay undisturbed until 1986, when Tommy Thompson and his ColumbusAmerica Discovery Group located the ship in 8500 feet of water. After ten years of legal struggles, the salvagers were awarded about 92% of the treasure, with most of the rest going to insurance companies who had paid the claim when the ship sank. Widely touted as the greatest treasure ever found, the gold from the Central America has been very heavily promoted and cleverly marketed.

HMS Lutine , sunk in 1799 off Terschelling Island, the Netherlands Sunk in a heavy gale on October 9, 1799, the British Royal Navy frigate Lutine was taking a cargo of some £1,200,000 in gold and silver ingots to the continent to provide German banks with funds to prevent a stock market crash, which indeed occurred due to the loss. Only one person survived the wreck. Immediate salvage attempts (up to 1804) were thwarted by silt, which covered the wreck right away. Lloyd’s of London, which insured the cargo, authorized salvage attempts throughout the 1800s, with limited success. The most famous item to be recovered (in 1858) was the ship’s bell, which was mounted in the Lloyd’s offices and traditionally rung once (up till 1979) when a ship went missing and twice (up till 1989) when the missing ship had arrived. (The ringing of the bell ensured that all the brokers and underwriters were notified at the same time.) Most of the cargo remains on the wreck to this day.

Egypt, sunk in 1922 off Ushant, France In May of 1922, the Egypt encountered thick fog off the northwest coast of France and was accidentally rammed by another ship, the French cargo steamer Seine, sinking the British ship within twenty minutes. The Egypt was carrying some 15 tons of silver and gold bullion in addition to British gold sovereigns totaling £1,054,000 (1922 values). Nothing was salvaged until the early 1930s, when an Italian company recovered an estimated 95% of the treasure from the ship’s depth of 420 feet, an amazing success for its time. “Manila Bay treasure,” dumped in Manila Bay, the Philippines, in 1942 Under siege from the Japanese, the U.S.-run government of the Philippines retreated to the fort of Corregidor in 1942 with the entire treasury of some $3 million in U.S. currency, $28 million in Philippine currency and over five tons of gold. All of the gold and some of the silver was loaded as ballast onto the submarine U.S.S. Trout and eventually made it to the U.S., but some 350 tons of silver pesos had to be dumped into the Bay, the exact location recorded and sent by radio to the U.S. The advancing Japanese did manage to recover about 2 million pesos, but the rest was recovered by the U.S. 7th Fleet Ship Salvage Group.

Leocadia, sunk in 1800 off Punta Santa Elena, Ecuador This wreck, salvaged periodically in the late 20th century, typically yielded portrait (bust) 8 reales from Lima, Peru, but more recent work in 2001 brought up a handful of small silver cobs of the mid- to late 1700s mostly from the Potosí mint. These were probably from a small, private purse and not part of the more than 2 million pesos of registered silver and gold cargo aboard the

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GOLD COBS MEXICO

1. 8 escudos, 1715J. S-M30, KM-57.2, 26.6 grams. Choice specimen with 100% full date (haven’t seen any like that in a long time!) and oMJ, nearly full shield and crown, great full cross and tressure, no legend at all, a bit “sandwashed” (underwater wear) but with XF details. From the 1715 Fleet, with (Mrs.) Arthur McKee certificate from June 7, 1988. Estimate: $7,000 - $9,000

coin and bezel and chain all look good as new. The coin is at least XF and is probably undamaged, due to the conscientiousness of the jewelers. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $4,500 - $6,000

3. 4 escudos, (171)3(J). S-M30, KM-55.1, 13.5 grams. Scarce with full final digit of date (confirmed by style of cross), struck so offcenter as to show a complete crown (interesting to see the detail), yet with a full cross, crude edge, XF for wear. From the 1715 Fleet. Estimate: $4,000 - $5,000

SEVILLE, SPAIN

4. 8 escudos, Charles II, assayer not visible. CT-Type 8, KM168.2, 26.9 grams. Typically very rugged on a big, broad flan, with nearly full but very off-center shield and about 75% cross and tressure, clear CA- of king’s name (much scarcer than Philip IV), non-salvage VF (plagued with flat spots) despite the misinformation on the accompanying certificate. With 1998 Art of Money photo-certificate that calls it Philip IV and from an “un-named wreck off Cuba.” Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000

2. 4 escudos, Philip V, date and assayer not visible (1712J), mounted in an elegant 18K gold necklace bezel with 14 diamonds, with 26½”-long 18K gold chain. S-M30, KM-55.1, 25.7 grams (coin and bezel), 28.0 grams (chain). At first glance one might think the coin chosen for this jewel could have been more impressive, but then consider the fact that the full shield and full cross are on almost perfectly aligned axes, making the coin somewhat “reversible” (although the diamonds are on only one side, and the cross side shows a double-bezel around the contour to hold the coin in place). Smith’s International of Cayman, who are renowned for their use of high-end materials and a talented eye for aesthetics, crafted this whole piece in the 1980s, but the

5. 4 escudos, Philip II, assayer Gothic P. CT-11, Fr-158 13.5 grams. Typically broad, round coin with lots of detail, including a full mintmark and assayer to left and denomination o-IIII to right, much legend, full cross and tressure and shield and crown, XF with minor flat spots. With (1990s) Sea Treasures photocertificate. Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000

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OTHER GOLD COINS BRAZIL

6. 2 escudos, 1595, assayer not visible. CT-71, Fr-169, 6.7 grams. Curious type with 100% full date vertically to right of full shield below most of crown, nice full cross and tressure on reverse, no legend, well-centered XF. Estimate: $2,000 - $2,500 7. 2 escudos, Philip II, assayer B, (OM)NIV(M) variety. CT54, Fr-169, 6.7 grams. Bold mintmark-assayer S-B to left of about 75% shield with bold -NIV- in legend at about 9 o’clock (confirming the variety, which was the aging and increasingly delusional Philip II’s way of saying he was king of the whole world!), nearly full but off-center cross, XF+ with much peripheral flatness. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

11. Rio, 6400 reis, José I, 1753. KM-172.2, Fr-65, 14.3 grams. Very choice specimen, matte Mint State, utterly perfect all over (just a small spot of original brown crud near edge), in fact handchosen by us from the original sale and off the market since then. From the “Clive of India treasure,” with original Spink/Sedwick auction certificate from September 28, 2000. Estimate: $1,200 -

$1,500

8. 2 escudos, Philip III, 1615D. CT-25a, KM-unlisted, 6.7 grams. Rare assayer for date (unlisted in KM and higher relative value in CT), manifest fully and boldly under a bold mintmark S to left of a nearly full shield under a full crown, with full denomination •II• to right, full cross and tressure with clear 1615 date above, nice XF+ with sediment on fields. Estimate: $1,400 - $1,700

12. Rio, 6400 reis, José I, 1755. KM-172.2, Fr-65, 14.1 grams. Lightly polished VF+ with hint of toning, just a competent specimen of an increasingly difficult type to find. Estimate: $600 - $750

9. 2 escudos, 161?G. CT-Type 15, KM-unlisted 6.8 grams. Full •G• assayer to left of a full shield, full cross, clear bottom half of 161 of date, broad flan but flat peripheries, VF with sediment on fields. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

GREAT BRITAIN

13. London, England, sovereign, George V, 1913. Sp-3996, KM-820, 8.0 grams. Typical UNC with a minimum of contact marks, the well-preserved box and certificate being the more impressive part of the package. From the Egypt (1922), with custom

10. 1 escudo, Charles-Joanna, assayer Gothic P to left. CTType 25, Fr-153, 3.4 grams. Typically thin and very crisply detailed all over, and quite high grade (AU+), with full and beautiful shield and cross, the cross side a little too shiny (probably polished from jewelry mounting). Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

leather box and enclosed small certificate dated 30th June, 1932, handsigned by the Chairman of Lloyd’s of London. Estimate: $350 -

$500

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NETHERLANDS

14. Overijssel, ducat, Philip II (1590-93). Fr-262, 3.3 grams. Among the many egotistical measures adopted in Philip II’s later years was the striking of ducats like these in the Spanishcontrolled territories of the Netherlands, with facing, crowned portraits of Ferdinand and Isabel, just like the heralded excelente coin of a century prior but with Philip’s name in the legend, and this one is a decent example, with well-detailed portraits and crowned shield, much legend, lightly polished AU from former mounting. Estimate: $400 - $600

15. Utrecht, ducat, 1729. KM-7, Fr-285, 3.4 grams. Typically lustrous but obviously hand-struck Mint State, full detail on knight’s head. From the Vliegenthart (1735), with NGC photocertificate (Terner collection). Estimate: $700 - $900 16. Utrecht, ducat, 1729. KM-7, Fr-285, 3.3 grams. As above (Mint State) but slightly more even strike (especially the legends) yet cruder edge. From the Vliegenthart (1735). Estimate: $700 $900

SHIPWRECK INGOTS “Tumbaga wreck,” sunk ca. 1528 off Grand Bahama Island

17. Silver disc #M-159. 16.88 pounds (avoirdupois), roughly 10½” in diameter and 1½” thick in center. This huge “torta” (Spanish for round cake, related to the word for “turtle,” which is exactly what it looks like) is one of the most impressive of all the “tumbaga” finds, both for its markings (fineness IVCLXX [1970/2400], serial #RC, and assayer B~Vo, as well as two nearly full but faint circular tax seals) and for the fact that over half the (relatively flat) topside shows partially melted drips that contain lots of air pockets, in which you can almost imagine the remnants of the native artifacts that composed these ingots! It is also impressively large, with beautiful satin-silver surfaces. The assayer-mark, which consists of a B and V with a tilde (~) above the B and an o above the V, was originally believed to stand for Bernardino Vasquez, one of Cortez’ compatriots in the conquest of Mexico, but as it turns out, that man was never an assayer! We kept this bar personally from the original find, so it has never been for sale until now. With Sedwick photo-certificate from the 1990s. Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

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“Golden Fleece wreck,” sunk ca. 1550 in the northern Caribbean

18. Complete, coral-encrusted “finger” bar #39. 1110 grams About 10¼” long, 1" wide, and ¾” thick. Nothing says treasure like a big, long “finger” bar of gold! We have offered many cut bars in the past, but this is one of the few complete ones available. Stamped clearly with fineness XVII (17K) five times (so it could be cut down into five pieces if needed) and loaded with beautiful white coral, which is actually unusual for most shipwreck gold ingots, with a nice butter-yellow color on all the exposed parts, round at both ends (as made), this is surely a premium item that would make a great centerpiece for any serious shipwreck collection. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $35,000 - $40,000

19. Large cut bar #40. 7592 grams, rectangular, approx. 7¾” x 5" x 1-3/8". Unlike most silver ingots from this wreck, which are thin and round “splashes,” this piece is a solid, molded bar—or at least half of one anyway, as one end of it shows a relatively clean cut (chiseled down about halfway and then broken from there), probably parceled for different accounts as was done with so many of the ingots from this wreck (both gold and silver). In effect, it has the look of a slightly more modern ingot (like the big bars from the Atocha and Maravillas, for example), with a large inscribed cipher “P(?)” (owner/shipper’s mark?) visible on the top despite harsh corrosion and cleaning, although a more likely scenario is that it is an old “tumbaga” bar cut down and reused. The fineness is unknown, but the bar is quite dense for its size—over 16 pounds of silver! With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $4,500 - $5,500

20. Half-cut round “splash” #C. 1430 grams, about 3½” radius and 5/8" thick in center. This is more typical of the silver ingots from this wreck: Round and crudely manufactured by “splashing” molten silver onto the bare ground. What’s neat about this particular “splash” is that it appears to have been poured twice, as the bottom shows a thinner, smaller-diameter “pancake” of silver attached to the main ingot above it. It was also cut in half, which is typical, with this half showing a fineness marking of IIU CCC L x (2360/2400 = 98.3% fine) in boxes on the topside. It is also typically corroded and cleaned, with lots of gray and gold color mixed in, and a small part of the round edge shows some stress from bending, the opposite (straight) side chiseled about halfway down and then broken from there. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $1,250 - $1,750

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SHIPWRECK SILVER COINS “Golden Fleece wreck,” sunk ca. 1550 in the northern Caribbean but pillars side somewhat pitted from corrosion, very scarce. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

(all Mexico, Charles-Joanna) “Early Series” (no waves under pillars, 1536-1542)

24. 4 reales, assayer G below pillars. S-M2, KM-17, 13.4 grams. A technically perfect specimen of a very scarce issue: no doubling or corrosion, well centered on a very broad flan with full legends and inner details, high grade (AU), richly toned (dark) all over—what more could you ask for? With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $2,500

21. 4 reales, assayer R (Rincón) below pillars. S-M1, KM-16, 13.3 grams. Choice specimen of a rare and popular type (the first coinage of the New World), dark AXF but with virtually no corrosion, nearly full legends (with curiously backwards N’s), perfect inner details (especially the shield), broad and round planchet, just a few flat areas that exclude it from the best (and most expensive) examples. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $2,000 - $2,500

25. 2 reales, assayer Gothic R (Rincón) below pillars. S-M1, KM-10, 6.5 grams. A choice, broad-flan specimen of the earliest type with Gothic lettering (rare), with bold full shield and pillars, full legends, bold XF+, silvery from cleaning but no corrosion. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $750 - $1,000

22. 4 reales, assayer P to right. S-M4, KM-17, 13.5 grams. Clear mintmark oMo to left and assayer oPo to right of full shield, choice full pillars on the other side, full legends, well-centered strike on a nice round planchet, dark XF+ with a hint of corrosion (could be cleaned), very scarce. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000

26. 2 reales, assayer P to right. S-M4, KM-11, 6.6 grams. Broad flan with bold legends (slightly off-center strike) and perfect inner details (including oMo mintmark to left and oPo assayer to right of shield), darkly toned, no corrosion, AU, very scarce. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $500 - $700 23. 4 reales, assayer P to right. S-M4, KM-17, 12.6 grams. Choice full shield with oMo to left and oPo to right, also good crown and legends, with contrasting toning against AU details,

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CAROLVS, perfect inner details and crown, dark XF with barest hint of corrosion around edge. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $750 - $1,000

27. 2 reales, assayer P to right. S-M4, KM-11, 6.5 grams. Full and choice shield and crown and pillars, most of legend, oMo to left and oPo to right, very minor corrosion around edge, silvery from cleaning, AU for wear, very scarce. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $400 - $600

28. 2 reales, assayer G below pillars. S-M2, KM-11 (unlisted but pictured), 6.7 grams. Broad planchet with nearly full legends, full inner details and crown, no corrosion but some minor flatness (otherwise XF), slightly silvery from cleaning, very scarce. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $500 - $700

“Late Series� (with waves under pillars, 1542-1571)

29. 4 reales, assayer A to right. S-M6, KM-18, 13.7 grams. Very broad planchet with full legends (the metal even extending beyond the legends in some places), weak assayer A (scarce) but full mintmark M, nice full pillars but with doubling in the legends, good full crown and shield, dark but no corrosion, XF+. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $500 - $700

31. 2 reales, upside-down assayer G to right. S-M5a, KMunlisted (cf. 12), 6.9 grams. Very rare and curious error with assayer G punched into the die upside-down, and a pretty decent specimen too, with full legends on a broad flan, full inner details except for some flatness, XF for wear, dark but no corrosion. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $400 - $600

32. 2 reales, assayer G to left. S-M5a, KM-12, 6.5 grams. Scarce issue with assayer G to left and mintmark oM (not just M) to right, choice (well-detailed) full shield and crown, bold but lightly encrusted pillars, much legend, XF with light corrosion. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $350 - $500

33. 2 reales, assayer A to right. S-M6, KM-12, 6.8 grams. Rare (in this denomination) with assayer A to right and mintmark M to left, broad flan with full legends and crown and inner details (no flatness), dark (uncleaned) XF, a rather nice example. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $350 - $500

34. 2 reales, assayer A to right. S-M6, KM-12, 6.8 grams. Rare (as above), particularly boldly struck in the centers but not as much legend (not as broad) as above, also not dark (still XF), with just a hint of corrosion. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $350 - $500

30. 4 reales, assayer R to left. S-M7, KM-18, 13.3 grams. Rare with bold full assayer and mintmark, nearly full legends with full

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San Martín, sunk in 1618 off Vero Beach, Florida

1554 Fleet, sunk off Padre Island, Texas

35. Mexico, 4 reales, Charles-Joanna, “Late Series,” assayer L to right. S-M9, KM-18, 9.6 grams. Broad planchet with clear mintmark M to left, assayer L to right of full shield, full pillars on other side, much legend and well centered but with moderate corrosion all over (typical for this wreck) yet with the usual rusty encrustation cleaned off. Estimate: $250 - $350

37. Mexico, cob 8 reales, 1611F. S-M17, KM-44.3, 17.1 grams. Very rare with full 1611 date and oMF, decent shield and cross despite light to moderate corrosion. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $600 - $750

Atocha, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida

Unidentified wreck off Ecuador, late 1500s?

Mexico cobs

36. Lima, Peru, cob 8 reales, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre. S-L4, KM-14, 24.3 grams. We certainly wish Lou could have been more specific about the origin of this coin, especially in light of the much-anticipated 1612 wreck in the same general area, but Lou was adamant this was something different. The coin is just what you would expect: Very well detailed, with nice full shield and cross (the latter doubled), *-8 to left and P-oD to right, much legend, full crown, round and well centered, but silvery from cleaning and with light pitting all over. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $350 - $500

38. 2 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible. 4.4 grams. Grade 1 with particularly nice, full shield, good full cross, broad planchet, light corrosion around edge, more toned than usual, popular for jewelry. With Fisher certificate #189965 Estimate: $600 - $750

Potosí, Bolivia cobs

39. 8 reales, Philip II or III, assayer B (5th period). S-P14 or 14a, KM-5.1 or 10, 21.1 grams. Grade 2, with nearly full and welldetailed shield and crown (typical of this early type), most of cross, part of edge missing from corrosion and some flatness. With Fisher insert-card #174064 (certificate missing but replaceable).

Estimate: $200 - $350

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of the other digits to warrant an educated guess. With Fisher certificate #155431 Estimate: $350 - $500

40. 8 reales, Philip III, assayer Q. S-P17, KM-10 26.9 grams. Grade 1, with good full cross and shield, both well centered on a roundish flan, some flat spots but no corrosion. With Fisher insertcard #219823 (certificate missing but replaceable). Estimate: $250 $350 44. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T, lions and castles transposed in upper half of shield and quadrants of cross. SP21, KM-10, 25.1 grams. Grade 1, small, thick planchet with good full shield and cross, both displaying typical transpositions (although the reversed shield is scarce) that exemplified the incompetence (some say dyslexia) at the mint in this period of rapid conversion of ingots into coins. With Fisher certificate #116256 Estimate: $400 - $600 41. 8 reales, Philip III, assayer Q. S-P17, KM-10 15.5 grams. Grade 3, with bold assayer Q to left of nice full shield, full cross too, but both sides moderately to heavily corroded, unusually darkly toned. With Fisher certificate #82-172. Estimate: $225 $375

45. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T. S-P21, KM-10 26.8 grams. Grade 1, no corrosion, nice full shield with bold assayer T, good and full but off-center cross (also slightly doubled), nice thick flan (practically full weight!). With Fisher certificate #190253 Estimate: $500 - $700 42. 8 reales, Philip III, assayer M. S-P18 or 19, KM-10 20.5 grams. Grade 1, full shield and cross, light surface corrosion and tangential piece of edge missing (more like Grade-2 quality). With Fisher certificate #194239 Estimate: $400 - $600

46. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T, backwards mintmark “q�. S-P21, KM-10, 25.5 grams. Grade 2, but really Grade-1 quality with minimal corrosion, full shield and cross, bold backwards mintmark (another typical transposition for this era) and assayer, uneven thickness. With Fisher certificate #219599 Estimate: $300 - $450

43. 8 reales, 1619?T. S-P21, KM-10 22.7 grams. Grade 2, broad planchet with full shield, full but rather flat cross, light corrosion all over but nothing deep, clear 6 of date and just barely enough

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47. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T. S-P21, KM-10 9.0 grams. Grade 3, very thin and corroded (arguably Grade-4 quality) but with clear full shield, fairly clear assayer. With Fisher certificate #82-658 Estimate: $150 - $250

48. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible. 13.0 grams. Grade 3, good full shield and cross-lions-castles, crude shape due to heavy corrosion. With Fisher certificate #87A-138371 Estimate: $175 - $275

49. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible. 13.3 grams. Grade 3, bold full shield, full cross, thin and heavily corroded but decent detail. With Fisher certificate #135951 Estimate: $175 $275

50. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible. 13.2 grams. Grade 3, nearly full shield and crown and cross despite heavy corrosion and tangential piece of edge missing (more like Grade4 quality). With Fisher certificate #136482 Estimate: $175 - $275

51. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, quadrants of cross transposed. 22.7 grams. Grade 3, thick and solid coin with full and uncorroded cross (a bit flat, however), the shield side heavily pitted from corrosion. With Fisher certificate #190443 Estimate: $175 - $275

52. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible, lions and castles transposed in upper half of shield. 17.6 grams. Grade 4, despite the heavy corrosion the shield is nearly full and shows the scarce transposition error clearly, cross side rather flat and corroded. With Fisher certificate #193137 Estimate: $150 - $250

53. 8 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer not visible. 15.9 grams. Grade 4, full but off-center shield, decent full cross despite heavy corrosion, actually a bit nicer than most Grade 4’s. With Fisher certificate #136982 Estimate: $100 - $175

54. 2 reales, Philip II, assayer Rincón. S-P1, KM-3.2, 6.5 grams. Rare first coinage of the mint, with full and bold assayer R to left of a full shield, nice full cross-lions-castles on other side, very little corrosion (just around edge) but worn from 50 years of circulation before its shipwreck fate. With Fisher certificate #132743 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

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Concepción, sunk in 1641 off Hispaniola (all Mexican cobs) 55. 2 reales, Philip III or IV, assayer T. S-P21, KM-8 6.0 grams. Grade 2, chunky and out-of-round, with nearly full shield and cross, minor corrosion but flat spot on both sides, overly polished like all of the more modern recoveries (1990s and later). With Fisher certificate #10376 Estimate: $400 - $600

Bogotá, Colombia

58. 8 reales, (16)34P/D, with canvas impression. S-M19, KMunlisted (cf. 45), 24.9 grams. Full 4 of date (very rare, missing in Calbetó) and bold oMP with very clear over-assayer, and among many coins from this wreck that, for whatever reason, show a grid pattern from the fusion of canvas onto the surface of the coin (only on the cross side on this example), no corrosion but lots of flatness, valuable old pedigree. Pedigreed to the Henry

56. 4 reales, S-(A) (1622). S-B1, KM-2.1, 13.4 grams. Extremely rare first issue with bold mintmark S to left of about 75% shield below full crown (both very well detailed), king’s ordinal IIII in legend (which is important, as it proves the die was not engraved in Spain in 1621 or before), big flat area to right of shield where the assayer A would be, most of cross with practically pristine (Mint State) surfaces (no corrosion), the shield side with just a hint of corrosion, clearly one of the best examples out there and by all rights a coin that should have been included in the famous Research Collection. With Fisher certificate #236040, and Plate

Christensen sale of May 14, 1982 (the only major auction of Concepción material ever to take place), with original lot envelope #24. Estimate: $400 - $600

Coin in the 4th edition of The Practical Book of Cobs (2007)

Estimate: $3,500 - $4,750

Santa Margarita, sunk in 1622 west of Key West, Florida

59. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer P, with mineralized canvas attached. S-M19, KM-45, 22.9 grams. Taking a step further from the last lot, this coin shows the actual canvas still attached to the cross side, held into place with green, white, and black encrustation, the coin itself an even brown with no surface corrosion but bits of the edge missing, full shield with oMP to left and denomination 8 to right. With original insert-card (filled out by Frank Sedwick) and certificate. Estimate: $250 - $375

57. Cartagena, Colombia, cob 8 reales, RN-A (1622). S-C2, KM-3.2, 10.8 grams. Very rare first issue with clear mintmark RN to left and full assayer A to right of about 75% shield, nearly full cross, but all worn and thin from corrosion, attributed to Cartagena and not Bogotá by virtue of the pomegranate in the middle (as opposed to the bottom) of the shield (hard to see). With Fisher certificate #11262 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000

Please visit our website at www.sedwickcoins.com!

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60. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer P. S-M19, KM-45 26.4 grams. Big, thick flan with full shield and cross, no corrosion but lots of peripheral flatness and uneven thickness (very typical), lightly toned. With Blanchard leatherette wallet-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

61. 8 reales, Philip IV, assayer P. S-M19, KM-45 26.6 grams. Broad, roundish planchet with full oMP and cross, most of shield, no corrosion but the usual flatness and unevenness, well centered. With ANACS photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

Capitana, sunk in 1654 off Chanduy, Ecuador (all Potosí, Bolivia, cobs) Shield-type (through 1652)

62. 8 reales, 1649Z, crown-alone countermark on shield. SP34 (c/m 1), KM-19b (c/m C19.1), 16.3 grams. Very bold details all over (full shield and crown and cross and P-Z and 8 and—best of all—four-digit date 1649, rare thus) despite moderate corrosion (thin planchet) and edge-crack, the countermark especially bold and full. Estimate: $350 - $500

63. 8 reales, 1650O, with crowned-L countermark on cross. SP35 (c/m 2), KM-19b (c/m C19.2), 22.4 grams. Very broad planchet, double-struck shield with P-O relocated horizontally toward the bottom, full 4-digit date (scarce) and full and crisp countermark, minor corrosion only but some flat spots and an edge-crack. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $450 - $650

64. 8 reales, (1)651O, with crowned-”phi” countermark on cross. S-P35 (c/m 10 variant), KM-19b (c/m unlisted for this date), 27.2 grams. Extremely rare countermark that was originally thought to be a script P (Calbetó’s Type L) but on this full example it is clearly more like the Greek letter “phi,” a flattened O with a central vertical slash. The whole coin in fact is pretty nice, with full shield and cross, two assayers (on either side of shield), lots of legend (including date and king’s name), 100% corrosion-free but some flatness, nice contrasting toning on fields. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,500

65. 8 reales, (1)651E/O, with crowned-•F• countermark on shield. S-P36 (c/m 3), KM-19b (c/m C19.3), 13.7 grams. Full countermark, bold over-assayer, and full 51 of date, also full cross and shield, but the whole coin rather worn and thin from corrosion. With Atlantic Treasure Coins photo-certificate. Estimate: $275 - $350

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66. 8 reales, (16)52E, with crowned-•F• countermark on shield. S-P36 (c/m 3), KM-19b (c/m C19.3), 20.6 grams. Very rare final date of the shield-types, with full and clear 2 of date, nice full shield with 60% countermark, good full cross, lots of bold legend, a little thin and worn from corrosion but with nicely contrasting toning. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $1,200 - $1,500

69. 8 reales, 1(6)52E, Type IV. S-P37, KM-A20.4, 23.8 grams. Nice central detail like on the last lot (especially bold pillars) but with a hint of corrosion all around (high grade otherwise) and evenly toned, 2 dates, 2 full crowns, well centered, scarce. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $800 $1,200

1652 transitional

67. 8 reales, (1652)E, Type IV. S-P37, KM-A20.4 18.7 grams. Bold full pillars with clear F-8-IIII and E-8-E and full crown, full shield (slightly doubled) and crown with (A)-P-8 to left and O-E(52) to right, full king’s ordinal IIII in legend, worn down but only light corrosion, nice toning, scarce. With Atlantic Treasure Coins photo-certificate. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

70. 8 reales, (16)5(2)E, Type uncertain (II through V). S-P37, 25.3 grams. Solid coin but doubled and corroded to the point that the exact Type cannot be determined (clear F-8-III at top and assayer E at bottom right, bold AP to left of shield), nicely toned, scarce. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

Pillars-and-waves (1652 forward)

68. 8 reales, 1652E, Type IV. S-P37, KM-A20.4, 27.3 grams. Very solid coin (full weight) with no corrosion, nice full central detail, most of king’s name and ordinal in legend, very minor doubling and flatness, spots of toning, scarce. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $800 - $1,200

71. 8 reales, 1652E. S-P37a, KM-21, 25.1 grams. Also known as transitional Type VIII, with choice full cross and pillars-andwaves, 3 mintmarks, 2½ dates and assayers, full 1-PH-6 above pillars, full king’s ordinal IIII, high grade (XF or better) with just a hint of corrosion. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

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otherwise quite nice. With original Subamerica Discoveries certificate Estimate: $175 - $225

72. 8 reales, 1653E. S-P37a, KM-21, 25.3 grams. Excellent specimen with 3 full dates, full (P)HILIPPVS IIII, •PH• at top, full but slightly doubled cross and pillars, no surface corrosion but small piece of edge missing, expertly cleaned and re-toned with good contrast. From the collection of Florida conservator Doug Armstrong, with certificate Estimate: $300 - $400

76. 4 reales, 1654E. S-P37a, KM-18, 13.7 grams. 100% corrosionfree coin with full and well-centered cross and pillars-and-waves, 3 dates, 2 mintmarks, some flat spots but with nicely contrasting toning. Estimate: $250 - $325

Maravillas, sunk in 1656 off Grand Bahama Island (all cobs) Potosí, Bolivia

73. 8 reales, 1653E. S-P37a, KM-21, 17.9 grams. Full cross, bold waves and one full pillar, bold PH at top, 3 partial dates, king’s ordinal IIII, but evenly worn and thin from corrosion. With Atlantic Treasure Coins photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

Shield-type (through 1652)

77. 8 reales, 1650O, modern 5 in date, crowned-L countermark on cross. S-P35 (c/m 2), KM-19b (c/m C19.2), 25.0 grams. Curious (scarce) transitional date with modern 5 (fully visible), full countermark in middle of full cross, full crown above full shield with bold assayer O to right, attractively toned, with hint of corrosion around edge and typical edge-crack. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $450 $650

74. 8 reales, 1653E. S-P37a, KM-21, 16.7 grams. Bold pillars-andwaves, nearly full but slightly doubled and off-center cross, 2 full crowns, evenly worn and thin from corrosion. With original Subamerica Discoveries certificate Estimate: $100 - $150

Please visit our website at www.sedwickcoins.com! 75. 8 reales, 1654E. S-P37a, KM-21, 25.7 grams. Solid coin (no corrosion) with full cross and waves, one full pillar, bold •PH• at top, 3 dates, 2½ assayers, king’s ordinal IIII, some flatness but

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1652 transitional

78. 8 reales, (1)•6•5•(0)O, with crowned-O countermark on cross. S-P35 (c/m 5), KM-19b (c/m C19.4), 24.2 grams. Another curious date-variety, this with dots between the digits (also scarce), on a broad planchet with good full cross and shield (full P-O to left with 5-dot ornaments), much legend, minimal corrosion, light toning, the O in the scarce countermark full and clear. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $450 - $650

79. 8 reales, 165(0-1)O, with crowned-L countermark on cross. S-P35 (c/m 2), KM-19b (c/m C19.2), 24.2 grams. Full shield and cross with especially bold and full countermark, full 165 of date (assayer to right of shield makes it post-1649), full PHILIPPVS IIII in legend, nicely toned but lightly corroded around edge. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $450 - $650

81. 8 reales, (16)52E, Type III. S-P37, KM-A20.3, 26.6 grams. Choice obverse (full inner details, including crown), with full but slightly doubled pillars-side details as well, much legend (full PHILIPPVS IIII and POTOSI and EL PERV), high grade but lightly corroded around edge, with edge-split, very scarce. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $800 $1,200

82. 8 reales, (165)2E, Type IV. S-P37, KM-A20.4, 20.5 grams. Nice but off-center full shield, full and well-centered pillars-andwaves, lightly corroded but nicely toned, with edge-crack, scarce. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $700 - $1,000

Pillars-and-waves (1652 forward)

83. 8 reales, 1656E, Royal-like. S-P37a, KM-21, 27.4 grams. Lou felt this was a Royal (round presentation issue) due to the fact that it is nearly round and shows nearly all details, but we feel it just misses that classification because of size (not large enough) and evenness and an edge-split that Royals never have. It is nevertheless exceptional for a regular issue, with all 3 dates and mintmarks and assayers, full king’s name and ordinal, nicely toned, no corrosion, so it should command a premium. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $1,000 $1,250

80. 8 reales, 1651E, with crowned-•F• countermark on shield. S-P36 (c/m 3), KM-19b (c/m C19.3), 26.6 grams. Very broad flan (extends beyond the legends) with full shield and crown and cross, bold full countermark, 2 assayers, bold 165 of date, mostly darkly toned, minimal corrosion but edge a little crude (one split). From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $450 - $650

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Colombia

Shield-type

86. Cartagena, 8 reales, (1655S). S-C4, KM-7.2, 27.2 grams. Extremely rare and the finest specimen we have ever handled (at least in terms of preservation), with no corrosion at all (full weight), choice full shield and pillars (both well centered), bold denomination VIII, part of mintmark C visible but not the assayer or date, high grade (XF or better), with nicely contrasting toning on fields. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,000 84. Bogotá, 8 reales, Philip IV, •N•R•P• to left, reverse legend rotated 180°. S-B4, KM-3.3, 26.1 grams. Very rare issue, and quite exceptional as a type-coin (though regrettably without any part of the date visible), with full mintmark-assayer, full denomination “VIIII” (the extra I due to doubling), full shield and especially full and bold cross-lions-castles, big flan, nicely toned, and 100% corrosion-free. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $2,500 - $4,000 87. Cartagena, 4 reales, (1655S). S-C4, KM-10.2, 13.1 grams. Extremely rare, and the perfect companion-piece for the above lot because this is also the best specimen we have ever handled and is probably the finest known (again, in terms of preservation), as it is practically corrosion-free with full shield (slightly doubled) and pillars, colorful toning, very solid, high grade (XF or better) and well centered. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,000

Pillars-and-waves

San Miguel el Arcángel (“Jupiter wreck”), sunk in 1659 off Jupiter, Florida (all cobs)

85. Bogotá, 8 reales, 1653, assayer P°RA(S). S-B7, KM-unlisted (cf. 7.1), 23.9 grams. Very rare with full 1653 date, assayer corroded but attributable, particularly bold shield below full crown, bold pillars, broad flan but with peripheral flatness, corrosion only on pillars side. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $3,500 - $5,000

88. Lima, Peru, “Star of Lima” type, 1 real, 1659V, mintmark LIMA. S-L5, KM-15, 2.9 grams. Very choice specimen (possibly finest known) on a broad planchet with full star and LIMA and 1659 date, •V• to left, king’s ordinal IIII in legend (funny, he didn’t recall authorizing that!), and full cross and tressure, no corrosion, high grade (AU) and beautifully toned. Estimate: $600 - $800

Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

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Unidentified ca.-1671 wreck in Seville Harbor, Spain

89. Lima, Peru, “Star of Lima” type, ½ real, (1659). S-L5, KM-unlisted, 1.5 grams. This extremely rare issue was unknown until recently, when a specimen with the same distinctive monogram and clear 1659 date sold at auction in Spain, confirming the attribution of some other ½R from this wreck. On this coin you get a perfect 100% monogram with king’s ordinal IIII in legend, nice full cross, no corrosion, great toning and high grade (XF or better), just no part of the date. Estimate: $600 $800

92. Potosí, Bolivia, cob 8 reales, 1666E. S-P37a, KM-21, 25.2 grams. Interesting shape, sort of like a barrel with a diagonal piece missing from corrosion, darkly toned, with 2 dates (the “666” below the cross weak but certain) and assayers, full POTOSI, king’s ordinal IIII, nearly full cross and pillars, a bit worn but solid. With Sedwick certificate from 1999. Estimate: $100 - $150

90. Potosí, Bolivia, 8 reales, 1657E. S-P37a, KM-21,27.0 grams. Very choice specimen, 100% corrosion-free and full weight, with 3 full dates and mintmarks and assayers, full cross and pillars, obviously not a Royal due to shape and evenness but still exceptional (like lot #83 above), nicely toned, VF for wear. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $600 $800

93. Potosí, Bolivia, cob 8 reales, 1669E. S-P37b, KM-26, 26.4 grams. Odd planchet (uneven edge, lots of flatness, oblong shape) but no corrosion to speak of, with 2 dates (bold full 669 in legend), 2 mintmarks, 3 partial assayers, lightly toned with minor edge-split. With 1990s-era (Leissering) photo-certificate. Estimate: $150 - $200

Nuestra Señora Santa María de Quintanpalla, sunk in the late 1670s in Seville Harbor, Spain

91. Bogotá, Colombia, 4 reales, 1657, assayer P°R. S-B7, KM10.1 8.1 grams. Extremely rare, with fairly clear date and assayer despite moderate corrosion, nice full shield, particularly bold pillars with distinctive tops. From the Louis Ullian collection of shipwreck coins. Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

94. Potosí, Bolivia, cob 8 reales, 1658E. S-P37a, KM-21, 14.2 grams. Heavily corroded all over (looks just like those from the San Miguel of 1659 off Jupiter, Florida, but the consignor swears it comes from the wreck indicated on the certificate, which

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sounds suspiciously like another unfounded attempt to name the infamous “Seville Harbor wreck” of 1671) but with discernible date and decent waves. With recent TREASURESEARCH certificate. Estimate: $50 - $75

Consolación, sunk in 1681 off Santa Clara Island, Ecuador (all Potosí, Bolivia, cobs)

95. 8 reales, 1652E transitional Type VI or VII. S-P37, KMA20.6 or A20.7, 7.4 grams. Very thin and corroded but with clear upper half of pillars design and most of shield, the bottom of the pillars doubled, partial date in legend. With ROBCAR certificate #3459 Estimate: $150 - $200

96. 8 reales, 1652E post-transitional (Type VIII). S-P37, KM21, 12.9 grams. Choice reverse with full pillars-and-waves and all inner detail, obverse corroded but still with bold date and assayer and nearly full cross, thin planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3457 Estimate: $150 - $200

97. 8 reales, 1652E post-transitional (Type VIII). S-P37, KM21, 14.5 grams. Bold full pillars-and-waves and cross, full 1-PH-6, king’s ordinal IIII in legend, thin from corrosion, hairline edgesplit. With ROBCAR certificate #3458 Estimate: $150 - $200

98. 8 reales, 1655E. S-P37a, KM-21, 19.1 grams. Solid flan with bold pillars and PH and date, nearly full cross, PHILIP(PVS) in legend, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3418 Estimate: $75 - $125

99. 8 reales, 1655E. S-P37a, KM-21, 12.6 grams. Thin from moderate corrosion but with full cross, 3 dates and mintmarks, 2 assayers, bold pillars. With ROBCAR certificate #3431 Estimate: $50 - $75

100. 8 reales, 1663E. S-P37a, KM-21, 22.2 grams. Nice full cross and pillars (both slightly doubled), bold king’s ordinal IIII in legend, 3 partial dates, 3 bold mintmarks, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3434 Estimate: $75 - $125

101. 8 reales, 1666E. S-P37a, KM-21, 21.7 grams. Bold 1666 date in legend, one bold P and E, but much of the coin flat and lightly corroded. With ROBCAR certificate #3414 Estimate: $75 - $125

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106. 8 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-26, 22.7 grams. Big flan with lots of legend on pillars side, full crown above full cross, moderately corroded, 2 dates and mintmarks and assayers. With ROBCAR certificate #3422 Estimate: $75 - $125

102. 8 reales, 1668E. S-P37b, KM-26, 20.6 grams. Bold and wellcentered pillars and cross, smallish flan with some corrosion around edge. With ROBCAR certificate #3427 Estimate: $75 $125

103. 8 reales, 1672(E). S-P37b, KM-26,16.9 grams. Worn, but with bold 672 date in legend, 2 mintmarks, good cross. With ROBCAR certificate #3416 Estimate: $75 - $125

104. 8 reales, 1672E. S-P37b, KM-26, 16.4 grams. Bold pillars and date, 2 assayers, part of king’s name and bold ordinal II in legend, off-center cross, some moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3439 Estimate: $75 - $125

107. 8 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-26, 19.4 grams. Bold waves, doubled pillars, 2 dates and mintmarks and assayers, most of king’s name and ordinal in legend, light to moderate corrosion and flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3428 Estimate: $75 - $125

108. 8 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-26, 19.9 grams. Very bold pillars-and-waves and cross, 2 dates and assayers, some corrosion around edge. With ROBCAR certificate #3436 Estimate: $150 - $200

105. 8 reales, 1674E. S-P37b, KM-26, 17.5 grams. Very bold full cross, full pillars-and-waves, 2 dates and mintmarks and assayers, light corrosion all over. With ROBCAR certificate #3451 Estimate: $75 - $125

109. 8 reales, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-26, 24.8 grams. Two bold dates, one great lion, good pillars, not much corrosion but some flatness (uneven planchet). With ROBCAR certificate #3433 Estimate: $150 - $200

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114. 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-26, 20.8 grams. Bold pillars, full cross, 2 dates and mintmarks, edge-crack. With ROBCAR certificate #3450 Estimate: $75 - $125

110. 8 reales, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-26, 17.5 grams. Two dates (bold 76 in legend), nice waves, most of cross, flatness on pillars, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3447 Estimate: $75 - $125

111. 8 reales, 1677E. S-P37b, KM-26, 24.9 grams. Solid but somewhat pitted, with full cross, bold PERV in legend, edgecrack. With ROBCAR certificate #3432 Estimate: $75 - $125

115. 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-26, 19.8 grams. Well-centered strike but plagued with flatness on cross, doubling and corrosion on pillars, and an edge-crack. With ROBCAR certificate #3452 Estimate: $75 - $125

112. 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-26, 17.7 grams. Particularly bold pillars, 1½ dates and mintmarks and assayers, some corrosion and flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3440 Estimate: $75 - $125

116. 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-26, 16.0 grams. Good full cross and pillars-and-waves, 2 dates and assayers, but corroded and worn thin, small edge-split. With ROBCAR certificate #3453 Estimate: $75 - $125

113. 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-26, 21.6 grams. Bold full cross and pillars-and-waves, light corrosion, edge-crack. With ROBCAR certificate #3446 Estimate: $75 - $125

117. 8 reales, 167?E. S-P37b, KM-26, 20.0 grams. Bold pillars and most of cross, 3 assayers, 2 bold mintmarks despite much flatness, some corrosion, 2 small edge-splits. With ROBCAR certificate #3435 Estimate: $50 - $75

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118. 8 reales, 167?E. S-P37b, KM-26, 18.9 grams. Nice but doubled pillars side, heavily corroded cross side, 3 clear mintmarks. With ROBCAR certificate #3437 Estimate: $50 - $75

122. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 21.4 grams. Full cross with bold 79 below, corroded pillars with bold C. With ROBCAR certificate #3441 Estimate: $75 - $125

119. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 24.8 grams. Bold 16 in legend and 79 between pillars, full assayer C, broad planchet but with much flatness, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3415 Estimate: $75 - $125

123. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 22.3 grams. Corroded and doubled but with clear date, 2 C’s, decent cross and crown, edgecrack. With ROBCAR certificate #3442 Estimate: $75 - $125

120. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 18.6 grams. Two bold C’s, good full cross, bold waves, one large edge-split, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3421 Estimate: $75 - $125

124. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 23.0 grams. Three C’s, decent pillars-and-waves and cross despite light corrosion and some flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3444 Estimate: $75 $125

121. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 17.7 grams. Two dates, 2 bold C’s, 3 mintmarks, bold cross and pillars, but thin from corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3438 Estimate: $150 - $200

125. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 22.3 grams. Three C’s, good centers, flat peripheries, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3445 Estimate: $150 - $200

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126. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 20.0 grams. Bold waves with clear date and C above, doubled cross with clear C to right, lightly to moderately corroded with edge-split. With ROBCAR certificate #3448 Estimate: $75 - $125

127. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 20.8 grams. Most of cross with bold P, C and 79, 2 C’s on pillars side despite flatness, light to moderate corrosion all over. With ROBCAR certificate #3449 Estimate: $75 - $125

130. 8 reales, 1679V/C. S-P39, KM-unlisted (cf. 26) 15.6 grams. Bold pillars, clear V/C (scarce), 2 dates, thin and worn from moderate to heavy corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3455 Estimate: $150 - $200

131. 8 reales, 1679V/C. S-P39, KM-unlisted (cf. 26) 21.1 grams. Bold pillars with 2 bold V/C’s (scarce), 2 dates, nearly full cross, light to moderate corrosion, slightly odd shape. With ROBCAR certificate #3456 Estimate: $150 - $200

128. 8 reales, 1679V/C. S-P39, KM-unlisted (cf. 26) 22.4 grams. Good but doubled cross, 2 fairly clear V/C’s (scarce), bold pillars-and-waves, some pitting from corrosion, small edge-split. With ROBCAR certificate #3426 Estimate: $150 - $200

132. 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-26, 16.6 grams. Nice full cross, bold pillars, 3 partial dates, 2 assayers, some pitting on pillars side. With ROBCAR certificate #3419 Estimate: $75 - $125

129. 8 reales, 1679V/C. S-P39, KM-unlisted (cf. 26) 20.2 grams. Good but off-center cross, 2 bold V/C’s (scarce), bold pillars, 2 dates, 3 mintmarks, a bit worn. With ROBCAR certificate #3454 Estimate: $150 - $200

133. 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-26, 20.2 grams. Bold date below nearly full cross, bold pillars, 2 assayers, edge-crack, minimal corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3423 Estimate: $75 - $125

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134. 8 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-26, 19.5 grams. Roundish flan with excellent waves, slightly doubled cross and pillars with flatness, bold date and assayer, part of king’s name in legend, corrosion around edge. With ROBCAR certificate #3429 Estimate: $75 - $125

135. 8 reales, 1679(C or V). S-P38 or 39, KM-26, 20.4 grams. Double-struck but with 2 bold dates and assayers, not much corrosion, small edge-split. With ROBCAR certificate #3424 Estimate: $75 - $125

136. 8 reales, 1679(C or V). S-P38 or 39, KM-26, 19.9 grams. Weak date due to flatness and some corrosion, bold waves, nearly full (but off-center) cross. With ROBCAR certificate #3425 Estimate: $50 - $75

137. 8 reales, 1679(C or V). S-P38 or 39, KM-26, 23.2 grams. Very bold date between pillars, bold cross, nice thick flan but with some corrosion around edge. With ROBCAR certificate #3430 Estimate: $75 - $125

138. 8 reales, 1679(C or V). S-P38 or 39, KM-26, 22.7 grams. Good but off-center cross, particularly full waves (but that side doubled), 2 dates, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3443 Estimate: $75 - $125

139. 8 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-26, 19.8 grams. Big flan with 3 dates, nice waves, good pillars and cross, but somewhat worn and with edge-split. With ROBCAR certificate #3412 Estimate: $150 - $200

140. 8 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-26, 17.3 grams. Bold 680 in legend, bold pillars, good cross, king’s name (C) AROLVS in legend, light to moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3413 Estimate: $75 - $125

141. 8 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-26, 21.2 grams. Large round flan with bold pillars, prominent 680 date in legend, some corrosion and flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3417 Estimate: $75 - $125

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146. 4 reales, 1674E. S-P37b, KM-25, 11.3 grams. Bold pillars, full cross, 2 dates and assayers, light corrosion, edge-crack. With ROBCAR certificate #3470 Estimate: $60 - $100

142. 8 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-26, 20.3 grams. Bold full pillars, bold but doubled cross, parts of 3 dates, 2 assayers, much legend, light corrosion all over. With ROBCAR certificate #3420 Estimate: $75 - $125

147. 4 reales, 1674E. S-P37b, KM-25, 8.1 grams. Nice full cross and bold pillars, small planchet due to corrosion, 3 mintmarks. With ROBCAR certificate #3472 Estimate: $60 - $100 143. 8 reales, uncleaned and thickly encrusted with pebbles and shells. 18.7 grams. A beautiful display showing how some of these coins are found, with at least four prominent rocks or shells attached, mostly gray with bisecting orange line that probably was where an iron nail once rested on the coin. With ROBCAR certificate #3461 Estimate: $150 - $200

148. 4 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-25, 11.4 grams. Good but offcenter cross, full crown, decent full pillars, some moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3462 Estimate: $125 - $175

144. 8 reales, uncleaned and thickly encrusted. 28.2 grams. Like the above, this shows how some of the coins were found, this one with no shells or rocks but a dark, crystalline encrustation all over, with parts of the underlying design discernible. With ROBCAR certificate #3460 Estimate: $150 $200

145. 4 reales, 1655E. S-P37a, KM-18, 7.6 grams. Roundish planchet with decent, well-centered details but worn and thin from corrosion, bold PH at top. With ROBCAR certificate #3467 Estimate: $40 - $75

149. 4 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-25, 8.3 grams. Nice full cross with bold date below, pillars side corroded. With ROBCAR certificate #3463 Estimate: $60 - $100

150. 4 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-25, 4.8 grams. Good full cross and pillars, thin from corrosion but nice detail. With ROBCAR certificate #3469 Estimate: $40 - $75

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151. 4 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-25, 8.7 grams. Bold but offcenter cross, bold waves and date, 2 mintmarks, thin and worn from corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3476 Estimate: $60 $100

155. 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-25, 10.9 grams. Bold but slightly off-center cross, bold assayer, 2 mintmarks, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3464 Estimate: $125 - $175

152. 4 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-25, 8.0 grams. Bold pillars, good but off-center cross, 2 dates and mintmarks, thin and worn from corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3479 Estimate: $60 $100

156. 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-25, 11.1 grams. Good full pillars, nearly full cross, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3468 Estimate: $60 - $100

153. 4 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-unlisted (cf. 25), 9.7 grams. Big flan with large edge-crack, full but slightly doubled cross, 3 clear C’s, king’s name (CA)ROLVS in legend, thin from corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3466 Estimate: $60 - $100

154. 4 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-unlisted (cf. 25), 10.9 grams. Full pillars and cross despite some flatness and corrosion, bold date and 3 bold mintmarks. With ROBCAR certificate #3473 Estimate: $60 - $100

157. 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-25, 8.8 grams. Good full cross (one choice lion), particularly nice waves, bold assayer, 2 mintmarks. With ROBCAR certificate #3477 Estimate: $60 - $100

158. 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-25, 11.5 grams. Bold mintmark, assayer, denomination and date, but much flatness/wear/ corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3480 Estimate: $60 - $100

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163. 4 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-25, 8.7 grams. Bold full cross and pillars, odd shape, minimal corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3478 Estimate: $60 - $100 159. 4 reales, 1679V. S-P39, KM-25, 7.7 grams. Good but offcenter cross, one bold pillar (otherwise pitted on that side). With ROBCAR certificate #3481 Estimate: $40 - $75

164. 4 reales, 16(79-80)V. S-P39, KM-25, 11.2 grams. Nearly full cross, pillars side moderately to heavily corroded. With ROBCAR certificate #3465 Estimate: $40 - $75 160. 4 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-25, 10.6 grams. Very sharp waves, 2 clear dates, light corrosion all over, small edge-split. With ROBCAR certificate #3471 Estimate: $125 - $175

165. 4 reales, uncleaned and thickly encrusted. 6.3 grams. Both sides covered with thick, gray encrustation, hiding whatever details may be underneath, somewhat low weight so probably heavily corroded. With ROBCAR certificate #3482 Estimate: $25 $40

161. 4 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-25, 8.7 grams. Big, oblong planchet with good cross and pillars, full 1680 in legend, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3474 Estimate: $60 - $100

166. 2 reales, 1661E. S-P37a, KM-16, 4.9 grams. Well-centered pillars, off-center cross, 2 dates, 2½ assayers, light corrosion all over. With ROBCAR certificate #3494 Estimate: $60 - $90

162. 4 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-25, 9.3 grams. Bold 1680 in legend, CAR- of king’s name, good full cross and pillars-andwaves, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3475 Estimate: $125 - $175 167. 2 reales, 1664E. S-P37a, KM-16, 4.1 grams. Choice but offcenter details, peripheral flatness, 2 assayers, 2½ dates, no corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3487 Estimate: $100 - $150

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173. 2 reales, 1670E. S-P37b, KM-24, 3.2 grams. Choice cross, 2 bold mintmarks, odd shape, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3489 Estimate: $100 - $150

168. 2 reales, 1665E. S-P37a, KM-16, 4.0 grams. Good full cross and pillars despite moderate corrosion, 2 dates and mintmarks. With ROBCAR certificate #3485 Estimate: $60 - $90

174. 2 reales, 1673E. S-P37b, KM-24, 4.7 grams. Nice cross and pillars, bold date, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3496 Estimate: $100 - $150

169. 2 reales, 1666E. S-P37a, KM-16, 4.3 grams. Barrel-shaped flan with edge-split, full cross, good pillars, 2 mintmarks, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3495 Estimate: $60 - $90

175. 2 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-24, 4.8 grams. Full cross, bold full pillars, 2 dates, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3483 Estimate: $60 - $90

170. 2 reales, 1667E. S-P37a, KM-16, 5.8 grams. Full but doubled cross, full but slightly off-center pillars, minor flatness and corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3491 Estimate: $60 - $90

176. 2 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-24, 4.1 grams. Nice cross side with much of king’s name and ordinal (CA)ROLVS II in legend, corroded pillars side, somewhat thin. With ROBCAR certificate #3486 Estimate: $100 - $150

171. 2 reales, 1669E. S-P37b, KM-24, 4.2 grams. Good full cross and pillars, full 1669 date in legend, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3488 Estimate: $100 - $150

177. 2 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-24, 3.9 grams. Good full cross, nice pillars and waves, bold king’s ordinal II in legend, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3500 Estimate: $100 - $150

172. 2 reales, 1669E. S-P37b, KM-24, 5.8 grams. Broad flan with good full cross and pillars, corrosion on pillars side only, edgesplit. With ROBCAR certificate #3499 Estimate: $100 - $150

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178. 2 reales, 1675(E). S-P37b, KM-24, 2.7 grams. Bold pillars, good full cross, 2 dates, light to moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3490 Estimate: $60 - $90

179. 2 reales, 1675(E). S-P37b, KM-24, 4.5 grams. Small flan from corrosion, good pillars, decent cross, 2 mintmarks. With ROBCAR certificate #3502 Estimate: $60 - $90

183. 2 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-24, 4.8 grams. Full pillars and cross, 2 dates and assayers, light corrosion but some flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3493 Estimate: $100 - $150

184. 2 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-24, 7.3 grams. Broad flan with full cross, particularly bold mintmark and assayer, some flat spots and corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3498 Estimate: $100 - $150

180. 2 reales, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-24, 3.6 grams. Good cross and pillars, 2 partial dates, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3492 Estimate: $60 - $90 185. 2 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-24, 4.7 grams. Bold waves, small flan from corrosion, off-center cross, clear date and assayer and mintmark. With ROBCAR certificate #3497 Estimate: $60 $90

181. 2 reales, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-24, 4.9 grams. Good cross with clear date below, corroded pillars side 2 assayers. With ROBCAR certificate #3501 Estimate: $60 - $90 186. 1 real, Philip II, assayer A (shield-type), small hole near edge. S-P11, KM-2.2, 2.3 grams. Very worn but with clear P-A and decent cross, curiously holed near edge, so possibly from a sailor’s necklace (rather early for the cargo of this ship anyway— by about 100 years!). With ROBCAR certificate #3550 Estimate: $30 - $50 187. 1 real, Philip IV, assayer not visible (1640s, shield-type). KM-12a or 12b, 3.2 grams. Good but off-center cross, most of shield, not much corrosion, very scarce early issue for this wreck. With ROBCAR certificate #3516 Estimate: $50 - $75

182. 2 reales, 1677E. S-P37b, KM-24, 5.3 grams. Full cross and pillars, bold waves, 3 mintmarks, 2 assayers, moderate corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3484 Estimate: $60 - $90

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188. 1 real, 1654E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.0 grams. Three dates, good cross, partially flat, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3543 Estimate: $50 - $75

196. 1 real, 1660E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.8 grams. Interesting shape, 2 dates, no corrosion but lots of wear and flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3541 Estimate: $30 - $50

189. 1 real, 1655E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.7 grams. Full cross and nearly full pillars, 2 dates, 3 assayers, king’s ordinal IIII in legend. With ROBCAR certificate #3529 Estimate: $50 - $75

197. 1 real, 1661E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.6 grams. Nicely detailed all over (full cross and pillars-and-waves), 3 dates, 2 assayers, king’s name and ordinal (PHI)LIPPVS IIII in legend, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3506 Estimate: $50 $75

190. 1 real, 1656E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.6 grams. Good full cross, bold date between pillars, light corrosion, starting to tone colorfully. With ROBCAR certificate #3503 Estimate: $50 - $75 191. 1 real, 1656E. S-P37a, KM-13, 4.7 grams. Good full cross and pillars, 2 dates, light corrosion only, oversized planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3542 Estimate: $50 - $75

192. 1 real, 1656?E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.2 grams. Thin from corrosion but with nice, well-centered details on both sides (tops of pillars especially nice). With ROBCAR certificate #3532 Estimate: $50 - $75 193. 1 real, 1657E. S-P37a, KM-13, 3.5 grams. Interesting shape, 100% corrosion-free but with flat areas as struck, 3 dates. With ROBCAR certificate #3517 Estimate: $50 - $75

198. 1 real, 1663E. S-P37a, KM-13, 3.2 grams. Nice pillars side with 2 bold dates but some flatness, full cross with a little corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3511 Estimate: $50 - $75 199. 1 real, 1664E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.9 grams. Good full cross and pillars, 2 clear dates and assayers, light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3524 Estimate: $50 - $75

200. 1 real, 1664E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.3 grams. Bold cross, one bold pillar, 2 bold assayers, some flatness but not much corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3549 Estimate: $50 - $75 201. 1 real, 1664?E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.7 grams. Full cross but pillars side corroded and weak. With ROBCAR certificate #3504 Estimate: $50 - $75

194. 1 real, 1657E. S-P37a, KM-13, 3.2 grams. Round planchet, well-centered strike, bold waves, bold king’s ordinal IIII in legend, 2 dates, minimal corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3528 Estimate: $50 - $75

202. 1 real, 1665E. S-P37a, KM-13, 4.0 grams. Choice and welldetailed full cross and pillars, 2 dates and mintmarks and assayers, king’s name and ordinal PHILIPPVS IIII in legend, minimal corrosion, overweight planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3540 Estimate: $50 - $75

195. 1 real, 1660E. S-P37a, KM-13, 3.5 grams. Two dates, 3 bold assayers, bold king’s ordinal IIII in legend, some wear but no corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3509 Estimate: $50 - $75

203. 1 real, 1666E. S-P37a, KM-13, 2.5 grams. Choice full cross, bold full pillars, 2 dates and assayers and mintmarks, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3523 Estimate: $50 - $75

48


204. 1 real, 1667E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.1 grams. Good full cross and pillars, king’s name CARO(LVS) in legend, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3526 Estimate: $50 - $75

212. 1 real, 1671(E). S-P37b, KM-23, 3.1 grams. Well-detailed cross but off-center pillars, 2 dates and mintmarks, no corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3546 Estimate: $50 - $75

205. 1 real, 1667E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.0 grams. Good full cross, most of pillars, no corrosion but some peripheral flatness, 2 dates. With ROBCAR certificate #3533 Estimate: $50 - $75

213. 1 real, 1672E, E to left of cross. S-P37b, KM-unlisted (cf. 23), 3.3 grams. Unique error with assayer to left of cross instead of right, good full cross, one full and bold pillar (off-center), light corrosion only. With ROBCAR certificate #3518 Estimate: $50 - $75

206. 1 real, 1667E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.7 grams. Full cross and pillars, decent detail despite light to moderate corrosion all over. With ROBCAR certificate #3537 Estimate: $50 - $75 214. 1 real, 1672E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.8 grams. Excellent pillars, good full cross, bold date, minimal corrosion, overweight planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3505 Estimate: $50 - $75

207. 1 real, 1668E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.0 grams. Good full cross, one bold full pillar (off-center), 3 dates (bold 68 in legend), light to moderate corrosion all over. With ROBCAR certificate #3530 Estimate: $50 - $75

215. 1 real, 1672E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.7 grams. Full and wellcentered cross and pillars but both sides somewhat corroded. With ROBCAR certificate #3521 Estimate: $50 - $75

208. 1 real, 1668E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.0 grams. Corrosion-free, with good cross, 2 dates and assayers and other nice detail despite some flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3536 Estimate: $50 - $75

216. 1 real, 1673E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.7 grams. Good full cross and pillars (the latter slightly off-center), 2 assayers and mintmarks, full CAROLVS II in legend, light corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3510 Estimate: $50 - $75

209. 1 real, 1669E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.7 grams. Bold 69 date between pillars and 16 in legend, good cross, some corrosion and flatness. With ROBCAR certificate #3535 Estimate: $50 - $75

217. 1 real, 1673E. S-P37b, KM-23, 4.1 grams. Small, thick flan with bold cross, clear date, some corrosion, overweight planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3539 Estimate: $50 - $75

210. 1 real, 1669?E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.1 grams. Broad planchet with good cross and other nice detail despite flatness (no corrosion), 3 mintmarks and assayers. With ROBCAR certificate #3534 Estimate: $50 - $75

218. 1 real, 1674E. S-P37b, KM-23, 4.1 grams. Full ANO 1674 in legend, clear date between pillars too, decent cross, some flatness and corrosion, overweight planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3507 Estimate: $50 - $75

211. 1 real, 1671E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.2 grams. Decent pillars and cross, some flatness, no corrosion to speak of. With ROBCAR certificate #3514 Estimate: $50 - $75

219. 1 real, 1674E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.4 grams. Excellent pillars, well-detailed cross, 3 assayers, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3519 Estimate: $50 - $75

49


220. 1 real, 1674E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.5 grams. Full cross and pillars, light corrosion and some flatness, somewhat turnipshaped flan. With ROBCAR certificate #3548 Estimate: $50 - $75

228. 1 real, 1677E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.7 grams. Nicely detailed pillars and cross, 2 dates and mintmarks, no corrosion to speak of. With ROBCAR certificate #3547 Estimate: $50 - $75

221. 1 real, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.3 grams. Good full cross, bold date between pillars, light corrosion only around edge. With ROBCAR certificate #3527 Estimate: $50 - $75

229. 1 real, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.0 grams. Choice full cross and pillars (one lion perfect), bold date, 2 assayers, minor flatness and corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3508 Estimate: $50 - $75

222. 1 real, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-23, 4.1 grams. Thick, overweight planchet with bold date below full cross, second date between corroded pillars. With ROBCAR certificate #3522 Estimate: $50 $75

230. 1 real, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.0 grams. Nice full cross, good but doubled pillars, 2 dates and mintmarks, minimal corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3513 Estimate: $50 - $75

223. 1 real, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.0 grams. Broad planchet with full cross and pillars (both a little crude), full crown, 2 dates and assayers, some corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3525 Estimate: $50 - $75

231. 1 real, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.9 grams. Choice full crown, one good pillar, nearly full cross, 2 dates, bold king’s ordinal II, some flatness but no corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3515 Estimate: $50 - $75

224. 1 real, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-23, 2.0 grams. Good full cross, off-center pillars, 2 dates, minor corrosion and flat spots. With ROBCAR certificate #3538 Estimate: $50 - $75

232. 1 real, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.7 grams. Bold date below nearly full but somewhat flat cross, most of pillars and crown above, light corrosion, overweight planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3520 Estimate: $50 - $75

225. 1 real, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.3 grams. Full cross, good pillars, interesting shape, peripheral flatness but no corrosion to speak of. With ROBCAR certificate #3544 Estimate: $50 - $75

226. 1 real, 1677E. S-P37b, KM-23, 3.8 grams. Choice, welldetailed cross-lions-castles (slightly off-center), bold date and waves, 2 assayers, no corrosion, overweight planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3512 Estimate: $50 - $75 227. 1 real, 1677E. S-P37b, KM-23, 4.8 grams. Good full cross and waves, bold date and part of another, no corrosion but some flatness, turnip-shaped flan, very overweight planchet. With ROBCAR certificate #3531 Estimate: $50 - $75

233. 1 real, 16??E (Charles II). S-P37a or P37b, KM-13, or 23 3.0 grams. Good cross (one super lion), off-center pillars with extra metal in middle of left pillar, 2 assayers, full EL PERV in legend, some flatness but no corrosion. With ROBCAR certificate #3545 Estimate: $30 - $50

234. ½ real, 1664. S-P37a, KM-B12, 0.5 gram. Good but offcenter cross, moderately corroded monogram with clear date below, thin planchet, scarce denomination from a shipwreck. With ROBCAR certificate #3554 Estimate: $30 - $50

50


235. ½ real, 1667? (Charles II). S-P37b, KM-22, 1.7 grams. Good full monogram, nearly full cross, interesting shape with sharp point, some corrosion, scarce denomination from a shipwreck. With ROBCAR certificate #3553 Estimate: $30 - $50 236. ½ real, 1670?. S-P37b, KM-22, 0.6 gram. Bold CA in monogram, decent but off-center cross with partial date in legend, thin and small from corrosion, scarce denomination from a shipwreck. With ROBCAR certificate #3555 Estimate: $30 - $50

240. Natural clump of two 4 reales, one with date and assayer 1679V visible. 21.9 grams. Good full cross on the coin that does not show a date, other coin pillars-side out with clear date and assayer, no encrustation, just two coins stuck together as found. With ROBCAR certificate #3557 Estimate: $200 - $300

237. ½ real, 1674. S-P37b, KM-22, 0.7 gram. Bold date and right half of monogram, good but off-center cross, not much corrosion but nearly half of coin flat, scarce denomination from a shipwreck. With ROBCAR certificate #3552 Estimate: $30 - $50 238. ½ real, Charles II, date not visible. KM-22, 0.8 gram. Good cross, most of monogram, moderate corrosion, scarce denomination from a shipwreck. With ROBCAR certificate #3551 Estimate: $30 - $50

241. Natural clump of two 1 reales, one with clear date 1678/ 7 and the other with clear date 1679 (assayers not visible). 4.5 grams. Bold 78 date with clear 8/7 (rare overdate) on one coin, clear 79 and P on other coin, both cross-side out, no encrustation, just two coins stuck together as found. With ROBCAR certificate #3558 Estimate: $100 - $150

Joanna, sunk in 1682 off Cape Town, South Africa 239. Natural clump of two 8 reales, both assayer V, one with 1679 date visible. 44.7 grams. Choice full cross on the coin that does not show a date, with CARO(LVS) in legend, the other coin with pillars-side out (worn, but with date and assayer visible), no encrustation, just two coins stuck together as found. With ROBCAR certificate #3556 Estimate: $200 - $300

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242. Mexico, cob 8 reales, Charles II, assayer not visible. 23.7 grams. Typical specimen with central details only, worn and flat around the edge, with only minor corrosion, very thick and solid. With generic certificate. Estimate: $60 - $90

51


1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida Association, sunk in 1707 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England

243. Potosí, Bolivia, cob 8 reales, 1652E transitional Type I Royal, with Brazilian 600-reis c/m (Type III, 1663) above shield. S-P37, KM-A20.1 (c/m unlisted), 25.7 grams. A true “wonder coin” with so many distinctions it is hard to know where to start! First of all, the countermark/host combination is unknown (unlisted in KM, which gives a value of $5,000 in VF for the equally rare “Star of Lima” 8R of 1659 with the same c/m) and the countermark itself is quite bold and clear. The host coin itself, like most Royals, is remarkably round and well struck (for the type), albeit with a few flat spots and minor doubling, and in fact the pillars-side die is an exact match with Lázaro #117 (which the author valued at $45,000!), and also it is very well preserved, with only a trace of corrosion and nicely toned on the fields. Note also that this is the very rare Type I, with just F-8IIII above PL-VSVL-TRA and no third line above the waves. Lastly, consider the wreck, which is known for an odd assortment of coins, but not for this early type, which was struck some 55 years before the sinking, during which time the coin must have hitched a ride to Brazil and thence to Europe, either via London or the Mediterranean campaign from whence the ill-fated Admiral Shovell was returning! Don’t let the low estimate fool you—this coin could go for another wild ride! With hand-signed certificate from the Isles of Scilly. Estimate: $3,500 - $10,000

Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

(all Mexico cobs)

244. 8 reales, 1714(J), mounted in 18K necklace bezel. S-M22, KM-47, 32.9 grams (with bezel). The 714 date on this coin is amazingly bold, and the coin itself is very solid (no corrosion at all, nicely toned, with nearly full cross and crown) but with some flat areas as expected, so it is a little out of place in a necklace bezel that does not even align with either axis! Buy it for the date and use the gold for something else. Estimate: $300 - $475

245. 8 reales, Philip V, assayer J. S-M22, KM-47 26.6 grams. Dark and a bit crystalline in texture as uncleaned, also an odd shape, with most of shield and cross and oMJ peeking out (should clean up nicely, if so desired). Estimate: $125 - $175

246. 4 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible. 12.4 grams. Very bold full shield and full cross (both well centered), mostly contrasting toning, no corrosion but obviously cleaned. Estimate: $75 - $100

52


Unidentified ca.-1718 wreck off Peru

247. Lima, Peru, cob 8 reales, 1718(M). S-L20, KM-34, 25.0 grams. A thick, round lump of a coin, with nearly full cross and pillars, weak but certain date, with patchy toning and sporadic pitting from corrosion, mysterious (unconfirmed) shipwreck origin. Estimate: $60 - $90

250. 8 reales, 1732F. S-M26, KM-47a, 23.3 grams. Very thick planchet with full date and oM, nearly full cross (slightly offcenter), lightly to moderately corroded all over, silvery from cleaning. With two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #74 from the salvager. Estimate: $175 - $225

1733 Fleet (“Coffins Patch� site) (all Mexico mint) Cobs 251. 8 reales, 1732F. S-M26, KM-47a, 19.7 grams. Full oMF and 173 of date, but last digit has a flat base, so we call it a 2 even though the salvager (via his certificate) calls it a 3 (which would be scarce), most of shield, nearly full cross, solid but pitted all over, silvery from cleaning. With two-page, hand-signed photocertificate #90 from the salvager. Estimate: $125 - $175

248. 8 reales, 1731F. S-M26, KM-47a, 21.4 grams. Bold full date and oM mintmark, well-centered cross but off-center shield, solid coin but with moderate corrosion all over and silvery from cleaning. With two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #52 from the salvager. Estimate: $175 - $225

252. 8 reales, 173(3?)F. S-M26, KM-47a 22.2 grams. Now this one could be a 1733, but it is impossible to be sure, as it is corroded over the last digit, yet with other surfaces unscathed, leaving a perfect oMF and part of shield, the cross pitted and off-center. With two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #81 from the salvager.

Estimate: $125 - $175

249. 8 reales, 1732F. S-M26, KM-47a, 22.6 grams. Full date with perfectly bold 173 and oMF, nearly full cross, most of shield, some moderate pitting but also some pristine surfaces, no toning.

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

With two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #57 from the salvager.

Estimate: $175 - $225

53


than oM or oXM), with beautiful, lustrous AU pillars side but lightly to moderately corroded shield side (all details still clear), very silvery from cleaning and polishing. With two-page, handsigned photo-certificate #20 from the salvager. Estimate: $1,000 $1,300

253. 8 reales, Philip V, assayer F. S-M26, KM-47a 20.2 grams. Nice, thick, oblong planchet with bold oMF, nearly full shield, moderately corroded, bottom part of date only (not enough to attribute). With two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #67 from the salvager. Estimate: $150 - $200

257. 8 reales, 1733F. CT-693, KM-103, 25.9 grams. Normal mintmark (oM) and better specimen overall, with 95% of the surfaces absolutely pristine (no corrosion) but all overly cleaned and polished. With two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #10 from the salvager. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

254. 8 reales, Philip V, assayer F. S-M26, KM-47a 21.9 grams. Squarish flan with full oMF and 17 of date (the rest corroded, as is much of the coin), most of cross, silvery from cleaning. With

Vliegenthart, sunk in 1753 off Zeeland, the Netherlands

two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #42 from the salvager.

Estimate: $125 - $175

(all Mexico cobs)

255. 8 reales, Philip V, assayer F. S-M26, KM-47a 21.1 grams. Another thick, squarish cob with full oMF, most of cross, moderately corroded. With two-page, hand-signed photo-certificate #94 from the salvager. Estimate: $125 - $175

258. 8 reales, (17)29(R). S-M24, KM-47a, 22.0 grams. Full 29 of date (scarce), most of shield, nearly full cross, nicely toned but with areas of heavy corrosion. With generic certificate. Estimate: $125 - $175

Pillar dollars

256. 8 reales, 1733F, mintmark M•X. CT-695, KM-103 24.4 grams. Very rare one-year mintmark variant (in fact the only instance since the 1570s where the mintmark was anything other

259. 8 reales, 1732(F). S-M26, KM-47a, 25.7 grams. Very thick planchet with full 732 of date and oMF, about 40% shield, nearly full cross, nicely toned and with minimal corrosion. With generic certificate. Estimate: $125 - $175

54


Rooswijk, sunk in 1739 off southeast England (all Mexican pillar dollars)

263. 8 reales, Philip V, 1736MF. CT-138, KM-103, 26.8 grams. AU details under light encrustation and patchy toning, virtually no corrosion. With color certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $250 - $350

260. 8 reales, Philip V, 1735MF. CT-138, KM-103, 26.6 grams. Choice specimen with XF details on both sides, practically no corrosion but patchy toning, nice early date. With color certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $250 - $350

Princess Louisa, sunk in 1743 off the Cape Verde Islands, west of Africa

261. 8 reales, Philip V, 1735MF. CT-138, KM-103, 26.0 grams. AU details under spots of encrustation, minimal corrosion, nice early date. With color certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $250 - $350

264. Natural clump of 10 silver cobs and debris. 55.1 grams. Beautiful, sprawling array of cobs and small pebbles (as found), the coins mostly corroded and/or with pieces missing but with some good details (full crosses on both top and bottom coins), some orangish concretion between the coins, hard item to find these days since the salvagers would rather tear up the clumps and hope to find a rarity inside. With certificate Estimate: $500 $700

262. 8 reales, Philip V, 1736MF. CT-138, KM-103, 26.8 grams. Lightly polished XF with spots of encrustation, no corrosion to speak of, choice for salvage. With color certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $250 - $350

Please visit our website at www.sedwickcoins.com!

55


Hollandia, sunk in 1743 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England

265. Holland, United Netherlands, “Rider” ducatoon, 1672, mounted in sterling silver necklace bezel with 26" chain. KM51,48.3 grams (including bezel and chain). Choice specimen with full inner details (particular the “rider” knight on horse) and nearly full legends on both sides, minimal corrosion, XF details, starting to tone, scarce early date. With original, hand-signed, numbered certificate from the salvagers. Estimate: $150 - $250 266. Overijssel, United Netherlands, “Rider” ducatoon, 1742, mounted in sterling silver necklace bezel with 27" chain. KM-80, 56.8 grams (including bezel and chain). Incredibly lustrous Mint State with the barest trace of corrosion, silvery from cleaning but starting to tone around edge, perfect full details on entire coin. With rare (small, 1970s vintage) certificate from Nowell “Chippy” Pearce (one of the original divers on the Association wreck) Estimate: $150 - $250

Dodington, sunk in 1755 off Port Elizabeth, South Africa 267. Potosí, Bolivia, cob 8 reales, 1752q. S-P52, KM-40, 23.9 grams. Bold full date and assayer on pillars side, full assayer and half a date on the cross side, typically chunky and corroded but not so shiny as most, attractive square shape. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $200

56


Tilbury, sunk in 1757 off Nova Scotia, Canada (all Mexican pillar dollars)

271. 8 reales, 1663E. S-P37a, KM-21, 24.9 grams. Choice full cross, good full pillars and waves (slightly doubled), king’s ordinal IIII in legend, 2 assayers, 2½ mintmarks, light corrosion only, lightly toned on fields. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250 268. 8 reales, Ferdinand VI, 1754MM. CT-294, KM-104.2 24.6 grams. Typical specimen from this wreck with light to moderate corrosion all over, not much contrast but some nice details, worth a premium for the original certificate. With large, color certificate hand-signed by the salvagers. Estimate: $175 - $275

272. 8 reales, 1668E. S-P37b, KM-26, 24.5 grams. Full (C) AROLV(S) and 1668 date in legend, second date under nearly full but slightly off-center cross, crude edge with 3 small splits and upturned piece, lightly corroded with gold toning. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250 269. 8 reales, Ferdinand VI, 1753J. CT-277, KM-55.1, 18.3 grams. Slightly bent and moderately corroded but with important details still visible, light pink toning, worth a premium for the original certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

Piedmont (“Lyme Bay wreck”), sunk in 1795 in Lyme Bay, south of England (all Potosí, Bolivia, cobs)

270. 8 reales, 1657E. S-P37a, KM-21, 26.0 grams. Very early coin for this wreck (struck almost 140 years before the sinking!), with good full pillars and waves, full but doubled cross, 2 dates, 3 mintmarks, 2½ assayers, typically lightly corroded and darkly toned. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

273. 8 reales, 1669(E). S-P37b, KM-26, 25.0 grams. Two bold dates, bold ANO in legend plus most of CA(R)OLV(S), most of cross and pillars, minimal corrosion but some flatness, darkly toned. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

274. 8 reales, 1673E. S-P37b, KM-26, 26.2 grams. Small thick flan with 3 dates (full and bold 1673 in legend!), much of king’s name, nearly full cross, minimal corrosion but several flat spots, darkly toned. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

57


275. 8 reales, 1674E. S-P37b, KM-26, 25.4 grams. Big, rectangular planchet with full cross, bold 74 between pillars, lightly corroded and darkly toned. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

279. 8 reales, 1679C. S-P38, KM-26, 26.6 grams. Good pillarsand-waves, bold assayer and 3 mintmarks, off-center cross, darkly toned with a minimum of corrosion but some flatness, edge-split. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

276. 8 reales, 1675E. S-P37b, KM-26, 25.1 grams. Nice full pillars and waves, nearly full but doubled cross, 3 dates, 2 mintmarks and assayers, no corrosion to speak of but some flatness, darkly toned. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $200

280. 8 reales, 1680V. S-P39, KM-26, 25.6 grams. Good full cross and pillars despite flatness, 3 mintmarks, 2 assayers, minimal corrosion, dark tone. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 $250

277. 8 reales, 1676E. S-P37b, KM-26, 25.8 grams. Broad flan with full cross, nearly full but off-center pillars, bold 167 in legend, 3 bold mintmarks, light corrosion, gray toning. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

281. 4 reales, 1659E. S-P37a, KM-18, 10.5 grams. Two dates, bold waves, nearly full cross, lightly corroded and darkly toned, as is typical, but very early issue for this wreck. With generic certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325. 278. 8 reales, 1678E. S-P37b, KM-26, 25.2 grams. Nice full cross and pillars, all 3 dates and mintmarks and assayers visible due to perfect centering on a smallish flan, minimal corrosion, dark tone, edge-split. With generic certificate. Estimate: $150 - $250

58


HMS Lutine, sunk in 1799 off Terschelling Island, the Netherlands

284. 3-coin clump of 8 reales. 91.7 grams. A beautiful “sea sculpture,” with the three coins at odd angles to one another, none with visible data but all three covered with greenish encrustation and lots of small pebbles and shells. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $150 - $200

282. Mexico, bust 8 reales, Charles IV, 1797FM. CT-652, KM10925.8 grams. Uncleaned coin with dark tone and some encrustation, yet with all important details visible, worth a big premium for the accompanying presentation box and certificate from the 1930s. Housed in a custom, blue-leather presentation box

285. 2-coin clump of 8 reales. 57.8 grams. A thick two-coin stack with the date (1800) and king’s ordinal (IIII) plainly visible on the top coin, the bottom coin totally cocooned in white and green encrustation, quite a neat display for just two coins. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

with small 1938 certificate hand-signed by the Chairman of Lloyd’s of London. Estimate: $175 - $250

Leocadia, sunk in 1800 off Punta Santa Elena, Ecuador (all Lima, Peru, busts)

286. 2-coin clump of bust 8 reales. 58.3 grams. While still a neat display, this two-coin stack does not offer much numismatic interest, as both coins are reverse-side out, with beautiful green encrustation on most of the surface. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

283. 4-coin clump of 8 reales. 108.1 grams. Attractively encrusted “leaning stack” of 8 reales, no details visible but with lots of tan and orange coating and debris, a curious display of how the coins are found, and scarce due to the divers’ habit of cleaning up everything to find rarities. With Sedwick photocertificate. Estimate: $150 - $200

59


287. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-631, KM-97, 26.6 grams. Although the patchy toning on this coin does not bring it out, this coin is practically Mint State, with some luster and really not a lick of corrosion or flaws except for some light adjustment marks on the bust—a clear candidate for the “restoration experts”! Certainly the best specimen from this wreck we have ever handled. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $125 - $175

291. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-631, KM-97, 22.3 grams. Light to moderate corrosion all over does not detract from the attractive details and smooth satin toning, light adjustment marks on bust. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $75 - $125 292. No lot.

Unidentified ca.-1850 wreck off the Dominican Republic (all U.S.A.)

288. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-631, KM-97, 26.1 grams. Beautiful contrasting toning on this piece outweighs the minimal evidence of corrosion, making this one of the best specimens from this wreck we have ever seen. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150 293. Philadelphia, 50 cents (“seated Liberty”), 1844. KM-68, 13.3 grams. Lustrous Mint State underneath patches of encrustation and staining (but no corrosion), would be beautiful if cleaned, but then you would lose the salvage evidence, which seems to add $1000 of value to big-name U.S. wrecks like Republic and Central America. Estimate: $100 - $150

289. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-631, KM-97, 24.6 grams. Another well-contrasted beauty but with light corrosion all over. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $100 - $150

294. New Orleans, 50 cents (“seated Liberty”), 1847-O. KM68 13.2 grams. As above, just a different date and mint (antebellum New Orleans, if that matters). Estimate: $100 $150

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290. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800IJ. CT-631, KM-97, 23.8 grams. Nice details (and beautiful toning) despite some heavy pitting from corrosion. With Sedwick photo-certificate. Estimate: $75 $125

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“Manila Bay treasure,” dumped in Manila Bay, the Philippines, in 1942

Lusitania, torpedoed and sunk in 1916

(all Philippines)

295. Peso. KM-177, 17.7 grams. Dollar-sized coin with portraits of Presidents Roosevelt and Quezon on obverse, lightly corroded and cleaned but with all important details quite clear. Estimate: $25 - $50

298. Great Britain, steel medal commemorating the sinking of the Lusitania in 1916. 59.1 grams. About 2" in diameter and 1/ 8" thick, made in imitation of a German propaganda medal made after the sinking of the Lusitania in 1916, with a depiction of the disaster on one side with German wording announcing the sinking of the Lusitania in exergue, and a scene of passengers buying tickets from a skeletal Cunard attendant on the other side, perfect condition save for some tiny rust spots. Estimate: $100 $120

296. Peso. KM-178, 17.7 grams. Dollar-sized coin with portraits of Governor General Murphy and President Quezon on obverse, lightly corroded and cleaned but with all important details quite clear. Estimate: $25 - $50

MEDALS PERTAINING TO SHIPS AND SHIPWRECKS

U.S.S. Olympia, permanently decommissioned in 1922

HMS Victory, retired in 1812, dry-docked in the 1920s

297. Medallion struck from copper taken from the ship, stamped with “Save the Victory Fund”. 13.6 grams. Similar to the Olympia medallion below (lot #299), this piece was struck from copper from the ship itself in an effort to raise funds to preserve the ship, which has been in dry-dock in Portsmouth, England, since the 1920s. The HMS Victory was famous for her role in the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805; seven years later she was retired from active duty and used for ceremonial purposes. Estimate: $100 - $150

299. Bronze medal struck from the propeller of Admiral Dewey’s flagship. 13.7 grams. Curious item, a medallion (in perfect condition, nice golden color) that was struck as a fundraiser in the 1960s from the actual bronze propeller from the cruiser Olympia, Admiral Dewey’s flagship in the Battle of Manila Bay (Philippines) in the Spanish-American War (1898). The ship is now docked at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia and is the only warship from the Spanish American War still in existence. Estimate: $75 - $100

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SILVER COBS MEXICO Charles-Joanna, “Late Series” (1542-1571)

304. 8 reales, Philip IV, oMD (1630s). S-M18a, KM-45, 27.7 grams. Solid coin but very crusty from burial (impossible to determine grade without cleaning) and with several test-cuts, dark gray all over. Estimate: $50 - $75

300. 4 reales, M-O. S-M10, KM-18, 13.4 grams. Choice detail (bold legends) and nice contrast, toned AVF. Estimate: $250 $375

301. ½ real, oM-o-o, very rare error with “S-V-P” (for PLVS) across middle. S-M10, KM-6.5, 1.4 grams. Very apparent error (backwards motto) despite crude strike, broad planchet, Fine with hole near edge (plus another, smaller attempted hole). Estimate: $100 - $200

305. 8 reales, Philip IV, oMP (ca. 1650). S-M19, KM-45, 27.5 grams. Bold assayer and denomination, nearly full shield and cross, richly old-toned VF with two tiny test-cuts on edge. Estimate: $80 - $120

302. ½ real, oM-o-o. S-M10, KM-6.5, 1.5 grams. Very richly toned AXF with barely noticeable edge-split, nearly full legends, perfect inner details. Estimate: $275 - $375

Shield-type cobs (1571-1733)

306. 8 reales, Philip IV or Charles II, assayer not visible, cut down to approximately the size of a 4 reales, with test-cuts. 13.9 grams. Curious rhomboid cut, the diminution probably not intentional so much as the result of over-zealous testing of the metal (via cutting) by merchants in China, whence this came. Uncleaned and impossible to grade, but with some shield and cross showing. Estimate: $25 - $50

303. 8 reales, Philip III, oMF. S-M12a, KM-44.1, 27.4 grams. Choice full shield and cross, full oMF, richly old-toned Fine+ Estimate: $150 - $250

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LIMA, PERU Early pillars type (1568-1571)

307. 8 reales, Philip V, assayer not visible, chopmarks. KM-47, 26.9 grams. Most of shield and cross, the latter sprinkled with four clear chopmarks from circulation in the Orient, non-toned Fine. Estimate: $80 - $120

308. 1 real, (16)24/3(D). S-M18a, KM-unlisted, 3.0 grams. Clear 24 of date (rare), most of shield and cross and oM mintmark, Fine with toning in crevices. Estimate: $110 - $185

310. 4 reales, Philip II, assayer R (Rincón) to left. S-L1, KM10.1, 11.5 grams. Nice specimens of this very rare issue (effectively the highest available denomination of the first coinage ever made in South America) typically go for $2500 and up, but this is not what we would call a “nice specimen”: worn, doubled, and probably shaved since the edge is smooth and the weight is low. Still, the details are clear (particularly the allimportant assayer R, as well as the denomination 4), and there is no corrosion, just good, honest wear (VG+). Estimate: $1,000 $1,250

Shield type (1577-1592)

Klippe type (1733-1734)

311. 1 real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre, *-I to left, PoD to right. S-L4, KM-7, 3.3 grams. Choice AU specimen with very crisp detail in the full shield and cross, nearly full crown but very little legend (small planchet), bold P-oD, very attractively toned. Estimate: $200 - $275 309. 8 reales, 1733MF, with Guatemala sun-over-mountains c/m (Type II) of 1839. S-M28, KM-48 (107 under Guatemala for c/ m), 26.7 grams. Beautiful broad planchet (full crown and date, nearly full legends, perfect inner details) marred by a crude hole in the periphery, VF with lovely toning, the countermark in the shield very deep (XF details). Estimate: $700 - $900 312. ½ real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre, oD to left, * to right. S-L4, KM-5, 1.5 grams. Broad planchet (nearly full crown and legends), nice full inner details, AVF with contrasting toning on fields. Estimate: $150 - $225

Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

313. ½ real, Philip II, assayer Diego de la Torre, oD to left, * to right. S-L4, KM-5, 1.7 grams. Beautiful full legends and bold crown but inner details a bit doubled, nicely toned XF. Estimate: $100 - $150

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POTOSI, BOLIVIA

Pillars-and-waves type (1684-1752)

Shield-type (1574-1652)

Note: Lots marked with an asterisk (*) come from an early-1630s hoard in southern Peru.

314. 8 reales, 1698H. S-L13, KM-24, 27.3 grams. Full and wellcentered cross and pillars, 2 dates, 2½ assayers, richly toned Fine. With ANACS photo-certificate. Estimate: $175 - $225 320. 8 reales, Philip II, P-B (5th period), borders of x’s. S-P14, KM-5.5, 27.1 grams. Nice full crown and shield and cross, clear PB (slightly doubled) and denomination o-VIII, broad planchet with much legend, clear borders of x’s, but only Fine with patchy toning. Estimate: $200 - $250

315. 1 real, 1686R. S-L7, KM-20, 3.6 grams. Big, oblong planchet with nice full cross and pillars, 2 assayers, flat peripheries, otherwise VF with rich toning all over. Estimate: $75 - $100 316. ½ real, 1697. S-L13, KM-22, 1.2 grams. Nearly full date, monogram and cross, XF but probably salvaged (slightly grainy). Estimate: $50 - $75

*321. 8 reales, Philip III (ordinal visible), P-B (5th period). SP14a, KM-10, 27.1 grams. Very rare issue with king’s ordinal III visible in legend, and a nice specimen too, with full shield and cross, bold P-B, minor planchet-flaw above cross, cleaned and re-toned AVF. Estimate: $300 - $400 317. ½ real, 1741. S-L22, KM-30a, 0.9 gram. Full monogram with mintmark L to left, assayer V to right, and bold 741 date below, nearly full cross, VF with flat spots. Estimate: $50 - $75 318. ½ real, 1748. S-L22a, KM-41, 1.4 grams. Toned VF with bold date below full monogram, mintmark L to left, nearly full cross, small planchet. Estimate: $50 - $75

*322. 8 reales, Philip III, P-R (curved leg), commas in legend. S-P15, KM-10, 26.9 grams. Unique variety with commas separating words in legend, good full crown and shield, full but crude cross, uneven and oddly shaped planchet, VF+ with sediment on fields. Estimate: $500 - $700

319. ½ real, 1751. S-L23, KM-41, 1.8 grams. Bold full date, full but partially flat monogram, mintmark L to left, probably Fine underneath. Estimate: $50 - $75

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*323. 8 reales, Philip III, P-R (curved leg). S-P15, KM-10, 27.1 grams. Bold P-R, nice full shield and crown and cross, VF with some central flatness, nicely toned. Estimate: $200 - $300

*327. 8 reales, Philip III, P-M. S-P18, KM-10, 27.0 grams. Good full shield and cross, bold denomination o-VIII, king’s name PHIL(IPPVS) in legend, AVF with sediment on fields, somewhat crude planchet. Estimate: $200 - $300

*324. 8 reales, Philip III, P-R (curved leg). S-P15, KM-10, 27.5 grams. Good full shield and crown and cross, weak P-R, AVF with brownish sediment on fields, uneven planchet. Estimate: $150 - $250

328. 8 reales, Philip III, P+T (ca. 1620). S-P21, KM-10, 25.3 grams. Darkly toned as from burial or salvage (otherwise AXF), good full cross (quadrants transposed) and shield. Estimate: $150 - $200

325. 8 reales, Philip III, P-Q. S-P17, KM-10, 27.1 grams. Round planchet with choice full cross-lions-castles, nice full shield, bold assayer Q and denomination o-VIII, VF+ with uneven toning. With ANACS photo-certificate. Estimate: $150 - $200

*329. 8 reales, “16ZIII,” P+T, possibly finest known. S-P22a, KM-19, 27.2 grams. Big round planchet with full shield and cross (quadrants transposed), full P+T, most of legends, including a very clear 16ZIII (1623 date), a very rare and curious issue resulting from a lack of proper number punches, cleaned and retoned AVF. Estimate: $500 - $750

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

326. 8 reales, Philip III, P-Q, cut and chopmarked. S-P17, KM-10, 27.1 grams. Very crude specimen with no less than 19(!) test-cuts around the edge, dark surfaces with spots of blue-green (uncleaned and impossible to grade), most of shield and cross barely visible. Estimate: $50 - $80

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*334. 8 reales, (1)629T, denomination 8, large dots in borders. S-P26, KM-19a, 27.1 grams. Uneven planchet with much flatness (otherwise VF) but bold 29 of date, full shield and cross, some sediment and verdigris. Estimate: $350 - $575

*330. 8 reales, (162)4, P•P. S-P23, KM-19 26.7 grams. Bold P•P and clear bottom half of 4 of date (extremely rare), good and nearly full shield and cross (quadrants transposed, slightly doubled), typically crude, VF with sediment on fields. Estimate: $300 - $400

*335. 8 reales, 1629T, denomination 8, small dots in reverse border. S-P26, KM-19a, 26.2 grams. Nice full shield and cross, bold 29 of date, very elegant new border of dots, VF+ with slightly patchy toning. Estimate: $350 - $575

*331. 8 reales, (16)28T. S-P24, KM-19a, 27.0 grams. Choice full shield and cross, clear bottom half of “Z8” of date, AXF with spotty toning and verdigris. Estimate: $300 - $500

*332. 8 reales, 16(2)8P/T. S-P25, KM-19a, 26.4 grams. Nice full shield, full cross with bold 16 and bottom half of 8 of date, full P•P with the assayer clearly punched over a T (very rare), cleaned and re-toned AXF. Estimate: $350 - $450

*336. 8 reales, 1630, •P•T•, denomination •8•. S-P26, KM-19a, 27.4 grams. Well-detailed full shield (slightly doubled), good full cross, all four digits of date plainly visible, VF+ with spots of toning. Estimate: $450 - $675

*333. 8 reales, (1)6229T (doubled date, with two clear 2’s), denomination 8, large dots in borders. S-P26, KM-19a, 27.3 grams. Very bold full cross (slightly doubled), nice full shield, bold P-T, nearly full 6229 of date with the penultimate digit very clear twice due to doubling, AXF with sediment on fields. Estimate: $500 - $700

*337. 8 reales, (1)630T, denomination x8x. S-P26, KM-19a, 27.0 grams. Very nice cross with very bold 30 of date, full but slightly doubled shield, AXF with rich toning all over. Estimate: $350 $575

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*338. 8 reales, Philip IV, (P)-T (ca. 1630), denomination x8(x). S-P26, KM-19a, 26.9 grams. Choice full shield and cross, VF with sediment on fields, peripheral flatness. Estimate: $200 $300

*342. 4 reales, Philip III, P-Q. S-P17, KM-9, 13.5 grams. Beautiful round planchet with perfect inner details, bold P-Q, lightly toned AVF, one of the best specimens possible. Estimate: $200 - $300

*343. 4 reales, 1629T, large dots in borders. S-P26, KM-17a, 13.6 grams. Bold date (rare), nearly full shield and cross, VF but somewhat crude planchet, unevenly toned. Estimate: $500 $700 339. 8 reales, Philip IV, P-T (early 1640s). S-P30, KM-19a, 24.0 grams. Good full cross, full but typically crude shield, silvery with spots of rusty sediment, very underweight but full flan, typical of this period of debased silver. Estimate: $100 - $150

*344. 4 reales, 1629, •P•T•, denomination o-IIII, small dots in reverse border. S-P26, KM-17a, 13.7 grams. Good full shield and cross, clear bottom half of 629 of date (rare), full mintmarkassayer, cleaned and re-toned AXF. Estimate: $300 - $400 *340. 4 reales, Philip III, P-R (curved leg). S-P15, KM-9, 13.6 grams. Nice clear assayer, full shield and cross, Fine+ with sediment on fields. Estimate: $150 - $250

*341. 4 reales, Philip III, P-R (curved leg). S-P15, KM-9, 13.7 grams. Nice full shield and cross, large edge-split, Fine+ with sediment on fields. Estimate: $135 - $225

*345. 4 reales, (1)630T, denomination (o)-IIII. S-P26, KMunlisted, 14.2 grams. Full but crudely doubled shield and 630 of date (rare), full cross, VF+ with sediment and spots of verdigris. Estimate: $500 - $700

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*350. 2 reales, 1629T, large dots in borders. S-P26, KM-14a, 6.8 grams. Very high grade (AU+) with crisp detail in shield and *346. 4 reales, Philip IV, P-T (ca. 1630). S-P26, KM-17a, 13.8 grams. Nice and full but slightly doubled shield, full cross, crude edge, VF+ with lots of sediment on fields. Estimate: $150 $250

*347. 2 reales, 1626T/P, denomination z over o-II. S-P24, KM14a, 6.8 grams. Very rare date (clear bottoms of 62 and bottom half of final 6), unusually round and well-centered planchet, slightly doubled denomination clearly manifest as a small “z” punched over “o-II” (unique to this date), also clear over-assayer T/P, nice full shield and cross, cleaned and re-toned VF+. Estimate: $450 - $575

cross (but both with flatness to right), full 1629 date (very rare thus), broad and roundish planchet, cleaned and re-toned. Estimate: $350 - $500

*351. 2 reales, (16)30T. S-P26, KM-14a, 6.0 grams. Crisply detailed shield and cross (both nearly full), clear 0 of date (scarce), somewhat odd shape, cleaned and re-toned XF+. Estimate: $300 - $400 352. 1 real, Philip IV, P-O to left (1649). S-P35, KM-12b, 3.4 grams. Nice full cross, nearly full shield, About Fine. Estimate: $60 - $90

353. 1 real, Philip IV, P-O to left, neater style (1650-1). S-P35, KM-12b, 3.4 grams. Broad planchet but with much flatness, otherwise VF, darkly toned, probably salvaged. Estimate: $50 $80 *348. 2 reales, (1)628P/T, denomination Z. S-P25, KM-14a 6.6 grams. Very crisp full shield and cross, bold 8 of date and clear over-assayer P/T (very rare), cleaned AXF with the beginnings of attractive rainbow toning. Estimate: $300 - $400

354. ½ real, Philip II, assayer L below monogram, P to left. SP3, KM-1.2, 1.6 grams. Typically broad, thin planchet with full inner details, full crown and nearly full legends, attractively toned VF, scarce early issue. Estimate: $125 - $200

1652 transitional

*349. 2 reales, (1)629T, denomination z, large dots in borders. S-P26, KM-14a, 7.0 grams. Bold date (rare), full shield and cross, AVF with some flat spots, heavy sediment on fields. Estimate: $400 - $525

355. 1 real, (1652)E McLean Type II. S-P37, KM-B13.2, 1.8 grams. Nice pillars-and-waves with clear I’s in the central column, good but off-center shield, lightly toned AVF, scarce. Estimate: $75 - $125

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356. ½ real, (1652E) McLean Type IIb with upside-down V for A in PLVS VLTRA. S-P37, KM-A12.5, 0.9 gram. Clear motto with unusual (and unique) error, nice little cross as well, attractively toned AXF, slightly grainy from salvage. Estimate: $100 - $150

360. 8 reales, 1669E. S-P37b, KM-26, 26.9 grams. Lots of detail (full cross and pillars-and-waves, 2 bold dates, 3 bold assayers, king’s name CAROLVS), toned AVF with minor corrosion (probably salvaged). Estimate: $200 - $250

357. ½ real, (1652E) McLean Type IIe. S-P37, KM-A12.6, 1.4 grams. Crude from salvage (VG+) but with most details clear, scarce type. Estimate: $40 - $60

Pillars-and-waves (1652-1773)

361. 8 reales, 1671E. S-P37b, KM-26, 24.3 grams. Non-toned About Fine (salvaged, probably from a ca.-1671 wreck in Seville harbor, Spain) with much flatness, nearly full cross and pillars, 2 assayers. Estimate: $100 - $150

358. 8 reales, 1662E. S-P37a, KM-21, 27.1 grams. Big, lemonshaped planchet with full but slightly doubled cross and pillarsand-waves, 3 dates, 2 mintmarks and assayers, richly toned VF. Estimate: $150 - $200

362. 8 reales, 1687VR. S-P40, KM-26, 28.2 grams. Broad flan with 2 dates, 3 mintmarks, nice full crown, full but doubled cross and pillars, king’s name CAROLVS, Fine+ with many flat spots. Estimate: $150 - $200

359. 8 reales, 1668E. S-P37b, KM-26, 23.4 grams. Small, roundish, underweight planchet (probably shaved long ago), with full cross and pillars-and-waves, 3 bold assayers, 2 dates and mintmarks, 3 hairline edge-splits, no toning, Fine. Estimate: $100 - $150

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363. 8 reales, 1700(F). S-P42, KM-26, 24.7 grams. Very crude VG (needs cleaning) with clear date and decent pillars-and-waves, but cross off-center and mostly flat, orange and brown sediment and encrustation all over. Estimate: $60 - $90

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364. 8 reales, 1709Y. S-P43a, KM-31, 26.6 grams. Bold date and denomination on pillars side, very crude cross (as struck), thick and chunky planchet, lightly toned About Fine. Estimate: $200 $275

368. 8 reales, 1764V-Y. S-P57, KM-45, 27.0 grams. Choice specimen, richly toned VF, with full cross and date and assayer Y, round and thick planchet. Pedigreed to the Craig A. Whitford auction of November 24-25, 1995 Estimate: $200 - $300

365. 8 reales, 1723Y. S-P43a, KM-31, 27.2 grams. Typically chunky About Fine with 2 dates and assayers, hole near edge, mostly toned, oddly shaped (consignor saw the profile as a face). Estimate: $100 - $200

369. 4 reales, 1658E. S-P37a, KM-18, 15.2 grams. Large, round coin that is actually overweight (unusual for the mint to give away silver like that!), nearly full cross and pillars-and-waves, lightly toned AVF with some flat spots, small edge-split. Estimate: $200 - $300

366. 8 reales, Philip V or Louis I, date not visible, assayer Y.

370. 2 reales, 1690VR. S-P30, KM-24, 8.0 grams. Choice, round, broad specimen with full cross, bold CARO(LVS), 2 dates, 3 assayers, slightly off-center pillars, beautifully toned VF, also overweight (free silver again!). Estimate: $200 - $300

27.1 grams. Chunky and very crudely corroded and encrusted on

pillars side (impossible to grade), most of cross, patchy dark toning. Estimate: $40 - $60

371. 2 reales, 1770(V-Y). S-P59, KM-43, 6.4 grams. Crude chunk of a coin, with most of cross, weak but certain date, AVG for wear, patchy toning. Estimate: $50 - $70 367. 8 reales, 1761(V)-Y. S-P57, KM-45 26.9 grams. Very bold date, good full cross with second date below, typically very chunky but with nicely contrasting toning, Fine+ for wear. Estimate: $125 - $175

372. 1 real, 1660E. S-P37a, KM-13, 5.6 grams. Thick, overweight planchet (another unusual instance of the mint giving away free silver!), with choice full crown but most of cross flat, pillars side a bit corroded (otherwise About Fine), weak date. Estimate: $40 - $60

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SANTO DOMINGO, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

373. 1 real, 1661E. S-P37a, KM-13, 3.9 grams. Broad, crude planchet (uneven strike) with much flatness but otherwise decent grade (AVF), 2 dates and mintmarks and assayers, much of king’s name in legend, patchy toning. Estimate: $40 - $60 374. ½ real, 1699. S-P42, KM-22, 1.2 grams. Nearly full cross and monogram, bold 69 of date, somewhat silvery with light corrosion (otherwise Fine). Estimate: $40 - $60

375. ½ real, 1723. S-P43a, KM-27, 1.0 gram. Bold 723 date below nearly full monogram, worn cross, small planchet, About Fine, no toning. Estimate: $25 - $50

382. Copper 4 maravedís, Charles-Joanna, assayer F, with key countermark for revaluation to 2 maravedís (1577). SSD1, KM-47 (host coin), 2.6 grams. Uncleaned (impossible to grade), with attractive green encrustation all over, but with nice details peeking through, including complete assayer F and denomination 4 flanking the anchor-shaped Y (for YOANA), nice crowns above pillars, much legend, but best of all is the full and well-detailed key countermark at upper right, a scarce mark that was applied in 1577 to devalue the coin to 2 maravedís, since nearly all the coins were underweight. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small certificate Estimate: $50 - $75

376. ½ real, date not visible, Louis I (1725-7). S-P43b, KM32,0.9 gram. Scarce issue with most of Louis I monogram visible but typically very crude and also salvaged (probably from the Rimac River in Lima, Peru), otherwise About Fine. Estimate: $40 - $60 377. ½ real, 1729. S-P44, KM-27, 1.3 grams. Broad flan with nearly full cross and monogram, bold 9 in date, Fine+ with sediment in crevices. Estimate: $40 - $60

383. Copper 4 maravedís, Charles-Joanna, assayer F. S-SD1, KM-47 3.2 grams. F to left, 4 to right, part of king’s name (CA)ROLV(S) in legend, clear mintmark S-(P), Fine with edgesplit, nice copper color. Estimate: $25 - $40

SEVILLE, SPAIN

378. ½ real, 1733. KM-27a, 1.6 grams. Most of monogram and cross, clear date, Fine with some flatness. Estimate: $40 - $60 379. ½ real, 1736. S-P46, KM-27a, 1.2 grams. Bold date, most of cross, typically small and chunky, nicely toned Fine+. Estimate: $40 - $60

384. 8 reales, Philip IV, S-R. CT-Type 82, KM-80, 27.4 grams. Very thick planchet (as usual) with nearly full cross and shield, clear mintmark S (weak assayer R), nicely toned AVF. Estimate: $100 - $150

380. ½ real, 1745. S-P50, KM-27a,1.3 grams. Odd-shaped Fine with nearly full cross and monogram, clear 45 of date, very lightly toned. Estimate: $40 - $60 381. ½ real, 1758. S-P54, KM-36, 1.7 grams. Bold 758 date, most of cross, toned About Fine with flat spots. Estimate: $40 - $60

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OTHER COINS (all silver except where noted otherwise)

BOLIVIA 385. 4 reales, Ferdinand-Isabel, assayer Gothic P to right of yoke. CT-179, 13.6 grams. Round planchet with typically welldetailed shield and yoke-and-arrows, full crown, some legend, lustrous XF+, no toning. Estimate: $325 - $475

(Potosí mint, bust-type)

386. 4 reales, (161)2B. CT-192a, KM-36.2, 13.3 grams. Choice, broad-planchet specimen with full shield and cross, much legend, full crown, elegantly toned AXF with edge-split. Estimate: $150 - $225

389. 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1818PJ. CT-537, KM-84, 26.8 grams. Lightly cleaned XF, starting to re-tone. Estimate: $50 $80

387. 4 reales, Charles II, assayer S (ca. 1680). CT-unlisted, KMunlisted, 9.5 grams. Very rare issue (unlisted in any references that I know of), with bold S•S to left of shield, most of cross, crude strike (and quite underweight, although that may be from old clipping), About Fine with toning in crevices, could be quite valuable. Estimate: $75 - $100

390. 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1823PJ. CT-542, KM-84, 27.1 grams. Attractive XF with light, natural toning. Estimate: $70 $100

391. 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1824PJ. CT-543, KM-84, 26.8 grams. Lustrous XF with weak centers, no toning. Pedigreed to the Superior auction of December 5-6, 1997 Estimate: $100 - $150 388. 8 reales, 1694, “Maria” type. CT-200, KM-206, 20.6 grams. Nice specimen for the type (which comes rather crude), with bold “MARIA” monogram, nearly full shield and crown, weak but certain date at about 7 o’clock in the legend, richly toned VF+ with edge-split, much flatness, very scarce. Estimate: $575 - $750

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GREAT BRITAIN

392. London, England, sixpence, Elizabeth I, 1561. S-2561, 2.5 grams. Broad-planchet AVF with full and bold legends, nice shield, full bust, with nicely contrasting dark sediment and/or toning in crevices. Found by Bill Sauerwalt with 23 Mexican

395. Lot of 100 ¼ reales, 1861-3, 1866-9, 1888, and 1893, all of the “lion” type. Each coin about 0.75 gram. As above, sold as a lot of 100 pieces only. Estimate: $500 - $600

Charles-Joanna coins south of Edgewater, on the east coast of Florida (see The Rainbow Chasers, by Gore [2006]). Estimate: $200 - $250

GUATEMALA (Guatemala City mint)

(photos reduced)

396. Lot of 100 ¼ reales, 1861-3, 1866-9, 1888, and 1893, all of the “lion” type. Each coin about 0.75 gram. As above, sold as a lot of 100 pieces only. Estimate: $500 - $600

393. Lot of 100 ¼ reales, 1861-3, 1866-9, 1888, and 1893, all of the “lion” type. Each coin about 0.75 gram. Various types but all with rampant lion on one side, hence very desirable for jewelry (typically five times the price of the non-lion types), most high grade (XF or better) but all useable (no throwaways), sold as a lot of 100 pieces only. Estimate: $500 - $600

397. Lot of 100 ¼ reales, 1861-3, 1866-9, 1888, and 1893, all of the “lion” type. Each coin about 0.75 gram. As above, sold as a lot of 100 pieces only. Estimate: $500 - $600

Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

394. Lot of 100 ¼ reales, 1861-3, 1866-9, 1888, and 1893, all of the “lion” type. Each coin about 0.75 gram. As above, sold as a lot of 100 pieces only. Estimate: $500 - $600

73


MEXICO (all Mexico City mint) Pillar dollars

398. Lot of 144 ¼ reales, 1872-9 and 1889-91, type with small sun over mountains on obverse and wreath design on reverse. Each coin about 0.75 gram. No lions on these, but still very useful pieces for jewelry or a starter collection (talk about an easy thing for kids to collect, yet still old and silver!), mostly XF or better, no throwaways, sold as a lot of 144 pieces only. Estimate: $500 - $750

401. 8 reales, Philip V, 1739MF. CT-702, KM-103, 26.6 grams. Decent, non-salvage Fine but with damage near edge at date. Estimate: $60 - $90

399. Lot of 114 ¼ reales, 1879-86, 1889 and 1893, type with long-rayed sun over mountains on obverse and wreath design on reverse. Each coin about 0.75 gram. As above but higher grade (mostly AU), sold as a lot of 114 pieces only. Estimate: $500 $750

402. 8 reales, Charles III, 1767MF. CT-826, KM-105, 27.0 grams. Lustrous XF+ with light rainbow toning all over. Estimate: $200 - $250

Bust-type

403. 8 reales, Charles III, 1773FM, initials facing rim. CT-835, KM-106.1, 26.6 grams. Cleaned XF with some light scratches, popular early issue. Estimate: $70 - $100

400. Lot of 176 ¼ reales, 1894-99, new type with small sun over mountains on obverse and wreath design on reverse. Each coin about 0.75 gram. As above but higher grade (mostly AU or UNC), sold as a lot of 176 pieces only. Estimate: $500 - $750

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404. 8 reales, Charles III, 1778FF. CT-842, KM-106.2, 26.9 grams. Lustrous (lightly cleaned?) XF with a few very light scratches. Estimate: $60 - $90

408. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1791FM. CT-646, KM-109, 26.8 grams. Deeply rainbow-toned AXF, no problems, quite pretty. Estimate: $60 - $90

405. 8 reales, Charles III, 1785FM. CT-852, KM-106.2a, 26.8 grams. AVF with weak centers, 5 or 6 very distinct and curious chopmarks from circulation in the Orient. Estimate: $50 - $75

409. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1791FM. CT-646, KM-109, 26.4 grams. Toned VG and loaded with chopmarks from circulation in the Orient. Estimate: $40 - $60

406. 8 reales, Charles IV transitional (bust of Charles III, ordinal IV), 1789FM. CT-642, KM-107, 26.8 grams. Nicely toned AVF with weak centers, slightly off-center reverse. Estimate: $70 - $100

410. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1792FM. CT-647, KM-109, 26.5 grams. Cleaned VG, with many small chopmarks (as above). Estimate: $50 - $75

411. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1794FM. CT-649, KM-109, 26.5 grams. VG+ with patchy toning and loaded with small chopmarks (as above). Estimate: $40 - $60

407. 8 reales, Charles IV transitional (bust of Charles III, ordinal IIII), 1790FM. CT-644, KM-108, 26.7 grams. Nicely toned Fine+ with chopmarks? behind head. Estimate: $60 - $90

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416. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1804TH. CT-661, KM-109, 27.0 grams. Very colorful and lustrous XF+ with weak spot in center, streak of dark toning. Estimate: $80 - $120

412. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1795FM. CT-650, KM-109, 26.8 grams. Lustrous XF with faint beginnings of rainbow toning. Estimate: $100 - $150

413. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1796FM. CT-651, KM-109, 26.8 grams. Richly toned Fine with stress marks on bust, dent in edge. Estimate: $40 - $60

417. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1806TH. CT-663, KM-109, 26.9 grams. Lightly cleaned VF with spots of new toning. Estimate: $50 $75

418. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1807TH. CT-664, KM-109, 26.9 grams. Lustrous XF (cleaned), crude edge. Estimate: $40 - $60

414. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1798FM. CT-653, KM-109, 26.9 grams. Very heavily chopmarked (impossible to grade) but with just enough of the original design peeking out to attribute it. Estimate: $30 - $50

419. 8 reales, Ferdinand VII (“armored” bust), 1809TH. CT492, KM-110, 27.1 grams. Lustrous (lightly cleaned) XF with weak centers, desirable transitional type. Estimate: $70 - $100

415. 8 reales, Charles IV, 1800FM. CT-655, KM-109, 26.9 grams. Lustrous AU with light rainbow toning, curiously with everything on the obverse faintly doubled, a “shadow effect” from the die itself, a rare occurrence in this type. Estimate: $200 - $275

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PERU (all bust-type)

420. 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1814JJ. CT-503, KM-111, 26.9 grams. Lightly toned XF with minor flaws (as made) in legends. Estimate: $60 - $90

424. Lima, 8 reales, Charles IV, 1798IJ. CT-629, KM-97, 26.7 grams. Bold VF, lightly cleaned and with scratches on bust. Estimate: $40 - $60

421. 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1818JJ. CT-507, KM-111, 26.9 grams. Lustrous (lightly cleaned?) XF, slightly off-center reverse, better date. Pedigreed to the Richard A. Long sale of July 15, 1997 Estimate: $100 - $150

425. Lima, 8 reales, Charles IV, 1805JP. CT-637, KM-97, 23.5 grams. Polished AVF, no problems except for the buffed surfaces, also rather underweight but undeniably genuine (stress lines in fields, details correct). Estimate: $40 - $60

422. 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1821JJ. CT-510, KM-111, 26.8 grams. Very deeply toned Fine+, no problems, desirable final date of series. Estimate: $40 - $60

Medal

426. Lima, 8 reales, Ferdinand VII (“imaginary” bust), 1811JP. CT-467, KM-106.2, 26.7 grams. VF with flat area in center, adjustment marks on both sides, desirable transitional type. Pedigreed to the Ponterio sale of November 11, 2003 Estimate: $60 - $90

423. 4 reales-sized “proclamation” medal, 1796. Grove-C268, 14.1 grams. Beautifully toned AU, no problems. Estimate: $175 $250

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SPAIN

427. Lima, 2 reales, Ferdinand VII (“imaginary” bust), 1810JP. CT-823, KM-104.2, 6.7 grams. Somewhat weakly struck AXF, lustrous, desirable transitional type that you rarely see in this denomination. Estimate: $125 - $200 430. Madrid, 4 reales “double pistareen,” Philip V, 1740JF. CT-811, KM-337.1, 13.2 grams. Beautifully rainbow-toned AXF,

perfectly struck, no problems. Estimate: $275 - $350

428. Cuzco, 8 reales, Ferdinand VII, 1824T. CT-397, KM-117.2, 26.8 grams. Richly old-toned AVF, very off-center strike but no real problems, quite attractive and desirable as a one-year issue at the end of the colonial period. Estimate: $100 - $150

431. Segovia, 4 reales “double pistareen,” Charles II, 1685/ 4BR. CT-361, KM-200, 12.9 grams. Attractively toned VF with tiny old dent in shield, the final digit of the date clearly erased and then overstruck (presumably from 4 to 5). Estimate: $350 - $500

PORTUGAL

429. Lisbon, copper 5 reais(?) of Sebastian I (?) (1557-78), with unidentified C countermark. 4.8 grams. Broad, round coin, cupped and nearly smooth from wear but with clear C countermark (possibly quite rare and valuable) in the middle of the Portuguese arms. From a hoard found in Jamaica in 1973, with small certificate Estimate: $50 - $75

432. Seville, 2 reales “pistareen,” Philip V, 1724J. CT-1029, KM-307, 5.0 grams. Lightly toned XF, typically slightly off-center and warped (from a roller press). Estimate: $30 - $50

433. Seville, 2 reales “pistareen,” Philip V, 1737/6P. CTunlisted (cf. 1042), KM-unlisted (cf. 355), 5.8 grams. Perfectly struck VF+, nicely toned, with clear overdate that is unlisted and presumably rare. Estimate: $50 - $75

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78


ARTIFACTS (mostly from shipwrecks) NOTE: Photos in this section are NOT to scale and are generally much reduced in size.

Unidentified ca.-1450 Chinese wreck off Indonesia

Spanish “Manila Galleon wreck” in the Philippines, ca. 1571

435. Small, ornate bronze cannon, Spanish, 1500s. About 47 pounds, total length about 25", about 4" in diameter (not including trunnions), 1¼” bore. What a beautiful cannon this is! Its small

size means it was probably more ornamental than anything else (or a signal cannon of some sort), with lots of bells and whistles: “dolphin” lifting handles, M•V•S in escutcheon behind the second reinforce, trunnions and cascabel, and large but somewhat damaged touchhole with stanchions on either side (sights?), the muzzle very bulbous and with no less than 13 bands, and graced with a lovely patina all over (really from a shipwreck?). Shame there is not more known about its origin, but for a display artifact at least you could not ask for better! From the collection of Robert F. Marx through Seahawk. Estimate: $4,500 - $5,750

434. Earthenware mercury vessel, European, 1400s?. 958 grams, about 7½” tall and 5" in diameter at its widest. Among the many amphora-type vessels made in Europe since ancient times were small jars with very narrow mouths, like this one, used to transport mercury (or quicksilver), an important liquid metal for silvering mirrors and extracting pure silver and gold from ore. The jar tapers to a narrow, flat base, and is widest at its top, where the (missing) lip is broken off to reveal a neck of only about a half inch in diameter. While the inside actually jingles with the sound of flaked-off encrustation, the outside is loaded with the same stuff but still adhering, all very white and beautiful against the grayish color of the original earthenware. A rare object, and quite cute. Estimate: $500 - $700

Atocha, sunk in 1622 southwest of Key West, Florida 436. High-grade emerald ring. 5.7 grams, about 5/8" in diameter, with approx. 1-carat stone. This fabulous artifact contains one of the best (darkest and clearest) emeralds ever recovered from this wreck, in its original high-karat gold setting from the 1600s, made for a lady and still useful for that purpose today! The design around the stone (which is rectangular) is like a Tudor rose, understated but elegant, a jewel that had high value in its own time as well. The Fishers’ original price (as printed on the accompanying tag) was $43,000, but you can have it for far less now. With Fisher hologram photo-certificate #95A-29458 from 2003 along with an appraisal certificate for $43,000 that specifies the item as “Kane Fisher [Mel’s son] 2003 Division Ring.” Estimate:

$17,000 - $20,000 437. Single silver chain link. 4.2 grams, oval, about 1" x ¾”. A single, fused link of high-grade silver, purpose unknown, possibly an example of how the Spaniards smuggled silver without taxation. With Fisher photo-certificate #86A-4863. Estimate: $250 - $375

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Santa Margarita, sunk in 1622 southwest of Key West, Florida

440. Earthenware “olive jar” neck and side (Spanish). Side piece: 703 grams, about 11" x 5"; neck: 252 grams, about 2" tall, 3¾” in diameter, with 2¼” aperture. These are the typical objects found

438. Gold spiral-link chain (77 links, 139 grams). 142.3 grams, 18½” long, each link about 3/8" in diameter. Next to the gold bars, perhaps the most obviously valuable of all the artifacts from the Atocha and the Santa Margarita were its many gold chains, the biggest of which sold in the original Christie’s auction of 1988 for $319,000! Since that auction there have been very few gold chains on the market, and this is clearly one of the nicer ones, with good-sized links of fluted (and every other one twisted) gold, probably high grade but certainly in excellent condition. The length is just right for a lady, but it is heavy! The ends of the links are slightly open, the idea being that one could easily break off pieces of the chain to use as a form of untaxed money, hence the term most often associated with these artifacts is “money chain.” The original point value for this piece, stated on the certificate, is 973 points, which in 1985 had a value of about $54 per point according to the State of Florida (roughly $52,500), although prices as high as $108 per point have been realized at auction. With Fisher photo-certificate #68 from 1985. Estimate: $75,000 - $100,000

on a colonial shipwreck site: not the intact vessels but just the broken sides and tops (necks), inexpensive artifacts that make great displays. You can get them from the 1715 Fleet by the bucketful, but you hardly ever see them from the Maravillas, as these are. Both pieces are a nice reddish orange with bits of white encrustation, very thick and solid. Sold as a lot of two pieces only. Estimate: $60 - $90

Vergulde Draeck (“Gilt Dragon”), sunk in 1656 off Western Australia

Maravillas, sunk in 1656 off Grand Bahama Island

441. Earthenware “Bellarmine” jug, German or Dutch, ca. 1620. 959 grams, about 8¼” tall, 6" in diameter across the middle, 3¼” base. So-called Bellarmine jugs like this one, with a grotesque, bearded face on the neck, were first made in the early 1500s, but by the 17th century they were mass-produced in Protestant areas of Europe to poke fun of Cardinal Robert Bellarmine, who was very unpopular for his theological views (most famously, he was the one who warned Galileo against promoting the heliocentric theory, which of course is factual today but at the time was heresy). These distinctively brown and bulbous beer jugs then found their way into nearly every selfrespecting pub and tavern across Europe and even abroad, and some have even been found on shipwrecks, like this one. The condition of this piece is near perfect, with a right-facing rampant lion in medallion on the side below the face (both features with a hint of blue color), “rat-tail” style handle, some wormy encrustation in places, quite rare in this condition from a documented wreck. From the Rodney Harmic collection of Bellarmine jugs, with tag #B0141. Estimate: $1,500 - $1,800

439. Thickly encrusted silver buckle. 41 grams, roughly 2" x 1¼”. A typical small, rectangular buckle with moving parts fused to main part, all rather “puffy” from oxidation and with green and white encrustation on the black surfaces, rare from this wreck and a neat little display. Estimate: $300 - $450

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Consolación, sunk in 1681 off Santa Clara Island, Ecuador

445. Group of nine small brass nails and tacks. 1.5 oz. total, each between 2 and 11 grams, the nails about 1" to 1¾” in length, the tacks about ½” long and 7/8" in diameter. The most common and

442. Iron horseshoe mounted on a plaque. 375 grams (including plaque), about 5" x 3¾” (plaque: about 7½” x 6"). Mundane iron artifacts from shipwrecks, like horseshoes and ax-heads, are harder to find than one might think, mostly because they rarely survive the oxidation. This horseshoe, however, is in relatively decent shape (professionally conserved), even with three nail holes still in evidence, a little wrinkled and corroded but definitely “all there,” mounted upright (for good luck!) on a sturdy, dark-brown particle-board plaque with imprinted nameplates at top and bottom that say “Santa María de la Consolación - 1681” (top) and “Isla Santa Clara, Ecuador ‘El Muerto’” (bottom). With ROBCAR photo-certificate #I00003. Estimate: $25 - $40

mundane fasteners on a ship. This lot consists of four flathead tacks and three small nails, plus one larger nail with square cross-section, each its own color (coppery to brassy), some with encrustation and patina and some completely clean, sold as a lot of 9 items only. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #B0010. Estimate: $30 - $50

446. Earthenware “olive jar” neck with section of side attached. 504 grams, approx. 8" x 7" overall, the neck about 2-7/8" in diameter. Impressive fragment of an olive jar, with wide-mouth neck and section of the shoulder of the jar, with dried brown mud caked on the inside and little bits of encrustation here and there. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #C00025. Estimate: $20 - $30

443. Complete bronze hull-pin with markings. About 3 lb., about 30½” long, ¾” in cross-section. The ribs of a ship were generally held together with all sorts of fasteners of wood, iron and bronze, but perhaps the most impressive of those was the hull-pin, a long nail that fastened the wooden skin of the ship and was blunted at both ends to keep it in place. Most of the time we see incomplete hull-pins or the more-common spikes that, albeit large, had one blunt end and one pointed end, but this pin is complete. This one also has the added distinction of carrying a very clear marking “XXXVII” (Roman numeral 37, probably to show where it went in the building of the ship) deeply slashed in the center, in an area that is polished and looks more brassy than bronze. The rest of the pin shows encrustation and a slight bend to it, all very solid and intact. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #B0008. Estimate: $100 - $125

444. Complete bronze spike. About 1 lb., 3 oz., 8¾” long and 13/ 16" in cross-section. Another impressive part of the architecture of the ship, this with one flat end and one pointed end, the latter tapering to a flat point with six slashes on each side to help the spike keep its grip (now holding tight to some grayish encrustation), the rest of the spike quite straight and alternating black and brassy in color. With ROBCAR photo-certificate #B0009. Estimate: $40 - $60

447. Lot of three earthenware “olive jar” necks. Between 150 and 300 grams each, roughly 3"-4" in diameter (each). The tops of three separate jars, each with a small portion of the shoulder of the jar too, in varying degrees of preservation, some wormy encrustation on one. Sold as a lot of three only. With ROBCAR photo-certificates #C00026, 7, 8. Estimate: $45 - $75

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“Porto Bello wreck,” sunk in 1681 or 1682 off Porto Bello, Panama

1715 Fleet, east coast of Florida

448. Long steel rapier blade, Spanish, professionally conserved. A little over 1 lb., and just over 45" long and ¾” at its widest. In the 1990s one of our diver contacts here in Florida told us he had a box of Toledo rapiers for sale from a 17th-century Spanish shipwreck, so we met him and bought what we could. The rest were taken to a conservator and eventually got the notoriety deserving of such rare relics. After all, how could such thin and fragile iron artifacts survive centuries of oxidation under the sea? The answer is that they were found in the silt just as they had been packed, inside big wooden chests, and not spilled out all over the sea floor. The divers were a little disappointed, as they were hoping the chests would be full of silver and gold, but the sword-blades were actually much rarer! After conservation, each blade ceased rusting, as they had been since recovery, and remained solid and even still sharp! This piece is typical, a twosided foil with dark brown color throughout, its very tip broken off but otherwise intact and impressive. With July-August 1998

451. Gold ring with purple amethyst. 4.2 grams, about ½” in diameter, with large (3-4 carats) stone. A very curious jewel, with a large, rectangular, “emerald-cut” amethyst mounted off-axis (to draw attention?) in a dainty little ring that would require a small lady’s finger, perfectly intact, about 22K gold, the stone quite dark and beautiful. While the odd mounting is not today’s style, it was popular in the Spanish colonial era, as evidenced by the many emerald dress-mounts from the Atocha (for example). Found in the area of the “Corrigans” site off Vero Beach. Estimate: $6,000 - $7,000

issue of Treasure Quest magazine, which contains an interesting article by Daryl Pinck about the salvaging of these blades and the wreck that yielded them (and how he was thrown in the Panamanian jail in the process!). Estimate: $125 - $175

449. Steel short-sword blade, Spanish, professionally conserved. 179 grams, about 20" long and 7/8" at its widest. Same story and condition as above but a totally different type of blade: one-sided, slightly wider near the tang, more like a dagger or extra-long steak knife. The point is intact and very sharp, and parts of the surface are uncorroded and even show some ornate design. Somewhat rare, as most of the blades were of the rapier type above. With July-August 1998 issue of Treasure Quest magazine,

452. Iron cannonball (unconserved). Nearly 8 lb., about 4" in diameter. Iron cannonballs, being solid iron, do not keep well in the ocean. They rust and fall apart, unless they get covered with coral, and then they fall apart later if the coral is not sealed airtight. This is an example of one that either lost its coral shell or somehow did not rust away, but it is flaking (very uneven exterior) and needs to be conserved. A simply lacquer coating will do the trick, although then it will not have the nice, smooth black surfaces that conserved balls do. The problem is that professionally conserving one cannonball costs more than the ball is worth! Anyway, it is fragile but heavy, and still a highdemand artifact from the Fleet. Estimate: $70 - $100

which contains an interesting article by Daryl Pinck about the salvaging of these blades and the wreck that yielded them (and how he was thrown in the Panamanian jail in the process!). Estimate: $125 -

$175

Unidentified wreck in the Bahamas, late 1600s/early 1700s 450. Professionally conserved section of hemp. Three small sections, total about 10" x 7". Among the many mundane materials that virtually never survive centuries under the sea is hemp, a rope-fiber used (in this instance at least) to make baskets, hence this item is extremely rare. The sections of weaving present here look as good as the day they were made, just a little dark (brown) and fragile, which is why they are safely displayed in a glass-top Riker mounting box. Estimate: $50 - $75

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453. Small iron cannonball-grenade with replica fuse. 775 grams, about 3" in diameter. A small, professionally conserved cannonball with a twist: It was cast with a hole and hollow center for packing in powder and inserting a fuse, so that the ball would explode like a modern hand-grenade. Of course the original wooden fuse and powder are gone, but a very convincing replica fuse has been inserted instead. A rare item from the Fleet, and in high demand. From the “Corrigans” site, with Salvors, Inc.(Fisher) photo-certificate #11554A. Estimate: $500 - $675 454. Brass gimbal from the ship’s compass. 2.6 grams, about 7" in diameter, the strips about ½” wide. This is really just two thin

456. Blue-on-white Chinese K’ang Hsi porcelain shards. 58 grams, originally about 4" in diameter and 11/16" tall. It survived a shipwreck and 250+ years under the sea, but not a trip through the postal service! This was once a cute little saucer, with floral design on the interior and brown on the exterior, but now it is just shards (three big ones and five small ones). The value of this piece, even if one were to glue it back together, would be minimal as a porcelain collectible; but it still has artifact value— consider that this is the exact same type of material (in shard form) found on the 1715 Fleet that is so rare today. Estimate: $25 - $50

bands of metal, one (the outer ring) with holes in it for holding the other (the inner ring), the outer piece band with a small section missing but the inner piece nearly whole, used to hold a compass level no matter the pitch of the ship, a rare and important artifact, even if not completely intact. With Fisher photo-certificate #26036. Estimate: $150 - $200

1733 Fleet, Florida Keys

“Ca Mau wreck,” sunk ca. 1723-1735 off Ca Mau Island, Vietnam 457. Small bronze cross. 1.2 grams, about 1" tall and ¾” wide. Cute little artifact, encrusted with small bits of shell and nearly black from oxidation, but with some design visible and the loop at top intact. The value of this piece comes from its original certificate from Art McKee. With color certificate on thick cardboard hand-signed by Art McKee and dated February 23, 1965, and also pedigreed to the Craig A. Whitford auction of November 2425, 1995, with lot-tag and clipped description. Estimate: $275 -

$325 455. Small, intact, blue-on-white Chinese porcelain powderbox, K’ang Hsi period. 62 grams, about 2¼” in diameter and 1" tall. A few years back we sold a ton of porcelain artifacts from this wreck, including many small, round, lidded boxes like this one, but in a different design, this one being six vine-like ornaments around a 19-point sunburst (as opposed to the grassy design before). This is also one of the more perfectly preserved specimens we have ever seen, with no chips or cracks or repairs, just some typical crazing under the still-slick glaze. With Sedwick certificate. Estimate: $120 - $150

Nuestra Señora de los Milagros, sunk in 1741 off the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico

458. Pewter buckle. 11.9 grams, rectangular, approx. 1-7/8" x 1-7/ 16". Highly ornate and beautiful buckle, the hasp and any

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attachments missing (just the main part), with Baroque scrollwork throughout the design on the front, plain back. Estimate: $70 - $100

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“Ronson wreck,” sunk(?) ca. 1750 off Manhattan (New York City)

459. Pair of English leather shoe soles, early 1700s. About 3 oz. total, each about 10"-10½” long and 3¼” wide. Can you just picture a colonial merchant wearing these? Completely black but still 100% intact, these were the insoles from shoes (we’re guessing size 10) that were found in the hull of this mysterious ship found buried in lower Manhattan. Sold as a pair only. Estimate: $40 $60

461. Blue-on-white Chinese porcelain bowl, “scholar on bridge” pattern. 280 grams, about 2-5/8" tall and 5¾” across the top. Perfectly intact bowl with design on exterior showing a man (face downcast, deep in thought) crossing a bridge between two rocky shores, no chips or cracks or wear. Again, one of thousands of identical examples from this wreck alone. From the Christie’s “Nanking Cargo” auction of 1986, with lot-sticker #3122, booklet and certificate. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,250

Geldermalsen (“Nanking Cargo”), sunk in 1752 in the South China Sea

460. Blue-on-white Chinese porcelain plate, “boatman” pattern. 358 grams, 9" in diameter and 1" tall. A beautiful, perfectly preserved china plate (doesn’t even look like it could ever have been in the sea!), its blue design consisting of two buildings on opposite outcroppings in a river with a fisherman in a boat in the center, six flowers around the rim, not a single chip or crack or loss of glaze anywhere, simply sublime! As nice as this one is, it was among thousands just like it on the wreck and in the original auction! From the Christie’s “Nanking Cargo” auction of 1986, with lot-sticker #1755, booklet, certificate and stand. Estimate: $1,200 $1,500

462. Blue-on-white Chinese porcelain cup and saucer set, “Imari pavilion” pattern. Cup: 52 grams, saucer: 53 grams. The cup about 1½” tall and 3" across the top; the saucer about 11/16" tall and 4½” across the top. A matched set of the same design, which is

a building (pavilion) on a rocky outcropping, with gray and gold and even a hint of red overglaze highlights, no chips but some of the paint worn away and some flaws in the rim of the cup as made (under the glaze) as well as a hairline crack in same, noticeably inferior to the two premium pieces above but still remarkably well preserved and attractive. With certificate and stand. Estimate: $400 - $600

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Nuestra Señora del Rosario, sunk in 1753 off Tounant, sunk in 1779 off Haiti Montevideo, Uruguay

463. Lot of 4 wooden knife handles. About 7" long and ½” wide when full. Wood rarely survives under the sea, due to the dreaded teredo worm, but sometimes the wood is buried deep in the mud or silt and thus preserved, as were these knife-handles (the iron in these knives, however, did not survive for a different reason!). Two are complete, each with one rounded end and one flat end with a hole and in two thin parts, then a third piece is just one thin part with a big concretion of debris at one end, and the fourth is just a fragment. Estimate: $40 - $50

466. Two-handled earthenware bowl, French (intact). 409 grams, about 2-5/8" tall and 6¼” in diameter, with two 1½” handles.

This beautiful piece, probably some kind of porringer, is perfectly intact (which is rare for pottery from a sunken warship) and attractive, with tan color all over except for the places where the original green glaze remains, also both handles (each in a sort of arrow shape) remarkably intact. Estimate: $200 - $300

Unidentified wreck, ca. 1781, Yorktown area

464. Lot of 20 small buttons. Diameters of ½” to ¾”. Small, plain, flat buttons, some with the back loop intact, some with encrustation, mundane but still historical. Estimate: $40 - $50

Tilbury, sunk in 1757 off Nova Scotia, Canada

465. Lot of eight pieces of brass musket “furniture,” English, early 1700s. Anywhere from about 15 to 50 grams each, 2½” to 6½” long and up to 1" wide. The various brass trappings (triggerguards, side- and butt-plates, etc.) on a colonial-era musket are known as “furniture” and are often the only part of the musket to survive on a wreck, as the iron and wood disintegrate. These eight pieces, therefore, appeal to firearms collectors and shipwreck-artifacts collectors alike, especially the one piece that shows a “broad arrow” marking to indicate its English origin. Some are cleaned and brassy, but most are uncleaned and rusty with patina. Sold as lot of eight pieces only. Estimate: $300 $450

467. Large iron cannonball from the Revolutionary War (unconserved). About 17 lb. and over 5" in diameter. Like lot #452, this piece needs conservation to keep it from disintegrating (large sections have already flaked off, and the winning bidder can have those piece too, if desired), but that may be worthwhile, as this is a poignant memento of the Revolutionary War! This is actually one of the biggest cannonballs we have ever handled—the cannon that shot it into the unidentified wreck that yielded it must have been huge! The starting bid on this one is quite low, so it may be a bargain. Estimate: $40 - $50

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HMS Bounty, scuttled by mutineers in 1790 off Pitcairn Island

Not from shipwrecks, but related

468. Brass tack. About 1¼” long and 5/8" in diameter across the head. An unassuming little tack, but consider its place in history: This small nail was once part of the famous ship HMS Bounty, whose famous voyage and mutiny have been retold many times in print and on film. Pivotal to the value is the accompanying certificate from Bob Marx, who mentions of the finding of these tacks in his various books. With custom certificate from Robert Marx. Estimate: $250 - $375

Leocadia, sunk in 1800 off Punta Santa Elena, Ecuador

469. Long, hollow-link gold chain. 54.2 grams, about 60" long, each link about 1/8" in diameter. Yes, you read that right—this piece is five feet long, and it is surely the “sleeper” of this auction! It was found with various coins and artifacts by U.S. servicemen stationed at Punta Santa Elena, Ecuador, during World War II, and was acquired and marketed by the well-known salvager Capt. Carl Fismer in the 1990s. The 18K spherical links are intricate but curiously hollow (almost like tiny skulls) and remarkably light, making this super-long chain rather wearable. It is in perfect condition, with no encrustation (probably cleaned), and very impressive, easily a six-figure item if it had come instead from the Atocha or Santa Margarita! With Capt.

471. Huge (17" diameter) pewter plate with hallmarks, probably Spanish, 1600s?. 4 lb., about 16½” in diameter and ¾” deep. Truly we have never seen such a big round plate, probably a serving platter of some sort, let alone in such beautiful condition. The surface shows many years’ worth of knife-cuts and other wear, but the hallmarks (three on top, one on bottom) on the wide rim are still in evidence, two being a sun and an anchor and the other two not so identifiable, in addition to three clear letters R, P and S. There are no wrinkles or holes or corrosion, as you see with shipwreck specimens, which typically cost well into the thousands of dollars! Found in the Chagres River near Ft. San Lorenzo, Panama. Estimate: $500 - $1,000

Carl Fismer photo-certificate and color photos of Fismer holding the chain underwater, and also with a copy of the August, 1992, issue of Treasure magazine, the cover of which features a similar photo of Fismer underwater with the chain, the cover hand-signed by Fismer.

Estimate: $7,500 - $10,000

S.S. Central America, sunk in deep water off North Carolina 470. Pinch of gold dust in capsule with wooden presentation box. 1.5 grams. This is a promotional package, but in effect it is the only affordable way to get a piece of this well-known shipwreck, and at least it is something valuable: gold! In addition to the many gold coins, this ship was carrying quite a lot of gold nuggets and dust, straight from the panners in California known as “49ers”! The gold dust is safely contained in a typical plastic “slab” from Collectors Universe, printed with “California Gold Rush / Pinch 1.5 grams / S.S. Central America 1857” inside. Housed in a 10" x 4½” x 3¼” wooden box with sliding lid imprinted with “DESTINATION: NEW YORK” containing a small booklet and certificate #3983 (also with unapplied foil seal for the outside).

Estimate: $200 - $250

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472. Small iron cannonball grenade, probably Spanish, 1600s?. 900 grams, 2¾” in diameter. See lot #453 for an explanation of what a cannonball-grenade is. This one does not have a fuse (replica or otherwise), so you can see the hollow interior very clearly. Also it has not been conserved and therefore is a rusty brown color instead of black, but it is completely stable and solid (since it did not sit under the sea for centuries). Found in the Chagres River near Ft. San Lorenzo, Panama. Estimate: $300 - $500

474. Silver thimble, Spanish, 1600-1650. 8.5 grams, about 1" tall and almost ¾” in diameter across the bottom. A very ornate thimble whose inscribed lateral design features a pelican and the sacred heart (referring to a Christian legend in which the pelican pierces its own breast to shed its blood for its young to drink, like the Christian practice of communion), a bit dented but completely intact and silvery with spots of patina. From an early-1630s hoard in southern Peru. Estimate: $500 - $700 475. Silver spoon, Spanish, 1650-1725. 51.7 grams, about 7" long, with bowl about 2½” x 1¾” and 3/8" deep. A beautifully preserved “rat-tail” type spoon, made and used in Peru, with straight, cylindrical handle and flattish, almost rectangular bowl, perfectly intact and usable, mostly silvery from cleaning, no markings. From an early-1630s hoard in southern Peru. Estimate: $500 - $700

473. Bronze breech block, probably Spanish, 1600s?. 18 lb., about 7¾” tall and 3¾” in diameter at its widest, with 4" long handle.

This object is akin to a signal cannon (see lots #479 and #480) but with a handle for dropping into the firing end of a breechloading cannon. The concept is the same: You load powder into the breech block and insert a fuse into the touchhole to ignite the powder and propel the cannonball. Breech blocks, however, are much rarer than any kind of cannon because they were sort of an “accessory” that typically got thrown aside and lost when not in use. This particular block is in great shape, with just minor pitting on the otherwise smooth surfaces of an old dark-bronze color (no patina), with ¼” touchhole and 1-3/8" bore, very solid and heavy. Found in the Chagres River near Ft. San Lorenzo, Panama. Estimate: $500 - $1,000

476. Silver cloak buttons (pair), Spanish, 1650-1700. 13.8 grams and 14.6 grams, each about ¾” tall and 1" in diameter. A matched pair of cloak buttons that would make a perfect set of cufflinks now, each one round and smooth but rising to a point in the center, with scalloped edge, probably high-grade silver (good way to avoid colonial taxes), with spots of verdigris, sold as a pair only. From an early-1630s hoard in southern Peru. Estimate: $400 - $600

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477. Black-glass “pancake” onion bottle, English, ca. 1690. 948 grams, about 5½” tall and 6" in diameter at its widest. As onion bottles go, early English ones are the rarest, and are distinguishable by their pontils (the sunken center on the bottom), which are flatter (like a pancake) than on the later (and commoner) Dutch bottles, with a base that is wider than the bottle is tall. This specimen also happens to be in excellent condition, with no cracks or chips or repairs, and the string lip at top is all there as well. It is a lovely green color with patches of pearlescent flakes inside. Very rare and choice. Estimate: $1,000 - $1,300 478. Bronze gunpowder pourer in the shape of an eagle’s head, British, ca. 1690. 86.3 grams, roughly 2½” x 2" x 1¾”. A curious spout in the shape of an eagle’s head, with a 3/16" hole in the head and a ¾” hole at the other end for affixing to a powder-flask, also with a ¾” double bar sticking out of the top with a tiny hole for connecting to a chain, and three square-shaped knobs near the back that probably formed some kind of spanner for a musket, all intact except for one of the square knobs, and with excellent detail for having spent several centuries in a riverbank. Found in the River Thames (London, England). Estimate: $50 - $100

480. Small bronze signal cannon, Spanish, 1600s-1750. 998 grams, about 3" tall and 2" in diameter, 7/8" bore. As above but much smaller, so possibly just a powder-tester and not for shooting balls. Very dusty and patinated, nice and solid (very thick), probably because it stayed on land. Found in Peru. Estimate: $200 - $250

481. Bronze miniature cannon, European, 1600s-1700s?. 1029 grams, about 8" long and 2" in diameter at its widest. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was common for cannon foundries to present potential customers with small samples to show what the finished products (which were very expensive) would look like. These samples were scale models and fully operational, as is the case with this piece. It is rather ornate and intact except for the lack of one of the “dolphin” lifting handles (the other one is present and nicely detailed), with large touchhole (where the fuse went) and ½” bore. Unfortunately the cannon does not show any markings to indicate the foundry or craftsman who made it, or when. From the collection of Robert F. Marx, sold to Seahawk in the 1990s, identification #M-138. Estimate: $500 - $675

479. Large bronze mortar/signal cannon, Spanish, 1600s1750. About 14 lb., 6" tall and 5" in diameter across base, 2½” bore. Signal cannons (appropriately nicknamed “thunder mugs,” a term also used for chamber-pots!) are usually small, mug-like objects that shoot straight into the air, like a colonial-era flare-gun. The smallest ones, some believe, were only used to test powder. This huge one, however, seems more like an actual cannon (although who wants to shoot an iron ball straight up overhead?), as it is rather large and heavy and has a cannonball-sized bore. It is also in excellent condition, with a nice dark finish and light patina, very thick and with three reinforcements on the outside, also fine straight lines inside the bore corresponding to where cannonballs scraped the sides, and with large (½”) touchhole near the flat bottom. Found in Peru. Estimate: $600 - $750

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482. Bronze hawking bell, Spanish, late 1600s/early 1700s. 11.5 grams, spherical, roughly 1" in diameter. Inhabitants of more northern climes would consider this a sleigh bell, but the technical term is “crotal bell”—ball-shaped with a slit in the bottom and a ball-bearing-like clapper inside, with a loop at the top for attaching to leather straps. But in colonial Panama these bells were used for hawking, the bells tied to the legs of hawks to keep track of the birds. This bell is a little wrinkled, with the clapper missing, but otherwise intact, and with a nice, dusty patina all over. Found near Nombre de Dios in Panama (Camino Real trail). Estimate: $40 - $60

484. Silver reliquary pendant, hand-painted mother-of-pearl inside, probably Spanish (colonial), 1700s. 11.3 grams, oval, about 1½” x 1-3/16" and ¼” thick. A beautiful Brazilian antique, possibly from a shipwreck (since it was found on a beach), but in way too nice condition to have spent much time (if any) underwater. The case is plain silver, with a tulip pattern around the rim and twisted wire around the outside and small loop at top (ready to wear), but the inside is gorgeous, hand-painted motherof-pearl with gold inlay, with Jesus on the cross flanked by two figures on one side and a crowned Mary with crowned Christchild in her arms on the other side. Found on a beach in Brazil Estimate: $700 - $900

482a. Bronze mortar and pestle set, Spanish, 1600s-1700s. Mortar: 1414 grams, about 3¼” tall and 5" across top; pestle: 775 grams, about 8¼” long and 1½” in diameter at its widest. Like cup-

weight sets, the mortar-and-pestle (used for grinding and mixing foodstuffs and medicines) was a colonial necessity that makes for an attractive collectible today. This set is beautifully matched, both parts completely intact and useable, the inside of the mortar beautifully patinated at the bottom where things got mashed (no telling what traces might still be there!), both pieces a nice dark bronze color. Estimate: $500 - $700

485. Gold/crystal reliquary pendant, probably Spanish, 1720s-1770s. 2.9 grams, oval, about 1¼” x 7/8". A dainty little artifact made of high-grade gold filigree, with a cross-topped sunburst monstrance and four candles inside a clear crystal with ornate design around the outside and a gold loop at top for wearing on a chain. The gold work is very intricate and delicate, as if spun by a spider! One can imagine it around the neck of a wealthy passenger on a nearby unidentified shipwreck, the stated origin of this piece, but if that were the case then surely the glass would be gone and the gold wire would not be in such perfect condition! Found on the coast of Brazil. Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

483. Bronze buttplate for flintlock pistol, Spanish, 1700s. 27.5 grams, roughly 1¾” x 1½” x 5/8". A cap for the round butt-end of a flintlock pistol, with hole in center for screw or nail, a design of parallel lines (deeply engraved) around that, and smooth outer part with four dimples in edge. The metal is bronze but is silvery in color (washed or plated?), with green encrustation spots in the interior, very solid. From an early-1630s hoard in southern Peru. Estimate: $100 - $150

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486. Black glass mallet bottle, English, ca. 1700-1740. 916 grams,

489. Two intact glass “onion” bottles, Dutch, ca. 1720-1750. Anywhere from 600 to 850 grams each, and each about 8" tall and 5½” in diameter at its widest. These were the wine bottles of their time,

about 8¼” tall and 4¼” in diameter at its widest. The fat bottom section of

with rolled lips and bulbous bodies (like an onion) inside which are deep pontils (the sunken center in the base), which made them more or less stackable. We have made sure to choose perfect ones, intact and unrepaired, and not too worn from their stint at sea, nice dark green, for best display. Sold as a lot of two bottles only. Found in colonial harbors in Central America. Estimate: $150 - $200

this bottle is close to cylindrical but with a slight flare near the base (with very deep and wide pontil), so it looks like a mallet (hence the name), and it is made of very thick glass that is so opaque that unless you hold it up to the light it looks black instead of green (which it actually is), nice smooth surfaces in perfect condition (no chips, cracks or repairs), and with intact lip at top. Estimate: $300 - $400

489a. Two intact glass “onion” bottles, Dutch, ca. 1720-1750. Anywhere from 600 to 850 grams each, and each about 8" tall and 5½” in diameter at its widest. These were the wine bottles of their time,

with rolled lips and bulbous bodies (like an onion) inside which are deep pontils (the sunken center in the base), which made them more or less stackable. We have made sure to choose perfect ones, intact and unrepaired, and not too worn from their stint at sea, nice dark green, for best display. Sold as a lot of two bottles only. Found in colonial harbors in Central America. Estimate: $150 - $200

487. Iron carronade, European?, ca. 1750. About 104 lb., total length about 36", about 3½”-5¼” in diameter, 2½” bore. Unlike the other cannons in this sale, this small but heavy piece was definitely used for warfare, and its rusty (but stable) brown surfaces show centuries of wear and abuse, but it is all intact and even well marked, with a crown above “SJS” between the first and second reinforces, a rope loop (for lifting) on the cascabel, intact trunnions, the touchhole cinched shut from oxidation. Has a very “Pirates of the Caribbean” look to it, although it is not know whether (or when) this piece ever saw service in this hemisphere. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

490. Glass longneck “ladyleg” bottle, Dutch, ca. 1750-1770. 763 grams, about

488. Two intact glass “onion” bottles, Dutch, ca. 1720-1750.

11¼” tall and 3½” in diameter at its widest. The

Anywhere from 600 to 850 grams each, and each about 8" tall and 5½” in diameter at its widest. These were the wine bottles of their time,

name for these bottles comes from the fact that, when turned upside-down, the fat cylindrical chamber atop the long thin neck looks somewhat like a lady’s leg—at least to 18th-century colonists! This piece is perfectly intact, even the lip at top, with deep pontil in the bottom, and the glass is attractively slick and green. Found in

with rolled lips and bulbous bodies (like an onion) inside which are deep pontils (the sunken center in the base), which made them more or less stackable. We have made sure to choose perfect ones, intact and unrepaired, and not too worn from their stint at sea, nice dark green, for best display. Sold as a lot of two bottles only. Found in colonial harbors in Central America. Estimate: $150 - $200

colonial harbors in Central America.

Estimate: $75 - $115

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495. Bronze lantaka, Dutch, late 1700s/early 1800s, with yoke and wooden tiller. About 30 lb. and about 32" long (with 6½”-long wooden tiller) and 2"-3½” in diameter, 1" bore. Also known as swivel or rail guns, bronze lantakas like this one were generally cast in the Netherlands for trading for spices in Indonesia and were fully operational but mostly used as bridal dowries and other displays of wealth (affluence through weaponry!). Some aspects of this cannon are typical: “dolphin” lifting handles, trunnion and yoke, tubular cascabel, flared muzzle with front sight, touchhole with rear sights; but the cascabel also contains the original wooden tiller, a sort of extension handle and aiming mechanism whose use over the years has turned the wood a dark color to match the bronze. Perfectly intact except for part of the yoke. Estimate: $3,000 - $4,500

491. Glass longneck “ladyleg” bottle, Dutch, ca. 1750-1770. 748 grams, about 11¼” tall and 3½” in diameter at its widest. As above except with longer and slightly more flared neck, shallower pontil, surfaces a little scuffed from salvage, a few tiny bubbles in the glass for character. Found in colonial harbors in Central America. Estimate: $75 - $115

496. Decorative brass tip from a British naval officer’s “swagger stick,” late 1700s to early 1800s. 5.2 grams, almost 2" long and 3/8" at its widest diameter. This conical tube, decorated with an ornate design with a crown in the center, was affixed to the point end of a wooden wand, known as a “swagger stick,” typically about 18" long, used by officers to point to a sailor’s bad dress habits during parade or at maps to show battle orders, etc. The metal is thin, and a little wrinkled here and there, but the design is intact and there is no significant corrosion or encrustation. Found outside a row of cottages

492. Glass porter bottle, Dutch, ca. 1750-1780. 763 grams, about 9½” tall and 3½” in diameter at its widest. A fat, cylindrical bottle in dark green glass with rolled lip, perfectly intact with slick but slightly bubbled surfaces, probably held a lot of beer in its day. Found in colonial harbors in Central America. Estimate: $75 - $115 493. Glass porter bottle, Dutch, ca. 1750-1780. 724 grams, about 9¼” tall and 3-5/8" in diameter at its widest. As above but slightly shorter and much darker and brown instead of green, with great smooth surfaces except for a 1½”-long scar (as made) in the side. Found in colonial harbors in Central America. Estimate: $75 - $115

near Plymouth, England, that were occupied by Naval personnel up till about 1820. Estimate: $30 - $50

497. Glass “case gin” bottle, English, early 1800s. 514 grams, about 9¼” tall and 3" on a side at its widest. These square-sided bottles are not overly rare or valuable but make wonderful displays (double as vases). The lip is completely intact and the sides are all shiny and unscathed, with just the usual bubble-seeding inside the green glass to add character. Estimate: $80 - $120

494. Silver British naval officer’s seal from the time of Nelson, dateable to 1794 (London hallmark). 5.6 grams, about ¾” tall, with oval face about ¾” x 11/16". A small stamper with anchor design (not very deep, probably worn from heavy use), perfectly intact with four hallmarks on back (one a clear “CF” for the London maker on one side of the post, the other three in a row opposite the other mark with what appears to be the letters “Q” and “t” flanking a lion), the post almost in the shape of a sextant, possibly connected with the famous Admiral Horatio Nelson and his Fleet. Found on “Ballast Bank” (very near where Nelson’s

Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

flagship Victory used to anchor) in Portsmouth Harbor, England, the British Naval Base whence Nelson and his fleet set out for the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Estimate: $75 - $100

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501. Official 19th-century reproduction of a large, bronze cannon made by Burger in 1676. Approx. 800 lb., total length 8' 10", bore 3". This huge and very ornate bronze cannon was cast in the 1800s and is marked with “IOHANES BVRGER HUYS ME FECIT 1676,” as the original was made by John Burger in 1676. The original would sell in today’s market in excess of $100,000, so even the value of its still-antique replica is significant, especially since the material cost of 800 lb. of bronze alone is quite high! The artistry is incredible, with ornate grapevine-like decoration around the cascabel, between that and the “dolphin” lifting handles, even all the way to the muzzle, with trunnions and touchhole intact (presumably capable of firing), deeply patinated all over and without any porosity or damage. Note: shipping not available. Winning bidder must arrange to have this lot picked up in person at its current location in south Georgia.

Estimate: $12,500 - $15,000

498. Glass “case gin” bottle, English, early 1800s. 482 grams, same as above. As above but with slightly lower lip and somewhat sunken sides (also a little more translucent and without the seeding). Estimate: $80 - $120

502. Artillery saber, European (German?), 1850s?. A little over 2 lb., about 18" from tip to hilt and 1½” at its widest, the handle about 5¼” long and 3½” at its widest. This is really just an antique, and

499. Large set of European brass nested weights, early 1800s. Total weight about 1.95 kilograms, about 3½” in diameter and 2½” tall.

not a colonial artifact, but I couldn’t resist taking it on consignment, for the look of it just said “arrr, run ya through!” The brass handle is perfectly intact, and the steel blade is all there too but shows a series of old nicks that one can just picture being made in combat with another sword-wielding opponent (“clashing swords”). Estimate: $100 - $150

A massive set of cup-weights with six cups inside a big one weighing about ½ oz., 1 oz., 2 oz. (marked “2”), 4 oz. (marked “4”), 9 oz. (marked “9”), and 500 grams (marked “500 g”), the outer cup weighing about 1000 grams, all very well preserved and intact, with the latching bar also intact (but the lateral fastener is missing), probably missing the little ½-oz. plug that fits into the smallest cup and also all the cups a little bit light (hence the whole set is 50 grams under the stated “2 kg” marked on the lid), a very nice and sturdy display. Estimate: $250 $375 500. Small set of European brass nested weights, early 1800s. 432.2 grams total, overall about 1¾” tall and 2" in diameter. A beautifully preserved 1-lb. set of cupweights that nest inside one another (like Russian “matrioshki” dolls), consisting of a ½-oz. plug marked “1/2” inside cups of about ½, 1, 2, 4 and 8 oz. (but each a little bit off in exact weight), the outside cup marked “16” (for 16 oz. total) and with a bar across that latches onto the side. Sets like this abound, but rarely in this condition— perfectly functional, no parts missing or replaced, and especially with the fastening bar intact. Found in Central America. Estimate: $350 - $475

503. Gold wire-chain coin purse, probably Portuguese, ca. 1840-1870. 22.4 grams, approx. 19K+, about 3" x 2". While this antique artifact from Brazil may not have come from a shipwreck, it certainly evokes a grand period of South American history! The container of the purse consists of chain-links with 4 small balls below, with a heavy, 2"-wide clasp at the top with small ring attached for fastening to a chain or belt. One can just imagine a small handful of Brazilian “Joes” clanking around inside! Estimate: $1,200 - $1,500

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MEDIA PRINTS

504. Lot of three black-glass “cylinder” bottles, probably English, ca. 1850-1870. About 700-800 grams each, and each about 11½” tall and 3¼” in diameter. The shape of these is like modern wine bottles, but that is where the comparison ends, for the glass itself is thick, dark and very opaque (looks black but is actually a dark greenish brown) and the lip at top is deep, and also each bottle is lightly speckled with white or tan encrustation. Not very pricey pieces, and not colonial period, but definitely antique and a good display. Sold as a lot of three only. Estimate: $45 - $75

506. Engraved print of the Potosí mountain, Dutch, dated 1702, perfect condition. 11¾” x 9¾”. This black-and-white engraving shows in minute detail the mountain of Potosí, with spired building on top, from a distance, with soldiers and buildings in the foreground valley; but here’s the fun part: One large building in the foreground and all the distant buildings on the other side of the mountain are windmills (from a Dutch engraver after all), and the trees in the foreground are all palm trees (as the engraver was probably told that palm trees are all over South America, without regard to elevation). An opening in the foreground windmill reveals silver bars inside, stacked like cordwood! Below the picture is the legend in Dutch and Latin, as well as the engraver’s name Pet(er) Schenk. Penciled comments by a Dutch dealer on the paper frame show that this was actually copied from a ca.1680 engraving by C. Allard. A perfect companion-piece for the collector of Potosí cobs! Estimate: $500 - $1,000 507. Engraved print of the Potosí mountain, Italian?, probably 1700s, in ornate wooden frame. About 10" x 7½”, the frame about 14½” x 11¾”. Ironically, this print appears to have been copied from the same ca.-1680 Dutch original as above, as the angle and some details (like the building on top of the mountain and the windmills in the background and palm trees in the foreground) are the same, except this one is in portrait format as opposed to landscape, and it is probably a bit newer. The engraver is unknown except by his initials “G.M.T.” below the print on the left. At top is the legend in Italian. Like the above, the print itself is in perfect condition (no tears or stains), although the baroque frame is a little cracked (perhaps how it was made). Estimate: $350 - $500

505. Parker 75 fountain pen made in 1965 from 1715-Fleet silver, in a presentation box. As mentioned in his book Pieces of Eight, Kip Wagner’s Real Eight Co. was badly in need of money when investor Ken Parker came forward with the idea to melt down 4,000 oz. of silver cobs from the 1715 Fleet and turn them into popular fountain pens (limited to 4,821 units) to sell at $75 each (triple the normal retail price for their pens), a small fortune in 1965 for anyone but wealthy executives. (Interestingly, if you note that the amount of silver was probably around 3,600 8R cobs, which in today’s market would be worth about $360,000, and if you divide that by the number of pens made, you get about $75 each!) But it is not just the pen that makes these collectibles valuable: You have to have the whole package, with the box and certificates and booklets, and this offering has it all! The pen itself shows the normal Parker 75 crosshatch pattern on the outside but with the all-important “SPANISH TREASURE FLEET - 1715” embossed on it and also with the oM mintmark for Mexico and the Mexican eagle in the gold accents at either end. I cannot attest to the condition or working order of the pen, as I am not a pen expert, but it looks completely functional (just needs some ink) and flaw-free. For more information, go to the website http://www.parker75.com. With hinged box, 6-5/8" x 3¾” x 1-3/8", that shows a map on top, a diagram of a galleon inside, inspection certificate/guarantee #158569, small booklet, and (best of all) a notarized certificate signed by Kip Wagner. Estimate: $700 -

$1,000

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FILM 508. Original 16 mm film from the early 1970s entitled Treasure Salvors of the Florida Keys, with DVD copy for modern viewing. Metal canister is 12½” in diameter. This is an original color film (16 mm), about a half hour long, written by Joseph Keyerleber and produced by Mel Fisher and his company in the early 1970s to attract investors in the search for the Atocha by providing an overview of their work to that point. The film starts with narrative about the 1733-Fleet disaster against a background of Spanish guitar music, then alternates with dialogue between Fisher and his divers, starting with their original operation on the 1715 Fleet in Vero Beach, Florida, and then their move to Key West to search for the Atocha, during which time they salvage a 1733-Fleet ship (with cameo performances by Tom Gurr and Mendel Peterson), with numerous underwater scenes. What is probably most fascinating is all the footage of Mel’s family, particularly his children in their younger days (like Kim and Taffi Fisher as adolescents, but also their older brother Dirk, who was killed four years later when their salvage boat capsized). Considering the penniless state of Treasure Salvors at the time, this film is impressively done from a technical point of view. Also included is the original metal canister containing the film and a DVD copy of the film so you can watch it now. Estimate: $200 - $500

DOCUMENTS

divulgence of information (specifically latitude and longitude numbers) in the search for the Maravillas (1656) in the Bahamas, including a photocopy and translation of an entire folio from the Spanish archives regarding the shipwreck and a sample contract for a lease from the Bahamian government, as well as correspondence regarding Real Eight affiliate Robert Marx, who—quite suspiciously—found the Maravillas site right when Mr. Neal’s contract with Real Eight expired. Could it be that this gentleman, John Neal, should be credited with the finding of the Maravillas?! Also included is a short (8 pages), unpublished narrative by Mr. Neal entitled Blind Man’s Gold, which presents his amusingly disgruntled perspective, in addition to several salvage contracts and letters (some important names: Harry Cannon, Walt Holzworth and State agent Tommy Gore), plus a 7page pamphlet entitled Beachcomber’s Guide to the 1715 Spanish Treasure Fleet by Sea Siren Treasure Salvors, Ltd. Really a wealth of material for collectors of Real Eight memorabilia, and a curious glimpse of the “treasure fever” that inflicted people in the 1960s (and still does today!). Estimate: $100 - $200

510. Lot of six Real Eight Co. stock certificates redeemed in the 1970s. Each about 12" x 8". Starting in the early 1970s, the Real Eight Co. “went public” and offered shares in their company as a way to “keep going” in their salvage efforts. These stock certificates were issued to investors, their names and number of shares (ranging here from 2 to 100) being printed on each numbered certificate. These certificates (designed and printed by the Columbian Banknote Company) bear color borders/backgrounds in red, green or blue and show two Mexican cob 8 reales (one fully dated 1715) above “REAL EIGHT CO., INC.” at top. Each certificate is dated from 1972 to 1975 and is in perfect condition except for all the signatures and stampings on the back to indicate transfers and redemptions. Sold as a lot of six documents only. Estimate: $175 - $275

Please send your bids to our special email bidding address: treasurebids@gmail.com

509. Large lot of documents concerning the Real Eight Co. Big sheaf of papers from the late 1960s to early 1970s from a Mr. John A. Neal, Jr., concerning his involvement with the Real Eight Co., in particular an ongoing dispute regarding his

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BOOKS

that sank in 1724 off the Dominican Republic coast. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $25 - $40

Featuring selections from the treasure libraries of Dave Crooks and Bruce Prior/ Kelly Tarlton

519. Briggs, Peter. Buccaneer Harbour, The Fabulous History of Port Royal, Jamaica. (1970) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 123 pp, illus. This book tells the story of England’s struggle to establish a colony at Port Royal, Jamaica, and of the buccaneers who made it rich. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35

511. Allen, Geoffrey & David. Clive’s Lost Treasure. (1978) C1090, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 104 pp, illus. This well-illustrated book tells the story of the search for and salvage of treasure from the Dodington, an East Indiaman, off the coast of South Africa. The gold was never officially found, and this book opens some avenues as to what could have happened to it. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50 512. Allen, Geoffrey & David. The Guns of Sacramento. (1978) C-1100, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 81 pp, illus. This book describes the raising

of 40 bronze cannons from the Portuguese galleon Sacramento off South Africa. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum

520. Broxam, Graeme and Michael Nash. Tasmanian Shipwrecks Volume 1, 1797-1899. (1998) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 342 pp, illus. This is a comprehensive account of the circumstances of shipwrecks in Tasmanian waters from 1797 to 1899. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $65 - $85 521. Broxam, Graeme and Michael Nash. Tasmanian Shipwrecks Volume 2 1900-1999. (2000) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 402 pp, illus. A comprehensive account of the circumstances of shipwrecks in Tasmanian waters from 1900 to 1999, in complement with Volume 1. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $65 - $85

of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $40

513. Bascom, Willard. Deep Water Ancient Ships—Treasure Vault of the Mediterranean. (1976) C-1290, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 226 pp, illus. This is an introduction to, and summary of, the idea of searching in deep water for treasure that might have survived for thousands of years. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

522. Burchell, David. The Bells of Sunda Strait. (1971) Cunlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 135 pp, illus. This book tells the story of the author’s recovery of a ship’s bell and other relics from the cruiser Perth that sank in the Sunda Strait, west of Java, on March 1, 1942. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $60

514. Bass, George F. (ed.). Ships and Shipwrecks of the Americas. (1996) C-1340, American ed. (first published in London in 1988), SC, 272 pp, illus. This is a history of shipwrecks in North and South America based on underwater archaeological discoveries. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

523. Burgess, Robert F. They Found Treasure. (1977) C-1730, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 243 pp, illus. This book relates the story of nine famous treasure hunters and their challenges in finding and recovering sunken treasure: Art McKee, Kip Wagner, Tom Gurr, John Baker, Robert Marx, Robert Sténuit, Mel Fisher, Eugene Lyon and Duncan Mathewson.

515. Belcher, Bill. Shipwreck on Middleton Reef. (1979) Cunlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 190 pp, illus. This book tells the story of a Tasmanian man’s survival after being lost on the Middleton Reef due to shipwreck. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40

Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton, and hand-signed by Mel Fisher (“I know you’ll find some big lumps, Kelly”). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $125 - $150

516. Berg, Daniel & Denise. Tropical Shipwrecks. (1989) Cunlisted, 1st ed., SC 159 pp, illus. A vacationing diver’s guide to the Bahamas and Caribbean. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20

524. Burgess, Robert F. Sunken Treasure: Six Who Found Fortunes. (1988) C-1720, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 333 pp, illus. The story of Art McKee, Kip Wagner, Robert Marx, Burt Webber, Barry Clifford and Mel Fisher...and their successful sunken treasure hunts. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40

517. Blair, Clay. Diving for Treasure. (1961) C-1440, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 240 pp, illus. This book tells the story of not a treasure galleon but the richest merchant shipwreck yet discovered in the Western Hemisphere. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

525. Burgess, Robert F. and Carl J. Clausen. Gold, Galleons & Archaeology. (1976) C-1690, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 195 pp, illus. This tells the story of the sinking and salvage of the 1715 Spanish Fleet, which sank in a hurricane off Vero Beach, Florida, and spilled millions of dollars in gold, silver and jewels just offshore. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 $50

Estimate: $30 - $50 518. Boer, Susan Dudnick. The Treasure of the Quicksilver Galleons. (1982) C-1480, 1st ed., SC, 32 pp, illus. This is a catalog (with a fictional background story) for the exhibit of artifacts from the Conde de Tolosa and Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe

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526. Burgess, Robert F. and Carl J. Clausen. Gold, Galleons & Archaeology. (1976) C-1690, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 195 pp, illus, owner’s bookplate. As above. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

535. Concerned Citizens for the National Museum, Inc. (Philippines). Saga of the San Diego. (1993) C-1037, 1st ed., SC, 95 pp, illus. This is an anthology of nine articles about the warship San Diego that wrecked in 1600 off the Philippine coast. Several articles deal with the ceramics and artifacts recovered. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $40 $50

527. Byron, Kenneth W. Lost Treasures in Australia and New Zealand. (1964) C-1810, 1st Australian ed., HC, DJ, 232 pp. Classic book about treasure ships lost in Australia and New Zealand, including the Batavia, Gilt Dragon, Zuytdorp, General Grant, Elingamite, and Niagara. Many more lesser-known wrecks are also described. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $60

536. Cousteau, Jacques-Yves. Diving for Sunken Treasure. (1971) C-2400, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 302 pp, illus. This well-known text relates the author’s unsuccessful hunt for the sunken Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de la Concepción, and references William Phips’ prior salvage efforts on that wreck. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

528. Byron, Kenneth W. Lost Treasures in Australia and New Zealand. (1965) C-1810, 1st British ed., HC, DJ, 232 pp, illus, owner’s name in pen on first free frontispiece. Classic book about treasure ships lost in Australia and New Zealand, including the Batavia, Gilt Dragon, Zuytdorp, General Grant, Elingamite, and Niagara. Many more lesser-known wrecks are also described. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 $60

537. Cousteau, Jacques-Yves. Diving for Sunken Treasure. (1971) C-2400, SC, 302 pp, illus. As above but in softcover. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20 538. Craig, Dr. Alan. Florida Archaeology—Gold Coins of the 1715 Spanish Plate Fleet: A Numismatic Study of the State of Florida Collection. (1988) C-2420, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 83 pp, illus. A numismatic study and popular account of the gold coins of the 1715 Spanish Plate Fleet owned by the State of Florida.

529. Byron, Kenneth W. Treasure Ships and Tropic Isles. (1985) C-1820, SC, 118 pp, illus. The true story of the wrecks of the Port au Prince in Tonga in 1806 and of the Eliza in Fiji in 1808. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

Autographed by the author. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75

539. Craig, Freeman. Coinage of El Peru. (1988) C-2450, 1st ed., SC, 24 pp, illus. An offprint from the American Numismatic Society’s “Coinage of the Americas Conference” of 1988, this pamphlet and its accompanying 36 color slides and box cover overview the coins produced in Peru from the time of the conquistadors to 1826. Estimate: $30 - $45

530. Campbell, Lord Archibald. Armada Cannon. (1899) C1905, 1st ed., HC, 63 pp, illus, some loose pages and staining on cover.

This book describes an impressive cannon (manufactured by Benvenuto Cellini) that was salvaged from the Spanish galleon Florencia in Tobermory Harbor (Scotland). From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $40 - $50

540. Crile, Jane & Barney. Treasure Diving Holidays—The Adventures of a Family Under the Sea. (1954) C-2480, 1st ed., HC, DJ (corner clipped), XL, 256 pp, illus. The story of the Crile family of Cleveland, Ohio, and their adventures treasure-hunting in the Caribbean during the 1950s and 1960s. The Criles teamed up with Art McKee and Mendel Peterson to salvage the HMS Looe. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $60

531. Clarke, Arthur C. Indian Ocean Treasure. (1964) C-2180, 1st ed., HC, DJ (torn), 147 pp, illus. A condensed version of The Treasure of the Great Reef, which tells the story of Clarke’s accidental finding of an early 18th-century wreck off the coast of Sri Lanka and its subsequent salvage. Estimate: $25 - $35 532. Clarke, Arthur C. with Mike Wilson. The Treasure of the Great Reef. (1964) C-2190, 1st ed., SC, 209 pp, illus. As above but not condensed and paperback. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20 533. Clifford, Barry. The Black Ship—The Quest to Recover an English Pirate Ship and its Lost Treasure. (1999) C-2230, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 311 pp, illus. This is the story of the excavation by the author of the Whydah, which sank off of Cape Cod in 1717. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40 534. Coffman, F.L. Atlas of Treasure Maps. (1952) C-2290, 1st ed., HC (oversized), 124 pp, illus. This classic reference features 41 beautifully done nautical charts showing 3,047 known (or suspected) wreck sites in the Western Hemisphere and British Isles (including the longitude and latitude). It also includes some land-treasure sites on the maps. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $125 - $150

541. Crile, Jane & Barney. Treasure Diving Holidays—The Adventures of a Family Under the Sea. (1954) C-2480, 1st ed., HC, DJ (small tears), 256 pp, illus. As above. Estimate: $25 - $40 542. Croall, James. Fourteen Minutes—The Last Voyage of the Empress of Ireland. (1978) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 240 pp, illus. This book discusses the account of the wreck of the Empress of Ireland, with other articles on the same shipwreck laid in. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $30 - $45

Please visit our website at www.sedwickcoins.com! 97


543. Crooks, David S. Bibliography of Important Shipwreck Auction Catalogs. (2004), 1st ed., SC, 81 pp. A list of auction catalogs that contain only shipwreck material or have significant sections devoted to shipwreck material. An invaluable checklist for buyers in this sale! Limited edition of 100 copies. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $10 - $20 544. Daley, Robert. Treasure—The Story of the Most Successful and Most Tragic Treasure Hunt of Modern Times. (1977) C-2550, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 192 pp, illus. The story of Mel Fisher’s successful search for the sunken Spanish galleon Atocha, sunk near Key West, Florida, in 1622. It also includes details of some of the early salvage efforts. Signed by Mel Fisher. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75 545. Daley, Robert. Treasure—The Story of the Most Successful and Most Tragic Treasure Hunt of Modern Times. (1977) C-2550, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 341 pp. illus. As above but without the signature. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

Elingamite sank in 1902 off the New Zealand coast with a cargo of gold and silver. Autographed by the author. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $40 - $50 552. Doak, Wade. The Elingamite and its Treasure. (1969) C2780, 1st ed., HC, DJ, XL, 192 pp, illus. As above but without the signature. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $40 553. Driscoll, Charles B. Pirates Ahoy! (1941) C-2840, 1st ed., HC, 340 pp. While this book is primarily about pirates, it does include the story of the sinking of the Thetis off the coast of Brazil. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $60 554. Earle, Peter. The Wreck of the Almiranta: Sir William Phips and the Hispaniola Treasure. (1979) C-2930, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 260 pp, illus. A scholarly work describing the sinking of the Nuestra Señora de la Concepción off the coast of Hispaniola in 1641, and the salvage by both William Phips in 1687 and more recently by Burt Webber. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

546. Dash, Mike. Batavia’s Graveyard. (2002) C-2580, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 381 pp. An fascinating narrative about the sinking of the Batavia off the west coast of Australia in 1629, and the mutiny that continued after the catastrophe. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

555. Ellsberg, Capt. Edward. On the Bottom. (1966) C-unlisted, 22nd printing, HC, DJ, XL, 324 pp. The author’s account of the raising of the US Navy’s S-51 submarine. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40

547. De Burgh, W. J. and Graeme Henderson. The Last Voyage of the James Matthews. (1979) C-unlisted, 1st ed., SC, 37 pp, illus. From slave ship to trading brig, the story of this ship and its voyage to colonial Western Australia as told from the diary of one of its passengers. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $15

556. Falcon-Barker, Ted. Devil’s Gold. (1969) C-3080, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 159 pp, illus. The story of the author’s search for and salvage of the Nuestra Señora de la Concepción, sunk in 1641 north of Hispaniola. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the

548. Denmead, Doug. Skindivers and Shipwrecks. (1973) Cunlisted, 1st ed., SC, 96 pp, illus. A contemporary update (at the time) of recent wrecks for the benefit of the non-diving public to become aware of the submarine world of the wreck-divers.

557. Farb, Roderick M. Shipwrecks: Diving the Graveyard of the Atlantic. (1985) C-unlisted, 1st ed., SC, 264 pp, illus. The most comprehensive book about North Carolina shipwreck-diving on more than 70 different shipwrecks dating from 1800 through contemporary times. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20

late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $35 - $50

Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate:

$30 - $40 558. Garrett, Charles. The New Treasure Recovery from Land and Sea. (1990) C-3360, 2nd ed., SC, 466 pp, illus. This book discusses many facets of metal detecting near or in the water. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 $15

549. Denmead, Doug. Skindivers and Shipwrecks. (1973) Cunlisted, 1st ed., SC, 96 pp, illus. As above but without the pedigree. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 $30

559. Gentile, Gary. Andrea Doria: Dive to an Era. (1989) Cunlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 160 pp, illus. The complete story of the Andrea Doria from its sinking through the author’s twenty-two expeditions to the wreck. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

550. Dethlefsen, Edwin. Whidah: Cape Cod’s Mystery Treasure Ship. (1984) C-2690, 1st ed., SC, 171 pp, illus, loose spine, well-used condition. The first book about the search for the Whydah (misspelled in the title). The Whydah was a pirate ship that sank off the Cape Cod coast in 1717. In 1984, when this book was published, the wreck still had not been found. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

560. Gibbs, James A., Jr. Pacific Graveyard. (1950) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, 192 pp, illus. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40

551. Doak, Wade. The Elingamite and its Treasure. (1969) C2780, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 192 pp, illus. The author’s own story about finding and salvaging the Elingamite with Kelly Tarlton. The

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561. Godard, Philippe. The First and Last Voyage of the Batavia. (1993), C-3470, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 331 pp, illus. This large book tells the story from beginning to excavation of the V.O.C. ship Batavia, which was wrecked on the Western Australian reefs in 1629. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $125 - $150 562. Grissim, John. The Lost Treasure of the Concepción. (1980), C-3650, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 207 pp, illus. This popular book recounts the salvage of the Concepción by William Phips in 1687, and then tells the story of Burt Webber’s search for, recovery, and salvage of this ship in the late 1970s. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

printing. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $55 570. Henderson, Graeme. Maritime Archaeology in Australia. (1986) C-3960, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 201 pp, illus. This useful book describes underwater archaeological recoveries in the waters surrounding Australia from the 1600s to the present. Shipwrecks discussed include the Batavia, Vergulde Draeck (Gilt Dragon), Zeewijk, Zuytdorp, Rapid, and Tryall. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $75 571. Hinrichs, Dunbar Maury. The Fateful Voyage of Captain Kidd. (1955) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ (damaged), 203 pp. This is a factual and lively account of Captain Kidd’s escapades and life. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 $35

563. Grocott, Terence. Shipwrecks of the Revolutionary & Napoleonic Eras. (1997) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 430 pp. A chronicle of shipping disasters (1500) during the last great war of the age of sail, based almost exclusively on the reporting of the time. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40

572. Hoppé, E. O. Pirates, Buccaneers and Gentlemen Adventurers. (1972) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 139 pp, illus. An “objective look at the swashbuckling, dashing, romantic plunderers of the seas who have been the heroes—and the villains—of song and story, film and novel.” From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35

564. Hardcastle, Nate. Deep Blue—Stories of Shipwreck, Sunken Treasure and Survival. (2001) C-unlisted, 1st ed., SC, 321 pp. This book offers thirteen of literature’s greatest stories about the ocean and the people who have risked its wrath from pirates to scuba divers. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

573. Horner, Dave. The Treasure Galleons. (1971) C-4110, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 259 pp, illus. This highly respected classic contains twelve stories of undiscovered (as of 1971) sunken treasure ships. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late

565. Hatcher, Michael, with Antony Thorncroft. The Nanking Cargo. (1987) C-3880, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 176 pp, illus. The story of the search for and salvage of the Geldermalsen, a Dutch Indiaman that sank in 1752 off the coast of Singapore. Michael Hatcher salvaged the wreck in 1985, yielding an astounding cargo of Chinese porcelain and gold.

Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $40 - $55 574. Hudson, L. Frank. How to Discover and Profit from Florida Shipwreck Treasures. (1986) C-4130, 1st ed., SC, 85 pp, illus. Small book of information on many of Florida’s shipwrecks for divers and amateur archaeologists who want to know what treasures lie hidden beneath the water’s surface. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

Signed by Capt. M. Hatcher. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $75 - $100

566. Haydock, Tim. Treasure Trove—Where to Find the Great Lost Treasures of the World. (1986) C-3920, 1st ed., SC, 160 pp, illus. A compact book devoted to treasures on land and at sea. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 $25

575. Hult, Ruby El. Lost Mines and Treasures of the Pacific Northwest. (1964) C-unlisted, HC, DJ, 257 pp. For the first time, long-accepted stories about the lost mines and treasures of the Pacific Northwest are thoroughly investigated. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40

567. Heden, Karl E. Directory of Shipwrecks of the Great Lakes. (1966) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 116 pp. This guide pinpoints the locations of approximately 1,500 shipwrecks in the Great Lakes region of North America. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $45

576. Ingleman-Sundberg, C. Relics from the Dutch East Indiaman Zeewijk. Foundered in 1727. (1978) C-4200, SC, 107 pp, illus. A short description of the wreck of the Zeewijk in Western Australian waters in 1727, with many drawings of the artifacts recovered. It also includes a tabular listing of all artifacts recovered from the wreck. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $45

568. Helm, Thomas. Treasure Hunting Around the World. (1960) C-3950, 3rd printing, HC, DJ, 288 pp, illus. This book encompasses both sunken and land treasures, including sections on the Hussar, Laurentic, and Concepción. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $55

577. Ingram, C. W. N.. New Zealand Shipwrecks 1795-1970. (1951) C-unlisted, revised and enlarged 4th ed. (orig. pub. in 1936), HC, DJ, 448 pp, illus, XL. A record of about 1900 shipping casualties over a period of 175 years in New Zealand waters. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 $50

569. Helm, Thomas. Treasure Hunting Around the World. (1960) C-3950, 4th printing, HC, DJ, 288 pp, illus. As above but 4th

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586. Latil & Rivoire. Sunken Treasure. (1962) C-4690, 1st American ed., HC, DJ, 276 pp, illus. As above but American edition. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $40

578. Jameson, W.C. Buried Treasures of the American Southwest. (1989) C-unlisted, 1st ed., SC, 200 pp, illus. Legends of lost mines, hidden payrolls and Spanish gold in the Southwest. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 $20

587. Latil & Rivoire. Sunken Treasure. (1962) C-4690, 1st American ed., HC, DJ, XL, 276 pp, illus. As above. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

579. Jameson, W.C. Buried Treasures of the Rocky Mountain West. (1993) C-unlisted, 1st ed., SC, 191 pp, illus. Legends of lost mines, train robbery gold, caves of forgotten riches and Indians’ buried silver in the Rocky Mountain West. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20

588. Le Gallienne, Richard. Pieces of Eight. (1920) C-unlisted, reprint ed., HC, 333 pp. The authentic narrative of a treasure discovered in the Bahama Islands in the year 1903. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $60 - $80

580. Jameson, W.C. Buried Treasures of California. (1995) C4230, 1st ed., SC, 189 pp, illus. Legends from California’s mountains, deserts, beaches, and cities. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20 581. Jefferis, Roger and Kendall McDonald. The Wreck Hunters. (1966) C-4260, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 255 pp, illus, XL. A book about amateur divers’ search for sunken wrecks along the English coast, including the Mary Rose, the Spanish Armada shipwrecks, the Association and many other wrecks. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30 582. Jörg, C. J. A. The Geldermalsen, History and Porcelain. (1986) C-4330, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 124 pp. illus. This beautifully illustrated book discusses the shipwreck of the Geldermalsen (“Nanking Cargo”), which sank near Singapore in 1752, and its fabulous cargo of ceramics. Autographed by the author. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $75 - $95

583. Kirby, Percival R. The True Story of the Grosvenor—East Indiaman. (1960) C-4420, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 266 pp, illus. This book describes the wreck of the Grosvenor off the coast of South Africa in 1782, the desperate trek of the survivors to civilization, and the various salvage efforts. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $60

584. Klare, Normand E. The Final Voyage of the Central America, 1857. (1992) C-4430, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 278 pp, illus. The story of the final voyage of the SS Central America (1857), the saga of a gold rush steamship, the tragedy of her loss in a hurricane off the North Carolina coast, and the treasure which is now recovered. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75

589. Lenihan, D. J. (ed.). Submerged Cultural Resources Study: USS Arizona Memorial and Pearl Harbor National Historic Landmark. (1990) C-unlisted, 2nd ed., SC, 192 pp, illus. A study done on the USS Arizona by the National Park Service’s Submerged Cultural Resources Unit and the Navy’s Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit, showing how undersea explorations ought to be done so as to leave their historic subjects intact. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35 590. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Victorian Shipwrecks. (1971) Cunlisted, HC, DJ, 177 pp, illus. A succinct account of all known wrecks in the waters off Victoria, Australia, supplying details of tonnage, location and conditions, as well as easily-used indexes and cross-references. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35 591. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Wrecks along the Great Ocean Road. (1974) C-unlisted, 4th ed., SC, 137 pp, illus, with gift inscription. Small but useful book that presents many fascinating stories of disasters from Point Lonsdale to Portland (Australia). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30 592. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Wrecks on the N.S.W. North Coast. (1978) C-unlisted, SC, 135 pp, illus. Another brief book that encompasses more than 1000 casualties between 1800 and 1976 on the north coast of New South Wales, Australia. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $45 593. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Mysteries of the Bass Strait Triangle. (1980) C-unlisted, SC, 112 pp, illus. Short book about the strait between Victoria (Australia) and Tasmania where many vessels have mysteriously disappeared. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $30

585. Latil & Rivoire. Sunken Treasure. (1962) C-4690, 1st English ed., HC, DJ, 276 pp, illus. This French classic (translated into English) tells the story of 11 treasure ship recoveries, including: Nuestra Señora de la Concepción; Grosvenor; Lutine; Egypt; the Vigo Bay galleons; Laurentic; Elisabethville; Niagara; the Spanish Armada ship Florencia; and Telemaque. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 $40

594. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Wrecks on the Gippsland Coast. (1980) C-unlisted, 6th ed., SC, 87 pp, illus. A survey on shipping incidents along the Gippsland Coast (Australia). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $15 595. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Australian Shipwrecks 1871-1900 Volume 3. (1982) C-unlisted, HC, DJ, 296 pp, illus. A concise account of more than 1800 wrecks around the Australian coast, nearby waters, and her territories between 1871 and 1900. Limited edition #1324 of 1500, signed by the author. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $70

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596. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Wrecks on the Queensland Coast, Vol. 1. (1982) C-unlisted, SC, 87 pp, illus. Yet another short book that discusses a number of wrecks that occurred on the Queensland Coast of Australia from 1791 to 1900. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $15 597. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Wrecks along the Great Ocean Road. (1983) C-unlisted, 4th ed., SC, 138 pp, illus. This book incorporates previous works by the author about shipwrecks on the west coast of Victoria (Australia) from Point Lonsdale to Portland. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $15 598. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Australian Shipwrecks 1901-1986 Volume 4. (1987) C-unlisted, HC, DJ, 283 pp, illus. Concise reports of over 3000 vessels lost during this period. Signed by the author. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 $70

605. Lyon, Eugene. The Search for the Atocha. (1974) C-4900, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 246 pp, illus. The story of how good archival research located and identified the sunken Spanish galleon Atocha, salvaged by Mel Fisher in the 1970s and 1980s. The author was the researcher who found the “key” to locating the Atocha wreck site in the archives in Seville, Spain...after Mel had spent 10 years searching the entire length of the Florida Keys without success. Signed by the author and Mel Fisher and one more unidentified person. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75

606. Lyon, Eugene. The Search for the Atocha. (1974) C-4900, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 246 pp, illus. As above but without signatures. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate:

$45 - $60 599. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Wrecks on the Queensland Coast, Volume 2. (1987) C-unlisted, SC, 44 pp, illus. Booklet about wrecks that occurred on the Queensland Coast (Australia) from 1901-1986. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $15

607. MacKenzie, Margaret E. Shipwrecks. (1964) C-unlisted, 3rd ed., HC, DJ, 135 pp, illus. This is an account of 18 wrecks along the Victorian coast of Australia from Cape Otway to Port Fairy between the years 1836 and 1914. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20

600. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Australian Shipwrecks Update 16221990. (1991) C-unlisted, HC, DJ, 169 pp, illus. An update that added more than 1000 additional casualties to this author’s previous volumes. Limited edition #457 of 500 hardbound copies, signed by the author. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $40 - $55

608. Marsden, Peter. The Wreck of the Amsterdam. (1985) C5040, 2nd printing, SC, 207 pp, illus. This is the story of the salvage of the Dutch East Indiaman Amsterdam, beached near Hastings, England, in 1749, laden with silver bullion. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

601. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Admella. (no date given) C-unlisted, 4th in a series, SC, 20 pp, illus. Pamphlet about the tragic wreck of the Admella off the southern coast of Australia. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $5 - $15

609. Marshall, Logan. The Tragic Story of the Empress of Ireland. (1972) C-unlisted, revised printing, HC, 232 pp, illus. An authentic account of the most horrible disaster in Canadian history, constructed from the real facts obtained from those on board who survived. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck

602. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Famous Wrecks. (no date given) Cunlisted, SC, 115 pp, illus. The stories of eight famous wrecks along the southern coast of Australia including the “Mahogany ship,” the Admella, the R.M.S. Australia and the S.S. Casino. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 $35

Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

603. Loney, J. K. (Jack). The Loch Ard Disaster. (no date given) C-unlisted, 5th ed., SC, 44 pp, illus. The story of the wreck of the Loch Ard on the Victorian coast of Australia. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $15 604. Loney, J. K. (Jack). Wrecks in Australian Waters. (no date given) C-unlisted, SC, 235 pp, illus. An illustrated survey of shipwrecks, fires, collisions and strandings on the Australian coast from 1629 to present. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

610. Martin, Colin. Full Fathom Five—Wrecks of the Spanish Armada. (1975) C-5060, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 288 pp, illus. An account of the author’s search for, and excavation of, three Spanish Armada shipwrecks off Ireland: Santa María de la Rosa, El Gran Grifón, and La Trinidad Valencera. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35 611. Marx, Robert F. The Treasure Fleets of the Spanish Main. (1968) C-5370, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 127 pp, illus. This book overviews the history of the Spanish fleets from the “flota” system to ports of call and the trip back to Spain. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $75 612. Marx, Robert F. Shipwrecks in Florida Waters. (1969) C5290, 2nd ed., SC, 74 pp, illus. A history of the Spanish treasure fleets, some background on other nations in the New World, an overview of the early salvors, and a descriptive listing of 350+ shipwrecks in Florida waters. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

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613. Marx, Robert F. Shipwrecks of the Western Hemisphere. (1971) C-5320, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 483 pp, illus. Primarily a comprehensive listing of significant Western Hemisphere shipwrecks from 1492-1825, organized geographically. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $55 - $70

620. Marx, Robert F. Quest for Treasure. (1982) C-5250, 1st ed., SC, 271 pp, illus. The story of the author’s search for and successful salvage of the Maravillas. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

614. Marx, Robert F. Sea Fever. (1972) C-5260, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 250 pp, illus. The story of 16 famous underwater archaeologists, scientists and treasure hunters. The archaeologists include Peter Throckmorton, George Bass and Pablo Bush Romero, and the treasure hunters include Art McKee, Tom Gurr, Kip Wagner, Mel Fisher, Teddy Tucker and Edwin Link. Pedigreed to the New Zealand

5310, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 482 pp, illus. An updated edition of

Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. Dedicated by the author to Kelly Tarlton, with a hand-written note from the author laid in as well. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $95 - $120

622. Marx, Robert F. Shipwrecks in Florida Waters—A Billion Dollar Graveyard. (1985) C-5290, Mickler reprint of 1979 ed., SC, 147 pp, illus. Historical information on shipwrecks and possible shipwrecks in Florida waters. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

615. Marx, Robert F. Port Royal Rediscovered. (1973) C-5240, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 304 pp, illus. The whole story of the author’s 2½year archaeological excavations and recoveries from the pirate city of Port Royal, Jamaica, which sank into the ocean in 1692 from an earthquake. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

623. Marx, Robert F. Sunken Treasure—How to Find It. (1990) C-5350, 1st ed., SC, 400 pp, illus. An overview of both underwater archaeology and treasure hunting, including the history of the Spanish galleons, and researching, locating, salvaging and identifying shipwrecks. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

616. Marx, Robert F. Shipwrecks of the Western Hemisphere. (1975) C-5320, 2nd ed., HC, DJ, 483 pp, illus. A comprehensive listing of significant Western Hemisphere shipwrecks from 14921825, organized geographically (from Canada to South America). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $40

624. Marx, Robert F. and Jennifer. The Search for Sunken Treasure—Exploring the World’s Great Shipwrecks. (1993) C5270, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 192 pp, illus. An overview of virtually all of the great treasure wrecks. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

621. Marx, Robert F. Shipwrecks in the Americas. (1983) C-

617. Marx, Robert F. Still More Adventures. (1976) C-5340, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 256 pp, illus. A continuation of the adventures of the author, a successful treasure hunter turned underwater archaeologist (basically a sequel to Always Another Adventure), including the author’s exploits in Port Royal, Jamaica, and on both the Serranilla Bank and the Serrana Bank. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $40 - $50 618. Marx, Robert F. The Capture of the Treasure Fleet—The Story of Piet Heyn. (1977) C-5150, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 276 pp. illus, XL. The story of the how the Dutch privateer Piet Heyn seized the Spanish treasure fleet off of Cuba in 1628 and recovered an amount equivalent to $150 million in modern value. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $45 619. Marx, Robert F. Spanish Treasure in Florida Waters—A Billion Dollar Graveyard. (1979) C-5330, 1st ed., HC, 147 pp. illus. Historical information on shipwrecks and possible shipwrecks in Florida waters. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. Autographed and inscribed by the author. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $70 - $85

Shipwrecks of the Western Hemisphere (and in fact the most popular edition), with shipwrecks from 1492-1825, organized geographically (from Canada to South America). It also includes a short overview of locating shipwrecks, salvage, dating and preserving artifacts, and archaeological techniques. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

625. Marx, Robert F. and Jennifer. The Search for Sunken Treasure—Exploring the World’s Great Shipwrecks. (1993) C5270, 1st ed., SC, 192 pp, illus. As above but in softcover. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25 626. Marx, Robert F. with Jennifer Marx. New World Shipwrecks 1492-1825: A Comprehensive Guide. (1994) C5220, reprint of 1993 ed., SC, 434 pp, illus. The most recent edition of Shipwrecks in the Americas (see lot #621), with some additional material. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35 627. Marx, Robert F. with Jennifer Marx. Treasure Lost at Sea—Diving the World’s Great Shipwrecks. (2003) C-5270, 1st ed., SC, 194 pp, illus. An overview of virtually all of the great treasure wrecks. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35 628. Mathers, William M. and Nancy Shaw. Treasure of the Concepción. (1993) C-5470, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 165 pp. illus. The finding and salvage of the Manila galleon Nuestra Señora de la Concepción, that sank in 1638 off the coast of Saipan in the Mariana Islands. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

Please visit our website at www.sedwickcoins.com! 102


629. Mathewson, R. Duncan, III. Archaeological Treasure: The Search for Nuestra Señora de Atocha. (1985) C-5480, reprint of 1980 ed., SC, 171 pp, illus. An overview of the archaeological problems and techniques used in excavating the Atocha shipwreck. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $45 630. Maynard, Jeff. Niagara’s Gold – Treasure Recovery. (1996) C-5520, SC, 160 pp, illus. The remarkable story of how an Australian and New Zealand team salvaged eight tons of gold from a German minefield during WWII. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25 631. McCarthy, Kevin M. Thirty Florida Shipwrecks. (1992) C5535, 1st ed., SC, 128 pp, illus. Thirty of the most interesting stories of Florida shipwrecks, with a map pinpointing each wreck’s location illustrated in a full-color painting by renowned artist William L. Trotter. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30 632. McCarthy, Mike. Excavation of the Barque Day Dawn. (1980) C-unlisted, 1st ed., SC, 58 pp, illus. This work discusses the excavation and identification of the wreck of an ex-American whaler in Cockburn Sound by the Maritime Archaeological Association of Western Australia. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

preservation. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30 637. McKee, Alexander. Tarquin’s Ship—The Etruscan Wreck in Campese Bay. (1985) C-5660, HC, DJ, 216 pp, illus. The story of the author’s attempts to excavate an Etruscan wreck in 150 feet of water off the coast of Italy. He was partially successful in his excavations, overcoming many obstacles along the way. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50 638. McNickle, Andrew J. S. The Lost Treasure of King Philip IV. (1952) C-5680, 1st ed., SC (pamphlet), 17 pp, illus. A brief history of sunken treasure discovered in Bahamian waters. It tells of a silver bar and some cobs that might have been from the wreck of the San Pedro. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75 639. Mel Fisher Treasure Exhibit (Treasure Salvors, Inc.). The Treasure of 1622. (1989) C-7820, 1st ed., SC, 30 pp, illus. A beautifully illustrated collection of topics, from the wrecks of the Nuestra Señora de Atocha and Santa Margarita to conservation of treasures found by Mel Fisher. Signed by Mel Fisher. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $40 - $50 640. Mew, F. Back of the Wight. (1990) C-unlisted, 12th reprinting of 1934 ed., SC, 116 pp, illus. “Yarns” of shipwrecks and smuggling off the coast of the Isle of Wight. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

633. McDonald, Kendall. The Wreck Detectives. (1972) C-5590, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 392 pp, illus. An overview of underwater archaeological projects off the coasts of England in which the author was an active participant. Included are De Liefde, Association, Amsterdam, Earl of Abergavenny, HMS Assurance and two Spanish Armada wrecks: Girona and La Trinidad Valencera. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the

641. Moore, Robin and Howard Jennings. The Treasure Hunter. (1974) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 261 pp, illus. A compendium of treasure-hunting lore, in which the author discloses the secrets that made him wealthy and pinpoints the location of several stillundiscovered treasure hoards. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $35 - $50 634. McHaley, Bleth and Wendy Tucker. Mel Fisher—”The World’s Greatest Treasure Hunter”. (1991) C-5600, 1st ed., SC, 33 pp, illus. A brief account (mostly in pictures) of Mel Fisher and his spectacular treasure recovery from the sunken Spanish galleon Atocha during the 1970s and 1980s. Signed by Mel Fisher. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $50 $60 635. McKee, Alexander. King Henry VIII’s Mary Rose—Its Fate and Future. (1973) C-5650, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 346 pp, illus. All about how the author, a military historian, succeeded in discovering and excavating the Tudor warship Mary Rose 12 feet beneath the mud of Portsmouth harbor. With news article about the ship laid in. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

636. McKee, Alexander. How We Found the Mary Rose. (1982) C-5640, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 152 pp, illus, XL and missing last free end-page. An outstanding book on King Henry VIII’s Tudor flagship Mary Rose, including the unrelenting search for the wreck, the lifting of the wreck intact to the surface, and the ship’s

642. Morris, Roland. Island Treasure. (1969) C-5860, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 232 pp, illus. The story of the author’s search for and recovery of Sir Cloudesley Shovell’s flagship HMS Association off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $70

643. Morris, Roland. Island Treasure. (1969) C-5860, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 232 pp, illus. As above but without the pedigree. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $55 644. Morris, Roland. Island Treasure. (1970) C-5860, 3rd impression, HC, DJ, 232 pp, illus. As above but later printing and with author’s signature. Autographed by the author. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75 645. Morris, Roland. Sunken Treasure, with Treasure Trove Islands wraparound. (1970s) C-5870, booklet, illus. The story of Roland Morris’ passion for sunken treasure and his experiences going after it, particularly the wrecks of Association (1707) and Colossus (1798). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

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pp, illus, XL. As above but hardcover. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $40

646. Morris, Roland. HMS Colossus, The Story of the Salvage of the Hamilton Treasures. (1979) C-5850, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 238 pp, illus. The story of the sinking (1798) and salvage by the author of Nelson’s ship HMS Colossus, that was carrying William Hamilton’s second collection of ancient Greek vases. Estimate: $25 - $40

656. Newark, Peter. The Crimson Book of Pirates. (1978) Cunlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 181 pp, illus. A chronicle of the course of piracy from the earliest times to the present day. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40

647. Muckelroy, Keith (ed.). Archeology Under Water—An Atlas of the World’s Submerged Sites. (1980) C-5910, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 192 pp, illus. This well-illustrated comprehensive book covers techniques, Mediterranean wreck sites and classical seafaring, European shipwrecks over the last 3000 years, exploration wrecks, underwater structures and preservation of finds. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $55 648. Mudie, Ian. Wreck of the Admella. (1966) C-unlisted, Rigby Ltd. ed., HC, DJ, 184 pp, illus. The complete tragic story of the loss of the pride of the Australian fleet, the Admella, in 1859. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $50 649. National Geographic Society (ed. by Breeden and Crump). Undersea Treasures. (1974) C-1610, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 200 pp, illus. With some 175 varied photographs, this book gives the reader a close-up of the divers’ world: their methods, their rewards, and their frustrations. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

651. Nayler, Geoff. Wrecks and Relics. (no date given) Cunlisted, SC, 64 pp, illus. A survey of thirty well-known wrecks on the Central Victorian coast of Australia. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35

658. Olds, Dorris L. Texas Legacy from the Gulf—A Report on Sixteenth Century Shipwreck Materials Recovered from the Texas Tidelands. (1976) C-6050, 1st ed., SC, 204 pp, illus. An archaeological report on the artifacts recovered from the salvage of the 1554 Fleet of Spanish galleons that sank near Padre Island, Texas. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75

of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $40

660. O’May, Harry. Wrecks in Tasmanian Waters 1797-1950. (no date given) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 209 pp, ills. As above. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 $40 661. Paine, Ralph D. The Book of Buried Treasure. (1926) C6090, 2nd (posthumous) printing, HC, 425 pp, illus, owner’s name in pen on first free frontispiece. “A true history of the gold, jewels,

652. Nesmith, Robert I. The Lima Pieces of George II of England. (1954) C-5980, SC (Wayte Raymond pamphlet), 16 pp, illus. Originally published as a monograph in the Coin Collector’s Journal in 1944, this small but significant work gives the background behind the English coins bearing “LIMA” under the bust of George II. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $20 - $30 653. Nesmith, Robert I. Dig for Pirate Treasure. (1958) C-5970, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 302 pp, illus. Various treasure stories, both land and sea, including: the “Mesuno hoard,” Concepción, Lutine, Hussar, Vigo Bay galleons, and the 1715 and 1733 Fleets. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $75

655. Nesmith, Robert I. and John S. Potter, Jr. Treasure Hunter’s Guide. (1975) C-6000, HC reissue of the above, DJ, 152

Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $75

659. O’May, Harry. Wrecks in Tasmanian Waters 1797-1950. (no date given) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 209 pp, illus. A discussion of numerous wrecks that went down in the waters around Tasmania. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum

650. Nayler, Geoff. The Silent Fleet. (no date given) C-unlisted, SC, 32 pp, illus. All about the ships scuttled in a “Ship’s Graveyard”, an area three miles in diameter situated over 5 miles from Barwon Heads (Australia). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20

654. Nesmith, Robert I. and John S. Potter, Jr. Treasure Hunters. (1961) C-5990, 1st ed., SC, 144 pp, illus. All types of information on where and how to find treasure: ghost towns, money-digging, pirate treasures, gold-panning, and more. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

657. Norvill, Roy. The Treasure Seeker’s Treasury. (1978) Cunlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 173 pp, illus. A collection of stories about land-locked treasures, how they came to be hidden and the attempts that have been made to find them. Pedigreed to the New

and plate of pirates, galleons, etc., which are sought for to this day.” Half of the book regards sunken treasure...the rest of it is land treasure. It includes chapters about the Thetis, the Spanish Armada galleon Florencia, the Vigo Bay galleons, the Lutine, and William Phips and his salvage of the Concepción. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $125 - $150 662. Paine, Ralph D. The Book of Pirate Treasures. (1992) C6100, Rio Grande reprint of 1911 ed., SC, 434 pp, illus. As above but in softcover and with different title. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35 663. Parke-Bernet Galleries. Treasure of the Spanish Main. (1967) C-6120, 1st ed., pre-auction booklet, SC, 38 pp, illus. An exhibition catalog for 1715 Fleet jewelry, coins, and artifacts that were sold at auction by Parke-Bernet Galleries on February 4, 1967. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $20 664. Perrin, Rosemarie D. and the Explorers Ltd. Staff. Explorers Ltd. Guide to Lost Treasure in the United States and Canada. (1977) C-6220, 1st ed., SC, 204 pp, illus. A listing of

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treasures in the US and Canada. Some states, such as Florida, California and Delaware, have many shipwreck references. About one half page is devoted to each shipwreck listing, describing the wreck and the contents. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $75 665. Peterson, Mendel. The Funnel of Gold. (1975) C-6230, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 481 pp, illus. A scholarly and detailed history of the Spanish treasure fleets and the Spanish occupation in the Caribbean. Includes discussions on the 1715 and 1733 Fleets. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $80 $100 666. Pickford, Nigel. The Atlas of Shipwrecks and Treasure. (1994) C-6270, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 200 pp, illus. An overview of the history and treasures of the more famous ships lost at sea from ancient times through World War II. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35 667. Pickford, Nigel and Michael Hatcher. The Legacy of the Tek Sing: China’s Titanic—its Tragedy and its Treasure. (2000) C-6280, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 176 pp, illus. This beautifully illustrated book describes the wreck, discovery and salvage of the Tek Sing, a Chinese junk that sank in the South China Sea in 1822 with a large load of porcelain ceramics. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $65 - $85 668. Playford, Phillip. Carpet of Silver: The Wreck of Zuytdorp. (1998) C-6330, reprint ed., HC, DJ, 260 pp, illus. The story of a Dutch ship that sank off Western Australia in 1712 en route from Holland to Jakarta with 250,000 guilders of treasure. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 $30 669. Potter, John S., Jr. The Treasure Divers of Vigo Bay. (1958) C-6410, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 480 pp, illus. This epic book tells the complete history of the galleons that were sunk at Vigo Bay, Spain, in 1702...and the subsequent salvage attempts. Inscribed by author to fellow diver Hank Heimlick. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $125 - $150 670. Potter, John S., Jr. The Treasure Divers of Vigo Bay. (1958) C-6410, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 480 pp, illus. As above but without inscription. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $35 - $50 671. Potter, John S., Jr. The Treasure Diver’s Guide. (1960) C-6400, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 501 pp, illus. Scarce 1st edition of the first comprehensive listing of treasure wrecks ever written (although some of its data has been shown to be erroneous), this book discusses the Spanish galleons carrying gold and silver from the New World to Spain, the stories of wrecks already salvaged (as of 1960), wreck identification, and underwater archaeology as it was at that time. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 $75

672. Rawson, Geoffrey. Pandora’s Last Voyage. (1963) Cunlisted, HC, DJ, 165 pp, illus. The story of the Pandora’s mission to bring home the Bounty mutineers and its subsequent wrecking. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 $65 673. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. Treasure Hunter. (1945) C-6620, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 260 pp, illus. The story of William Phips’ successful salvage of the Spanish galleon Concepción off the Hispaniola coast in 1687. It also tells of the successful salvage of gold bars from the Royal Mail Steamer Niagara, which sank off the New Zealand coast in 1940. Various other sunken treasures are also briefly mentioned. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $65 674. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. I Dive for Treasure. (1951) C6590, 9th printing, HC, DJ (damaged), 331 pp, illus. The story of the author’s exploits in searching for sunken treasure in the 1930s and 1940s. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25 675. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. My Compass Points to Treasure. (1955) C-6600, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 148 pp, XL. This adolescent book tells of the author’s adventures aboard the ship Cholita looking for sunken treasure in the Caribbean. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $65 676. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. Treasure! (1957) C-6640, 1st ed., HC, 122 pp, XL. A discussion of various treasure-laden shipwrecks. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40 677. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. Treasure of the Buccaneer Sea. (1962) C-6630, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 231 pp, illus. A vivid account of the search to locate and recover old treasure ships in the Caribbean Sea. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $65 678. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. The Sea of Treasure. (1966) C6610, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 217 pp, illus, XL. More of the author’s adventures in salvaging sunken treasure ships in the Caribbean and along the west coast of South America. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $60 679. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. Fell’s Complete Guide to Buried Treasure, Land & Sea. (1970) C-6570, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 235 pp. A most comprehensive guide for active and potential treasurehunters including lists of hundreds of sunken treasure ships by location while the second part of the book lists lost and abandoned mines. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $45 680. Rieseberg, Lieut. Harry E. and A. A. Mikalow. Fell’s Guide to Sunken Treasure Ships of the World. (1965) C-6580, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 221, illus. A description of the major treasure wrecks off each continent, devoting a few pages to each. It also lists all the known treasure wrecks off each continent in tabular form. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $45 - $60

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681. Rule, Margaret. The Mary Rose—The Excavation and Raising of Henry VIII’s Flagship. (1982) C-6750, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 224 pp, illus. This well-illustrated book tells the story of the search, excavation and raising of King Henry VIII’s flagship Mary Rose. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $25 682. Schurz, William Lytle. The Manila Galleon. (1939) C-6910, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 453 pp. Extremely rare first edition with nice dust jacket! A scholarly book that documents the Manila galleons, i.e., the Spanish trading ships that crossed the Pacific Ocean from Acapulco, Mexico to Manila, Philippines (and back) during the period 1565 to 1815. This book documents each of the Manila galleons that were lost. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $200 - $300

344 pp, illus. This is an exciting 200-year history (1609-1807) of pirates and their activities in the Chesapeake Bay region. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

690. Silverberg, Robert. Sunken History—Story of Underwater Archaeology. (1963) C-7100, 1st ed., HC, 177 pp. The story of the new developments of the time in underwater archaeology. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35 691. Singer, Steven D. Shipwrecks of Florida: A Comprehensive Listing. (1992) C-7120, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 368 pp, illus, XL. A geographical listing of 2,100 shipwrecks in Florida, with short descriptions of each. It also includes sections on research, search and salvage, wreck identification, artifact conservation and legal rights to wrecks. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

683. Sedwick, Dr. Frank. The Practical Book of Cobs. (1987) C6990, 1st ed., SC, 81 pp, illus. The groundbreaking and awardwinning 1st edition of our popular work on cobs, an essential for beginners and advanced numismatists alike. Autographed by the author. Estimate: $35 - $50 684. Sedwick, Dr. Frank. The Practical Book of Cobs. (1990) C6990, 2nd ed., SC, 100 pp, illus. As above but 2nd edition, scarce in nice condition (many fell apart). Estimate: $20 - $30 685. Sedwick, Daniel & Frank. The Practical Book of Cobs. (1995) C-6990, 3rd ed., SC, 130 pp. illus. As above, popular edition (well made and most recent till the new 4th edition this year). Estimate: $20 - $30

692. Slack, Jack. Finders Losers—The Lucayan Treasure Find. (1967) C-7130, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 184 pp,. The true story of the author’s finding, and salvage, of a Spanish treasure wreck off Lucaya in 1964 and the loss of the treasure through bad business deals. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50 693. Snow, Edward Rowe. True Tales of Buried Treasure. (1965) C-7220, 12th printing of a 1960 revised ed. (orig. pub. In 1951), HC, DJ, 295 pp. One of the all-time treasure-hunting classics, written by a master storyteller and including 18 chapters of the most famous treasure stories along with the author’s own treasure adventures. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35 694. Snow, Edward Rowe. Incredible Mysteries and Legends of the Sea. (1967) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 266 pp, illus, XL. Twenty-two incredible stories about the sea-mysteries and legends. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35

686. Sedwick, Daniel & Frank. The Practical Book of Cobs (20th anniversary edition). (2007) C6990, 4th ed., HC, 253 pp with foldout map, illus.

Hardbound copy #1 of our popular book, from a limited printing of 100 copies (of which this #1 copy is the most desirable), signed and specially inscribed to the winning bidder by Daniel Frank Sedwick. Estimate: $200 - $500

695. Spence, Dr. E. Lee. Treasures of the Confederate Coast: The Real Rhett Butler & Other Revelations. (1996) C-unlisted, 1st ed., SC, 517 pp, illus. This book is primarily a listing of ships reported as wrecked in the shallow waters of the Confederate Coast during the Civil War. Autographed by the author. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

687. Sellschopp, Dr. E. A. Las acuñaciones de las cecas de Lima, La Plata y Potosí 1568-1651. (1992) C-7030, 2nd ed., SC, 159 pp plus 58 photo plates and 8 additional photo plates, illus.

Modern edition by Paul Karon (with new photos in back) of the landmark work on early Peruvian silver cobs, describing 561 specimens from the three mints with many photos. Estimate: $35 - $50 688. Shomette, Donald G. Shipwrecks on the Chesapeake— Maritime Disasters on Chesapeake Bay and Its Tributaries, 1608-1978. (1982) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 324 pp, illus. Information on a plethora of shipwrecks in the Chesapeake Bay area from 1608 through 1978. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

696. Stack’s (New York). The Treasure of 1715. (no date stated but probably 1970) C-7370, 1st ed., SC (sales pamphlet), 16 pp, illus. A fixed pricelist of silver and gold coins from the 1715 Fleet. It has a brief history of the shipwreck, an explanation of coin grading, and grades and prices (all shockingly low compared to now). From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $20 - $30 697. Stanbury, Myra. Norwegian Bay Whaling Station. (1985) C-unlisted, SC, 75 pp, illus. This is an archaeological report on the modern era of whaling in Western Australia. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

689. Shomette, Donald G. Pirates on the Chesapeake—Being a True History of Pirates, Picaroons, and Raiders on Chesapeake Bay, 1610-1807. (1985) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ,

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698. Stark, Jack. The Sponge Pirates and Other Florida Stories. (1956) C-7390, 1st ed., HC, 86 pp, illus. Neat old book that includes a story about Art McKee, one of the early hard-hat treasure divers operating from Plantation Key, Florida, in the 1950s and 1960s, and two children who dive with him on a sunken galleon. Signed by Art McKee on March 15, 1958. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75

699. Stead, James. Treasure Trek. (1936) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, 304 pp, illus, with gift inscription. Three different tales of seeking treasure: Sacambaya, Bolivia; Lake Beaver, Canada; and The Treasure of Montezuma. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $75

700. Sténuit, Robert. Treasures of the Armada. (1972) C-7410, 1st English ed., HC, DJ, 282 pp, illus. A true “salvage” book! This book was used for reference on the actual Girona wreck dive-site during the John Grattans Expedition in June of 1975, and it must have been dropped overboard as there is extensive water damage. It was signed by the dive and expedition leader with a notation that the book was used on site. This book explores the history of the Spanish Armada, which sailed against England in 1588. The second part of the book tells the story of the author’s research, discovery, and excavation of the Spanish galleass Girona, which had been wrecked off the coast of Ireland. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $75 - $85

treasures by country, with each entry having a brief one- or twosentence description with treasures noted. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $75 706. Throckmorton, Peter. Shipwrecks and Archaeology: The Unharvested Sea. (1970) C-7740, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 270 pp, illus, XL. This book covers the causes of shipwrecks, stages of shipwreck deterioration, shipwreck research and how untrained treasure hunters are jeopardizing archaeological treasures (along with case studies). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25 707. Throckmorton, Peter. Diving for Treasure. (1977) C-7700, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 135 pp, illus. This well-illustrated book is an overview of underwater archaeology, with the treasures referred to only being archaeological ones. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40 708. Ure, John. The Quest for Captain Morgan. (1983) Cunlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 231 pp, illus. The author retraces the exploits on the ground, and sometimes on the water, of buccaneer Sir Henry Morgan. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40 709. Vanderbilt, Arthur T., II. Treasure Wreck—The Fortunes and Fate of the Pirate Ship Whydah. (1986) C-7950, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 164 pp, illus. The story of Barry Clifford’s search for and salvage of “Black” Sam Bellamy’s pirate ship Whydah, which sank off Cape Cod in 1717. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $40 710. Verrill, A. Hyatt. They Found Gold—The Story of Successful Treasure Hunts. (1972) C-7980, 1st ed., HC, 267 pp, illus. This book provides the serious researcher with many clues to hidden treasures in the Western Hemisphere. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $35

701. Sténuit, Robert. Treasures of the Armada. (1974) C-7410, reprint (first printed in England in 1972), SC, 271 pp, illus. As above but in soft cover and not “salvaged”! Estimate: $15 - $20 702. Stick, David. Graveyard of the Atlantic—Shipwrecks of the North Carolina Coast. (1952) C-unlisted, HC, late-ed. DJ but book itself is 1st ed., 176 pp. A factual account of hundreds of dramatic losses, heroic rescues, and violent adventures off the Outer Banks of North Carolina. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

711. Villiers, Alan. Vanished Fleets—Sea Stories from Old Van Diemen’s Land. (1974) C-unlisted, revision of 1931 ed., HC, DJ, 297 pp, illus. A colorful maritime history of Tasmania’s pirates, whalemen, escaped convicts, adventurers and pioneers. Pedigreed

703. Storm, Alex (as told to Brian Shaw). Canada’s Treasure Hunt. (1967) C-7460, 1st ed., SC, 152 pp, illus. This book relates how a fortune in gold and silver coins, lost off the coast of Nova Scotia in 1725, was hunted and found by three young Canadians in 1965. Autographed by the author. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $25 - $35

712. Von Hagen, Victor W. The Golden Man—The Quest for El Dorado. (1974) C-unlisted, HC, DJ, 338 pp, illus. The author describes the many aspects of the search for the Golden Man during the 16th Century. Pedigreed to the New Zealand Shipwreck

704. Taylor, J(ames) R. W. Gold from the Sea—Epic Story of the Recovery of “Niagara’s” Bullion. (1942) C-7580, 1st ed., HC, 271 pp, illus. A description of the 1940-41 salvage of the gold bullion from the RMS Niagara, which sank off the coast of New Zealand in World War II. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $85 - $110

713. Voynick, Stephen M. The Mid-Atlantic Treasure Coast— Coin Beaches & Treasure Shipwrecks from Long Island to the Eastern Shore. (1984) C-8030, 1st ed., SC, 164 pp, illus. This book relates information concerning treasure wrecks in the area of Long Island to the Delmarva peninsula, including the Juno, Sindia, Republic, HMS deBraak, Faithful Steward, Merida, and more. It also identifies beaches where treasures have washed up on shore. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $20 - $30

to the New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $55

Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $35 - $50

705. Terry, Thomas P. World Treasure Atlas. (1978) C-7650, 1st ed., SC, 144 pp, illus. A list of thousands of lost, buried and sunken

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721. Wilson, Derek. The World Atlas of Treasure. (1981) C8330, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 256 pp, illus. This book covers topics such as sunken treasure, underwater archaeology (ancient shipwreck finds in the Mediterranean Sea), and successfully salvaged treasure wrecks. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35

714. Wagner, Kip, as told to L. B. Taylor, Jr. Pieces of Eight. (1966) C-8040, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 221 pp, illus. The story of the finding and partial salvage of the 1715 Fleet of sunken Spanish galleons off Vero Beach, Florida, in the 1960s, as told by the original salvor. Kip Wagner’s story started the underwater treasure hunting craze in Florida. Copies with all eight signatures of the Real Eight Co. like this one are rare and highly sought.

722. Wilson, Ian. Undiscovered—The Fascinating World of Undiscovered Places, Graves, Wrecks and Treasure. (1987) C8350, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 192 pp, illus. Various unfound treasures around the world, from ancient times to present. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

Signed by the author and all eight members of the Real Eight Co. plus Kip’s nephew Rex Stocker. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $200 - $400

723. Windhorn, Stan and Wright Langley. Yesterday’s Florida Keys. (1987) C-unlisted, 7th printing, SC, 128 pp, illus. A record of the subtropical island chain at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula—a nostalgic history in many photographs of the people and power of the elements. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 - $20

715. Wagner, Kip (as told to L. B. Taylor). Pieces of Eight. (1967) C-8040, London ed., HC, 221 pp, illus, some cover staining, owner bookplate. As above but without signatures. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $55 716. Weller, Bob “Frogfoot”. Famous Shipwrecks of the Florida Keys. (1990) C-8090, Vol. 1, 1st ed., SC, 126 pp, illus. This book details 6 shipwreck recoveries in the Florida Keys: H.M.S. Winchester (1695); Alligator (1822); and 4 ships from the 1733 Fleet (Populo, San José, Angustias and Sueco de Arizón). From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

724. Wooldridge, Emily (ed. by Laurence Irving). The Wreck of The Maid of Athens—Being the Journal of Emily Wooldridge, 1869-1870. (1952) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, 160 pp, illus. This is a fascinating account by the captain’s wife of the shipwreck in 1870 and ultimate escape to the Falkland Islands. Pedigreed to the

717. Weller, Bob “Frogfoot”. Salvaging Spanish Sunken Treasure. (1999) C-8120, 1st ed., SC, 80 pp, illus. A guide for anyone considering treasure salvage as a hobby, an occupation or an investor. The book includes chapters about the 1622, 1715 and 1733 Spanish treasure fleets wrecked off the coast of Florida, putting a salvage operation together, salvaging treasure on a budget of $5000 or less, working the site, preservation of artifacts, dividing up the treasure and approaching investors. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $10 $20 718. Weller, Robert “Frogfoot” and Ernie “Seascribe” Richards. Shipwrecks Near Wabasso Beach. (2001) C-8130, 2nd printing, SC, 96 pp, illus. A very useful book that describes the locations of 14 shipwrecks in the Wabasso Beach (Florida) area, including five 1715-Fleet wrecks. There is also a brief history of each wreck and a list of recoveries (as of 1996) from each. Autographed by both authors. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $15 - $25

New Zealand Shipwreck Museum of the late Kelly Tarlton. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $30

725. Wright, John. Encyclopedia of Sunken Treasure. (1995) C8390, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 248 pp, illus. A brief overview of 54

significant sunken treasure ships around the world, geographically organized by continent, with two to four pages for each wreck. Estimate: $25 - $40 726. Zacks, Richard. The Pirate Hunter—The True Story of Captain Kidd. (2002) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 426 pp. The author chronicles the exploits of Captain Kidd in his pursuits of the pirate Robert Culliford. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $25 - $35 727. Zinck, Jack. Shipwrecks of Nova Scotia, Volume 1. (1975) C-8420, 1st ed., SC, 226 pp, illus. A brief overview of about 50 shipwrecks in Nova Scotia, including the salvage of the treasure ships Le Chameau and Feversham. Autographed and inscribed by the author. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books.

Estimate: $40 - $55 719. Whipple, A. B. C. Pirate: Rascals of the Spanish Main. (1957) C-unlisted, 1st ed., HC, DJ, 285 pp, illus. Tales of the most famous pirates, both male and female, in a very interesting style of writing. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $30 - $45 720. Williams, Mark. Sunken Treasure. (1980) C-8310, 1st ed. HC, DJ, 184 pp, illus. The story of Roland Morris and his successful salvage of the Association (sunk 1707) and the HMS Colossus (sunk 1798) off the Scilly Islands of England. From the Dave Crooks library of treasure books. Estimate: $60 - $75

MAGAZINE 728. Treasure World, Volume 1, Number 1. (March, 1967) SC, 26 pp. illus. An extremely rare first issue, with articles on a

variety of treasure-hunting topics such as bottles, coins, relics and sunken treasure, but most notably containing an article by Mel Fisher mentioning the sale of their fabulous dragon-whistle and chain for $50,000 at auction. Estimate: $25 - $40

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models of ships, ship instruments, globes, ship models, boats, pottery, paintings of ships and other items too numerous to list. The photographs of the offerings are exquisite. Estimate: $30 $50

AUCTION CATALOGS 729. American Numismatic Rarities (Wolfeboro). The Classics Sale—The Thomas H. Sebring Collection. (January 5-6, 2004) A-110, SC, 316 pp, illus. Important sale including cobs, portrait coins, “tumbaga” bars, and medallions from the extensive collection of Thomas Sebring. Among the 139 lots are coins from almost every major shipwreck, a William Phips medallion, 4 Vigo Bay medallions, and a S.S. Central America medallion. Estimate: $40 - $50

736. Christie’s (South Kensington). The Abbatucci Cargo. (October 7, 1997) A-220, SC, 31 pp, illus. Jewelry (much in wearable condition), chains, watches, coins, artifacts such as pressed glass, porcelain and bottles from the Abbatucci which sank in 1869 off the Corsican coast. Estimate: $30 - $50

730. Baldwin’s Auctions (London). The Ton Eijkelenkamp Collection of Coins of the Dutch S E Asian Territories Indian and Ceylon. (October 8, 2001) SC, 46 pp, illus. An important sale containing 25 lots from the Pre-Colonial Period, 20 lots of countermarked coins, 11 lots of the arrival of the Dutch in the Indies, 312 lots of Dutch East India Company 1602-1799, 146 lots of The Batavian Republic 1799-1806, 67 lots from the Kingdom of Holland and the French Empire 1806-1811, 32 lots from British Administration 1811-1816, 148 lots from Dutch East Indies Government 1816-1949, 142 lots of coins of the VOC in India and Ceylon. Estimate: $50 - $75 731. Castells & Castells (Montevideo). Nuestra Señora de la Luz. (October 27, 1997) A-180, SC, 48 pp, illus, PR. Rare catalog with 54 lots of gold cobs and portrait coins, 24 lots of silver cobs, 4 lots of pillar dollars, 92 lots of artifacts, and one cannon salvaged from the Nuestra Señora de la Luz, which sank in 1752 near Montevideo, Uruguay. Estimate: $40 - $50 732. Christie’s (Amsterdam). Important Gold, Silver, Jewellery and Artifacts Recovered from the Wrecks of Dutch, Spanish and English 17th, 18th and 19th Century Ships. (March 16, 1983) A-330, SC, 45 pp, illus, PR. A fabulous auction of gold, silver, jewelry and artifacts recovered from the following ships: Hollandia, Utrecht, Slot ter Hooge, Nuestra Señora de Esperanza, the “Standing Cannon wreck” and the H.M.S. Athenienne, plus Dutch and foreign coins and biographies of Robert Marx and Robert Sténuit. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $20 - $40

737. Christie’s (New York) in association with Spink. Gold Rush Treasures from the SS Central America. (December 14, 2000) A-320, HC, 245 pp, illus. A sizeable collection (167 lots) of gold coins and ingots recovered from the SS Central America. Estimate: $40 - $50 738. Dix Noonan Webb (London). The Santa Lucia Treasure Coins, Jewellery and Artefacts Recovered from the Mediterranean. (June 20, 2001) A-390, SC, 107 pp, illus. Scarce catalog (auction never held due to claims) with 230 lots of portrait coins (from Europe and the New World), 41 lots of jewelry, 21 lots of ceramics, and 14 lots of artifacts from the British steam packet Santa Lucia, which sank off the coast of Italy in 1841. Estimate: $25 - $35 739. Dix Noonan Webb (London). The Santa Lucia Treasure Coins, Jewellery and Artefacts Recovered from the Mediterranean. (June 20, 2001) A-390, SC, 107 pp, illus. As above. Estimate: $25 - $35 740. Glendining & Co. (London). Spanish and SpanishAmerican Gold Coins. (October 12, 1960) SC, 17 pp and 9 photo plates, illus. An important Spanish gold collection, including 1 lot from Philip IV, 23 lots from Philip V, 12 lots from Ferdinand VI, 49 lots from Charles III, 84 lots from Charles IV, 1 lot from Joseph Napoleon, 46 lots from Ferdinand VII, 17 lots from Isabel II, 2 lots from Alfonso XII and 3 lots from Alfonso XIII. Estimate: $30 - $50 741. W. H. Lane & Son (Penzance). The Hollandia Treasure. (September 21, 1973) A-480, SC, 64 pp and 7 photo plates, illus. This important catalog includes commentary on the history and recovery of the artifacts and coins from the wreck of the Dutch East-Indiaman Hollandia, sunk in 1743 off the Scilly Isles, southwest of England. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $60

733. Christie’s (London). Spanish Art I: Treasure from the Maravillas and other Works of Art. (May 28, 1992) A-370, SC, 261 pp, illus. One of the most important shipwreck auction catalogs of all time, with 86 lots of silver cobs, 30 lots of gold cobs, 12 lots of silver ingots, 15 lots of gold ingots, a bronze signal cannon, a few silver artifacts, and 2 lots of jewelry, all from the Maravillas, which sank in 1656 on Little Bahamas Bank. Estimate: $60 - $75 734. Christie’s (London). Spanish Art I: Treasure from the Maravillas and other Works of Art. (May 28, 1992) A-370, SC, 261 pp, illus, cover discolored. As above. Estimate: $60 - $75 735. Christie’s (Amsterdam). Maritime. (September 9, 1997) Aunlisted, SC, 140 pp, illus. A scarce catalog containing many works of art associated with the Dutch East India Company and works of art recovered from the wrecks of the Hartwell and the Santo Andre. Some of the items offered are silver miniature silver

742. W. H. Lane & Son (Penzance). The Association Coin. (September 24, 1974) A-430, SC, 58 pp plus 6 photo plates and 18 intro pp, illus, a few marks, PR. As the title tells you, this is a catalog of rare coins and artifacts recovered from the Association, the flagship of Sir Clowdisley Shovell, Lord Admiral of the Fleet, that sank off the Isles of Scilly on October 22, 1707, along with the Romney, Eagle and Firebrand. Quite a bit of background on the disaster is presented here. The Prices Realized, quite curiously, shows the names of the buyers of each of the lots! From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $60

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743. W. H. Lane & Son (Penzance). Sale of Sunken Treasure. (September 26, 1975) A-500, SC, 108 pp and 10 photo plates, illus. This sale was an offering from nine well-known shipwrecks (including DeLiefde, Association, Duoro, Hollandia, and Athenienne) from around the British Isles in 1327 lots (coins and artifacts), with ample histories on the wrecks and even a biography of Robert Sténuit. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $60 744. W. H. Lane & Son (Plymouth). Here is Treasure! / Dutch East Indiaman ‘Campen’. (August 2, 1981) A-470, SC, 15 pp. A rare and curious catalog that was originally named Here is Treasure! but with a sticker over that on the cover with the new title, which is more appropriate since this is the main catalog of coins recovered from the wreck of the Campen (1627), some 330 lots of lion daalders and half lion daalders and 4 lots of cobs, with a one-page description of the wreck, a brief description of the lion dahlers (daalders), and a list of the salvors, but also with coins from the Hollandia of 1743 (90 lots of cobs, pillar dollars and ducatoons). Estimate: $35 - $50 745. Nagel Auctions (Stuttgart). Tek Sing Treasures. (November 17-25, 2000) A-530, SC, 395 pp, illus. Beautifully illustrated catalog with 353 lots of porcelain from the Tek Sing, including an excellent history of the wreck and salvage. Estimate: $25 - $35 746. Ponterio & Associates (San Diego). The Paul Karon Potosí Cob Collection, special leatherbound hardcover edition (only one made). (March 15-17, 1990) HC, 100 pp, illus, with 29 photo plates, PR. One of the most complete and important collections of Potosí cobs, with a thorough introduction and articles by several important researchers, 292 lots of cob 8 reales, 165 lots of cob 4 reales, 243 lots of cob 2 reales, 255 lots of cob 1 reales, 108 lots of undated cob ½ reales, 145 dated cob ½ reales, 8 lots of cob cuartillas (1/ 4 Real) and 1 lot of an original royal 2 reales die of 1737. Special hardbound copy presented to the consignor (Paul Karon), with special 1st-generation photo plates in the back.

Estimate: $100 - $150 747. Ponterio & Associates (San Diego). The Paul Karon Potosí Cob Collection. (March 15-17, 1990) SC, 100 pp, illus, with 29 photo plates, PR. One of the most complete and important collections of Potosí cobs, with a thorough introduction and articles by several important researchers, 292 lots of cob 8 reales, 165 lots of cob 4 reales, 243 lots of cob 2 reales, 255 lots of cob 1 reales, 108 lots of undated cob ½ reales, 145 dated cob ½ reales, 8 lots of cob cuartillas (1/4 Real) and 1 lot of an original “Royal” 2 reales die of 1737. Estimate: $60 - $75 748. Ponterio & Associates (San Diego). “La Capitana”. (April 10, 1999) A-570, SC, 64 pp, illus. The one and only catalog dedicated to this wreck (1654), with countermarked shield-type issues, transitional issues of 1652, and pillars-and-waves cobs in 1, 2, 4, and 8 reales denominations as recovered from the wreck of the Capitana. Estimate: $25 - $40

749. Schulman, Hans (New York). Coin Selections from the “Treasures of Two Oceans” and other consignments. (February 6-8, 1969) A-unlisted, SC, 120 pp, illus, PR, previous owner’s name and address on cover. This auction is known as “Treasures of Two Oceans” because it contains coins from both the ca.-1628 “Lucayan Beach wreck” in the Bahamas and the 1656 Vergulde Draeck off Australia, plus a Russian Copper Collection, Large Cents and others. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 - $65 750. Schulman Coin & Mint (New York). Gold & Silver Coins of the Spanish World from the “Maravilla” sunk in 1656 & from the Spanish Plate Fleet perished in 1715. (December 2-4, 1974) A-590, SC, 136 pp, illus. This popular item is the first auction catalog of finds from the Maravillas, sunk in 1656 off Grand Bahama Island, and it also contains gold from the 1715 Fleet and the usual smattering of U.S. and world gold and silver coins (including a Panama Pacific $50), ancient coins, and talers. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $50 $75 751. Schulman, Jacques (Amsterdam). Coins and Medals, No. 281. (April 15-16, 1985) SC, 50 pp, 10 photo plates, illus. Large offering of 1009 lots, including coinage from several European countries including Spain and Portugal but notably with a nice collection of cob 8 reales, riders and ducatoons from the Vliegenthart. Estimate: $20 - $30 752. Sotheby & Co. (London). Treasure Recovered Off The Shetland Isles. (November 8, 1973) A-650, SC, 33 pp and 10 photo plates, illus. Rare classic with 190 lots of gold and silver coins and important artifacts from the Shetland Islands wrecks of the Wendela, Lastdrager, Curaçao and Evstafii, as well as three lots of items from the HMS Assurance. Estimate: $30 - $50 753. Sotheby’s (London). Coins, Medals and Paper Money. (October 8-9, 1992) SC, 107 pp and 37 photo pages, illus, PR. This auction is notable for its collection of some 302 Peruvian coins, including gold and silver cobs, but also contains 206 lots of other coins of the Hispanic World, 96 lots of Islamic Coins, 40 lots of foreign silver coins, 38 lots of historical medals, books and cabinets, 183 lots of foreign gold coins, 140 lots of English gold, silver and bronze coins, 264 lots of ancient coins and 123 lots of banknotes (some of which is hand-priced). Estimate: $25 - $40 754. Sotheby’s (New York). A Captain-General’s Chain and Badge of Office from the 1715 Spanish Treasure Fleet. (March 24, 1993) A-620, SC, 6 pp, illus. This rare catalog features a single item—a spectacular 2000-link gold chain and dragon whistle from the 1715 Fleet. Also included are two excellent fullpage color pictures. Estimate: $25 - $35 755. Sotheby’s (New York). The Uruguayan Treasure of the River Plate. (March 24-25, 1993) A-730, SC, 141 pp, illus, PR. An incredible auction of 725 gold cob and portrait coins, 37 gold ingots, 10 lots of silver cobs, 3 lots of artifacts, and a gold jewelry box, all from the Nuestra Señora de la Luz, which sank in 1752 in the River Plate, Uruguay. A history of the shipwreck is included, as well as numismatic analysis. Estimate: $15 - $30

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756. Sotheby’s (New York). Treasure from the SS Central America—Glories of the California Gold Rush. (December 89, 1999) A-720, SC, 205 pp, illus. A rare catalog of an auction that did not take place til June of 2000 (due to an injunction), lavishly illustrated with color photos and featuring 250 lots of Gold Rush-era gold coins (mostly double eagles), gold bars (many from rare private California mints), nuggets and dust salvaged from the steamer SS Central America, which sank off the coast of North Carolina in 1857. The history of many of the private mints is also provided. Estimate: $30 - $50 757. Sotheby’s (New York). Coins, Medals and Banknotes. (December 14, 2000) SC, 72 pp, illus, PR. A variety of offerings in 335 lots, including: ancient coins, foreign coins, U.S. coins, peace medals, banknotes and gold bars and nuggets from the SS Central America. Estimate: $25 - $35 758. Spink (London). Ancient and World Coins (No. 87). (October 9, 1991) SC, 72 pp and 79 photo pages, illus, some staining. As stated on the cover, this important catalog includes “an important collection of European and Latin American Coins and the J. Mayorga collection of gold coins of Spain and her possession,” which amounts to 1769 lots of Ancient Greek, Silver and Roman and Byzantine Coins (including a Group of Philip II and Alexander Gold Staters), Kushan Gold Coins, European and Latin American Coins, as well as the Emilio M. Ortiz Collection of Coins and Tokens of the West Indies. Estimate: $30 - $50

763. Swiss Bank Corp. (Zürich). Coins of Peru (#20). (September 14-15, 1988) C-7540, HC, 220 pp, illus, PR. As above but without the original Prices Realized. Estimate: $125 - $175 764. Swiss Bank Corp. (Basel). Collection of Spanish Colonial and Spanish Coins (#27). (January 24, 1991) HC, 118 pp, illus. A collection of Spanish and Spanish colonial “trophies” from the holdings of Emilio Ortíz, 446 lots in total, with 24 gold cobs that appear to be from the 1715 Fleet or other shipwrecks. Estimate: $75 - $90

END OF SALE

759. Spink (London). The Clive of India Treasure. (September 28, 2000) A-750, SC, 60 pp, illus. This catalog presents what is believed to be the gold treasure of Lord Robert Clive, British military hero in India, who had consigned his wealth to the English East India Company ship Dodington, which sank in 1755 off the coast of South Africa. All coins offered for sale in this auction were Brazilian and Portuguese gold. Estimate: $25 - $35 760. Superior Galleries (Beverly Hills). Antiquities and Coins of the World Including Coins of the Reijgersdaal Shipwreck. (June 2, 1992) A-800, SC, 98 pp, illus. The main interest here is pillar dollars from the Reigjersdaal wreck of 1747, but there is also world gold, a collection of pre-1500 world coins and minors, Greek coinage, Roman Imperatorial, Byzantine coinage, Judaic, Judean City, Varia and Antiquities. From the Bruce Prior Library of Treasure Books. Estimate: $40 - $50 761. Superior Galleries (Beverly Hills). Antiquities and Coins of the World Including Coins of the Reijgersdaal Shipwreck. (June 2, 1992) A-800, SC, 98 pp, illus. As above but without the pedigree. Estimate: $30 - $40 762. Swiss Bank Corp. (Zürich). Coins of Peru (#20). (September 14-15, 1988) C-7540, HC, 220 pp, illus, PR. This is the sale of the Sellschopp collection of Peruvian coins, the most important Lima and Potosí cob collection ever amassed (plus many gold cobs of Lima and Cuzco), 1356 lots in all. Estimate: $125 - $175

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Any questions? Please email Dan at info@sedwickcoins.com or call (407) 975-3325.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION IN OUR TREASURE AUCTION #2!

OUR TREASURE AUCTION #3 WILL TAKE PLACE IN MAY, 2008 (CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 1, 2008)


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Treasure Auction # 2  

Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC. Treasure Auction #2 October 2007

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