Page 1

“CULTURA”: A WAY OF LIFE

204 Bloor Street West Mix-Use Residential Development

SYSTEMS INTEGRATION & COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN Sebastian Lubczynski 500174806

April 2010


Table of

CONTENTS

1.0

Introduction

01

2.0

Urban High Streets

03

3.0

Urban High Streets: Bloor Street, Toronto

07

4.0

Design Approach & Philosophy

11

5.0

Comprehensive Design Strategy

17

6.0

Building Code Compliance

40

7.0

Systems Integration

43

8.0

Construction Schedule

47


1.0 INTRODUCTION

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 1


INTRODUCTION Before new building developments start erecting up across the city, one needs to consider many variables that effect the final outcome and success of that proposal. A sites location within the city can impact the type of building and architectural response by the architects. A specific client initiated a design request for 204 Bloor Street West in Toronto, Ontario and specified that the new development was to have a residential component, retail component, and if possible a commercial component. The first thing that needs to be noted is that 204 Bloor Street is situated within a very complex urban fabric and designing for such a space requires a more in depth understanding of these types of places. An investigation of urban precedents globally is completed first to acquire an in-depth knowledge of urban high streets and determine what qualifies a street a urban high street. When that understanding is in place, it is possible to look to Bloor Street and determine its qualities as a high street and respond to them within the architectural expression. The impacts of the geo-economic

Since the proposed spatial program was unable to fit within the prescribed zoning by-laws for the site, multiple site planning options were undertaken to fully examine the maximum design and development potentials. An articulation of the developments architectural expression is taken into development in order to visualize the impact on the streetscape, scale, proportions, etc. As the project moved forward, the integration of mechanical, electrical, and structural systems are implicated into the overall design aspects and are directly responsive to the sites context and potential tenants. All of these aspects are needed to be taken into account in order to complete a comprehensive design for any building typology. In the case of 204 Bloor Street West, this comprehensive analysis and integration has been completed and presented within this document as a final proposal to the client for the new development.

phenomenon, as well as market profile will in the end indicate the potential tenants of the clients development. Once the social and economic study is completed, a study of the pertinent planning by-laws and process related to the sites development is completed to investigate the development limitations, and determine the alternative planning compliances required to fulfill the clients needs and wants. During the Pre-Design and Feasibility study, the development of the spatial and functional program is initiated as a response to the analysis conducted. In turn, the spatial program is then reexamined through the development of a proforma to determine the financial viability of the development based on the sites current zoning. FIG 1. Grand Opening of the ROM, Toronto , Ontario

INTRODUCTION Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 2


2.0 URBAN HIGH STREETS 2.01

What is an Urban High Street

2.02

Cultural Impact

2.03

Circulation

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 3


at re Th

Invasion Th reat

Developing city

Developing city

Agriculture Land

Old city

Old city Developing city

Agriculture Land

Developing city Inv asio nT hre at

Agriculture Land

In va si on

Th re at

at hre nT asio Inv

Lake Zürich

Lake Zürich

at re Th

Legend Trade Route

Major Circulation

Water

Urban Land Use

Agriculture Land Use

Defensive Wall

Legend

FIG 2. - 1500’s ZURICH Developing city, surrounded by fortification walls (black)

Trade Route

Major Circulation

Water

Urban Land Use

Agriculture Land Use

Defensive Wall

FIG 3. - 1700’s ZURICH Expanding city outside the first fortification walls. First fortification wall and moat seperating the old city from the developing city

Agriculture Land

Train Station

Train Station

ar tC ee Str

Stage 2

Old city

Old city

Old city

Old city

r

Stage 1

Developing city

Developing city Agriculture Land

Developing city

Developing city

Agriculture Land

Stage 3

ar tC ee Str

When a city starts to develop on a specific piece of land, certain principles are needed to be taken into consideration. The first is the movement though the city. The establishment of northsouth axes and west-east axes through the city are vital in the ease of transportation to get to one end of the city to the next. With the establishment of these roads brings in the concept that the new established roads are the thoroughfares of the city. Though these implications in most cases are brought into effect long after the city had developed.

n sio va In

a et C Stre

HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT

Agriculture Land

ion as Inv

How does a street become that high street that it is during any point in time? What are the impacting principles that allow for such developments to occur? For a street to become the principle thoroughfare for traffic in a town, it would have needed to be established a long time ago. The streets development over time holds the secrets to how a street establishes itself as that high street, the principle method of transportation, and recognition from the cities residence as the place to be, for work, to live or even shop.

The Bahnhofstrasse, in Zurich Switzerland, is a street that is considered in today’s time one of the top High Streets in the world, which had established itself in a very interesting fashion. Back in the early 1500’s, the Bahnhofstrasse was nothing more than a fortification wall protecting the people of Zurich (fig 2). As time progressed and the city pushed out its limits in the 1700’s (fig 3), the fortification walls were dividing the new city from the old. The fortification wall was torn down in the 1850’s (fig 4) and the moat that was in front of the walls was filled in and utilized as a long avenue. This long avenue became crucial in the transportation within the city centre due to the lack of organizational patterns of the established streets in Zurich. By the end of the 1900’s (fig 5) the central part of the avenue that was established before was connected to the northern end of the city where at that location was the train station. At the southern end of the avenue was the harbour. The Bahnhofstrasse has since become the principle means of movement north to south within the main city core centre and has allowed for a great deal of potential in terms of development on the street itself.

at hre nT sio a Inv

at re Th

By definition a high street is considered to be a main street where the most important shops and business in town are, as per the Cambridge dictionary. The high street can also be looked as the street that serves as a principle thoroughfare for traffic in a town or city. For a street to be composed of such important developments it would require that the street itself have a significant importance within the city through its development over time.

enough to develop important buildings along those routes.

n sio va In

WHAT IS AN URBAN HIGH STREET?

Lake Zürich

Lake Zürich Legend

Legend

Trade Route

Major Circulation

Bahahenstrausse

Water

Urban Land Use

Railroad Circulation

Agriculture Land Use

Defensive Wall

FIG 4 - 1850’s ZURICH The city of Zurich is expanding, Stage 1 of the construction of the Bahnhofstrasse is taken place, as well as stage 2 and 3. Stage 2 was implicated to connect the avenue with the Rail Road Station. Stage 3 was implicated to connect the Rail Road Station with the harbour front. This resulted with a long avenue spanning north to south.

Trade Route

Major Circulation

Bahnhofstrasse

Water

Urban Land Use

Railroad Circulation

Agriculture Land Use

Defensive Wall

FIG 5 - 1900’s ZURICH Cities development was taken to another level by the introduction of the Tram, modern day version Street Car.

An interesting attraction for business owners of the thoroughfares is that they produce a high volume of moving traffic. Be it through walk, biking, or even by car, there is a lot of real estate up for grabs that can be utilized in the proper manner in terms of financial gain. The ease of access to such places seems attractive

URBAN HIGH STREETS Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 4


CULTURAL IMPACT The culture of the city and its residence’s plays a vital role in the indication of a streets status within the city. The choice of establishing a business here or there starts to take the shape of the street and acts as the catalyst for what is to come in the future. Certain personas help to classify a streets status within the city by its establishments. As per the definition already mentioned for high streets, the area needs to house the most important shops and business in town. Things that can be looked as the most important business’ within the city are city banks, top fashion shops, even office buildings that house the headquarters for their business. All these factors and more contribute a large portion to the success of a high street. Other variables that need to be located in a high street is a living occupancy, a place for people to congregate in, and any type of cultural building typology, be it museum or even a theatre. With all these buildings taking up all the expensive land and erecting their business’s, there is little room for any green parks. There needs to be an element of this type in order for the all the mixture of spaces to be in balance with one another. Green spaces provide a great deal of relaxation and the choice of escaping the busy city life.

typology on site that houses a variety of different functions. Small boutique shops start to be established, cafes that spill out onto sidewalks, giving the overall experience of luxury living. Referencing back to the Bahnhofstrasse, in Zurich, establishments from the very beginning still exist till this day that played a vital role in the beginning stages of its creation. The major role players were UBS (bank), Credit Suisse, (bank) and Hotel Schweizerhof. These developments were instrumental in the creation of a type of culture that was going to surrounded it in the future. Figure 6 shows the 4 divisions or districts on the street and the current establishments. Most of these establishments are highly expensive shops, cafes, banks, and office spaces, also some living spaces. This mixture of program typology create macro and micro activity nodes on the street. All of these spaces provide a high level services and in turn brings the experience of the high street to a level that draws you back to the spaces.

MITTE

HAUPTBAHNHOF

(middle)

(central station)

Paperterie Landlot-Arbenz Pelz Gut Juwelier Ernst Restaurant Massimo Dutti Marionnaud Parfumeries Bank Clariden/Leu Gubelin Salvatore Ferragamo Chopard Les Millionnaires Longchamp Lowen Apotheke Les Ambassadeurs Credit Suisse Visilab Wolford Cartier UBS Hugo Boss Chanel Zett Meyer Hermes Vidal Burberry PKZ Bucherer Bata

Victoria Apotheke Beldona H&M UBS Naegeli Tabakfass OrellFussli Modissa Tally Weijl Juwelier Kurz Appunto by Manor Apple Store Ex Libris Fielmann Goldhaus Pasito Merkur L’Entrecote Swarovski Kuoni Reisen Bonita Fein-Kaller Feldpausch/Blue Dog Gotte Optik Yves Rocher Kauffmann Ochsner Sport Kuoni Reisen

Airbijoux Weinberg Tiffany & Co. Prada Gross Couture Tommy Hilfiger Dior Osswald Parfumerie Devernois ZKB Zurcher Kantonalbank Schweizer Heimatwerk Salis & Vertes Art Dealer & Gallery

Bulgari La Serlas Bottega Venta Montblanc Ermenagildo Zegna Giorgio Armani Lichthof Balncpain Marsano Meister Silber Grieder Louis Vuitton (parade place)

(lake)

SEE

PARADEPLATZ FIG 6 - Street Districts and Business Establishments

Museums and other cultural spaces bring a level of sophistication to any city and also raises the status level of any street they are located on. Having a museum on a principle thoroughfare will not only bring more people to the site to view the museum but will increase the amount of tourism that is already occurring in the city. People within the city want to live near the heart of the city. The place that sees all the action day and night. Its a good attraction to have, because there starts to develop a highly mixed use building FIG 7 - Cultural Setting on the Bahnhofstrasse

CULTURAL IMPACT Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 5


CIRCULATION Circulation within a city is just as important as the social and economic impacts they have on urban high streets. The means of getting to one place from another with relative ease is highly desirable and creates a dynamic flow within the city. Within a high street setting, the pedestrian flow needs to be high on the priority list and cater towards creating a better experience for the occupants of that space. As mentioned before, the high streets location within the city is just as important to its success as a high street than anything else. The high street needs to be the gateway from which people come to and leave from. Access to subway systems, street cars, bike paths, are all vital in the ease of movement to and from the street. Along with the high street being the principle route through a city or town, its street furnishings are also important. Walking down an avenue that has only buildings at the edge of the sidewalk, built up to there max potentials with no trees or benches to sit on does not sound all that appealing. However, a beautiful wide street, lined with trees, bench’s to sit on, buildings brought down to human scale, by the creation of podiums, cafe’s spilling out onto the sidewalks, sounds much more appealing and inviting for a urban high street.

FIG 8 - Bahnhofstrasse mid day / wide sidewalks / Tram only allowed on street / road lined with tress

FIG 9 - Pedestrian circulation indicated in yellow on the Bahnhofstrasse

FIG 10 - Bahnhofstrasse mid day

FIG 11 - Purple - major automobile circulation, Blue - minor automobile circulation, Teal - pedestrian circulation only

A good example of this kind of model is the design of the Bahnhofstrasse. The city of Zurich implemented that the Bahnhofstrasse be only accessible to pedestrians and their Tram for transportation. This allows for a very friendly pedestrian oriented street and brings up the opportunities of having cafes spilling out of their shops throughout the day. The other successful reason why this model works in Zurich is because the Bahnhofstrasse is their principle route of travel for north-south axes feeding into the railway system and harbour front, giving them ample amount of people traveling though the street to give it life and a sustainable future.

CIRCULATION Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 6


3.0 URBAN HIGH STREETS BLOOR STREET, TORONTO 3.01

Urban High Street: Bloor Street

3.02

Bloor Street Contextual Map

3.03

Opportunities and Constraints

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 7


URBAN HIGH STREET: BLOOR STREET Bloor Street, located in Toronto, Ontario, is considered to be Toronto’s high street. It posses many traits mentioned thus far that make a street a high street. Bloor Street is the thoroughfare for both, the subway system and automotive means of transportation. A key difference of Bloor Street in relation to the Bahnhofstrasse is that Bloor Street is more car oriented. It posses 4 lanes for cars and not as wide sidewalks for pedestrians. Being located close to the heart of the cities core is being intersected by another major street in Toronto, and that street being Younge Street. The Bloor and Younge Street subway lines cross at the intersection of the two streets creating a major pedestrian node. At this major crossroads lays a very important building in Toronto, The Royal Ontario Museum. This cultural landmark is significant because it creates a central node within the street that people can reference to. There are also other museums in the area that elevate the status and sophistication of the Bloor Street, which in return raises the value of the land allowing for more of the high end shops to be within its vicinity . With these cultural landmarks in place, there are other business that contribute to the status of Bloor being a high street. Bloor Street houses many headquarters for insurance business, spanning from Sherbourne Street to Bedford Street. Many offices are located on Bloor Street which attacks people to live and shop in the areas as well. The key to having a successful high street lies within a good balanced mixture of high-end shops, offices, cultural events and buildings, easy access to transportation for quick relocation, and the ability to attract people to want to be there.

8.31

URBAN HIGH STREET: BLOOR STREET Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 8


E STREET SHERBOURNE

YOUNGE STREET TR R

UNIVERSITY AVENUE

BLOOR STREET

FIG 12 - Partial map of City of Toronto

BLOOR STREET CONTEXTUAL PLAN Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 9


REZONING APPLICATION PROCESS

The City of Toronto’s planning by-laws create opportunities and constraints on the development of a project. With any constraint there’s always a new design approach that can be taken to deal with those constraints.

Mixed Uses Areas achieve a high level of variety of functions within the city. Some of these functions include residential uses, offices, retail, institutions, entertainment, recreation and cultural activities, parks and open spaces.

Pre-application Consultation (Local district Oƥce)

Submission of Complete Application

These Mixed Uses Areas will be capable of absorbing the expansion of the retail, office and service employment in Toronto in the coming years.

Application Circulation Review for completeness and assign to a Star Stream

Technical response

Preliminary Report to Community Council

Community Consultation Within 2 months

Response to Application

PLANNING CONTROLS

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION

Within 9 weeks

Another hurdle that needs to be taken before a development is approved for construction is to get a site plan approval. The planning review board examines the design and technical aspects of a proposed development to ensure high quality building design and that it responses to the local neighborhood or local business area.

Application Revisions and Re-submission

9 Months

Applicant must resubmit within 6 weeks of receiving the comments

Recirculation, consultation, further revision, ƤƒŽ‹œƒ–‹‘ƒ†•–ƒơ report

When a client wants to build a high-rise building on a site that is zoned for 24m, he would need to apply for a rezoning application to allow for him to building his proposal. Fig 13. show’s the rezoning process in full cycle and the required steps necessary for a successful rezoning application.

24m limit

6 Weeks from the 1st re submission

2.0 Max Commercial

SITE INFORMATION

Public meeting at community council

Other aspects that are useful for the Architect when developing a design is the Committee of Adjustment. This city council hears in on and makes decsisions on minior planning matters such as: minor variances and rezoning based on legal non-conforming use applications and property division applications.

Designation: Mixed Use Area Zoning: CR T3.O C2.0 R2.5 CR - Commercial / Residential C2.0 - Density 2x lot area R2.5 - Density 2.5 lot area Height Limit (m): 24m

Location: 204 Bloor Street Site Area (sq.m): 550 Frontage (m): 12.7 Depth (m): 39.6

City council decision Within 8 months of submission

24m limit

OPA/By-law in eơect The city must issue a notice of approval within 15 days from the city council decision

Opportunity for third party appeal to OMB Within 20 days after eơect

8.31

PROPERTY LINE

2.5 Max Residential

15.2m

FIG 13 - Rezoning application process

24m limit Existing

39.7m

Firstly one needs to deal with the zoning by-laws that dictate the type of building type that is allowed to be constructed on the site. It also regulates building heights, site density, required setbacks on site from adjacent properties, as well as parking and amenity requirements.

OFFICIAL PLAN DESIGNATION

39.6m

PLANNING BY-LAWS

Existing

12.7m

3.0 Total Mixed Use

SIDEWALK FIG 14 - 204 Bloor Street Property Lines

FIG 15 - Zoning Restrictions

ZONING OF 204 BLOOR STREET Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 10


4.0 DESIGN APPROACH & PHILOSOPHY 4.01

Design Philosophy

4.02

Massing

4.03

Urban Integration: Site Plan

4.04

Urban Integration: Perspectives

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 11


Another aspect that grabs your attention when your on Bloor Street are the museums that are located adjacent to University and Bloor. An interesting thing about museums is that for a person to know what really is being put on exhibition, they must go into the space and find out. The overall idea of the Museum is to take objects that are of value and put them on display. By fusing these two concepts or identities into one form, the tenants of the building will be put on exhibition on Bloor Street through programing functions that are cantilevered from the buildings facade. The tenants will be showcased as if they were inside a museum and animate the buildings facade.

VIEW / EXHIBITION

The intent of the units is to have 2 story skip stop units throughout the building, allowing for a great amount of natural light to come into the occupied spaces.

70m max

70m max

When observing the context around Bloor Street one cannot go and not notice the amount of high end shops that fill up the ground floor plane of the street. Everyone goes to Bloor Street to find the finest things to wear and buy and express themselves through the materials they posses. This is all due to the type of society we live in today, the market society. One needs to express there worth to the world with the type of materials they own. If its not Gucci than its Prada and so on. This endless search for something to have and have it express who you are is seen everywhere on Bloor Street, but its difficult to spot because everyone is wrapped up in this kind of world.

the volumetric response on the site in respect to the existing buildings. Once the goals of the client are met the articulation of the parti idea is implicated in plan and section.

SETBACK RESIDENTIAL

The proposed Lounge on the ground floor and second floor is setback 2m from the property line, giving more space of congregation ground floor, and a visual separation from the Residential entry into the building. The Residential entry is cladded in wood slats giving the entry a different feeling before you enter the sun.

24m max

SITE AND BUILDING APPROACH

PERMITTED ZONING

PROFORMA COMPLIANT

RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCE FINAL PROPOSAL

DESIGN PARTI

The east facade is also set back about 5m from the property line. This allowed for a larger amount of glazing within the facade based on the OBC requirements. Internally within the units, the proposal is an open plan concept that allows the viewer to look all around within the space and see other areas within the building that are articulating the idea of exhibition. That critical space is the reading lounge on the 2nd floor. It allows for the viewer in that space to look down into the building projection, look out onto the ROM and directly right across is located the terrace.

DESIGN INSPIRATION - GARDINER MUSEUM

Certain measures were needed to be taken to full fill the clients requirements. Firstly what needs to be completed is an analysis of the buildings zoning by-laws to verify if the required programming fits within the permitted zoning. Since the building didn’t meet the required zoning, a proposal of additional height was required to investigate. Also, the cost implication of the building was taken into account when determining DESIGN INSPIRATION

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 12


MASSING Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 13


VALET PARKING

EXISTING BUILDING

EXISTING BUILDING MAIN LOBBY

LANEWAY

LOUNGE (BY OTHER)

SITE PLAN Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 14


URBAN INTEGRATION Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 15


URBAN INTEGRATION Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 16


5.0 COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN STRATEGY 5.01

Site Plan

5.02

Floor Plans

5.03

Elevations

5.04

Details

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 17


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

FIRE EXIT STAIR CAR PARKING MECHANICAL ROOM (HYDRAULIC SYSTEM) ELEVATOR VESTIBULE STORAGE ELEVATOR PIT

2

5

3

1

6

7

4

1

BELOW GROUND LEVEL SCALE 2 &1:150 3 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 18


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

13

8

13

13

13

13

13

13

11

ELEVATORS ELEVATOR VESTIBULE FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CONDO STORAGE SERVICE ELEVATOR UNIT SUBSTATION TRANSFORMER HYDRALIC ELEVATOR FIRE PUMP ROOM WATER PUMP ROOM POWER AND DATA VOICE UNIT STORAGE

10

9 4

5 13

13

13

13 12

7 13

2 6

3

1

1

3

13 13 13

BELOW GROUND LEVEL 1 SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 19


MAIN LOBBY Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 20


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM TELE. COM. ROOM LOBBY MAIL ROOM VESTIBULE LOUNGE (BY OTHER) CAR ELEVATOR STORAGE SERVICE ELEVATOR STORAGE

7

6

5

10

9

8

4

12

11

2

3

1

1

2

GROUND FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 21


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

5

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR CORRIDOR LOUNGE (BY OTHER) OFFICE SPACE MALE WASHROOM FEMALE WASHROOM GARBAGE ROOM

4 6

7

3 2

8

1

1

2

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 22


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR MALE WASHROOM FEMALE WASHROOM OFFICE SPACE

7 5

6

4 2

3

1

1

2

THIRD FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 23


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR MALE WASHROOM FEMALE WASHROOM OFFICE SPACE

7 5

6

4 2

3

1

1

2

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 24


UNIT TYPE 1 INTERIOR Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 25


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

15

11

10

9

9

10

15

11

12

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR MECH. ELEC. ROOM POWDER ROOM LAUNDRY ROOM ENSUITE WASHROOM BEDROOM WALK-IN CLOSET LIEN CLOSET HOME OFFICE DINNING AREA KITCHEN LIVING ROOM

12 7

8

7

8

13

13 6 14

5

4 2

3

1

5 1

2

6

14

UNIT TYPE 1 TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN LEVEL 1 SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 26


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

12

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR MECH. ELEC. ROOM WASHROOM READING LOUNGE ENTERTAINMENT ROOM WALK-IN CLOSET BEDROOM EN SUITE BATHROOM TERRACE

12 10

10

9 8

6 7

9 11

8

11

5

4 2

3

1

5 1

2

6 7

UNIT TYPE 1 TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN LEVEL 2 SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 27


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

11

10

9

9

10

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR MECH. ELEC. ROOM POWDER ROOM LAUNDRY ROOM ENSUITE WASHROOM BEDROOM WALK-IN CLOSET LIEN CLOSET HOME OFFICE DINNING AREA KITCHEN LIVING ROOM

11

12

12 7

8

7

8

13

13 6

5

4

5

6

15 14

15 2

3

1

1

2

14

UNIT TYPE 2 TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN LEVEL 1 SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 28


READING LOUNGE OVER LOOKING THE ROM Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 29


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

10

10

9 8

6 12

7

9 11

8

11

5

4 2

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR MECH. ELEC. ROOM WASHROOM READING LOUNGE ENTERTAINMENT ROOM WALK-IN CLOSET BEDROOM ENSUITE BATHROOM TERRACE

3

1

5 1

2

6 7

12

UNIT TYPE 2 TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN LEVEL 2 SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 30


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR GYM YOGA ROOM TERRACE BOARD ROOM KITCHEN LOUNGE H.C WASHROOM

10

5

12

9

11

8 7

7

4 6

2

3

1

1

2

AMENITY LEVEL FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 31


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

ELEVATORS FIRE EXIT STAIR GARBAGE ROOM CORRIDOR CHILLER FAN ROOM GREEN ROOF SYSTEM

7

5 6 4 2

3

1

MECHANICAL FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 32


SPATIAL PROGRAM 1 2 3

COOLING TOWER GREEN ROOF SYSTEM CONCRETE PAVERS

3

1

2

ROOF PLAN SCALE 1:150 Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 33


SOUTH ELEVATION Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 34


EAST ELEVATION Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 35


NORTH ELEVATION Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 36


DETAIL 1

BASE DETAIL SCALE 1:10

DETAIL 2

PARTY WALL PLAN DETAIL SCALE 1:5

SPECIFIC DETAILS Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 37


DETAIL 3

DETAIL 4

INTERIOR

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR

EXTERIOR

PARAPET DETAIL SCALE 1:5

PERIMITER HEATING WITHIN LIVING SPACE SCALE 1:5

SPECIFIC DETAILS Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 38


DETAIL 5

INTERIOR

DETAIL 6

EXTERIOR

SUITE TERRACE DRAIN DETAIL SCALE 1:5

SUITE TERRACE PARAPET DETAIL SCALE 1:5

SPECIFIC DETAILS Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 39


6.0 BUILDING CODE COMPLIANCE 6.01

OBC Matrix

6.02

OBC Check List

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 40


ONTARIO BUILDING CODE MATRIX

ONTARIO BUILDING CODE CHECK LIST (some portions removed that did not apply to the project)

Below is the Ontario Building Code Matrix that is typically filled out when starting a new development.

OAA Part 3, Buildings Drawings Reviewed: (titles plus dates)

Legend:

N

Not required

R

Project Name: Project Number:

Required

C

Review By:

Date:

Approved By:

BCDN:

Confirm requirements or construction detail(s)

RC

The Ontario Association of Architects provides the Architects with a OBC check list before there is a review of code requirement. Indicated here is a completed check list of all the required and implicated OBC requirements into the “CULTURA” Condominium.

Review completed and item indicated on documents

This checklist is intended to assist architects in a review of code requirements to be considered in the preparation and review of documents to support a permit application. A simple review of the checklist is not a substitute for a thorough review of the OBC. Modify the checklist to note applicable code requirements for the project.

OBC Code Reference(s)

1. PERMIT SUBMISSION DOCUMENTS a Professional design stamps & signatures b

2.3.1

General review commitment cetter

2.3.2

2. SIZE & OCCUPANCY REQUIREMENTS a Major occupancy (ies) GROUP C, D, E b

Building area AREA: 553m²

c

Number of storeys ABOVE: 22

Table 3.1.2.1, 3.1.2 1.1.3.2 & 3.2.2.5 3.2.1 & 3.2.2.5

BELOW: 3

TOTAL: 24

d

Number of streets 1

3.2.2.10.(1) to (5)

e

Building sprinklered YES

3.2.5.13

f

Classification GROUP C: ANY HEIGHT, ANY AREA – 3.2.2.42.

3.2.2.20 to 3.2.2.83

g

Type of construction required NON-COMBUSTIBLE

3.1.4/3.1.5

h

Storeys below ground 3 BELOW GROUND STOREYS

3.2.2.15.(1) to (3)

i

Fire containment in basements [600m2] AREA WITHIN BASEMENT DOES NOT EXCEED 600m²

3.2.1.5.(1) & (2)

k

Floor assembly over basement (min. 3/4hr) CONSTRUCTED OF 250mm POURED IN-PLACE CONCRETE = 2HR F.S

3.2.1.4.(1)

l

Other floor assemblies (mezz. as a storey) CONSTRUCTED OF 250mm POURED IN-PLACE CONCRETE = 2HR F.S

3.2.1.1.(6)

n

Roof assembly F.R.R. (sprinkler exception) 1 HOUR FIRE F.R.R

3.2.2.17

ONTARIO BUILDING CODE Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 41


OAA Part 3, Buildings 6. SAFETY REQUIREMENTS WITHIN FLOOR AREAS 1) Means of egress

3)

OAA Part 3, Buildings z

a

Egress from roof, platform, podium MEETS CODE REQUIREMENTS

3.3.1.3.(3) to (4)

b

Egress roof enclosure, 2 egress if > 200m2 EXIT STAIR PROVIDED AS A MEANS OF EGRESS AS PER CODE

3.3.1.3.(5) & (6)

c

Egress from service space EXIT STAIR PROVIDED AS A MEANS OF EGRESS AS PER CODE

3.3.1.3.(7)

d

Each suite to have exterior exit doorway or doorway into a public corridor or exterior passageway EXIT INTO CORRIDOR PROVIDED

3.3.1.3.(8)

e

Access to 2 separate exits in opposite directions CORRIDOR PROVIDES ACCESS TO BOTH EXIT STAIRS

3.3.1.3.(9)

f

Adequate egress width from rooms (Occ. Load x 6.1, 9.2, or 18.4mm) ADEQUATE WIDTH PROVIDED = 1600mm WIDE CORRIDOR

3.3.1.16

g

Egress from dwelling units ADEQUATE #OF EGRESS DOORS PROVIDED

3.3.4.4.(1) to (8)

h

Travel distance within the room or suite when > 1 egress LESS THAN 30m

3.3.1.6

Door swing COMPLIANT – DOOR SWINGS IN THE DIRECTION OF EGRESS

8. FIRE SEPARATION BETWEEN OCCUPANCIES, TENANTS, ROOMS AND SHAFTS a Fire separation between occupancies GROUP C FROM D = 1HR, C FROM E = 2HRS, D FROM E = NONE

3.3.1.10 & 3.4.6.11

3.1.3.1 & Table 3.1.3.1

f

Fire separation between suites COMPLIANT – RESISTIANCE RATING NO LESS THAN 1HR (DUE TO WALL CONSTRUCTION)

3.3.1.1 & 3.3.4.2

g

Fire separation of public corridor COMPLIANT – RESISTANCE RATING NO LESS THAN 45MIN (DUE TO WALL CONSTRUCTION)

3.3.1.4

n

F.S. of storage rooms in “C” occupancies COMPLIANT – RESISTANCE RATING NO LESS THAN 1HR (DUE TO WALL CONSTRUCTION)

3.3.4.3

p

Fire separation of storage garage COMPLIANT – RESISTANCE RATING NO LESS THAN 1.5HR (DUE TO CONSTRUCTION)

3.3.5.6

q

Fire separation of vertical transportation facilities & elevator machine room COMPLIANT – RESISTANCE RATING NO LESS THAN 2HR (DUE TO CONSTRUCTION)

3.5.3

Corridors a

Fuel fired appliances prohibited in corridor access to exit COMPLIANT

3.3.1.2.(3)

r

Service room fire separation COMPLIANT – RESISTANCE RATING NO LESS THAN 2HR (DUE TO CONSTRUCTION)

3.6.2.1 & 3.6.2.2

b

Headroom: min SUFFIECIANT HEAD ROOM PROVIDED

3.3.1.8 & 3.4.3.6

s

Incinerator & garbage room fire separation COMPLIANT – RESISTANCE RATING NO LESS THAN 1HR (DUE TO CONSTRUCTION)

3.6.2.5 & 3.6.2.6

c

Width: min 1100 mm ADEQUATE WIDTH PROVIDED = 1600mm WIDE CORRIDOR

3.3.1.9

t

F.S. of transformer vault 3 hr…..2hr…..[sprinklers]: solid masonry or concrete

3.5.2.8.(1)

7. REQUIREMENTS FOR EXITS b Minimum of 2 exits 2 EXIT STIARS PROVIDED

3.4.2.1.(1) to (7)

12. HEALTH REQUIREMENTS a Room dimensions in dwelling units COMPLIANT – SECTION 9.5.4 – 9.5.9 d

d

Distance between exits COMPLIANT – ONE HALF THE MAX. DIAGONAL

3.4.2.3.(1) & (2)

e

Location of exits TRAVEL DISTANCE ALLOWED = 105m - COMPLIANT

3.4.2.5.(1) to (5)

f

Clear path of travel from exit to a safe public space COMPLIANT

1.1.3.2

g

Clear width of exit, corridor, stair COMPLIANT

3.4.3.1.(1) to (3)

h

Required minimum exit width COMPLIANT = 950 PROVIDED, 790 REQUIRED

3.4.3.2 to 3.4.3.4

l

Fire separation of exits COMPLIANT – 2HR FIRE RATING – 190 POURED IN-PLACE CONCRETE

3.4.4.1 to 3.4.4.4

s

Length and width of landing COMPLIANT – L = 1100 W = WIDTH OF STAIR

3.4.6.3.(2)

t

Number and height of handrail COMPLIANT

3.4.6.4.(1) to (10)

u

Height and opening on guards COMPLIANT

3.4.6.5.(1) to (8)

w

Treads and risers COMPLIANT

3.4.6.7.(1) to (5)

3.7.1.2 & 9.5

Window in every sleeping room COMPLIANT – EACH BEDROOM HAS A WINDOW

3.7.2.1

13. OTHER ASPECTS THAT WERE ALSO CONSIDERED (ADDED ON BY ME) a Unprotected openings COMPLIANT

3.2.3.1A

ONTARIO BUILDING CODE Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 42


7.0 SYSTEMS INTERGRATION 7.01

Structural Summary

7.02

Mechanical Summary

7.03

Electrical Summary

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 43


Overview The proposed development is a 21 story reinforced concrete building with three below grade levels composed of parking and storage. A combination of shear walls and columns support a flat plate construction in order to maximize the largest span possible for the property. The lateral forces are entirely resisted by the concrete shear walls and the vertical forces are transferred in combination with the columns and shear walls.

Beams located within residential units

Vertical Loads

STRUCTURAL FLOOR PLAN Scale 1:300

Con

cret

Dryw

all P

Con

cret

Con

cret

She

ar W alls

e Bl

ock

e Co

lum

n

artit

ion

e Be

am

The vertical forces acting on the structure of the building are transferred within a combination of a flat slab, beam, and column system. Due to the proposed projections, heavy reinforcement of the concrete slab will be required. The proposed slab thickness for the design calls for a 250mm thick slab with 200mm permitter beams. The permitter beams are necessary for the purpose of transferring the vertical loads of the proposed cantilevers from the face of the building facade to the columns, which are preliminary sized at 350 x 350. Horizontal Loads

Suit

e1

Suit

e1

FORCE DISTRIBUTION DIAGRAM Concrete slabs transfer vertical loads to concrete beams and columns

Lev

el 2

Lev

el 1

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Combination of poured in-place concrete, concrete block, and gypsum board partitions

The horizontal forces acting on the building, primarily wind loads, are being transferred though a series steps. The first step is the transfer of wind load on the exterior cladding to the j-channels and z-channels of the cladding system. These loads are then transferred to the cladding frame which is composed of concrete block. Once the load has gone through the concrete block, its transfers into the primary structural system; concrete columns, concrete breams, and concrete slab. Another key component in transferring horizontal loads are the shear walls that are located on the west wall. These poured in place concrete shear walls are the necessary as they house the fire exit stairs, elevator shafts, and mechanical shafts.

STRUCTURAL SUMMARY Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 44


Cooling Tower

Overview Mechanical systems are vital to the heath and quality of life for the building and its occupants. Within the proposed development, there are three different types of occupancies that require different treatments when dealing with heating, cooling and ventilation.

Washroom Corridor

Chiller

Fan Room

Pressure Equalization Shaft for Fire Exit Stairs

Suit

e1

Lev

el 2

Kitchen

Vertical Shaft Providing Return and Supply Air Suit

e1

Lev

el 1 Washroom

DROP CEILING LOCATIONS Drop ceilings are provided within the unit to hide supply and return ducts

Suit

e1

Suit

e1

Lounge Space & Office Space The commercial offices and lounge space are receiving forced fresh air from the fan room, located on the top floor of the building. This allows for a constant flow of fresh air that is required for this type of occupancy. The type of system that is implicated within the building is called a Variable Air Volume (VAV). Air is conditioned at a central source, supply and return fans circulate the conditioned air through ducts to the occupied spaces in the building. At each individual zone, there is a thermostat at allows the occupants to control the room temperature by regulating the amount of air that is being brought into the occupied space.

Lev

el 2

Lev

el 1

EXHAUST AIR Air that needs to be exhausted, mainly from the kitchen and washroom, is collected within the same duct shaft and directed to the exterior (as per the white arrows).

Exhaust out

Pressure Equalized Shaft

The Suites Residential units are provided fresh air through a fan coil unit system. Hot and chilled water are piped to the fan coil terminal and a fan draws a mixture of room air and outdoor air through a filter and blows the air across a coil, heated or chilled, back into the unit. The fan coil unit is located adjacent to the main corridor for the possibility of maintenance services. From there ducts are run to the bed rooms and living spaces that require heating and cooling. Exhaust ducts remove unwanted air from the kitchen and bathrooms, and exhaust out from the east facade.

Fan coil unit

Suit

e1

Boiler, Fire & Water Pump

Lev

el 2

Fan coil unit

Suit OVERALL BUILDING SYSTEMS Cooling Tower, Fan Room, Chiller, Mechanical Shafts, Fire & Water Pumps

e1

Equipment The major components within this type of development at can incorporate both systems are: boilers, chilled water plant, cooling tower, vertical supply and return piping, horizontal supply and return piping, fan-coil terminals, outside grilles, and fan room.

Lev

el 1

SUPPLY AIR Air is being supplied to the suites through a centralized fan coil unit system

MECHANICAL SUMMARY Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 45


Overview Tele c

om.

Tele c

om.

Suit

e1

Roo

m

Roo

m

Lev

el 2

Without electricity our world would be dark. Our buildings would not provide us with the beautiful skylines that we have today. With today’s technology our buildings are becoming more efficient in how they operate on a macro and micro scale. 204 Bloor Street receives its power and data telecommunications directly from Bloor Street. Each is than sent below ground where the telecommunication room and switchgear room is located. Transformer

Suit

e1

Lev

el 1

ELECTRICAL AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS POWER AND DATA CLOSETS Satellite locations located on each floor to supply power and data services to each individual suite

The set down transformer is located on the first below ground level on the north east side of the property. The transformer is vital within the building because it reduces the transmitted high voltage electricity from the city to lower voltages that can be utilized directly in the building. Unit Substation The unit substation houses all the necessary disconnect switches, secondary switches, fuses, and circuit breakers that get translated without the building. Telecommunications Room A separate space has been provided for the telecommunications room. It is located on the south side of the property adjacent to Bloor street, allowing for a shorter distance for cables to the building.

Unit Substation & Transformer Vault

Electrical and telecommunications closets are also provided on each floor of the suites which houses wiring shafts, meters, and electrical panels. Data & Telecommunications Room

OVERALL BUILDING SYSTEMS Switchgear room, transformer vault, data & telecommunications room, electrical and telecommunications closets

ELECTRICAL SUMMARY Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 46


8.0 CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE

Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 47


PROPOSED PROJECT SCHEDULE Project:

CULTURA: RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 204 BLOOR STREET TORONTO ONTARIO

PHASE

DATE

PROPERTY ACQUISITION Client Purchases 204 Bloor Street Topographic Survey Soils Test

Nov 09

Dec 09

Jan 10

Feb 10

Mar 10

Apr 10

May 10

Jun 10

Jul 10

Aug 10

Sep 10

Oct 10

Nov 10

Dec 10

Jan 11

Feb 11

Mar 11

Apr 11

May 11

Jun 11

Jul 11

Aug 11

Sep 11

Oct 11

Nov 11

PRELIMINARY DESIGN PHASE / CONCEPT Space Program Design Site Plan Design Floor Plan and Elevations Building / Fire Code Review Meet with Planning Department For Site Plan Request Relief for Zoning Items Request Relief for Parking Space Exemption Review Site Plan / Building Elevations

Nov 09

Dec 09

Jan 10

Feb 10

Mar 10

Apr 10

May 10

Jun 10

Jul 10

Aug 10

Sep 10

Oct 10

Nov 10

Dec 10

Jan 11

Feb 11

Mar 11

Apr 11

May 11

Jun 11

Jul 11

Aug 11

Sep 11

Oct 11

Nov 11

REZONING AND OFFICIAL PLAN OF LAND USE PHASE Rezoning Application and Fee Official Plan Ammendment and Fee Public Meeting for Rezoning and OPA Rezone and OPA Approved

Nov 09

Dec 09

Jan 10

Feb 10

Mar 10

Apr 10

May 10

Jun 10

Jul 10

Aug 10

Sep 10

Oct 10

Nov 10

Dec 10

Jan 11

Feb 11

Mar 11

Apr 11

May 11

Jun 11

Jul 11

Aug 11

Sep 11

Oct 11

Nov 11

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT PHASE Execute Client / Architect Agreement Document 600 (Scope: Budget, Building Area, Parking, Consultant Team) Consultation to Public / User Groups Preliminary Design Approval Final Design Presentation Construction Documents

Nov 09

Dec 09

Jan 10

Feb 10

Mar 10

Apr 10

May 10

Jun 10

Jul 10

Aug 10

Sep 10

Oct 10

Nov 10

Dec 10

Jan 11

Feb 11

Mar 11

Apr 11

May 11

Jun 11

Jul 11

Aug 11

Sep 11

Oct 11

Nov 11

CONSTRUCTION PHASE Tender Call (RFP for Finance Lease to Own Contractor) Tender Close Award of Tender *Construction - 24 month duration Interior Fit Up Data / Voice Security Project Completion

Nov 09

Dec 09

Jan 10

Feb 10

Mar 10

Apr 10

May 10

Jun 10

Jul 10

Aug 10

Sep 10

Oct 10

Nov 10

Dec 10

Jan 11

Feb 11

Mar 11

Apr 11

May 11

Jun 11

Jul 11

Aug 11

Sep 11

Oct 11

Nov 11

* General Contractor of project will determine actual schedule

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE Sebastian Lubczynski • ASC620 Integration Studio II • April 2010 • PG. 48

Bloor Street Condo Design Proposal  

3rd Year Integration Studio Design Proposal - Ryerson University

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