Sea History 165 - Winter 2018-2019

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(508) 693-5871 ★ WWW.JPUWOODCARVER.COM

OWNER’S STATEMENT: Statement filed 9/20/18 required by the Act of Aug. 12, 1970, Sec. 3685, Title 39, US Code: Sea History is published quarterly at 5 John Walsh Blvd., Peekskill NY 10566; minimum subscription price is $17.50. Publisher and editor-inchief: None; Editor is Deirdre E. O’Regan; owner is National Maritime Historical Society, a non-profit corporation; all are located at 5 John Walsh Blvd., Peekskill NY 10566. During the 12 months preceding October 2018 the average number of (A) copies printed each issue was 25,287; (B) paid and/or requested circulation was: (1) outside county mail subscriptions 7,467; (2) in-county subscriptions 0; (3) sales through dealers, carriers, counter sales, other non-USPS paid distribution 5,465; (4) other classes mailed through USPS 354; (C) total paid and/or requested circulation was 13,286; (D) free distribution by mail, samples, complimentary and other 10,987; (E) free distribution outside the mails 438; (F) total free distribution was 11,425; (G) total distribution 24,711; (H) copies not distributed 576; (I) total [of 15G and H] 25,287; (J) Percentage paid and/ or requested circulation 54%. The actual numbers for the single issue preceding October 2017 are: (A) total number printed 25,747; (B) paid and/or requested circulation was: (1) outside-county mail subscriptions 7,330; (2) in-county subscriptions 0; (3) sales through dealers, carriers, counter sales, other non-USPS paid distribution 5,155; (4) other classes mailed through USPS 402; (C) total paid and/or requested circulation was 12,887; (D) free distribution by mail, samples, complimentary and other 11,865; (E) free distribution outside the mails 350; (F) total free distribution was 12,215; (G) total distribution 25,102; (H) copies not distributed 645; (I) total [of 15G and H] 25,747 (J) Percentage paid and/or requested circulation 51%. I certify that the above statements are correct and complete. (signed) Burchenal Green, Executive Director, National Maritime Historical Society.

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read that Sea History readers might want to check out. Close to Shore: The Terrifying Shark Attacks of 1916 by Michael Capuzzo is about a series of shark attacks that occurred at the New Jersey shore in the summer of 1916 that garnered much attention (and panic) at the time. The book came out in 2001, so readers may be able to find it in their local libraries, and of course, online. (isbn 978-0-76790-414-8) Milkweed for the WWII Sailor Having spent many years aboard ships that were equipped with kapok life jackets, I rather enjoyed the “kids” article on PFDs (personal flotation devices) in the autumn issue of Sea History. During WWII, our mariners were in a bit of a crisis with regards to this subject. Our supply of kapok had been cut off, as Java was a main grower of the ceiba tree from which kapok floss was harvested. The US Navy and Merchant Marine began to look for home-grown substitutes. Milkweed floss was suggested, as it was both water resistant and buoyant, and conveniently grew wild in the United States. After some experimentation, the Navy determined that just over a pound of the hollow waxy fiber could keep a man afloat for 40 hours, depending on the size of the man. Cultivating a commercial crop would take too much time, so defense contractor War Hemp Industries enlisted the help of everyday citizens, including thousands of schoolchildren, to scour the roadsides, fields, and rails and collect the milkweed pods that grew like weeds in those areas. Pamphlets (with instructions) were distributed by the Soil Conservation Service (US Dept. of Agriculture) that urged, “School Children of America! Help Save your Father’s, Brothers’ and Neighbors’ Lives by Collecting Milkweed Pods!” Two bushels of about 600 pods each would make one life vest. During the war, more than a million life vests were made from milkweed pods collected as part of this effort. Frank Conti Normal, Illinois

courtesy westby times, p.d.

J. P. URANKER WOODCARVER

THE TRADITION OF HANDCARVED EAGLES CONTINUES TODAY

milne special collections and archives dept., university of new hampshire library

Kids showing off the fruits of their labor. The child at right is wearing a milkweed-stuffed life jacket. SEA HISTORY 165, WINTER 2018–19