Page 1

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control

Including: What Do We Know About Energy? Energy from the Sun Food for Thought Forms of Energy The Ins and Outs of Energy Energy and Our Senses Construct a Device Energy Conservation Culminating Task

An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Written by: Moore, Jackson, Johnston, Kjeldgaard, Lynch, Tonner, Tudhope, Length of Unit: approximately: 16 hours

August 2001 Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:07:35 PM


Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1 Acknowledgements The developers are appreciative of the suggestions and comments from colleagues involved through the internal and external review process. Participating Lead Public School Boards: Mathematics, Grades 1-8 Grand Erie District School Board Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board Renfrew District School Board Science and Technology, Grades 1-8 Lakehead District School Board Thames Valley District School Board York Region District School Board Social Studies, History and Geography, Grade 1-8 Renfrew District School Board Thames Valley District School Board York Region District School Board The following organizations have supported the elementary curriculum unit project through team building and leadership: The Council of Ontario Directors of Education The Ontario Curriculum Centre The Ministry of Education, Curriculum and Assessment Policy Branch

An Integrated Unit for Grade 1 Written by: Moore, Jackson, Johnston, Kjeldgaard, Lynch, Tonner, Tudhope, Turnball (519) 452-2000 Thames Valley District School Board

Based on a unit by: Moore, Jackson, Johnston, Kjeldgaard, Lynch, Tonner, Tudhope, Turnball (519) 452-2000 Thames Valley District School Board This unit was written using the Curriculum Unit Planner, 1999-2001, which Planner was developed in the province of Ontario by the Ministry of Education. The Planner provides electronic templates and resources to develop and share units to help implement the new Ontario curriculum. This unit reflects the views of the developers of the unit and is not necessarily those of the Ministry of Education. Permission is given to reproduce this unit for any non-profit educational purpose. Teachers are encouraged to copy, edit, and adapt this unit for educational purposes. Any reference in this unit to particular commercial resources, learning materials, equipment, or technology does not reflect any official endorsements by the Ministry of Education, school boards, or associations that supported the production of this unit. Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:07:35 PM


Unit Overview Energy in Our Lives

Page 1

Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Task Context The Efficient Energy Agency has noticed that too much energy is being used in Ontario. They have hired us to be the Energy Super Sleuths for our community. Our task will be to collect information about energy use at school and/or at home. We will need to identify how energy can be conserved in these locations.

Task Summary In this unit, students will explore the sources of energy and the ways in which energy is used in daily life. They will investigate devices and systems that use energy and the ways in which these can be controlled manually. Using this knowledge, students will conduct an investigation into energy use and will identify ways to conserve energy.

Culminating Task Assessment Students will conduct an investigation of energy use at school. Students will collect data to identify an area where energy can be saved. After analyzing their data, students will design and display a poster to address one of these areas. They will collect additional data to determine if they have influenced a change in energy consumption. The data will be graphed and the results shared with the Efficient Energy Agency. Recommendations for further improvements in energy conservation will be discussed at this time.

Links to Prior Knowledge Students will be familiar with: - the concept of living and non-living things (refer to Grade One Life Systems strand) - the concept of the five senses (refer to Grade One Life Systems strand) - the use of a tally and a graph to display data and the interpretation of this data (refer to Grade One Data Management strand in Mathematics) Include prior knowledge skills and information on bulletin boards, wall charts and chart paper around the classroom. When appropriate, add to the information as the concepts are developed in the unit. For example, a vocabulary or fact bulletin board can begin with definitions or facts from related units and extended as new terms and facts are introduced. Students could demonstrate their prior knowledge in their science and technology journals using specific concepts prompts.

Considerations Notes to Teacher UNIT PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS 1. Curriculum This unit has been designed to cover all expectations in the ENERGY AND CONTROL strand in the Ontario Curriculum, Science and Technology document. 2. Integration Each activity is designed to build skills and concepts which will be demonstrated in the summative task. Although these lessons may be taught independently, integrated learning opportunities in other subject areas may be addressed simultaneously. Science is a form of knowledge that seeks to describe and explain the natural and physical world and its Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:07:41 PM Page A-1


place in our universe. Technology is both a form of knowledge that uses concepts and skills from other disciplines (including science) and the application of this knowledge to meet an individual need or specific problem. Inherent in these studies is the need to both research and communicate ideas and findings, whether through specific use of scientific and technical vocabulary, or through the use of diagrams or illustrations. The study of science and technology is an opportunity for students to reinforce and extend expectations in other subject areas. When planning a unit or term, teachers may wish to take advantage of opportunities to address and assess expectations from other curricula. 3. Timeframe As science is a hands-on, resource-dependent core subject, timetabling in all grades must address the necessity of block timetabling of up to 60 minutes to thoroughly complete the lessons in this unit. Although some lessons may be covered in a shorter period of time, many of the activities and follow-ups would benefit from a longer block of time. Teachers should also be prepared to timetable at least a month to complete the unit. 4. Assessment Overview In this unit, a variety of assessment strategies and recording devices has been included (see BLM 1.UW.1). The assessments provide the teacher with information on the development of students' skills in all areas of the achievement scale as outlined on page 13 in the Ontario Curriculum, Science and Technology document. Although sample assessment checklists and rubrics have been included as Black Line Masters, teachers should consider developing similar tools in conjunction with their students. Collaborative creation of assessment tools will help students to recognize the important criteria for assessing their own work. A sample assessment tool for students to use in assessing their group skills has been included on BLM 1.UW.8. Teachers may wish to work with students to identify different criteria or to use different rating scales. Assessment Accommodation Strategies - consult the Individual Education Plan and adapt the assessment format (e.g., oral, practical demonstration, interview, construction, tape-recorded test) to suit the needs of the student; - allow the student to write the main points and expand verbally; allow additional time, when required for completion; - read or clarify questions for the student and encourage the student to rephrase questions, in his/her own words; - provide highlighting of key words or instructions for emphasis; - use several assessments to establish ability 5. Science and Technology Journals Strategies, Accomodations and Adaptions Science and technology journals give students the opportunity to construct their own understanding; to put into their own words what they are learning. They can link the observations that they make with the knowledge that they bring with them. Verbalizing ideas, both orally and in writing, is an important step in internalizing new information. Explaining and describing experiences helps learners to make connections between concepts and ideas. It also allows the teacher to track and assess the students' understanding and it provides an opportunity to correct any misunderstandings that the student may have. In this unit, several blackline Masters are provided to simplify the use of journal writing. BLM 1.UW.1a is a cover page for the booklet. The criteria for writing a journal entry (BLM 1.UW.2) can be glued onto the inside cover of the journal for easy reference by students. Alternately, this could be used as a guide for the teacher to use when developing criteria with students. A journal page (BLM 1.UW.3) has been provided if notebooks are not available. It is recommended that blackline masters which are completed during the unit be included as entries in the science journal. In order for students to be successful communicators in science and technology, the following methodology has been introduced in this unit. a) Class Journal - During initial lessons, the teacher engages the whole class in the writing process. In order to provide opportunities for children to use rich oral language to describe, explain and respond to their shared experiences in science, the teacher acts as a scribe to record students' ideas. The class journal entries are prominently displayed as examples of "good" science writing. Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:07:41 PM Page A-2


b) Explaining Criteria - The teacher explains the criteria for writing a journal entry by demonstrating each statement using examples from class journal entries, for example - find all of the science and technology words used and circle these. Then, students can use the criteria to assess a piece of scientific writing. The teacher displays the writing on an overhead or chart paper and, as a class, the students discuss the piece of writing. The same procedure can be done in small groups where students find "3 Stars" (good things) and "a Wish" (things to improve next time) in a piece of writing. c) Independent Writing - When students have had many experiences in shared writing, then they can record their ideas independently. The teacher can assess the first entry and provide feedback to individual students in order to improve science writing skills. The information from this assessment could also be used for the development of class demonstrations in a specific area. 6. Inquiry and Design Models The performance tasks in this unit use the I.N.S.I.T.E. Model of inquiry. Teachers should ensure that students are familiar with these models as a framework for approaching design or inquiry challenges. 7. Safety Safety is an important aspect of any science and technology program. For more information on safety considerations, please see pages 8 and 9 of the Ontario Curriculum, Science and Technology document. 8. Use of Blackline Masters Included in this unit is a large number of black-line masters. Due to the sophisticated scientific material covered in the unit and in order to meet the needs of teachers with various backgrounds, it was decided to include a broad range of black-line masters. Instead of photocopying all black-line masters the following strategies could be used: Have students recreate the BLM as a science journal activity or in a group assignment. Recreate BLM on a bulletin board (e.g., vocabulary/definition and fact bulletin board). Recreate BLM as a wallchart or on chart paper. Copy BLM on acetate and use it on an overhead projector. 9. Classroom Accommodations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. Many of the activities include pictures and/or examples of a step-by-step process. These may be used at the discretion of the teacher for some or all students. As well, teachers can easily adapt the activities to allow for open-ended, student-directed tasks. Teachers are encouraged to: - involve the student in setting goals for work completion; - encourage risk taking; - provide varied opportunities for peer and/or group interactions (e.g., cooperative learning, sharing); - teach visual strategies for journal writing and/or note making (e.g., use of diagram/picture to represent content); - provide advance organizers to structure content (e.g., outlines, subtitles, paragraph frames); - encourage the use of lists, advance organizers, personal planner for personal organization; - allow opportunities for alternatives to writing (e.g., graphic representations, drama, media presentations, timelines, collages).

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List of Subtasks Energy in Our Lives

Subtask List Page 1

Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1 1

What Do We Know About Energy? Students will demonstrate their prior knowledge by creating a collage on the topic "Energy in Our Lives."

2

Energy from the Sun Students will investigate the concept that the sun is a source of light and heat energy.

3

Food for Thought Through classification, demonstration and discussion, students will identify food as the source of energy which allows their body to grow and repair itself as well as providing the energy required for an active lifestyle. Students will create a poster with an effective message to promote healthy food as a source of energy.

4

Forms of Energy Students will identify different forms of energy found in the classroom and in a variety of everyday devices.

5

The Ins and Outs of Energy With supervision, students will operate various appliances noting the energy input and energy output as well as the control mechanism.

6

Energy and Our Senses Students will explain how their senses of touch, hearing, and sight help them to control devices that use energy in the home, school and community.

7

Construct a Device Students will construct a manually controlled device that performs a specific task.

8

Energy Conservation Students will identify common devices that consume energy. They will predict how their lives would be changed without these energy consuming devices and will describe ways that energy can be saved.

9

Culminating Task Students will conduct an investigation of energy use at school. Students will collect data to identify an area where energy can be saved. After analyzing their data, students will design and display a poster to address one of these areas. They will collect additional data to determine if they have influenced a change in energy consumption. The data will be graphed and the results shared with the Efficient Energy Agency. Recommendations for further improvements in energy conservation will be discussed at this time.

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What Do We Know About Energy? Subtask 1

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

Description Students will demonstrate their prior knowledge by creating a collage on the topic "Energy in Our Lives."

Expectations 1s46 1s47 1s48

• demonstrate an understanding of ways in which energy is used in daily life; • investigate some common devices and systems that use energy and ways in which these can be controlled manually; • describe different uses of energy at home, at school, and in the community, and suggest ways in which energy can be conserved.

Groupings Students Working Individually Students Working As A Whole Class

Teaching / Learning Strategies Brainstorming Discussion Direct Teaching

Assessment Assessment Strategies Select Response Questions And Answers (oral)

Assessment Recording Devices Anecdotal Record Rubric

Teaching / Learning 1. Introduce this unit by explaining to the students that the class will be learning about energy in their lives. 2. To discover some of the children's impressions of the concept of energy, have the children do various tasks such as hopping on one foot or jogging on the spot for a short time and a long time. Ask the students: "What do you use when you do these kinds of activities?" If the answer (energy) is not given, then explain that when we exercise, play or do sports, we are using energy. 3. Continue the discussion by inquiring if the children have ever heard people say things like: "I have no energy today." or "Where do you get all that energy?" Discuss what these sayings might mean. Ask the question: "What is energy?" Begin a word web with "ENERGY" in the centre and the children's suggestions surrounding it. 4. Explain to the students that the word "energy" is the ability to do work or make things move or change. Write this definition on the word web for future reference. 5. To assess the students' prior knowledge of the concepts in this unit, have the students create a picture collage using cut outs from magazine or drawings with labels for the answers to these two questions: "Where does energy come from?" and "What things use energy?" When the students have completed their answers, this sheet should be dated and filed for use at the end of the unit. 6. In a large group, have students share some of their responses to the above questions. On chart paper, create a word web for each question. This web can be displayed throughout the unit and additional information can be recorded after each lesson. 7. In order to create student interest in the unit, provide the context and a brief description of the summative Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:00 PM Page C-1


What Do We Know About Energy? Subtask 1

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

task. 8. Distribute the letter to parents/guardians (BLM 1.1.1) so that parents are aware that their assistance may be needed in the collection of data at home. 9. To provide an opportunity to track students' understanding of basic concepts, use the anecdotal record sheet on BLM 1.UW.2a. Possible student responses are represented on BLM 1.UW.2b.

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

Resources BLM 1.1.1

BLM 1.1.1.cwk

Magazines

Notes to Teacher The collage task could be repeated again at the end of the unit and then compared with the initial assessment in order to demonstrate student progress in understanding basic concepts (see BLM 1.UW.1 Assessment Overview). Explanation of Terms: "Energy" is the name given to the ability to do work. No matter who or what does the work - people, animals, machines - energy is required. Although energy is available from a variety of sources, nearly all these sources can be traced back to the sun - either directly or through several links in the energy chain.

Teacher Reflections

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Energy from the Sun Subtask 2

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

120 mins

Description Students will investigate the concept that the sun is a source of light and heat energy.

Expectations 1s49

– recognize that the sun is the principal source of energy used on the surface of the earth;

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working Individually Students Working In Small Groups Students Working In Pairs

Teaching / Learning Strategies Brainstorming Discussion Learning Log/ Journal Inquiry

Assessment Assessment Strategies Select Response Response Journal

Assessment Recording Devices Anecdotal Record Rubric

Teaching / Learning Part A: Solar Energy 1. Present a solar calculator to the class. Have a student examine the calculator to see if it has batteries. Demonstrate the use of the calculator in a dark place and then in a light area. Ask the students to suggest why the calculator works in a light place but not in a dark place. "Where does the calculator get the energy to work?" Explain that the calculator uses the sun's energy to work. Ask the students if they know of any other devices that work this way. Present photos of a solar house and car which use the sun's energy. 2. Ask the question: "How does the sun help us?" Brainstorm suggestions and write the responses on the blackboard. (The sun gives us light and heat.) Create a chart with the headings: Light and Heat. 3. Students work in pairs or small groups to answer the question: "How do the sun's light and heat energy help us?" Groups share their responses under the appropriate heading. Examples of responses: Light gives day, makes plants grow, we eat plants. Heat - keeps us warm, keeps animals warm, to warm pools. 4. Using the pattern on BLM 1.2.1, have students work individually to complete words and drawings to demonstrate their knowledge of the sun's energy. Part B: Heat from the Sun 1. To complete this task, a sunny window is required. Students will use the I.N.S.I.T.E. Model (see BLM 1.UW.6 and BLM 1.UW.7) to explore how the sun gives heat energy. Demonstrate how to measure heat by Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:00 PM Page C-3


Energy from the Sun Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Subtask 2

120 mins

putting a thermometer into ice water and hot water to watch the liquid rise and fall. Have students explain the relationship of the liquid in the thermometer to the differences in water temperatures. 2. Pour room temperature water into three jars. Record the temperature of the water. Place one jar in a place which receives direct sunlight and the other two jars in places away from the sunlight. 3. As a class, create graphs to record student predictions about what they think will happen to the temperature of the water in each of the three jars (labels for graph - temperature up, temperature same, temperature down). 4. After thirty minutes, examine the thermometers in the three jars. Compare the jar in direct sunlight to the ones away from the sunlight. Ask: "How does the water feel in each jar?" Have students test the temperature of the water in each jar. Read the thermometers and determine the temperature for each jar. Ask the questions: "In which jar has the temperature risen? What made this happen?" (The sun heated the liquid.). Refer to the graphs created in #3 to determine if predictions were correct and discuss with class. 5. Refer to the chart created in Part A. Add any new information learned from this experiment to the chart. Part C: Planting Seeds 1. Pose the question: "How do plants use light energy?" Explain to students that they are going to set up an experiment to answer this question. 2. Provide each student with two bean seeds, soil and two clear plastic cups (names should be printed on masking tape and then attached to cup). Demonstrate how to fill the cups with soil until they are two-thirds full. Then poke a small hole in the middle of the soil using the index finger, put the seeds into the hole and cover with soil. Water the seeds well. One plant is placed in a sunny window and the other plant is placed under a box. 3. As a class, create a graph to record student predictions of what will happen to each set of seeds. 4. Over the next two weeks, check the seeds daily and record observations on BLM 1.2.2. Continue to water the seeds when the soil is dry. (The seeds which are kept in the dark will grow and the plant will turn yellow and die. The seeds which are kept in sunlight will grow and the plant will turn green and continue growing.) 5. At the end of the two weeks, ask students what they learned by doing this experiment. Create a class journal entry for this question (see Notes to Teacher in Unit Overview). Explain that this experiment demonstrates that plants need light to live. Green plants take energy from the sun. Ask students to explain how they could use what they have learned about plants and the sun's energy to help them at home. 6. In order to assess students' communication skills represented on BLM 1.2.2, use the anecdotal record sheet (BLM 1.UW.2a). Possible teacher comments are shown on BLM 1.UW.2b.

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

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Energy from the Sun Subtask 2

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

120 mins

Resources BLM 1.2.1

BLM 1.2.1.cwk

BLM 1.2.2

BLM 1.2.2.cwk

The Super Science Book of Energy p. 10

Jerry Wellington

chart paper bean seeds clear plastic cups water solar calculator 3 jars of water at room temperature 3 thermometers photographs of solar house and solar car

Notes to Teacher 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The sun produces light and heat by giving off radiation. It is the heat energy produced by the sun that causes changes in the water temperature. Heat does not travel through space. Radiation produces heat and light. Without the sun, plant leaves turn yellow and do not produce food. The earth absorbs energy from the sun. Summer is warmer than winter.

Teacher Reflections

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Food for Thought Subtask 3

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

Description Through classification, demonstration and discussion, students will identify food as the source of energy which allows their body to grow and repair itself as well as providing the energy required for an active lifestyle. Students will create a poster with an effective message to promote healthy food as a source of energy.

Expectations 1s50

– identify food as a source of energy for themselves and other living things;

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working Individually Students Working In Small Groups

Teaching / Learning Strategies Classifying Discussion Graphing

Assessment Assessment Strategies Performance Task Self Assessment

Assessment Recording Devices Checklist

Teaching / Learning 1. Display a collection of pictures. Some pictures should show people engaged in very active tasks while other pictures should show people relaxing. Sort the pictures into two groups and label the groups. The classification being sought is active/sedate. Continue sorting and guiding the discussion until this is achieved. Discuss: "What group is using the most energy?" (active group). "What kind of energy are these people using?" (body energy). Ask students: "Where do you get this energy?" 2. Take an energy break. Children measure their pre-exercise heartbeat by counting the number of beats in 10 seconds. Record this measurement. Then have students take a short run or skip for a few minutes. Right after exercising, students again calculate their heart rate and compare it to their pre-exercise heart rate. Discuss the findings. Ask the question: "Are the two heart rates the same?" (No. The heart rates should be higher after exercise.) "Where do you get the energy you need to exercise?" "What do you put into your body to give you the energy to do these activities?" Explain that your body burns food to get the energy you need to live and to maintain an active lifestyle. Nutrients from food fuel your body's systems. The input is food and the output is activity. 3. View and discuss a video such as "What's Your Fuel?" (13 min. in length) 4. As a group, chart foods that the students had for breakfast. Using a resource such as The Super Science Book of Energy as well as Canada's Food Guide, explore whether different foods generate high, medium, or low energy. (Refer to BLM 1.3.1.) Explain that some foods such as sugar contain a lot of energy. If we take in more energy than we need, our body will store excess energy as fat. 5. Explain that all living things (plants, animals, people) require food as a source of energy for growth and repair as well as to be active. Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:00 PM Page C-6


Food for Thought Subtask 3

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

6. In preparation for the culminating task have students create a poster to promote healthy food as a source of energy. To assist students, prepare and post a chart listing the criteria contained in "Checklist for Creating a Poster" (BLM 1.3.3). Discuss the criteria for creating posters. 7. Have students use the above criteria to self-assess or to work with a partner to peer assess their posters. Teachers can use the checklist on BLM 1.3.2 to assess the posters and then provide feedback to students in order for them to improve their poster making skills for the summative task.

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

Resources BLM 1.3.1

BLM 1.3.1.cwk

BLM 1.3.2

BLM 1.3.2.cwk

BLM 1.3.3

BLM 1.3.3.cwk

The Super Science Book of Energy Pgs. 6 Jerry Wellington -9 Canada's Food Guide What's Your Fuel? chart paper 8 1/2 x 14" paper for poster crayons pictures of active and sedate activities

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Food for Thought Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Subtask 3

60 mins

Notes to Teacher All living things require energy to live. Energy comes from a variety of sources. Using energy from the sun, plants can make their own food. Animals need the nutrients in food to get the energy their bodies need to grow, repair themselves and be active. Some foods are better sources of energy than others. The video "What's Your Fuel?" investigates the body fuel, food and the digestive processes that convert it to energy. Optional: Prior to this lesson, bean sprouts could be planted. Sprouts could then be eaten as part of this lesson.

Teacher Reflections

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Forms of Energy Subtask 4

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

180 mins

Description Students will identify different forms of energy found in the classroom and in a variety of everyday devices.

Expectations 1s48 1s51 1s57 1s58

1s60 1s61

• describe different uses of energy at home, at school, and in the community, and suggest ways in which energy can be conserved. – identify everyday uses of energy (e.g., gas to heat our homes, electricity to cook our food); – use appropriate vocabulary in describing their investigations, explorations, and observations (e.g., use words such as electricity, lights, energy); – record relevant observations, findings, and measurements using written language, drawings, concrete materials, and charts (e.g., create an energy poster illustrating the various forms of energy used in daily life and how they are controlled); – describe the different forms of energy used in a variety of everyday devices (e.g., coiled springs in wind-up toys, wood in fireplaces); – identify everyday devices that are controlled manually (e.g., a cassette recorder, lights);

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working In Small Groups Students Working Individually

Teaching / Learning Strategies Direct Teaching Field Trip Homework Working With Manipulatives

Assessment Assessment Strategies Exhibition/demonstration Observation

Assessment Recording Devices Rubric Anecdotal Record

Teaching / Learning Part A - Energy Walk 1. Begin this lesson by reviewing the various forms of energy which have been discussed in previous lessons i.e., the sun provides light and heat energy, plants and animals provide energy for people. Review the definition of energy, i.e., the ability to do work or make things move or change. 2. Plug in an electric kettle or popcorn popper. Tell the students that they will be observing what happens to when we use the device for what it is intended for (to "pop" popcorn or to boil water). Students will be reminded to stay a safe distance from the device. Have the students describe the popcorn before and after. Ask the question: "What is making the water or popcorn seeds change?" (heat energy). " What is the source of energy?" (electricity). "Where is it coming from?" (electrical outlet/socket). Explain that every time we use energy we need to get energy from somewhere or from something. In other words, we need a "source of energy." 3. Have students take a walk around the classroom to find things that are using energy. Students should try to discover where these devices get their energy. Possible observations might be: a) lights, computer, fan, tape player, CD player, clock - use electricity b) solar calculator - sun c) calculator, clock - batteries d) people moving - food e) the furnace heating the school - natural gas or oil 4. Create a chart entitled "Forms of Energy" and list the students' observations from the walk.

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Forms of Energy Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Subtask 4

180 mins

5. In order to discover other forms of energy, have the students view a video (see Resources). On the chart, list any new ideas from the video. Discuss the term "appliances" and how appliances change one form of energy into another form of energy (e.g., refrigerator, stove, batteries). Part B - Energy Stations 1. Set up several "Energy Stations" which contain a variety of safe devices or appliances (see Resources list and BLM 1.4.1a and BLM 1.4.1b for examples). Discuss with all students the safe use of each device. Divide the students into small groups and outline the task. The students are to operate the device at each station and make observations in order to discover what the device does and what type of energy makes it work. Explain how to complete BLM 1.4.1a and BLM 1.4.1b using the energy words at the top of the page. Prior to beginning at the stations, students should make a prediction by putting a "star" or "check mark" beside the type of energy that they think will be used the most. Remind students about safety issues with devices such as the hairdryer (only on cool switch) and remind them to turn off the device when the signal is given to rotate to a new station. Keep water and wet hands away from electrical cords, plugs and sockets. Hairdryers must not be used where water can enter the appliance. 2. In a large group, discuss each station and have students provide ideas for what each device does and the type of energy that makes it work, e.g., a flashlight - produces light - batteries. 3. Introduce the use of a tally chart to collect data about the type of energy that was used the most. Demonstrate how to count the tallies in order to check the children's predictions. 4. Explain the homework assignment. The students are to be "Energy Detectives". They are to find as many devices as possible for each form of energy and record these on BLM 1.4.2. Part C - Energy in the School or the Community 1. Begin this lesson by viewing the last half of the video entitled "Changes in Energy". This section explains how cities and towns get their energy through electrical power plants. Discuss this question: "How does electrical energy get to your home?" 2. The next part of the lesson is a mini-assessment task. In order to evaluate students' understanding of the different forms of energy, take the class on another energy walk. Before leaving the classroom, explain that students will be "Energy Detectives" in the school or in the neighbourhood. They are to look for and draw pictures of devices or appliances that use energy and then show the form of energy each uses. Students should be encouraged to find as many different examples as possible. 3. Using BLM 1.4.3, students independently record the forms of energy being used within the school or in the community, e.g., fax machine, photocopier, air conditioner, answering machine, alarm system, vacuum use electricity; furnace uses natural gas or oil or electricity; snowblower uses gasoline; snow shovel, broom, mop uses muscle energy. 4. After completing the task, short student-teacher conferences should be held so that students can explain their drawings. The teacher will assess the drawings and explanations.

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

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Forms of Energy Subtask 4

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

180 mins

Resources BLM 1.4.1a

BLM 1.4.1a.pdf

BLM 1.4.1b

BLM 1.4.1b.cwk

BLM 1.4.2

BLM 1.4.2.cwk

BLM 1.4.3

BLM 1.4.3.cwk

Changes in Energy

Magic Lantern Communications Ltd.

flashlight camera picture of a lawn mower pencil sharpener overhead projector marble toaster hairdryer blender Jack-in-the-Box (or any wind-up toy) calculator (solar or battery powered) computer V.C.R. television

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Forms of Energy Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Subtask 4

180 mins

Notes to Teacher The following are forms of energy: - sun - light and heat energy - food we eat and air we breathe - provide chemical energy - air - heat energy - firewood - light energy - natural gas, coal, oil, electricity - heat energy or chemical energy

Teacher Reflections

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The Ins and Outs of Energy Subtask 5

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

Description With supervision, students will operate various appliances noting the energy input and energy output as well as the control mechanism.

Expectations 1s54

– operate a simple device or system and identify the input and output (e.g., a hair dryer: the input is electricity, the output is heat);

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working Individually

Teaching / Learning Strategies Brainstorming Discussion Demonstration Homework

Assessment Assessment Strategies Exhibition/demonstration

Assessment Recording Devices Anecdotal Record

Teaching / Learning 1. Read aloud the book Farmer Joe's Hot Day. Discuss the problem in the story. (Farmer Joe is too hot.) Prompt the students: "Although Farmer Joe's wife made some unique suggestions, how else could Farmer Joe have solved his problem?" Brainstorm a list of cooling devices (fan, refrigerator, air conditioner, hair blower). Then ask students: "If the title of the story was Farmer Joe's Cold Day, how could Farmer Joe solve his problem?" Brainstorm a list of devices that produce heat (oven, toaster, hair blower, dryer, iron, glue gun, fireplace, lights, kettle, projector). Have as many of the devices as possible on hand for demonstration. (An appliance centre may have been set up as part of Subtask 4.) 2. Demonstrate how each device works. With supervision, students operate various appliances, noting the control mechanism of each. Construct a chart with the following headings: APPLIANCE, ENERGY INPUT, ENERGY OUTPUT, CONTROL (see BLM 1.5.1). Add suggestions under each heading such as: APPLIANCE lamp, ENERGY INPUT - electricity, ENERGY OUTPUT - light, CONTROL - switch. Add to the list any other devices or systems that the students can suggest. 3. Students peruse magazines and advertisements for pictures of appliances. These are glued onto art paper accompanied by Input/Output captions. This could also be an entry into science and technology journals. 4. Choosing a room(s) in their school or home, students make a list of all the appliances they find along with the energy input/energy output and the control mechanism. This information could be recorded on a chart similar to the one created during the class discussion. (Refer to BLM 1.5.1) 5. In order to assess students' understanding of basic concepts and relating to the world, use the anecdotal record sheet on BLM 1.UW.2a. Sample comments are provided on BLM 1.UW.2b.

Adaptations Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:00 PM Page C-13


The Ins and Outs of Energy Subtask 5

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

Resources BLM 1.5.1

BLM 1.5.1.cwk

Farmer Joe's Hot Day

N. Richards and W. Zimmerman

large pieces of art paper chart paper magazines and advertisements fan hair blower toaster glue gun lamp kettle

Notes to Teacher Teacher Reflections

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Energy and Our Senses Subtask 6

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

120 mins

Description Students will explain how their senses of touch, hearing, and sight help them to control devices that use energy in the home, school and community.

Expectations 1s52

1s56 1s58

– describe how our senses of touch, hearing, and sight help us to control energy-using devices in the home, school, and community (e.g., our sensitivity to heat and cold (sense of touch) tells us to turn a tap to adjust the water temperature; our sense of hearing tells us to turn off the alarm clock; our sense of sight tells us when to apply the brakes on our bicycle). – plan investigations to answer some of these questions or solve some of these problems; – record relevant observations, findings, and measurements using written language, drawings, concrete materials, and charts (e.g., create an energy poster illustrating the various forms of energy used in daily life and how they are controlled);

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working Individually Students Working In Pairs

Teaching / Learning Strategies Discussion Learning Log/ Journal Inquiry Graphing Oral Explanation

Assessment Assessment Strategies Performance Task Classroom Presentation

Assessment Recording Devices Checklist Rubric

Teaching / Learning Part A: Using Our Senses to Control Devices That Use Energy 1. In a large group, read the story You Can't Smell A Flower With Your Ear. Discuss the five senses described in the book and record ideas for each of the senses on chart paper. 2. Using a set of picture cards of everyday devices, ask students to place each card under the sense that would be used with each device (e.g., pencil sharpener - touch, lights - sight, radio - hearing, TV - sight and hearing). 3. Teacher sets up role play situations where students use their senses, e.g., touch and water temperature, hearing and an alarm clock, sight and bicycle brakes. 4. Explain that senses help us collect information about our environment (i.e., we see that the room is dark; we turn on the lights). "What makes the lights work?" (electrical energy). "How do the lights get the electrical energy?" (We turn on the light switch to provide electricity (i.e., we control the supply of energy to the lights). 5. Have students complete BLM1.6.1 by drawing a picture to illustrate one way we use sight, hearing, and touch to control devices that use energy. (Draw one picture to illustrate each sense. Examples: sight - lights on and off; hearing - at the listening centre or a door closing; touch - water temperature at the sink, using the pencil sharpener) Part B: Energy Detectives Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:00 PM Page C-15


Energy and Our Senses Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Subtask 6

120 mins

1. At the beginning of the day, discuss with the class that each student will be an "Energy Detective" that day. They will be watching throughout the day to see who is controlling energy devices in their classroom or the gymnasium or the library or the computer lab. 2. Distribute a tally sheet (BLM 1.6.2) to each student. Demonstrate how to complete the tally sheet (i.e., they draw a picture of the device or print the word for the device under the sense that was used to control it). Students carry their personal tally sheets with them to collect and record information. 3. At the end of the day, transfer the students' findings onto a large chart similar to the student sheet. Model how to read the data and create a tally for each device at the bottom of the page. Students complete the tally section for their data (BLM1.6.2). 4. Have students analyze the data using questions such as "Which sense do we use the most to control energy-using devices at school? Do you think the results would be the same at home?" Part C: Creating a Graph 1. Using the data collected on the tally chart from the previous day, model how to create a graph to show which sense was used to control the energy-using devices the most, the second most, and the least. The important aspects of creating a graph are reviewed with the students and printed on chart paper for future reference. 2. Then the students create their own graph of this information using BLM1.6.3. 3. This graph is assessed using the checklist on BLM1.6.4. Using the information from this assessment, suggest improvements or allow more practice using graphs prior to the completion of the culminating task. Part D: Oral Presentations 1. With the class, discuss the important aspects of making an oral presentation in front of a large group (see BLM 1.6.5). These criteria should be printed on chart paper and displayed during the rest of the unit. 2. Have students prepare oral presentations to explain the information contained in their graphs. Have students practise presenting the information with a peer or in a small group, then have them present their findings in front of the class. Have classmates provide feedback to each student about his/her oral presentation. Use the "Three Stars and a Wish" technique where three positive comments are given (stars) and one suggestion for improvement (wish) is provided. Part E: Learning Journal 1. In a large group, ask the question: "Would there be different results on a different day?" Have students explain their reasoning. 2. Create a class journal entry for the above question (see Notes to Teachers section in the Unit Overview).

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

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Energy and Our Senses Subtask 6

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

120 mins

Resources BLM 1.6.1

BLM 1.6.1.cwk

BLM 1.6.2

BLM 1.6.2.cwk

BLM 1.6.3

BLM 1.6.3.cwk

BLM 1.6.4

BLM 1.6.4.cwk

BLM 1.6.5

BLM 1.6.5.cwk

You Can't Smell a Flower With Your Ear

Joanna Cole

Set of Pictures of Everyday Devices chart paper

Notes to Teacher Teacher Reflections

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Construct a Device Subtask 7

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

Description Students will construct a manually controlled device that performs a specific task.

Expectations 1s53 1s57

– construct a manually controlled device that performs a specific task (e.g., a folding fan); – use appropriate vocabulary in describing their investigations, explorations, and observations (e.g., use words such as electricity, lights, energy);

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working In Pairs Students Working Individually

Teaching / Learning Strategies Discussion Learning Log/ Journal Fair Test Demonstration

Assessment Assessment Strategies Exhibition/demonstration Observation

Assessment Recording Devices Rating Scale

Teaching / Learning 1. In a large group, explain to the students that they will be creating a "Spool Racer". 2. In order to provide an opportunity for technical reading, have the students follow the steps on BLM 1.7.1 (pages 1, 2, 3, and 4) to build their Spool Racer. Depending on the reading levels of the students, use the shared reading with students to facilitate the reading of directions on the blackline master. a) Gather enough materials for each student to build a racer. Each student will need a spool, a small paper clip, a rubber band, a small piece of masking tape, a washer and a wooden skewer. The length of the paper clip should not exceed the diameter of the spool. The diameter of the washer should not exceed the diameter of the spool. Washers that measure 2 cm in diameter are recommended. Break the pointed end off of the wooden skewers prior to the lesson. Cut small strips of masking tape ahead of time. b) Have the students attach the paper clip to the rubber band and push the rubber band through the spool. Instruct them to use the skewer to help them push the rubber band through the hole in the spool. c) Have the students pull the rubber band all the way through the spool until the paper clip catches on the end of the spool. Have them lay the paper clip flat against the end of the spool and tape it in place so that it won't rotate. d) Have the students slide a rubber band through the washer. The washer should be flush with the end of the spool. e) Have the students slide the wooden skewer through the loop in the rubber band. The skewer should be between the washer and the end of the rubber band.

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Construct a Device Subtask 7

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

f) Have the students hold onto the spool and wind the skewer around and around until the rubber band is wound up. The tighter the rubber band is wound, the better the Spool Racer will work. The students may find that as the rubber band winds it gathers on the outside of the washer. To remedy this, simply lift the washer over the twisted rubber band so that the "clumps" are inside the spool. 3. As a group, discuss what will happen when the racer is placed on the floor. Record students' ideas on chart paper or the board. 4. Students draw and label an illustration of their Spool Racer on BLM 1.7.2. They explain how it works and from where it gets its energy. Using the top part of the rating scale on BLM 1.7.4, assess the students' ability to construct the Spool Racer. The communication and understanding of basic concepts can be assessed using the rubric on BLM 1.UW.5. 5. In a large group, discuss the aspects of a "fair test" (see "Notes to Teacher"). Explain that when testing the racers, everything must remain the same except the one thing (variable) that is being tested. This means that the starting spot is the same each time and the surface the racer travels on is the same. The thing that will change each time will be the number of times that the skewer is turned (0 turns, 5 turns, 10 turns, 15 turns, 20 turns). To see how this change affects the racer, measure the distance it travels with string. Using a tape measure, demonstrate to students how to start at zero and find out how long the string is in cm. The students will then record the number of centimeters on the blackline master. 6. With a partner, have students test their racers and cut string to record the lengths. Using the rating scale on BLM 1.7.4, assess the student's ability to conduct a fair test, to measure the distance the racer travelled and to record results in cm using on BLM 1.7.3. 7. In a large group, have the students present the results of their experiments with the racers. Discuss the question: "What provides the energy for the racer? Is it really the rubber band? How do you know? Where else have you seen devices that get their energy from being 'wound up'?" 8. In order to provide a further experience with graphing, students create a "string graph" using the string lengths to show the results of their experiment with the racers. Measure the string using non-standard units. Label the string graph.

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

Resources BLM 1.7.1

BLM 1.7.1.pdf

BLM 1.7.2

BLM 1.7.2.cwk

BLM 1.7.3

BLM 1.7.3.cwk

BLM 1.7.4

BLM 1.7.4.cwk

empty wooden thread spools

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Construct a Device Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Subtask 7

60 mins

paper clips metal washers wooden skewers rubber bands tape measure string

Notes to Teacher A "fair test" is an investigation which is carried out under strictly controlled conditions to ensure accuracy and reliability of results. In a fair test, all variables are controlled except the one under investigation. * Wooden skewers can be purchased at most grocery stores.

Teacher Reflections

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Energy Conservation Subtask 8

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

60 mins

Description Students will identify common devices that consume energy. They will predict how their lives would be changed without these energy consuming devices and will describe ways that energy can be saved.

Expectations 1s62

1s63

– identify devices they use that consume energy (e.g., lights, computers) and list things they can do to reduce energy consumption (e.g., turn lights out when leaving a room); – select one of the most common forms of energy used every day and predict the effect on their lives if it were no longer available.

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working Individually Students Working In Small Groups

Teaching / Learning Strategies Brainstorming Discussion Oral Explanation Learning Log/ Journal

Assessment Assessment Strategies Learning Log

Assessment Recording Devices Rubric

Teaching / Learning 1. Create a "blackout" so that the class can experience a day without electricity. At the beginning of the day, do not turn on classroom lights. Keep the P.A. system , computer, radio, VCR, tape player and all other appliances (devices) shut off. 2. In their science and technology journals, have students predict how their day at school will be different. Have students draw and label a list of classroom/ school devices that require electricity to work. Then students explain what would happen if the source of electricity for each device is unavailable. Have students draw pictures of how they think the class will cope with this "blackout". In a small group, share the drawings and discuss the students' predictions and feelings about this loss of energy. Students' journal entries can be assessed using the rubric on BLM 1.UW.5. 3. Review devices that use energy and, in particular, the devices that use electricity (see Subtask 5). Ask students to suggest ways that people completed certain tasks before electricity was invented (i.e., washing clothes by hand instead of in a washing machine). Using BLM 1.8.1, have students draw a device which uses electrical energy and a device that could be used if electrical energy was not available (i.e., clothes dryer versus hanging the clothes on an outdoor clothesline). 4. Students present their drawings to the class. 5. Introduce the word "conservation" and explain that it means saving through wise use or not wasting energy. On BLM 1.8.2, have students choose four devices and suggest ways to reduce their energy use. 6. Create a class chart of Energy Conservation Methods. The following are suggested "energy gobblers" and "energy conservers": Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:00 PM Page C-21


Energy Conservation Subtask 8

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1 - lights on - driving the car - playing the radio - putting up the thermostat - driving a big car - using a clothes dryer - driving a motor boat

60 mins

- lights off - walking or riding a bike - singing - keeping the thermostat at a lower temperature and wearing a sweater - driving a small car - using a clothesline - using a sailboat or a rowboat or a canoe

7. Students draw and write a journal entry outlining ways to conserve energy at home and at school (see Notes to Teacher section in the Unit Overview).

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

Resources BLM 1.8.1

BLM 1.8.1.cwk

BLM 1.8.2

BLM 1.8.2.cwk

chart paper

Notes to Teacher Teacher Reflections

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Culminating Task Subtask 9

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

240 mins

Description Students will conduct an investigation of energy use at school. Students will collect data to identify an area where energy can be saved. After analyzing their data, students will design and display a poster to address one of these areas. They will collect additional data to determine if they have influenced a change in energy consumption. The data will be graphed and the results shared with the Efficient Energy Agency. Recommendations for further improvements in energy conservation will be discussed at this time.

Expectations 1s46 1s47 1s48 1s51 1s55

1s56 1s57 1s58

1s59

1s62

• demonstrate an understanding of ways in which energy is used in daily life; • investigate some common devices and systems that use energy and ways in which these can be controlled manually; • describe different uses of energy at home, at school, and in the community, and suggest ways in which energy can be conserved. – identify everyday uses of energy (e.g., gas to heat our homes, electricity to cook our food); – ask questions about and identify needs and problems related to energy production or use in the immediate environment, and explore possible answers and solutions (e.g., discuss how people might cope with a power failure at home – by using candles for light, the barbecue for outdoor cooking, the fireplace for heat); – plan investigations to answer some of these questions or solve some of these problems; – use appropriate vocabulary in describing their investigations, explorations, and observations (e.g., use words such as electricity, lights, energy); – record relevant observations, findings, and measurements using written language, drawings, concrete materials, and charts (e.g., create an energy poster illustrating the various forms of energy used in daily life and how they are controlled); – communicate the procedures and results of investigations and explorations for specific purposes, using demonstrations, drawings, and oral and written descriptions (e.g., prepare a chart of energy conservation practices at home; prepare a chart illustrating how their senses help them use and control everyday devices). – identify devices they use that consume energy (e.g., lights, computers) and list things they can do to reduce energy consumption (e.g., turn lights out when leaving a room);

Groupings Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working Individually Students Working In Pairs

Teaching / Learning Strategies Discussion Inquiry Graphing Oral Explanation

Assessment Assessment Strategies Performance Task Classroom Presentation

Assessment Recording Devices Rubric

Teaching / Learning Part A: Introducing the Problem 1. Introduce the culminating task by reading the letter from the Efficient Energy Agency (see BLM 1.9.1). 2. Provide each student with the Energy Super Sleuth badge (BLM 1.9.2). Pose the question: "Where might Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:00 PM Page C-23


Culminating Task Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Subtask 9

240 mins

we begin looking for energy being wasted?" Review ideas about areas at school where energy could be conserved (see chart paper list created in Subtask 8). Other examples that could be added to the list are: at school - lights left on, taps dripping, windows open when heat is on, computer left on when no one is using it. 3. Decide with students whether they will collect data in their own classroom or other nearby classrooms as part of their daily routines. Students will carry sheets (on clipboards if possible) from the start of school to the end of their school day in regular supervised areas and during regular class rotary times (moving to and from other classrooms, during recess, etc.). Students are to tally the number of times that they see a problem occurring each day, then record this information on BLM 1.9.3. Remind students that all of the devices they are watching are ones which can be controlled manually (see Subtask 4). Ensure that students keep this introductory data to use for comparison purposes. 4. Review the important aspects of creating a graph (see chart paper list in Subtask 6). Using this data, students will complete BLM 1.9.5 page 1. The title identifies the energy problem or concern selected by the student. Part B: Affecting Change 1. Have each student select an energy problem. After reviewing the criteria for an effective poster (see Subtask 3), have each student create a poster designed to influence others to correct the problem. Have them select an appropriate place in the school to display their posters. 2. Using BLM 1.9.4, students collect more data about their area of concern to determine if they have influenced a change in energy consumption (i.e., lights off at recesses, lunch time, after school). The data is collected and tallied throughout the day for a period of three days. 3. At the end of each day, using the data they have collected, have students create a graph on BLM 1.9.5. page 2. 4. After three days, students compare this information with the data collected before displaying the poster (see information gathered on BLM 1.9.3). Provide the following questions to assist in the comparison: a) How does your data compare on page 1 and page 2 of your graph? Which is greater? What does that mean? b) Did your poster have an effect on energy consumption? How do you know? c) What else could you do to help? Part C: Presenting to the Efficient Energy Agency 1. Review the important aspects of making oral presentations (see chart paper list created in Subtask 6). Provide time for students to rehearse displaying and interpreting their graphs to a partner. 2. Explain to students that a member of the Efficient Energy Agency (teacher, parent, principal) is here to see the progress the Energy Super Sleuths have made with this conservation project. Have students present their graphs, explain their findings and relate any other ways that they could improve energy conservation. 3. With the class, determine the criteria for assessing their presentations. 4. As a final assessment of the unit, students complete another picture collage with labels for the answers to the following questions: "Where does energy come from?" and "What things use energy?" Compare this collage to the one completed in Subtask 1.

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Culminating Task Subtask 9

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

240 mins

Adaptations All accommodations must take into account the student's Individual Education Plan. All of the tasks and activities are designed to accommodate the needs of students at different levels of abilities. For detailed strategies see number 9 in the Notes to Teacher section of the Unit Overview.

Resources BLM 1.9.1

BLM 1.9.1.cwk

BLM 1.9.2

BLM 1.9.2.cwk

BLM 1.9.3

BLM 1.9.3.cwk

BLM 1.9.4

BLM 1.9.4.cwk

BLM 1.9.5

BLM 1.9.5.cwk

chart paper

Notes to Teacher Teacher Reflections

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Appendices Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control

Resource List: Black Line Masters: Rubrics: Unit Expectation List and Expectation Summary:

Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:26 PM


Resource List Page 1

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Blackline Master / File

BLM 1.6.3 BLM 1.6.3.cwk

ST 6

BLM 1.6.4 BLM 1.6.4.cwk

ST 6

BLM 1.uw.1 BLM 1.UW.1.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.6.5 BLM 1.6.5.cwk

ST 6

BLM 1.uw.1a BLM 1.UW.1a.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.7.1 BLM 1.7.1.pdf

ST 7

BLM 1.uw.2 BLM 1.UW.2.pdf

Unit

BLM 1.7.2 BLM 1.7.2.cwk

ST 7

BLM 1.uw.2a BLM 1.UW.2a.pdf

Unit

BLM 1.7.3 BLM 1.7.3.cwk

ST 7

BLM 1.uw.2b BLM 1.UW.2b.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.7.4 BLM 1.7.4.cwk

ST 7

BLM 1.uw.3 BLM 1.UW.3.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.8.1 BLM 1.8.1.cwk

ST 8

BLM 1.uw.4 BLM 1.UW.4.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.8.2 BLM 1.8.2.cwk

ST 8

BLM 1.uw.4 BLM 1.UW.5.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.9.1 BLM 1.9.1.cwk

ST 9

BLM 1.uw.6 BLM 1.UW.6.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.9.2 BLM 1.9.2.cwk

ST 9

BLM 1.uw.7 BLM 1.UW.7.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.9.3 BLM 1.9.3.cwk

ST 9

BLM 1.uw.8 BLM 1.UW.8.cwk

Unit

BLM 1.9.4 BLM 1.9.4.cwk

ST 9

BLM 1.1.1 BLM 1.1.1.cwk

ST 1

BLM 1.9.5 BLM 1.9.5.cwk

ST 9

BLM 1.2.1 BLM 1.2.1.cwk

ST 2

BLM 1.2.2 BLM 1.2.2.cwk

ST 2

BLM 1.3.1 BLM 1.3.1.cwk

ST 3

BLM 1.3.2 BLM 1.3.2.cwk

ST 3

BLM 1.3.3 BLM 1.3.3.cwk

ST 3

BLM 1.4.1a BLM 1.4.1a.pdf

ST 4

BLM 1.4.1b BLM 1.4.1b.cwk

ST 4

BLM 1.4.2 BLM 1.4.2.cwk

ST 4

BLM 1.4.3 BLM 1.4.3.cwk

ST 4

BLM 1.5.1 BLM 1.5.1.cwk

ST 5

BLM 1.6.1 BLM 1.6.1.cwk

ST 6

BLM 1.6.2 BLM 1.6.2.cwk

ST 6

Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:34 PM Page D-1


Resource List Page 2

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Print

Material

Canada's Food Guide

ST 3

8 1/2 x 14" paper for poster

ST 3

Farmer Joe's Hot Day N. Richards and W. Zimmerman ISBN 0-590-71713-8

ST 5

bean seeds

ST 2

chart paper

ST 2

The Super Science Book of Energy p. 10 Jerry Wellington ISBN 0-7502-0639-X

ST 2

chart paper

ST 3

chart paper

ST 5

chart paper

ST 6

The Super Science Book of Energy Pgs. 6 - 9 Jerry Wellington ISBN 0-7502-0639-X

ST 3

chart paper

ST 8

chart paper

ST 9

clear plastic cups

ST 2

crayons

ST 3

empty wooden thread spools per person

ST 7

large pieces of art paper

ST 5

Magazines

ST 1

magazines and advertisements

ST 5

metal washers per person

ST 7

paper clips per person

ST 7

rubber bands per person

ST 7

Set of Pictures of Everyday Devices per group

ST 6

string

ST 7

tape measure

ST 7

water

ST 2

wooden skewers per person

ST 7

You Can't Smell a Flower With Your Ear Joanna Cole ISBN 0-448-40469-9

ST 6

Media Changes in Energy Magic Lantern Communications Ltd. 10 Meteor Drive Toronto, Ontario M9W 1A4 1-800-263-1717 10 minutes in length

ST 4

What's Your Fuel? All About You Series, 1974 13 minutes in length

ST 3

Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:34 PM Page D-2


Resource List Page 3

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1

Equipment / Manipulative 3 jars of water at room temperature

ST 2

3 thermometers

ST 2

blender

ST 4

calculator (solar or battery powered)

ST 4

camera per class

ST 4

computer

ST 4

fan

ST 5

flashlight per class

ST 4

glue gun

ST 5

hair blower

ST 5

hairdryer

ST 4

Jack-in-the-Box (or any wind-up toy)

ST 4

kettle

ST 5

lamp

ST 5

marble

ST 4

overhead projector

ST 4

pencil sharpener

ST 4

photographs of solar house and solar car

ST 2

picture of a lawn mower per class

ST 4

pictures of active and sedate activities

ST 3

solar calculator

ST 2

television

ST 4

toaster

ST 4

toaster

ST 5

V.C.R.

ST 4

Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:34 PM Page D-3


Letter to Parents/Guardians

Dear Parents/Guardians, We are about to begin a new science unit called “Energy in Our Lives.� During this unit, the students will be observing and investigating the forms of energy that they come in contact with in their daily lives. They will be discussing the sun’s importance in sustaining all life. Food as a source of energy for functioning in daily activities is also a focal point. Students will be creating a simple toy that uses energy to work. For the culminating activity, students will conduct an investigation of energy use at school to identify an area where energy could be saved. Posters will be designed and displayed in an attempt to influence a change in energy consumption. Data will be collected and graphed before and after the posters have been displayed. Thank you so much for your interest in our new unit!

Sincerely,

BLM 1.1.1


Energy from the Sun Name: _______________

BLM 1.2.1


Watching My Seeds Grow

Name:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

Day 8

Day 9

Day 10

BLM 1.2.2


ENERGY FOUND IN BREAKFAST FOOD The following is a list of common breakfast foods. Children require energy from food to give them energy for activities.

Food

Energy

Food

Energy

cereal

medium

English muffin

medium

egg

low

muffin

medium

milk

medium

pancake

low

yogurt

medium

toaster pastry

high

cheese cube

medium

toast

low

fruit

medium

bacon (3 pieces)

medium

cereal/oatmeal

medium

peanut butter

high

Choose 3 foods that would provide enough energy for this activity.

ENERGY EXPENDED DOING DAILY ACTIVITIES Activity

Energy used per minute

basketball

medium

biking

medium

cross-country skiing

high

jumping

high

running

high

skipping

high

sitting

low

soccer

high

swimming

medium

walking

medium

BLM 1.3.1

Food Choices (3)


CHECKLIST FOR CREATING A POSTER Name:

Date:

Criteria

Yes No

- appropriate message about food - neat, large lettering for the title - large, colourful, appropriate picture - entire space (paper) is used Comments: _____________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________

BLM 1.3.2


CHECKLIST FOR CREATING A POSTER

appropriate message about food neat, large lettering for the title large, colourful, appropriate picture entire space (paper) is used

BLM 1.3.3


DIFFERENT SOURCES OF ENERGY Name: What energy source helps make each device work?

Me

Electricity

Batteries

Flashlight

BLM 1.4.1a

Wood

Gasoline


VCR

_______________

Jack-in-the-box

_______________

Toaster

_______________

Television

_______________

Calculator

_______________

Hairdryer

_______________

BLM 1.4.1b

Blender

_______________

Computer

_______________

Draw your own idea!

_______________


BE AN ENERGY DETECTIVE! Name:

How many devices can you name which use each form of energy?

Electricity makes it work.

I make it work.

Gasoline makes it work.

Batteries make it work.

The sun makes it work.

Natural gas makes it work.

Wood makes it work.

BLM 1.4.2


Energy Walk

Name:

Find devices that use different forms of energy. Draw a picture of each device and print what form of energy it uses. * use the back of the page if you need to draw more pictures

BLM 1.4.3


Name:

HOME APPLIANCES Search your home or school for appliances. Make a list of all the appliances you can find. Try to find at least five appliances. Complete the following chart.

Appliance

Energy Input

Energy Output

BLM 1.5.1

How Is It Controlled?


Name:____________

Controlling Energy Devices With Our Senses Sight

Hearing

BLM 1.6.1

Touch


Be an Energy Detective Sight

Name:___________

Hearing

Touch

Tally:

Tally:

Tally:

Total:

Total:

Total: BLM 1.6.2


Name:_____________________

Graph Title:_______________________________

What I noticed: _________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ BLM 1.6.3


CHECKLIST FOR SENSES GRAPHING ACTIVITY Name of Student: Date:

Criteria - graph has an appropriate title

Yes

No

- each column is labelled appropriately - graph has been numbered - data has been transferred from the recording sheet accurately - observations clearly and precisely recorded Comments: __________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

BLM 1.6.4


A GOOD ORAL PRESENTATION plan what you are going to say practise before presenting to the class use a loud, clear voice use expression in your voice look at the audience

BLM 1.6.5


Spool Racer

Page 1 BLM 1.7.1


Spool Racer

Page 2 BLM 1.7.1


Spool Racer

Page 3 BLM 1.7.1


Spool Racer

Page 4 BLM 1.7.1


My Spool Racer

Name: _______________

This is how my spool racer works:

___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ BLM 1.7.2


Name:

_____________

TESTING MY SPOOL RACER Number of Turns

Distance Travelled (cm)

0 turns 5 turns 10 turns 15 turns 20 turns

How many turns made the spool racer travel the farthest?

BLM 1.7.3


Name: RATING SCALE FOR BUILDING AND TESTING OF SPOOL RACERS 4 = excellent

3 = good 2 = okay 1 = needs improvement 4

Criteria - follows directions accurately - follows directions independently - stays on task and perseveres until completion - assumes the responsibility of completing the checklist - counts carefully while turning the skewer - starts at the same spot each time - measures accurately using string and transfers this to standard units using tape measure - records data accurately

BLM 1.7.4

3

2

1


BLACKOUT

Name:_______________

A device using electricity:

I drew a ________________________.. If there were no electricity,

I would ________________________..

BLM 1.8.1


Name:_______________

CONSERVING ENERGY Draw and label 4 devices that use energy

Show how to conserve energy

1.

2.

3.

4.

BLM 1.8.2


Efficient Energy Agency, 1 Conservation Road, Hopeful, Ontario. Dear Grade One Students, We are writing to introduce a new project proposed by our group, the Efficient Energy Agency. Our scientists and researchers have been conducting many tests in the province of Ontario. We have bad news for you! There is too much energy being used by everyone in Ontario. Because of this problem, we need your help! We require young students who know about energy and ways to conserve energy. Your job will be to find an area where energy is being wasted. Then you must try to change people’s habits so that energy will be conserved. We hope that you and your classmates will accept our offer of employment to help conserve energy in your community. We need dedicated Energy Super Sleuths. To help you with your task, we are sending Energy Super Sleuth badges for each of you and an information sheet for collecting data. We look forward to visiting your classroom to see how you have helped solve the energy consumption problem. Good luck with your mission! Sincerely, Efficient Energy Agency Encl.

BLM 1.9.1


ENERGY SUPER SLEUTH BADGE

Energy Super Sleuth

BLM 1.9.2


Name:_______________

Finding an Energy Problem - at School * Tally each time you see one of these energy gobblers at school.

Problem

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

- lights left on when no one is in the room

- window left open when heat is on

- warm water dripping from the taps

How can you help save energy? _________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ BLM 1.9.3


Name:____________________________ COLLECTING DATA ABOUT ENERGY USE I am watching for ______________________________________________________________________. Day Time Change (circle one each time you check) Day 1

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

Day 1 Day 1 Day 1 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3

YES NO Total: YES _________ NO __________

BLM 1.9.4


Name: _______________

Graphing My Data Before My Poster TITLE: _________________________

NO

YES BLM 1.9.5

Page 1


Name: _______________

Graphing My Data After My Poster TITLE: _________________________

NO

YES BLM 1.9.5

Page 2


Assessment Overview Knowledge Subtask 1: and Skills Anecdotal Record

Understanding of basic concepts

Subtask 2: Anecdotal Record

X

Subtask 5: Anecdotal Record

X

Subtask 6: Checklist

Subtask 8: Rubric

Subtask 9: Rubric

Inquiry Skills

X

X

Design Skills

X X X

X

BLM 1.UW.1

X

Subtask 7: Rating Score & Rubric

X

Relating to the World

X

Subtask 4: Rubric

X

Communica tion Skills

X

Subtask 3: Checklist

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X


MY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY JOURNAL

by: _____________

BLM 1.UW.1a


Student Criteria for Science and Technology Journal

In my Science and Technology Journal, I will try to: 1. use science and technology words 2. give examples of things using words and pictures 3. tell all I know about what I did 4. give information to the reader 5. use capitals and periods in my sentences

BLM 1.UW.2


ANECDOTAL RECORD SHEET

BLM 1.UW.2a


ANECDOTAL RECORD SHEET - POSSIBLE COMMENTS Jen Subtask 1: "Energy is being awake." - continued to provide many answers during discussions

Sue

Jack

Subtask 1: "Energy comes from food." Subtask 2: - accurate illustrations - added details - independent - attempted to measure size

Subtask 2: - required assistance - illustrations are inaccurate - incomplete Subtask 5: - pictures not revelant to task - no evidence of sorting

Lee Subtask 5: - variety of appliances - sorted correctly - variety of forms of energy

BLM 1.UW.2b

Fatima

Kuan


SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY JOURNAL PAGE

__________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________

BLM 1.UW.3


TITLE PAGE FOR THIS UNIT

Energy in Our Lives

BLM 1.UW.4


SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY JOURNAL - ASSESSMENT RUBRIC Skills Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Understanding i. understanding of relevant concepts (sun and food as sources of energy, everyday uses of energy, everyday devices and control and consumption) ii. explaining concepts

i. demonstrates limited understanding of relevant concepts ii. written and pictorial explanations are incomplete, inaccurate and lack detail

i. demonstrates some understanding of relevant concepts ii. written and pictorial explanations are partially complete and have some errors in accuracy

i. demonstrates clear understanding of relevant concepts ii. written and pictorial explanations are nearly complete, and accurate (but the level of detail is inconsistent)

i. demonstrates thorough understanding of relevant concepts ii. written and pictorial explanations are complete, accurate and detailed

Communication i. independence ii. writing of observations iii. examples given iv. vocabulary (electricity, lights, energy, conserving, controlling and consuming input and output)

i. writes ideas with assistance (needs much prompting) ii. writing is unclear iii. provides a few examples through words and/or pictures iv. rarely uses scientific vocabulary

i. writes ideas with limited assistance (needs some prompting) ii. writing is somewhat clear iii. provides some examples using words and/or pictures iv. sometimes uses scientific vocabulary

i. independently writes ideas (no prompting needed) ii. writing is generally clear iii. provides several examples using words and pictures iv. generally uses scientific vocabulary

i. independently and confidently writes ideas ii. writing is clear & precise iii. provides many, detailed examples using words and pictures iv. consistently uses scientific vocabulary

Relating to the World i. identify devices that consume energy ii. provide ideas to reduce energy iii. predicting effect if energy not available

i. shows limited understanding of the connections between energy and control at school, in the home or in the community

i. shows some understanding of the connections between energy and control at school, in the home or in the community

i. shows a clear understanding of the connections between energy and control at school, in the home or in the community

i. shows a thorough understanding of the connections between energy and control at school, in the home or in the community

BLM 1.UW.5


I.N.S.I.T.E. Model of Inquiry

I

- Identify the problem

NS I

Narrow the problem

- State the question and predict what will happen - Investigate possible procedures and gather materials

T

- Test and trial

E

- Express your findings

BLM 1.UW.6


I.N.S.I.T.E. Method Throughout this unit students will be involved in inquiry based learning and investigations. This problemsolving model helps the students work through these investigations based on the principles of scientific inquiry called the I.N.S.I.T.E. method. Identify the problem Narrow the problem State the hypothesis Investigate and gather information Test your hypothesis and record observations Examine the results and write (communicate) conclusions Identify the problem The first step is for the students to identify the problem they will investigate or need to resolve. Narrow the problem The second step is to narrow the problem. At this stage the students will state the varied questions (what, when, where, how, why, etc.) related to the problem. State the hypothesis The third step is to state the hypothesis. In this statement the students will make a scientific guess as to what they believe will be a solution to the problem. Investigate and gather information The fourth step is for the students to conduct a scientific investigation related to the hypothesis. Students will need to conduct research and gather information related to the problem and the questions they generated in the second step. Once the students have enough background they will create a plan of investigation to test their hypothesis. The students will need to consider all the possible variables and constants in order to carry out a fair test. Plans should include a list of materials they will need. Test the hypothesis and record observations The fifth step is for the students to follow their plan and carry out a fair test to confirm the validity of their hypothesis. Students will record their observations as they test their hypothesis. Students should be given opportunity to use a variety of recording devices such as: charts, graphs, learning logs, or science journals. Examine the results and write (communicate) conclusions The sixth step is for the students to examine the results of their test and then write a conclusion (communicate a response) that outlines what they learned in the investigation and testing of their hypothesis. It is important that students examine their results and whether or not their hypothesis was valid before writing their conclusion. If their hypothesis was not valid the students may need to either develop a new hypothesis or create a new plan to test their hypothesis in order to gain different results. Students should examine what worked and why, what needs further research, and what needs further investigation. If their hypothesis was valid the students should state the solution to the problem in their conclusion and outline why it was a solution.

BLM 1.UW.7


Checking My Group Skills I shared my ideas with my partner or group.

I listened when others were speaking.

I took turns and shared materials.

I helped my partner or group to finish our work. Next time I will _________________________________ ______________________________________________ BLM 1.UW.8


Expectation List Energy in Our Lives

Page 1

Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1 Selected

Assessed

Science and Technology---Energy and Control 1s46 1s47 1s48 1s49 1s50 1s51 1s52

1s53 1s54 1s55

1s56 1s57 1s58 1s59

1s60 1s61 1s62 1s63

• demonstrate an understanding of ways in which energy is used in daily life; • investigate some common devices and systems that use energy and ways in which these can be controlled manually; • describe different uses of energy at home, at school, and in the community, and suggest ways in which energy can be conserved. – recognize that the sun is the principal source of energy used on the surface of the earth; – identify food as a source of energy for themselves and other living things; – identify everyday uses of energy (e.g., gas to heat our homes, electricity to cook our food); – describe how our senses of touch, hearing, and sight help us to control energy-using devices in the home, school, and community (e.g., our sensitivity to heat and cold (sense of touch) tells us to turn a tap to adjust the water temperature; our sense of hearing tells us to turn off the alarm clock; our sense of sight tells us when to apply the brakes on our bicycle). – construct a manually controlled device that performs a specific task (e.g., a folding fan); – operate a simple device or system and identify the input and output (e.g., a hair dryer: the input is electricity, the output is heat); – ask questions about and identify needs and problems related to energy production or use in the immediate environment, and explore possible answers and solutions (e.g., discuss how people might cope with a power failure at home – by using candles for light, the barbecue for outdoor cooking, the fireplace for heat); – plan investigations to answer some of these questions or solve some of these problems; – use appropriate vocabulary in describing their investigations, explorations, and observations (e.g., use words such as electricity, lights, energy); – record relevant observations, findings, and measurements using written language, drawings, concrete materials, and charts (e.g., create an energy poster illustrating the various forms of energy used in daily life and how they are controlled); – communicate the procedures and results of investigations and explorations for specific purposes, using demonstrations, drawings, and oral and written descriptions (e.g., prepare a chart of energy conservation practices at home; prepare a chart illustrating how their senses help them use and control everyday devices). – describe the different forms of energy used in a variety of everyday devices (e.g., coiled springs in wind-up toys, wood in fireplaces); – identify everyday devices that are controlled manually (e.g., a cassette recorder, lights); – identify devices they use that consume energy (e.g., lights, computers) and list things they can do to reduce energy consumption (e.g., turn lights out when leaving a room); – select one of the most common forms of energy used every day and predict the effect on their lives if it were no longer available.

2 2 3 1 1 2 1

1 1 1

2 3 3 1

1 1 2 1

Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:39 PM Page F-1


Expectation Summary Selected

Energy in Our Lives

Assessed

Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1 English Language 1e1 1e11 1e21 1e31 1e41 1e51

1e2 1e12 1e22 1e32 1e42 1e52

1e3 1e13 1e23 1e33 1e43 1e53

1e4 1e14 1e24 1e34 1e44 1e54

1e5 1e15 1e25 1e35 1e45 1e55

1e6 1e16 1e26 1e36 1e46 1e56

1e7 1e17 1e27 1e37 1e47 1e57

1e8 1e18 1e28 1e38 1e48 1e58

1e9 1e19 1e29 1e39 1e49 1e59

1e10 1e20 1e30 1e40 1e50 1e60

1m3 1m13 1m23 1m33 1m43 1m53 1m63 1m73 1m83 1m93 1m103

1m4 1m14 1m24 1m34 1m44 1m54 1m64 1m74 1m84 1m94 1m104

1m5 1m15 1m25 1m35 1m45 1m55 1m65 1m75 1m85 1m95 1m105

1m6 1m16 1m26 1m36 1m46 1m56 1m66 1m76 1m86 1m96 1m106

1m7 1m17 1m27 1m37 1m47 1m57 1m67 1m77 1m87 1m97 1m107

1m8 1m18 1m28 1m38 1m48 1m58 1m68 1m78 1m88 1m98

1m9 1m19 1m29 1m39 1m49 1m59 1m69 1m79 1m89 1m99

1m10 1m20 1m30 1m40 1m50 1m60 1m70 1m80 1m90 1m100

1s4 1s14 1s24 1s34 1s44 1s54 1s64 1s74 1s84 1s94 1s104

1s5 1s15 1s25 1s35 1s45 1s55 1s65 1s75 1s85 1s95 1s105

1s6 1s16 1s26 1s36 1s46 1s56 1s66 1s76 1s86 1s96 1s106

1s7 1s17 1s27 1s37 1s47 1s57 1s67 1s77 1s87 1s97 1s107

1s8 1s18 1s28 1s38 1s48 1s58 1s68 1s78 1s88 1s98

1s9 1s19 1s29 1s39 1s49 1s59 1s69 1s79 1s89 1s99

1s10 1s20 1s30 1s40 1s50 1s60 1s70 1s80 1s90 1s100

Mathematics 1m1 1m11 1m21 1m31 1m41 1m51 1m61 1m71 1m81 1m91 1m101

1m2 1m12 1m22 1m32 1m42 1m52 1m62 1m72 1m82 1m92 1m102

Science and Technology 1s1 1s11 1s21 1s31 1s41 1s51 1s61 1s71 1s81 1s91 1s101

1s2 1s12 1s22 1s32 1s42 1s52 1s62 1s72 1s82 1s92 1s102

2 1

1 2

1s3 1s13 1s23 1s33 1s43 1s53 1s63 1s73 1s83 1s93 1s103

1 1

1

1

2 2

2 3

3 3

1 1

Social Studies 1z1 1z11 1z21 1z31 1z41

1z2 1z12 1z22 1z32 1z42

1z3 1z13 1z23 1z33 1z43

1z4 1z14 1z24 1z34 1z44

1z5 1z15 1z25 1z35 1z45

1z6 1z16 1z26 1z36 1z46

1z7 1z17 1z27 1z37 1z47

1z8 1z18 1z28 1z38 1z48

1z9 1z19 1z29 1z39 1z49

1z10 1z20 1z30 1z40 1z50

Health & Physical Education 1p1 1p11 1p21 1p31

1p2 1p12 1p22 1p32

1p3 1p13 1p23 1p33

1p4 1p14 1p24 1p34

1p5 1p15 1p25 1p35

1p6 1p16 1p26 1p36

1p7 1p17 1p27 1p37

1p8 1p18 1p28 1p38

1p9 1p19 1p29

1p10 1p20 1p30

1a2 1a12 1a22 1a32 1a42 1a52

1a3 1a13 1a23 1a33 1a43 1a53

1a4 1a14 1a24 1a34 1a44 1a54

1a5 1a15 1a25 1a35 1a45 1a55

1a6 1a16 1a26 1a36 1a46 1a56

1a7 1a17 1a27 1a37 1a47 1a57

1a8 1a18 1a28 1a38 1a48 1a58

1a9 1a19 1a29 1a39 1a49 1a59

1a10 1a20 1a30 1a40 1a50 1a60

The Arts 1a1 1a11 1a21 1a31 1a41 1a51 1a61

Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:43 PM Page G-1

1 1


Unit Analysis Page 1

Energy in Our Lives Energy and Control An Integrated Unit for Grade 1 Analysis Of Unit Components 9 29 92 90

Subtasks Expectations Resources Strategies & Groupings

-- Unique Expectations -18 Science And Tech Expectations

Resource Types 0 38 0 5 2 0 22 25 0 0 0 0

Rubrics Blackline Masters Licensed Software Print Resources Media Resources Websites Material Resources Equipment / Manipulatives Sample Graphics Other Resources Parent / Community Companion Bookmarks

Groupings

Assessment Recording Devices

9 4 4 9

4 2 1 6

Students Working As A Whole Class Students Working In Pairs Students Working In Small Groups Students Working Individually

Anecdotal Record Checklist Rating Scale Rubric

Teaching / Learning Strategies

Assessment Strategies

4 1 2 2 8 1 1 3 2 3 4 3 1

2 3 1 2 3 1 1 2 1

Brainstorming Classifying Demonstration Direct Teaching Discussion Fair Test Field Trip Graphing Homework Inquiry Learning Log/ Journal Oral Explanation Working With Manipulatives

Classroom Presentation Exhibition/demonstration Learning Log Observation Performance Task Questions And Answers (oral) Response Journal Select Response Self Assessment

Written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner 2.51 PLNR_01 March, 2001* Open Printed on Aug 30, 2001 at 11:08:47 PM Page H-1

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Energy in Our Lives.pdf  

SCIENCE_AND_TECHNOLOGY_Energy_in_Our_Lives.pdf

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