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SEAN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN www.seanmissal.com info@seanmissal.com

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5 WEEK TEAM CONCEPT WINTER 2012 Presented with the opportunity to study interaction design, Ben Dekock and I wanted to create a device that facilitated a digital experience though mechanical form and interaction. By researching poor interaction design, GoPro was selected as a valid case study.

PROBLEM RESEARCH COMPETITOR ANALYSIS IDEATION FINAL CONCEPT


PROBLEM The gopro camera has created its own following within the action camera genre. Through backwards compatibility and its iconic 170 degree wide angle lens, users continue to invest in the GoPro brand. How can this design be improved upon to further drive the brand forwards without losing its iconic and recognizable design?


GoPro cameras are used by more professional athletes, sports filmmakers, and core enthusiasts than any other camera in the world.

GOPRO.COM


RESEARCH

GOPRO divides their user base into three main categories, surf, motorsport, and outdoor. A specific bundle is marketed to each of these user categories, with the main differentiation between bundles being the mounts and waterproof case.


SURF The Surf Edition of the HD Hero 2 allows users to mount the GoPro camera on their surf boards through a specialized adhesive mount. Generally surfers will mount the camera at the end of their board facing themselves, not on their person.

MOTORSPORT

The Motorsports Edition of the HD Hero 2 comes with a specialty suction mount to allow easy mounting on smooth surfaces such as car glass or body panels. This allows the user to be looking at the device while it is mounted.

OUTDOOR The Outdoor Edition of the HD Hero 2 only comes with mounts that allow you to mount it on your person. This means you do not retain line of sight with the device after it is mounted, and currently have to remove the camera from the mount to be able to adjust the settings or mode.

How do we enable a blind interaction?

BLIND OPERATION

Because the outdoor user needs to be able to use the camera without line of sight, it became logical to design the camera to function without needing the user to be looking at it. If an interface was created to be intuitive without line of sight, then its functionality would carry through to the other segments where users are able to see the camera.


JESSIE WIXOM NOVICE USER

Having never used a GoPro before, Jessie’s interaction with the device told us the most about its interface. Not only was she initially unable to power it on, but she stumbled around the user interface unsuccessfully until finally she was able to figure out how to power the camera off.

JOHAN AXELSON AMATUER USER

Using his GoPro sparingly while on the slopes, Johan is familiar with the camera but only uses it on occasion. The current GoPro camera frustrated him because it was very hard for him to ensure that the camera was on and ready to record with its current twobutton interface. He wished it had a physical response.

CODY PAYNE PROFESSIONAL USER

As a local kayaking and wakeboard professional as well as avid GoPro user, Cody was able to give us some great insight. The main issue he had was when the GoPro is powered off then back on, it does not maintain the same camera mode, leading to confusion. The camera also has little visual response to show this.

USER INTERVIEWS

User interviews were conducted at all experience levels of GoPro users to ensure the problems we identified covered the whole spectrum of the cameras user base.


Holistically redesign the GoPro camera platform improving upon form, ease of operation, and intuitiveness of the user interface. - NO TACTILE FEEDBACK

- CONFUSING MENU UI

- POOR VISUAL RESPONSE

RESEARCH SUMMARY

Focusing these problems into three solid sections we found that in order to combat the core issues we needed to redesign the user interface, streamline the device interaction for obvious and easy use, and do this all within a refined form factor.


COMPETITOR ANALYSIS The Contour HD is the GoPro’s closest competition. Taking time to figure out why people chose the contour over the GoPro allowed us to gain valuable insight into what users expect from an action sports camera.


+ TACTILE RESPONSE

+ COVERED INTERNALS

+ STREAMLINED FORM

CONTOUR HD GPS User reviews and interviews showed that tactile feedback of the Contours main record slider was the primary reason for purchase, while a more streamlined form allowed for easier helmet mounting and covered internals helped to keep them free of dirt and debris.


IDEATION

With obvious mode selection lacking in the GOPROS current form, we looked to how other more complex imagining devices handled their complex user input, specifically looking at rings, buttons, and dials used on digital SLR cameras.


SKETCHES BY BEN DEKOCK

DIRECTION

Drawing heavily from focus and aperture rings found on DSLR camera lenses, a tactile mode selector was chosen to allow the user to feel which mode they are in by the direction of the selector. This selector would be directly linked to the digital user interface, aiding in visual and tactile affirmation of desired input.


FINAL CONCEPT By moving the core components which the users interact with onto a continuous front face of the device, a more concise user experience was developed. Basing the cameras function within physical interactions allowed for the creation of a blind interface.


+ TACTILE RESPONSE + REVISED FORM

+ USER INTERFACE


MODE DIAL Creation of a mode dial allows users to rapidly switch through the GoPro’s four camera modes, adjust the settings, or power the camera off. Directionality of the dial allows the user to become familiar with which mode is in what position around the lens. Tying this selection to a physical affordance rather than a digital interface allows for quicker and easier to understand navigation.

SIDE ROCKER The addition of a rocker button to the side of the camera assists with navigating through the user interface. By placing it on the left instead of the front face, it is made clearer that it is a secondary function.

SLIDER Giving tactile feedback to the user, a slider allows for blind control of the device through haptic feedback. With the slider on the left the device is active and recording, while sliding to the rights allows the user to adjust the settings of the current selected camera mode.

AFFORDANCES The addition and streamlining of affordances on the GoPro resulted in a simplified and more intuitive user experience allowing for the simple adjustment of settings and operation of the device through tactile indications alone.


FAMILIARITY When the slider is slid to its active position, it puts it on the users right, where are familiar with cameras having their shutter release button.

BLIND OPERATION By creating physical interactions the user is familiar with, patterns are created to aid in blind operation of the device. Within the mode dial, pointing it down is off, while up turns it onto the most common mode, video. From here users will be able to feel which direction the dial is pointing to determine what mode they are based of the two core positions.


MENU INTERFACE With the slider shifted right into settings mode, the top button becomes accept for the menu interface while the rocker allows the user to navigate through the options. The walkthrough above shows turning the GoPro on to video mode, changing the resolution, and changing the field of view.


REMOVED HOUSING

AUXILIARY HOUSINGS

WATERPROOF HOUSING Instead of relying on a bulky exterior case, the new concept features a swappable rear housing allowing for various mounting solutions based on the necessary application. The case lock on the left allows for easy and secure removal and installation while sealing the internal components.


FORM

USER INTERFACE

OPERATION

Moving all of the macro functions to a continuous front face allows users easy access to blind controls.

Relying on specific affordances rather than a two button navigation system, the user interface was streamlined.

Basing the function in familiar patterns allows users to navigate and use the device without line of sight.


5 WEEK EXPLORATION

WINTER 2012 A form-based space study developed into a retail space. Part of a series of exercises created by Rowena Reed Kostellow for Pratt.

IDEATION REFINEMENT FINAL SPACE


FORM BEFORE FUNCTION

Beginning the project, we developed five spacial studies focusing on curvilinear and rectilinear form within a space. Drawing on dynamic directionality, this study hoped to capture energy and complexity through the use of only rectilinear planes. The separate elements all join together to make a single flowing design through the piece, drawing the eye from the lower front to the upper rear.


Components


Space One

Space Two

Space Three

This first space attempted to bring in the energy and movement that the first form study had. It became apparent that this direct of a translation of the study led to a crowded and intimidating space, not inviting and intriguing as a retail space should be. It did help to show the interest of an entry wall as well as a lofted floor going over the front of the store, and how lofted architecture can add intrigue for the consumer.

By using a large front wall to garner intrigue from the storefront, this design is truly meant to draw the consumer in. To add to this the entry drops down to the main floor, leading people through the space. The idea was to have a cashier/ service table at the top of the entryway, while using the backside of that large wall as a shoe wall. While this space did create a good flow throughout, it also felt cluttered.

A combination of the previous two spaces, the third and chosen space combined the active forms of the first with visual intrigue of the second. Having the first visual in the space be a large cantilever not only creates an interesting space below, but one above as well. An entrance to get to the upstairs faces the consumer directly as they enter, leading them to the rear of the store.

REFINEMENT

We then received the prompt to translate the abstract forms into a functional space. The form studies were to be refined, translated and used as inspiration for the functional spaces without losing the energy or dynamics of the original forms.


SPACE THREE

Decided on for the final design, space three captured the dynamism of the original form study the most while still creating flow and intrigue throughout the space.


FINAL SPACE

Using the cantilever but opening up the front as well as the left side, the final design draws heavily from the third space design. Color and advertising was added to help draw people through the space, and add to the intrigue of the upper floor. The left side would be Nike sponsored team apparel, leading to the back wall which would be equipment. Going up to stairs leads the customer to shoes at the middle floor, and then a whole are for Nike ID at the top. Under the cantilever is clothing and checkout, leading to the full retail experience.


10 WEEK COLLABORATION FALL 2011 Approached by Extrasport to create a new product for their underdeveloped recreational line, we were asked to design a type-III Personal Floatation Device. This was our first endeavor into soft goods design.

RESEARCH PROBLEM STATEMENT IDEATION REFINEMENT FINAL CONCEPT


RESEARCH

Through preliminary research it was found that current Extrasport Kayak PFD’s lack proper ergonomics. They hit user’s arms and restricted movement while paddling within the vest.


- IMPROPER ADJUSTMENT

- IGNORED STRAP SYSTEM

ETHNOGRAPHY

Going out to the local student kayak rental on Lake Whatcom to watch people use PFD’s made it clear that the adjustment system was not working. Not only did most users not tighten their vests properly, they didn’t even notice the lower straps were there. On top of this, most users ended up removing the vests as they impeded movement too much.


How can the successful components of a highly rated vest be brought to the recreational user? While full pullover vests that force the user to loosen the straps every time and pull the vest of their shoulders can scare users away with their daunting donning and removal, bringing the security and fit that they provide would help to create a better overall PFD for the recreational user.


what have people said? “It keeps me safe while on the river without messing with my balance.” Weaver F. “This jacket is awesome! I love the comfortable, low profile fit.“ Nickel K. “Astral and the associated team of designers and have been pushing forward the form and function of PFDs for many years and this is probably the best rescue vest on the market.” Matthew K. “ Comfortable and reliable. The GreenJacket has everything you would expect out of a vest.” Chase N. “The fit is great! Range of motion too. I often forget I am wearing it.” Matt T.

what are they missing? “8 adjustment points adjusts 2 areas in reality - the lower torso and the floating front floatation.” Tak R. “While the strap system is extremely functional, it’s cumbersome ” Wilson R. “I love my Greenjacket so much, however I would like to modify it to fit my needs better. Let me start by saying I understand that there’s a reason these are made to pull over and the risks in changing the design.” Kevin E. “Do people prefer the Astral Greenjacket to the Stohlquist Rocker? The pullover system seems daunting, so I’m tempted to go for the side zipper on the Rocker.” Philip S.


For the recreational user age 20-40, create a new donning system with a revised system of adjustment to provide the user with an interface for easy entry and exit from the vest without compromising the overall security, comfort, and fit.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

By drawing keywords from the ethnographic study and user reviews of the top rated vest, I was able to identify keywords to base the design around in order to create the best overall design for the recreational user.


INSPIRATION

Looking at different types of strap systems and sports gear for inspiration, an attempt was made to find the product which best encompassed the three keywords, security, comfort, and fit.


IDEATION

Taking inspiration from the automotive industry, the four point harness provides security, comfort, and fit within a single release point. Using this as a launching point for ideation, an attempt was made to integrate this system into a PFD.


SKETCHING

Sticking to the familiarity of buckles and zippers to bring in the 4-point harness concept, the chosen design was able to create a secure overlapping mechanism. Through this ideation a secondary adjustment was also devised which would help combine the adjustment system into a single point.


INITIAL REFINEMENT

After ideation the sketching was refined down to two core concepts. Designed to give the user maximum arm range and movement, these vests used the same core connection points that pullover vests use.


CONCEPT ONE Relying purely on neoprene to conform to the user, the first refined concept was an attempt to bring the overlapping mechanism to the final vest simplistically.

CONCEPT TWO By using a side adjustment strap to conform to the user, the second refinement provided a much more realism in terms of comfort and fit.


SOLUTION Combining the form of the blue concept with the strap system of the orange concept, a vest with contrasting form and secure closure was created.


POCKET ZIPPER

PRINTED LOGO

1” BLACK WEBBING 1” STANDARD BUCKLE X2

BODY MATERIAL 1

BODY MATERIAL 3 CUSTOM BUCKLE X2

1” REFLECTIVE WEBBING

BODY MATERIAL 2

VEST ZIPPER

REINFORCED STITCHING

NEOPRENE

WEBBING PASS-THROUGH X4

BODY MATERIAL 1 500 CORDURA NYLON

BODY MATERIAL 2 500 CORDURA NYLON

BODY MATERIAL 3 500 CORDURA NYLON

NEOPRENE 2MM FABIRC COATED

INTERFACE

By using form and color, the creation of visible cues for the closure system was created to help guide the user. Colored buckles are accented for the user as well as colored panels to highlight the main separation points.


ZIPPER

BUCKLE

By using a center zipper it alleviates the need for the user to adjust the side of the vest every time they put it on, allowing for a simplified donning process

By using the familiarity of buckles in a unique manner, it provides a recognizable system for the user. Diagonal buckles help the vest to flex side to side.


SIDE STRAP

FOUR POINT

The two point side strap system keeps tension where necessary to allow for the user to rapidly tighten and loosen the vest.

Drawing back to the harness, providing four points to secure the PFD allows for the user to still be able to move within the vest.

DONNING AND CLOSURE

In order to create the same means of fit and comfort that a pullover style vest provides, connection points were established that would allow the user to twist and move within the vest to create a flexible but easy to enter PFD.


FOAM PANELING Along with the connection points that mimic that of a pullover vest, the foam was split in sections were it would allow the user the most freedom within the vest. By keeping the overarm straps a continuous band, overall user security was focused on without compromising the vests core integrity.


COMFORT

ADJUSTMENT

SECURITY

Featuring a revised strap system for ease of donning as well as separated panels to aid in user’s movement and overall comfort.

Combining two connection points into one fluid adjustment, the strap system simplifies fitting and overall donning for the user.

Using a connection system based upon the 4-point automotive harness to eliminate conflict between the user and the vest.


SKILLS ThirtyTwo brand snowboard boot created in Adobe Illustrator


SKILLS Two A4 sketch pages of ski boots


SKILLS Conceptual firefighter helmet created in Adobe Photoshop


SKILLS Conceptual bipedal reptile created in Adobe Photoshop


UNIDEN GMR1235

WALKIE TALKIE Bring the existing “tech oriented� walkie-talkie to the Generation Y sporting market through a welcoming interface combined with a contemporary form factor following Nixons design language. Used as a skill building extercise to bring a marker rendering through Adobe Illustrator and Rhino to create a final 3D Model.


SEAN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN www.seanmissal.com info@seanmissal.com

MISSAL

Industrial Design Portfolio  

Sean Missal Western Washington University Junior Industrial Design Portfolio

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