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MARINE ART

Brandy in the Milk To the Editor: I was very pleased to hear that you are going to make a regular feature of marine art. For what it is worth, however, I do think that such articles and comment on marine artists should have a lacing of brandy in the milk, and that fair criticism should find it s place in the praise. This is difficult, perhaps, where living artists are concerned, but by no means impossible. There are, when all is said and done, very few absolutely first-class marine artists living at any one time-even now! I very much favor a meed of internal ionalism brought into the subject, whether dealing with past or present artist s. For example, how many of your readers know the work of C. H. Friberg, in Sweden today? How many know the work of the Swedish admiral Jacob Hagg? What do they know of Johannes Holst of Hamburg? Yet all will know the prints of Montagu Dawson, who was capable of magnificent work, but who sold his soul to Frost and Reid, who promoted him marvellously and made his name a household word-with the provision that he paint what they wanted, mainly clipper ships under stunsails at absurd angles of heel and with such exaggerated roaches to their sailt that they looked like sputniks rather than ships . Now many aspiring artists see this road as the road to success, and are imitating th is heresy. Your Marine Artists Association is an excellent idea. Over here, the Royal Society of Marine Artists is by no means unsuccessful. I do sometimes find myself wondering a little when I go to RSMA shows over here just what some of them are trying to achieve. When it comes to square-rigged sailing ships, apart from the ubiquitous school ships, few have ever seen one under sail, and many are producing animated plans. They become "ship portraitists" rather than marine arti sts. Marine art, I submit, does not consist of mechanical drawing . I almost had a fit when I saw some of the pictures advertised in SEA HISTORY No. 6 ALEX A. HURST Teredo Books Brighton, Sussex England

Mr. Hurst, who missed signing on as a mate in Kaiulani at Capetown in 1941, toward the end of her last voyage, has been making up for that missed opportunity since by publishing works on square-rigged sailing ships.

SEA HISTORY, FALL 1977

Sea, Sails and Ports

AN EXHIBITION

OF IMPORTANT MARINE PAINTINGS September 15 October 29

Montague Dawson, "The Battle of Trafalgar," oil on canvas, 40 x S 0 inches

An illustrated catalogue of the fine oil paintings by James Buttersworth, Thomas Birch, Fitz Hugh Lane, Robert Salmon, Andrew Melrose, John Stobart and others is available for $3.00.

40 West 57th Street, 5th Floor, New York 10019 (212) 541-9600 Open Tuesday-Saturday 9 :30-5 :30

Sea History Prints

A collection of important harbor and river views during the heyday of the merchant sailing ship by the renowned marine artist

JOHN STOBART ALEXANDRIA , CINCINNATI, DARIAN , GEORGETOWN, NANTUCKET, NEW ORLEANS , NEW YORK, SAN FRANCISCO , SANTA FE , SAVANNAH

Published as limited edition collector's prints. Prices are $200.00 signed and $400.00 remarqued, except for New York and Savannah which are rare prints with prices subject to the dictates of the collector's market. All prices are subject to continued availability and are liable to increase . This offer is made through the generosity of the artist to benefit the work of the National Society. Orders and inquiries should be sent to:

The National Maritime Historical Society 2 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201

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Sea History 009 - Autumn 1977  

3 IN CLIO'S CAUSE: ON LOOKING BACK, by George Campbell • 6 THE FIRST AND LAST VOYAGE OF THE ST. MARY, by Sandford Hart Low and Peter Throckm...

Sea History 009 - Autumn 1977  

3 IN CLIO'S CAUSE: ON LOOKING BACK, by George Campbell • 6 THE FIRST AND LAST VOYAGE OF THE ST. MARY, by Sandford Hart Low and Peter Throckm...

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