Spring Magazine 2013

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L/C

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Round 3

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BOOKMARKS B

A

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Spy the Lie

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refreshingly wry sense of humor. Spy The Lie may not make you laugh out loud, but you’re guaranteed to chuckle to yourself more than once. Two of the most interesting chapters, “What Deception Looks Like” and “Let’s Be Careful Out There” debunk some of the myths we’ve all heard about lying and body language. The authors acknowledge that there is an important correlation between deception and nonverbal behavior, but that this correlation doesn’t work the way we might expect it to. For instance, you might think of lack of eye contact as an indicator of deceptive behavior. In fact, the authors discourage readers from overanalyzing eye contact. Instead, they suggest observing other behaviors we would have never thought to consider. A fascinating yet manageable page turner, Spy the Lie imparts practical tips and tricks that will likely have its readers using it as a reference guide for years to come.

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a personal level, their reasons for writing this book go a bit further. In the book’s introduction they write, “The three of us came into this world from entirely different backgrounds. The common denominator was the combination of a fascination with human nature and a conviction that untruthfulness lies at the heart of all too many of the problems we face as individuals, as a nation and as a global community.” Spy the Lie’s authors want to make it clear to their readers that there is no such thing as a human lie detector. But by imparting their knowledge, they make it possible for anyone to be a deception expert. The keys to understanding deception can be found within a methodology developed by Houston. Of course, the methodology is a painstakingly perfected intelligence tool, but the authors make it digestible—offering up simple exercises readers can try out on their friends. The authors also has a knack for unpacking a serious subject like deception with a

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The only thing separating a good lie from a bad lie is the ability to know the difference. In Spy the Lie, former CIA officers Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, ’92 JD, and Susan Carnicero, with the help of esteemed journalist Don Tennant, teach readers how to detect deceptive behavior in others. The authors share their expert knowledge through thrilling stories from the frontlines of counterterrorism and criminal investigations and help readers apply professional lie-detecting techniques to their daily lives. The last time you confronted your teenager about a missed curfew, did you get a straight answer? Can you say for certain that you’re always hearing the truth from your boss, your coworkers or your employees? And what about your spouse or significant other? What if you could enter any compromising conversation confident in your ability to catch a lie? While the authors are eager to assist their readers in applying this expertise on

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By Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, ’92 JD and Susan Carnicero with Don Tennant | Reviewed by Maura Beth Pagano,’12

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The only thing separating a good lie from a bad lie is the ability to know the difference.

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3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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34 / Bookmarks

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.


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