__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


Upcoming Events: ART SHOW: JF LYNCH: SOOT AND STARS Former Somerville resident JF Lynch exhibits new works in charcoal and assemblage. Opening: Thursday, September 26th, 6:00-8:00 pm Or, feel free to drop in to see the show whenever we are in the office. 10th ANNUAL EAST SOMERVILLE FOODIE CRAWL Eat your way through the international flavors at more than a dozen local restaurants — a local tradition that attracts people all over the region! Tuesday, September 17th, 6:30-9:30 pm (rain date September 18th) See www.eastsomervillemainstreets.org for more information Best Real Estate Agency

Best Real Estate Agent

Listings

32 Madison St. #2, Somerville

Treetop two-level condo with sweeping views, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, central air, 2 private porches, 2 parking spaces, and shared tiered multi-level garden in the backyard. Located on a residential side-street in Central Hill, just a block from the state-of-the-art high school under construction and a new GLX station.

87 Wallace Street, Somerville

A Victorian single-family gem in the heart of Davis Square awaits your reimagining. This grand home features 4 bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms on 3 floors, detached garage, and yard on one of the most beloved streets in Davis Square.

35 Curtis Avenue, Somerville $1,095,000

Large Teele Square single family home with a mature wild flower garden and a 4 bay garage. It has 6 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, and many original features including French doors and a warming cupboard tucked into the chimney breast.

348 Norfolk Street, Cambridge $1,950,000

Beautifully renovated, condo-quality, owner occupied 3-family between Inman Square and East Cambridge. First floor unit has open concept living, 1 bedroom, and 1 bath on the first level and finished lower level with study, media room, and laundry room. Second floor has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, private w/d hook-ups in basement. Top floor has 3 beds, 1 bath, private w/d in basement and is rented for $3,000 through 5/31/20. Rear patio and small front yard. Units 1 and 2 delivered vacant. Residents with cars registered at this address are entitled to free parking in City-owned lot across the street.

156 Ivy Street, Brookline $5,995,000

This stunning historic Early Gothic Revival (c. 1851) single family sits on 8/10 acre and abuts conservation land in the Cottage Farm neighborhood, yet it is within walking distance of Fenway Park and Cambridge. The house offers 5 bedrooms, 4 1/2 baths, 3 studies, library, dining room, living room, 5 fireplaces, finished basement with media room, high ceilings, central air, beautiful architectural details, and 3-car garage with electric car outlet. Walk to Green Line B, C, and D trains as well as major hospitals and BU campus.


Coming Soon

Thalia Tringo

19 Putnam Street, Somerville

Lovely Union Square attached single family on 3 levels with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, office with skylights, fenced yard, unfinished basement. Walk to all the delights of Union Square and 2 future GLX stations. Steps to the dog park, Nunziato Field, Community Growing Center, and Prospect Hill park.

31 Fairmount Avenue Unit 2, Somerville

In Teele Square, just a short walk to Davis, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath, condo has a private back porch, exclusive use of the driveway and garage, and large basement storage area.

President, Realtor ® 617.513.1967 cell/text Thalia@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

Jennifer Rose

Residential Sales Specialist, Realtor ® 617.943.9581 cell/text Jennifer@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

301 Lowell Street Unit 14 Somerville

There is great value to be had in this 2 bedroom, 1 bath condo with open floorplan, private balcony, and a parking space — all steps from Magoun Square restaurants, Trum Field, and the community path. Walkable to 2 Red Line Subways (Porter and Davis) now and 3 GLX stations in the near future.

East Arlington Condo

Beautiful 2-bedroom, 1-bathroom condo with in-unit laundry, 2 parking spaces, private yard, central air, and large basement storage area. Walk to the shops, cinema, and eateries on Mass. Ave. as well as the bike path and the Red Line station at Alewife.

Residential Sales Specialist, Realtor ® 617.895.6267 cell/text Brendon@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

First Time Home Buyers:

Wednesday, September 11th or Tuesday, October 1st

6:30 – 7:45 pm

If you’re considering buying your first home and want to understand what’s in store, this is a quick and helpful overview. Led by our agents and a loan officer from a local bank, it includes a 45-min presentation and 1/2 hour Q&A session. Handouts and refreshments provided.

How to Buy and Sell at the Same Time: for homeowners contemplating a move Monday, September 16th or Wednesday, October 23rd

Residential Sales Specialist, Realtor ® 617.216.5244 cell/text Lynn@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

Brendon Edwards

Free Classes an overview of the buying process

Lynn C. Graham

Seth Kangley

Residential Sales Specialist, Realtor ® 315.382.2507 cell/text Seth@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

6:30 – 7:45 pm

If trying to figure out the logistics of selling your home and buying a new one makes your head spin, this workshop will help make the process & your choices understandable. This workshop, led by our agents and a loan officer from a local bank, includes a 45-min presentation and 1/2 hour Q&A session. Handouts and refreshments provided.

Reading the Clues:

Sarasvati Lynn

Residential Sales Specialist, Realtor ® 617.702.4751 cell/text Sarasvati@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

recognizing the history of your old house With Architectural Historian, Sally Zimmerman Tuesday, September 17TH

6:30 – 7:45 pm

If you are a new owner of an old house, you may be wondering about how it’s changed over time and how you might go about bringing back some of its better attributes. Learn to read the clues about how old houses are frequently modified and how to uncover the history of your old house to reveal its best features in an illustrated 45-minute lecture on understanding how old houses evolve and why preserving them matters with architectural historian Sally Zimmerman, followed by Q&A on your old house projects.

How to Research Your Old House With Architectural Historian, Sally Zimmerman Wednesday, September 18TH

6:30 – 7:45 pm

You don’t have to go to the Registry of Deeds to find out a lot about your old house. Learn how to shortcut your way to great information about the history and occupants of your house in an illustrated 45-minute lecture by the Senior Preservation Services Manager at Historic New England. Submit a photo of your house ahead of time and we will share what we have learned in a Q&A session to follow the talk.

How Individuals Can Buy Property Together as a Group Tuesday, October 29th

6:30-8:30 pm

When two or more people, whether or not they are related, buy property together, what are their options for taking title? How do you determine each one’s financial contributions, percentage legal interest in the property, and expense allocation? What kind of arrangements can be made in the event one or more parties want to move on but others want to keep the property? What type of financing is available? We will address these and other questions, followed by a Q&A session. Lead by our team and a local real estate attorney.

To reserve space in any class, please email Adaria@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com. Admission is free, but we appreciate donations of canned goods for the Somerville Homeless Coalition.

Adaria Brooks

Executive Assistant to the President, Realtor ® 617.308.0064 cell/text Adaria@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

About our company... We are dedicated to representing our buyer and seller clients with integrity and professionalism. We are also commied to giving back to our community. Our agents donate $250 to a non-profit in honor of each transaction and Thalia Tringo & Associates Real Estate Inc. also gives $250 to a pre-selected group of local charities for each transaction. Visit our office, 128 Willow Avenue, on the bike path in Davis Square, Somerville.


SEPTEMBER 10 - NOVEMBER 11, 2019 ::: VOLUME 40 ::: SCOUTCAMBRIDGE.COM

contents 6 // EDITOR’S NOTE

SCOUT’S HONORED 2019 15 // SERVICES If you want to hang it on your wall—whatever “it” is— Cambridge Art & Frame is up to the challenge. 18 // WELLNESS Justine Cohen of Down Under Yoga knows that wellness doesn’t come from $120 yoga pants, but from dedication to teaching and learning. 20 // FOOD Chef Patricia Estorino has brought—and in many cases, reimagined—the flavors of Cuba to the tables of Gustazo, and she clearly has your hearts longing for Havana. 26 // DRINKS Cambridge loves its local brews, and you love the Lamp—tapping Lamplighter as your honoree, with its ever-changing roster of drafts and its full embrace of the community.

20

7 // WINNERS & LOSERS Harvard scientists find a cancerfighter in sea sponges, Celeste Ng rallies Twitter to support migrant families at the border, and what happens when you take the S out of Shell? 8 // NEWS: MIT SCHWARZMAN COLLEGE OF COMPUTING More and more, advancements in technology come with unanticipated downsides. MIT introduces an ethics course designed to help identify them before they’re implemented.

32 // SHOPPING Fair trade means something to Cambridge, and it means everything to NOMAD, your favorite destination for home decor from around the globe.

38 // WILD CARDS A fundamental principle of green living is that less is more, and Pemberton Farms puts it in practice with zero-waste, compostable, and sustainable products you love.

46 // DO-GOODERS, KEY PLAYERS, AND GAME CHANGERS: CAMBRIDGE IN MOTION The Health Department’s Dawn Olcott has a simple goal for Cambridge in Motion: To make the healthy choice the easy choice for people. 42 // CALENDAR 45 // MEET THE SCOUT TEAM!

30 // BEAUTY For 45 years, Judy Jetson has been cutting hair, challenging the patriarchy, embracing marginalized people, and daring anyone to try and stop her.

36 // ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT An incubator for new works and a showcase for Tony Awardwinners, American Repertory Theater is a powerhouse of the stage and your favorite arts destination.

10 // WHAT’S NEW? Two new public school campuses open, Muckykids invites youngsters to get handson with arts, crafts, and science, and Beantowne Coffee says goodbye on its own terms.

26

Photo, top: Best Breakfast winner The Friendly Toast. Photo courtesy of Friendly Toast. Photo, bottom: Best Brewery winner Lamplighter Brewing Company. Photo by Sasha Pedro. Cover illustration by Stefan Mallette. IG: @stefs_stuff


Denise Simmons is proudly serving her 9th term on the City Council, and she humbly asks for your #1 vote on Tuesday November 5. She can be reached at www.DeniseSimmons.com, where you can also be directed to her Facebook and Twitter accounts.

PLEASE GIVE YOUR #1 VOTE TO DENISE SIMMONS ON NOVEMBER 5! Paid for by the Campaign to Elect Denise Simmons.

Best Hair Salon

Best Hair Color

Best Liquor Store

Thank you for voting us Best Hair Color (Sam) & Best Hair Salon - AGAIN! BEST HAIR SALON: 2013–2019 BEST HAIR COLOR: 2016–2019 BEST HAIRCUT: 2016–2018

290 HIGHLAND AVENUE, SOMERVILLE • 617-776-6470 WWW.HAIRBYCHRISTINEANDCO.COM

Best Liquor Store

KIDS BACK IN SCHOOL WE CAN HELP YOU CELEBRATE

15 MCGRATH HIGHWAY, SOMERVILLE 233 ALEWIFE BROOK PARKWAY, CAMBRIDGE 2153 MYSTIC VALLEY PARKWAY, MEDFORD 48 BROADWAY, MALDEN

We deliver through the Drizly and Minibar Apps! NO PANTS REQUIRED!

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019

5


EDITOR’S NOTE

W

elcome to your annual Scout’s Honored issue! This is probably our favorite time of year, because we share your pics for all the great people and places that help make Cambridge such a wonderful place to live and work. It’s … Excuse us, but … who are you? Me? Oh, I’m Eric J. Francis, the interim editor for Scout Cambridge. I’m filling in after the departure of our fantastic editor-in-chief, Reena Karasin, who’s moved on to a new job. Your name sounds familiar. Have we met? Yes! Reena brought me in as a freelancer a Photo by Eric J. Francis. couple of years ago. My stories have included “Living on the Veg” (March/April 2019), where I explored the wonders of a plantbased diet at Nüssli118°, and my visit to the city’s most progressive grocer in “Nature is Nurture at Cambridge Naturals” (May/June 2019). Speaking of Scout’s Honored ... Yes! You did an amazing job, as usual, of finding and voting for the best places in Cambrdige to do, well, anything! I was particularly lucky to write about Gustazo (p. 20), the new restaurant where chef-owner Patricia Estorino is approaching traditional Cuban flavors with a modern sensibility. Plus, you’ll get to meet the indefatigable Judy Jetson (p. 30), the eco-conscientious Pemberton Farms Marketplace (p. 38), and the inventive spirits at Lamplighter Brewing Company (p. 26). Cambridge is an amazing city, as you’ve always known. In this issue, we get to share that hard-won knowledge for the benefit of everyone else—and we couldn’t do it without you. Thanks!

PUBLISHER Holli Banks hbanks@scoutmagazines.com

Eric J. Francis, Interim Editor-in-Chief efrancis@scoutmagazines.com

FIND US ONLINE

INTERIM EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Eric J. Francis efrancis@scoutmagazines.com ART DIRECTOR Nicolle Renick design@scoutmagazines.com renickdesign.com CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Jerry Allien jallien@scoutmagazines.com SCOUT FELLOW Abbie Gruskin agruskin@scoutmagazines.com STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Sasha Pedro EDITORIAL INTERN Jessica Blough CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JM Lindsay, Lilly Milman, Sarah Robbins COPY EDITOR Tasha Frank BANKS PUBLICATIONS 519 Somerville Ave, #314 Somerville, MA 02143

scoutcambridge.com scoutcambridge

scoutcambridge @scoutmags

Office Phone: 617-996-2283 Advertising inquiries? Please contact hbanks@scoutmagazines.com. GET A COPY Scout Cambridge is available for free at more than 250 drop spots throughout the city (and just beyond its borders). Additionally, thousands of Cambridge homes receive a copy in their mailbox each edition, hitting every neighborhood in the city throughout the year ... sometimes twice! You can sign up for home delivery by visiting scoutcambridge.com/shop. 6 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com


W&L

WINNERS

LOSERS

HARVARD CHEMISTS Harvard University chemists might be making advances to cure cancer, with a little help from sea sponges. After three decades of research, they achieved “total synthesis” of halichondrin, a “potent anti-cancer agent in mouse studies” and a substance found in small amounts in sea sponges, according to The Harvard Gazette. Chemistry Professor Yoshito Kishi and his team will begin studying the drug with researchers from Eisai, a Japanese pharmaceutical company, and hope to eventually begin a second trial in the United States.

THE S IN SHELL The iconic Shell sign in the city now greets passersby with a more confusing message—the lights on the illuminated “S” went out at the end of June for the first time since the sign was refurbished in 2011, according to The Boston Globe, making the historic neon sign read “HELL.” The “S” has gone missing once before when the original Shell sign still illuminated the sky near Memorial Drive. Tibor Hangyal, who runs the Shell service station, told the Globe he plans on reaching out to Shell officials to resolve the most recent mishap. “I get a kick out of it, kind of, but it’s almost embarrassing,” Hangyal said in the article. Until then, Hangyal told the Globe he may have to keep the Shell sign-gone-wrong turned off. “It’s a good landmark; it just needs some love once in a while,” he said in the article.

NICK DIGIOVANNI Nick DiGiovanni, a 2019 Harvard graduate, has impressed “MasterChef” judges during its 10th season, according to Boston Magazine, and is now vying to become “MasterChef ’s” youngest champion at 23. As a student, DiGiovanni developed his own concentration, called “Food & Climate,” to study the intersection of both fields. “In part, it really made me want to step in and play a role in figuring out how to align the global food system with our climate,” DiGiovanni told Boston Magazine. “I don’t know exactly what I’d be doing, but if I ever had the opportunity at some point in my career to try to step in and address that in any way, then I definitely want to.” Now he is working with a Harvard Medical School professor to create vegetable-based pasta for kids through a startup called Voodles. CELESTE NG Local best-selling author Celeste Ng kicked off a community-wide philanthropic endeavor in June. In response to inhumane conditions for immigrant families being separated at the U.S. border with Mexico, Ng announced on Twitter that she would match up to $2,000 from friends and fans to RAICES Texas, a nonprofit organization providing free legal services to immigrants and refugees. Just five hours later, Ng posted again to thank the 182 people who donated over $12,500 and upped her own donation to $3,000. Ng has remained outspoken about issues of immigration and family. “Ask yourself: If you’d been walking down Mass Ave. and seen a crying, lost child, what would you do?” she tweeted. “Then extend that to the separations of children at the border, to the refugees searching for safety worldwide, to the people everywhere just trying to keep their kids safe & alive.”

ELECTRICITY IN MOUNT AUBURN HOSPITAL Mount Auburn Hospital lost power in early July after not one but two electrical cables failed in the same day, according to Cambridge Day. The double cable system was designed to “serve customers with heavy demand,” Eversource spokesman Reid Lamberty told the Day, with each cable capable of fully powering the hospital on its own. The blackout lasted roughly seven hours, and though an emergency backup generator eventually kicked in, it couldn’t keep the “cooling equipment” cool enough. No patients were evacuated from the hospital, but police, fire, ambulance, and hospital workers did relocate some patients from higher floors to lower floors to avoid discomfort from rising temperatures. WEST NILE-CARRYING MOSQUITOS After finding two mosquito samples in the city that tested positive for West Nile virus this August, city and state health officials are recommending locals stay vigilant, according to the Cambridge Chronicle. “Residents should take added precautions to avoid mosquito bites, such as wearing repellent or protective clothing in the evening, fixing screens, and eliminating standing water on their property,” Claude Jacob, the city’s chief public health officer and director of the Cambridge Public Health Department, told the Chronicle. The city has posted signs in parks and playgrounds warning of dangerous mosquitoes, and the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project used larvicide, which kills mosquito larvae before they reach adulthood, in nearly 6,000 storm drains in Cambridge in June and August.

NEWS FROM THE NORTH Here’s just some of what you’ll find in the Scout’s Honored Issue of our sibling publication, Scout Somerville.

SUPERVISED DRUG CONSUMPTION SPACES Somerville’s mayor offers a plan to let addicts have a safe place to use, and be exposed to treatment and counseling. The state’s U.S. attorney isn’t a fan.

WEIRD AND WONDERFUL SCUL What does it take to be a superhero? A bike, some welding equipment, outrageous free expression ... and a little help from a guy named Skunk.

ASIAN WOMEN AND BREAST CANCER Often among women from Asian cultures, there’s a stigma attached to a breast cancer diagnosis that can get in the way of seeking treatment. ChienChi Huang is working to change that.

Someone rustle your jimmies or tickle your fancy?

Let us know at scoutcambridge.com/contact-us, and we just might crown them a winner or loser.

—BY ABBIE GRUSKIN scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019

7


NEWS

MIT ‘REWIRES’ ITS COMP SCI CURRICULUM WITH A NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLEGE BY ABBIE GRUSKIN

M

IT is overhauling its academic structure this fall with the introduction of an interdisciplinary college of computing, which will integrate ethics into the computer science curriculum. The MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, scheduled to open this September with an academic building to follow in 2022, will act as an academic “unit” distinct from the five existing schools on campus. Dramatic growth in the computer science field and an increasing number of disciplines 8 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

incorporating computer science into their curriculum, paired with community concerns about the societal impact of new technologies, pushed MIT to consider a new approach to teaching computer science. “We were seeing just an explosion of interest in our undergraduates who wanted to major in computer science,” Provost Martin Schmidt explains. “You think about driverless cars or dockless scooters, Lime drops 500 scooters in Cambridge and Somerville and the mayors

don’t know what to do with it. People were saying to us, ‘Geez, if you guys are working on these technologies, why aren’t you thinking about what the implications are when they’re deployed, and maybe you should be thinking about how policy should be framed to assist people when this deployment occurs.’ You could argue, I think, that we should be doing a better job of educating our graduates so that the social implications of what they’re working on are a habit of mind.” Offering a single ethics course

or making small adaptations to existing schools within the university wouldn’t be enough— MIT needed a complete overhaul to redirect the focus and structure of computer science and AI research, Schmidt argues. “The easiest thing to do is just to bolt on the ethics class and say you’re done, but that’s not going to create the habit of mind that you need people to have,” Schmidt says. “As we were looking at the challenges MIT was facing, it became very clear to us that doing something big at this scale Photo by Jake Belcher.


was really the only path, and in fact it presented this huge opportunity,” he adds. “And so we did something a little bit unconventional as an academic institution: We just decided to announce that this is where we’re going. Being clear that we knew what the end goal was, we said, ‘Let’s just state that, and then go about building it.’” The college is made possible by a $350 million gift and is part of the university’s $1 billion mission to focus on the growing opportunities and challenges in the fields of computing and artificial intelligence, according to MIT News. MIT has established five working groups comprised of faculty, students, and staff to help conceptualize the college and implications of the project. The university is planning to add 50 faculty members and recently appointed Dan Huttenlocher as

science, according to Schmidt. Nearly 40 percent of the undergraduate student body studies computer science or computer science and another field, while only seven percent of university faculty work within the computer science area of the Electrical Engineering & Computer Science department. Classes can be as large as 700 students. “A lot of the computing faculty were basically asking for help, because they were feeling that there was this huge transformation that’s occurring in their discipline, and they didn’t feel like they were resourced adequately, they didn’t feel like they had the right organizational structure,” Schmidt explains. “The faculty that were sort of feeling the brunt of this demand were basically saying ‘I need help.’ But also, the other disciplines were saying ‘We’re being transformed.’”

“People were saying to us, ‘Geez,if you guys are working on these technologies, why aren’t you thinking about what the implications are when they’re deployed, and maybe you should be thinking about how policy should be framed to assist people when this deployment occurs.’” -- Martin Schmidt, Provost the college’s dean. The college is still a work in progress, Schmidt emphasizes. “The way in which we find faculty, promote them, and tenure them, we have to think of a rewiring of our processes,” he says. “I think the college, at some level, may never be fully built, because I think what we need is an organization that is a little bit more dynamic than the traditional academic organization. So we’re building it, but I fully expect that in three years, in five years, in 10 years, that this will be very much an evolving organization.” Much of the demand for a new academic structure came directly from MIT faculty, who felt overwhelmed by the recent surge in interest in computer

The university intends the new faculty to be a mix of computing professors, “bilinguals” who are versed in both computer science and an additional discipline, and academics who practice a more “applied” approach to policy and ethics, according to Schmidt. “Imagine if you had professional staff who know how to teach ethics, who know how to teach thinking about social implications of emergent technologies,” Schmidt says. “Imagine if the staff were accessible to faculty that teach a machine learning class or a basic coding class, and imagine if those staff sort of help those faculty, imagine if they work jointly with the faculty to modify the course offering.”

Nov. 5th

SUKIA AKIBA CAMBRIDGE

City Council votesuki@yahoo.com sukiaforcambridge.org 857-800-6116

BREAKING BARRIERS | BUILDING A BETTER CAMBRIDGE scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019

9


WHAT’S NEW

BY ABBIE GRUSKIN

EXPANDING PALATES HARVARD SQUARE

STOKED PIZZA

COMING SOON

Stoked Pizza, which already has a presence in Harvard Square thanks to its popular red food truck, is gearing up to open a permanent restaurant on the Harvard Law School campus in 2020, according to Eater Boston. The pizza joint plans to use an electric oven instead of the traditional wood-fired alternative, and will serve 11-inch pizzas along with salads, wings, and more. Construction for the restaurant on Massachusetts Ave. is scheduled to begin this fall.

MOVE

KENDALL SQUARE

BEANTOWNE COFFEE HOUSE

Beantowne Coffee House is sadly no more: After 26 years of service, COMING the Kendall Square coffee shop SOON closed on Aug. 1, according to Eater Boston. “We are going out on a high note and on our own terms, which is incredibly fulfilling,” founder Ed Goyette told the magazine. Goyette now plans to focus on a new project aimed at fostering relationships between parents and children.

MOVED

HARVARD SQUARE

WACHUSETT BREWING COMPANY

COMING SOON

MOVE

The space John Harvard’s left behind won’t be empty for much longer. Wachusett Brewing Company has plans to start a brewpub in the 33 Dunster St. location this fall, according to Eater Boston. Wachusett intends to create a 15-barrel brew house and taproom in the Harvard Square site, complete with a food menu focused on flatbreads. HARVARD SQUARE

EAST CAMBRIDGE

9ZAAB

N

ew Thai restaurant 9Zaab, which opened this June, has a focus on COMING MOVED street food, ranging familiar noodle dishes like pad thai to more SOON from exotic options like sai ua, a seasoned pork sausage, according to Eater Boston. The restaurant seats 20 guests and features nonstop TV coverage of food and travel blogger Mark Wiens “eating his way through Asia and beyond.”

10 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

ZAMBRERO

Zambrero, an Australia-based Mexican restaurant chain, closed COMING its only Boston-area restaurant SOON in Harvard Square this August, according to Eater Boston. The eatery opened in March 2018 and served classic and casual burritos, bowls, tacos, and more, along with vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free options. 9Zaab photos courtesy of 9Zaab. Harvard Library photo by John Phelan.

MOVED


BACK TO SCHOOL

THANK YOU SOMERVILLE FOR VOTING PAWS IN THE VILLE

Best Dog Walking

BEST DOG-WALKING!

Dog walking and pet care services including solo walks, group walks and play, puppy visits, senior care and more.

HARVARD COLLABORATES WITH OTHER UNIVERSITIES TO ACCESS MORE BOOKS THROUGH ITS LIBRARY

This summer Harvard teamed up with Columbia, Princeton, and the New York Public Library through the Research Collections and Preservation Consortium (ReCAP), and with the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, to provide students with a total of 90 million books, according to The Harvard Gazette. The partnership allows users to access more books without owning them and frees up physical space on Harvard’s shelves. “We’re doing something radical that will change the way in which libraries operate,” Sarah Thomas, retired vice president of the Harvard library, told the Gazette. “And we expect that it means service will improve radically.”

NEW PUBLIC SCHOOLS OPEN: CAMBRIDGE STREET UPPER SCHOOL AND KING OPEN SCHOOL

The new Cambridge Street Upper School and King Open School opened this September on a shared campus, according to Cambridge Public Schools (CPS). The two schools were designed to be Net Zero Emissions, feature

Our mission is to give your city dog a country dog’s life!

nearly 3,600 photovoltaic panels to “produce renewable energy,” and share a “multi-purpose, multimedia learning hub with makerspace, group learning areas, and cozy reading nooks,” according to CPS’ description of the project on its website. HARVARD SQUARE

THE HIVE

COMING SOON

The lower level of the Cambridge Public Library is getting a new addition this fall—construction for The Hive, a STEAM “creativity zone,” started in June and is slated to finish in early 2020, according to the city website. The Hive will offer a makerspace complete with “digital and traditional fabrication tools,” audio and visual recording studios, and an Extended Reality Lab for experiments with VR.

Founded in 2010

www.pawsintheville.com • 413.530.4780

MOVED

Thank you Scout Readers for voting for us 7 years in a row! Best Frame Shop

MUCKYKIDS ART STUDIO REOPENS IN NORTH CAMBRIDGE

Muckykids is up and running again after moving to its new location a mile outside of Porter Square this August, according to the art studio’s website. Muckykids Art Studio now hosts drop-in hours Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is offering new fall classes on illustration, bookmaking, and art and science. scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019

11


WHAT’S NEW

CITY BEAT to Cambridge Day. The CRA has plans to work with the current tenants, including Cambridge Camping, The Algebra Project, and Brattle Film Foundation, to maintain the space as a “center for social services.”

‘HOUSING FOR ALL’ PACKAGE ENSURES RENT CONTROL AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING City Representative Mike Connolly filed a multibill “housing for all” package in late June that could reinstate the option of rent control and dedicate $1 billion to affordable housing, according to the Cambridge Chronicle. Some bills would allow cities and towns to opt in to whichever housingrelated restrictions or regulations they deemed appropriate to fit local needs, while others proposed statewide mandates.

CENTRAL SQUARE

REVOLUTIONARY CLINICS

COMING SOON

MOVED

R

evolutionary Clinics is opening its third marijuana dispensary this fall in Central Square, according to the company. The store will carry tinctures, topicals, edibles, and more from Revolutionary Clinics’ “grow and production” facility in Fitchburg. And the new location will display the work of local artists in collaboration with the Cambridge Arts Council.

PUBLIC POOLS IN THE CITY CAN’T TAKE THE HEAT

State officials denied the city’s attempt to lengthen the nineweekend season for the stateowned Francis J. McCrehan Memorial Swimming Pool, which closed for the summer at the end of August, according to Cambridge Day. The City Manager’s Office had been working on the proposed extension since January after feedback from residents and officials. “We offered to pay whatever for additional weeks … we tried,” Assistant City Manager for Human Services Ellen Semenoff told the Day. “We went all up and down the chain of command” at the state Department of Conservation and Recreation. 12 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

MT. AUBURN STREET BUS PRIORITY PILOT MAKES LOCAL BUSES FASTER AND MORE RELIABLE

The Mt. Auburn Street Bus Priority Pilot resulted in “improved travel time and service reliability” for over 12,000 bus and shuttle riders daily, the city announced on its website. The pilot, a collaboration between Cambridge and Watertown that started in October 2018, included creating segments of bus-only lanes and adding more green light time to traffic lights on Mt. Auburn Street to ease the flow of traffic.

CITY REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY SAVES “NONPROFIT ROW”

The Cambridge Redevelopment Authority reached a purchase and sale agreement with nonprofit Enroot this June for the “nonprofit row” building near Central Square, according

CAMBRIDGE ARTISTS’ COOPERATIVE STAYS IN HARVARD

The Cambridge Artists’ Cooperative isn’t going anywhere, at least for the time being. Rather than moving to a new location, the co-op is staying in the same Harvard Square storefront for the next two years and has been consolidated to a single floor, according to an announcement from the group. The GoFundMe campaign launched by the Cambridge Artists’ Cooperative earlier this year is still ongoing, as the co-op will need to find a new location after the two years are up. INMAN SQUARE

ZHAO ACUPUNCTURE & HERBAL CLINIC

Zhao Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic opened on Cambridge COMING Street this August, offering MOVED SOON acupuncture, Chinese herbals, therapeutic massage, and more, according to owner Xingning Zhao. Zhao’s offerings are meant to target and treat a wide array of ailments and can be individualized for each customer. Revolutionary Clinic photo courtesy of Revolutionary Clinics. Zhao photo courtesy of Zhao Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic. Curio Coffee photo courtesy of Curio Coffee.


GOING GREEN

ECSTATIC. MINDFUL. NOURISHING. H igH H oly D ays witH CURIO COFFEE AND WINE INTRODUCES SIPPY LIDS TO REDUCE WASTE

Curio Coffee and Wine has gone green with new sippy lids meant to “reduce and minimize” waste, according to the shop’s Instagram. The plastic lids are used for iced drinks and replace straws, though straws are still available upon request. And, if you want to take it one step further, Curio will fill customers’ reusable mugs even if they’re larger than the store’s single-use alternatives.

CITY ADDS SEVEN NEW PUBLIC ELECTRIC CAR CHARGING STATIONS

The city has installed seven new electric car charging stations—three in May and four over the summer—in an effort to accommodate the growing popularity of electric cars, according to the Cambridge Chronicle. Each new station can charge two cars at once, and brings the number of city-owned stations to 11. Bridgit Martin, communications manager for Community Development Department, told the Chronicle

that “encouraging car owners to switch to electric vehicles is an important part of the city’s climate strategy.” CENTRAL SQUARE

CLEENLAND

Cleenland is showing Central Square a new way to shop green—the colorful store COMING offers bulk household body SOON and MOVED supplies, like dish soap, laundry detergent, and shampoo, with little to no packaging, founder and owner Sarah Levy told Scout. Customers can bring their own reusable containers or choose from the shop’s selection of glass bottles and jars to fill up on all of the essentials.

CITY AWARDS MINI-GRANTS FOR PROMOTING HEALTH AND ACTIVITY

The Cambridge Public Health Department has awarded mini-grants totaling $5,000 to 10 different organizations in the city working to “promote healthy eating and active living,” according to a statement from the department. The funded projects include Cambridge and Somerville Programs for Addiction Recovery’s distribution of fruits and vegetables to homeless populations and shelter guests, Nurtury’s new gardening space for children, and many more.

Erev Rosh Hashana 9/29, 6 pm, Somerville

Yom Kippur daylong retreat 10/9, 10 am, Stow, MA

Connect with the energy of new beginnings in a musical, soulful, chant-based service. Whether you’ve never been to a Rosh Hashana service or you’ve been doing it all your life, there’s something here for you!

Take a deep dive with us as we explore forgiveness and return in an intimate offsite retreat. We’ll experience an energy-clearing technique that guides us through emotional blockages, led by special guest Miriam Katz, a shamanic healer passionate about the shamanic roots of Judaism. Silence, time in nature, and traditional elements of Yom Kippur will round out the day, capped by a potluck break-fast.

Tashlich by the Charles 10/6, 2 pm, Cambridge Let’s embody the change we want to be in our lives by “tossing away” the negative patterns and stories we’ve accumulated over the past year. We’ll toss found matter into the river, and sing in our higher selves.

AsiyAh is A heArtcentered community of jewish spirituAl prActice inspired by

Sukkot on the Farm 10/20, 9:30 am, Lincoln, MA Celebrate Sukkot’s agricultural roots in a community-wide celebration with sauerkraut, cows, and honeybees. Build a sukkah, make a local lulav, and wave it in an embodied Hoshana Rabbah practice. Fun for all ages!

jewish renewAl More information and registration: asiyah.org/hhd All events will include care and activities for kids ages 3+. You’re also invited to join us for twice-monthly Kabbalat Shabbat services and other events—check out asiyah.org for our calendar and more!

 asiyah.org  /asiyahjewishcommunity  @asiyahcommunity

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 13


s r e n n i W

14 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com


SERVICES FRAMING

CAMBRIDGE ART & FRAME AT THE MULTICULTURAL ARTS CENTER

41 SECOND ST., (617) 547-5944 CAMBRIDGEARTANDFRAME.COM

Best Florist

Central Square Florist FLORIST

653 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. (617) 354-7553 CENTRALSQUAREFLORIST.COM Family-owned Central Square Florist has been a cornerstone to the square for decades, catering to the local community since 1929. But the voice of the colorful shop has evolved in recent years as ownership has been passed down to a member of the family’s fourth and youngest

generation, Jackie Levine. During her time at Central Square Florist, Levine has further integrated the shop into the community by catering more events, welcoming new small business neighbors, donating floral arrangements, and networking. “We’ve always been very passionate about supporting the community around us, the Cambridge community,” Levine explains. “We’re also really into going to those events or making sure that we participate physically. Having a face to our name, too, is

Central Square Florist photo courtesy of Central Square Florist.

really special and important.” Levine’s fresh perspective, though, is most apparent in the store’s selection of plants: Leafy monstera, desert cacti, and colorful croton plants attract a younger crowd of customers to the world of flowers. “We’ve always had a good amount of plants, but I’m really into bringing in the trendy, hot plants,” Levine says. “I kind of know what’s in, making sure we’re up to trend and staying relatable. If there’s a really cool plant out there, I will find a way to get it, and I get excited about it.”

If you have something you want to display in your home or office, Cambridge Art & Frame will help you turn it into a museum-quality piece. Got a signed Tom Brady jersey you want to display in your rumpus room? Or an oil painting that you love but has been tucked away in storage for a decade? What about the custom sword you picked up on that trip to Spain? Or the large-format photo of everyone on the trip? Cambridge Art & Frame can handle all of that, and more. The family-owned business specializes in custom designs. Even oddly shaped three-dimensional pieces are not beyond the scope of founder Andrew Montone and his team—check out the business’s website for a specially framed iPad, a coin collection, historical documents, and more. And they do more than just designing displays for your items and art pieces; they also offer digital services like printing and photo restoration, and also have their share of art and photography for sale. A founding member of the East Cambridge Business Association, Cambridge Art & Frame is located in Lechmere’s Multicultural Arts Center, a 41-yearold Cambridge nonprofit corporation dedicated to hosting performing and visual arts from all of the city’s diverse residents. So while you’re waiting for your own piece to be framed, you can wander a beautiful Victorianstyle building and check out its own free art gallery. scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 15


SCOUT’S HONORED

PET GROOMING

LAUNDROMUTT

489 CONCORD AVE., (617) 864-9274 LAUNDROMUTT.COM

BANK OR CREDIT UNION

DOG WALKING

FOUR BRANCHES, (800) 327-8376 EASTERNBANK.COM

555 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 858-3647 BOSTONDOG.CO

EASTERN BANK INSURANCE AGENCY

RALPH J. GALANTE INSURANCE AGENCY 1939 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 864-5586 GALANTEINSURANCE.COM

BOSTON DOG

REAL ESTATE AGENCY

COMPASS

1073 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 303-0067, COMPASS.CO

MECHANIC

GOOD NEWS GARAGE

75 HAMILTON ST., (617) 354-5383 GOODNEWSGARAGECAMBRIDGE.COM 16 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

COMMUNITY CLASSES

CAMBRIDGE CENTER FOR ADULT EDUCATION 42 BRATTLE ST. AND 56 BRATTLE ST., (617) 547-6789, CCAE.ORG

“Enthusiastic and inspired students, dedicated instructors, and staff gather and learn together daily in our classrooms at 42 and 56 Brattle Street,” says Linda Burton, executive director of the Cambridge Center for Adult Education (CCAE). The CCAE educates thousands of students every year, in classes from “Telenovelas and Tequila” to “White People Challenging Racism.” The center also offers classes in 11 foreign languages.

CCAE and Laundromutt photos by Derek Kouyoumjian. Prellwitz Chilinski Associates photo by Robert Benson Photography.


INTERIOR DESIGN

PRELLWITZ CHILINSKI ASSOCIATES 221 HAMPSHIRE ST., (617) 547-8120 PRELLWITZCHILINSKI.COM

ARCHITECT OR ARCHITECTURE FIRM

LABHAUS

14 ARROW ST. SUITE 22, (617) 936-3482 LABHAUS.COM

LABhaus managing principal Sara Ann Logan says it is “an architecture firm like any other— we are hungry, talented, and unafraid to take on challenges and succeed (and sometimes fail).” Based in Cambridge, LABhaus works on projects throughout the United States, and the firm strives for economically viable high design. They specialize in housing. MOVING COMPANY

GENTLE GIANT MOVING COMPANY

29 HARDING ST., (617) 661-3333 GENTLEGIANT.COM

If you’re going to move house, you need the right crew. Gentle Giant was literally started on that principle—one of its co-founders was a rower at Northeastern, and many of its movers also row or participate in other sports. They’ll get you loaded, relocated, and unloaded in good order and with good cheer. It’s been 40 years

since the company was started with a borrowed truck and a $17 newspaper ad, so clearly they’re doing something right. PRESCHOOL OR DAYCARE

TWO LITTLE OWLS SCHOOLHOUSE

501 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 945-0071 TWOLITTLEOWLSSCHOOLHOUSE.COM

Two Little Owls Schoolhouse offers a traditional preschool for children under 4 years old, as well as a pre-kindergarten program for children ages 4 to 6 years old. Plus, students begin French classes from infancy. Two Littles Owls got its name from the nursery song “One Little Owl,” which became two owls in honor of owner Richard Gilreath’s two daughters. COWORKING SPACE

INDUSTRY LAB

288 NORFOLK ST., HI@INDUSTRY-LAB.COM INDUSTRYLAB.COM

Once a French laundry business, the building that houses Industry Lab now is home to almost 50 Cambridge companies. “Industry Lab is dedicated

to creating a communityfocused productive environment for all types of workers, even ones that can’t be accommodated by traditional coworking spaces,” says Industry Lab director Kate Douglas. “We don’t offer pay-by-the-hour desks or first come, first served seating; instead we focus on providing affordable, dedicated desk space to everyone from self-employed artists to hardware startups.” In addition to dedicated workspaces for its tenants, as well as shared resources and conference rooms, Industry Lab regularly hosts artists-inresidence and features artworks and performances from past and present artists. Plus, it’s a dog-friendly operation, so entrepreneurs can bring their best friends with them. “It is our mission to make Industry Lab a positive and meaningful member of the Cambridge community,” says Douglas. “The best compliment is always when our members succeed and credit our awesome workspace for giving them the space and community to thrive!”

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019

17


SCOUT’S HONORED

WELLNESS

Down Under School of Yoga Best Yoga

YOGA

2000 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. (617) 661-6565 DOWNUNDERYOGA.COM Down Under School of Yoga is committed to doing things differently—rather than looking to existing studios for inspiration and guidance, Down Under founder and owner Justine Cohen wanted to bring the practice of yoga back to its roots, free from catchy slogans or pricey accessories. “I’m quite an unlikely studio owner, I think,” Cohen says. “I never really had an interest in business. When we went around Boston, we didn’t see a lot of wonderful examples of studios that we wanted to replicate. When you have $120 yoga pants and this sort of fitness elite culture creeping in, that’s a confusing message for students.” “I think we want our vision for the studio to really be a space of teaching and learning, as opposed to a shop,” Cohen adds. “To create a quiet space where you could genuinely come and do what we consider to be the courageous work of yoga. We really feel like we’re trying to create a model that actually doesn’t exist.” Founded in 2004, Down Under School of Yoga began informally in a church in Newton Highlands before moving to the basement of a CVS store and eventually opening

18 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

its own studios in Cambridge, Brookline, and Newton. Now, the school offers a wide variety of traditional yoga experiences including continuous, flowfocused classes; free-form, oneon-one style group practices; through The Vinyasa School, The Ashtanga School, The Iyengar School, and more. Though the classes differ in the movements and paces required, they all serve the common goal of clearing the mind and creating a sense of community. “Every teacher is working a different aspect of your practice,” Cohen explains. “Each style, each tradition of yoga, has its own secrets. But the goal of every teacher is the same. The definition of yoga is the satiation of mental chatter, the quieting of your mind. Quite often it’s what’s hardest for you, not what’s heavenly to you, that teaches you the most. When I walk into a heated flow class, my mind’s chattering. My brain is going to get quiet, because in

heated flow, it’s the rhythm of the body and the rhythm of the breath, that actually you have to focus in order to keep up.” “I really love the energy in the room when I’m teaching a class, and it’s palpable the difference from the beginning of class,” Cohen adds. “When you walk in it’s like you can feel the sense of separation. Everyone’s an individual and we come in from the outside world. And then somewhere during class, it’s like the boundaries between people melt. At the end you’re much more aware that you’re connected to each other, because the practice often involves some kind of relationship with vulnerability.” Beyond caring for her community of loyal customers, Cohen’s approach to prioritizing sustainable working conditions for her team of staff and instructors sets the school apart. “We really, really wanted to be sustainable,” Cohen explains. “We took our profits for several years and just ploughed them into creating what is now a huge

management team. It means that the studio always looks clean and beautiful. It means that when you walk in and you say, ‘I have a herniated disk,’ there’s someone who’s knowledgeable behind the desk saying, ‘Okay, don’t go right into a heated flow class if you have severe spinal issues,’ and can really offer guidance. “Most yoga teachers are employed as independent contractors,” Cohen adds. “They have no protection, they have no benefits, they don’t get sick days, they don’t get retirement. We all know there’s this big white elephant in the room where most studios are employing people illegally. We had moved all of our managers to be employees, that was our first step. And then we took the move of moving all of our 60 teachers, making them all employees, giving them all the benefits. It’s taken 15 years of deliberate, intentional planning and strategy. We were really interested in making a studio that the teachers called home.”

Down Under Yoga photo courtesy of Down Under Yoga. Healthworks photo courtesy of Healthworks.


FITNESS

HEALTHWORKS

35 WHITE ST., (617) 497-4454 HEALTHWORKSFITNESS.COM/CAMBRIDGE

Thank You HOLISTIC HEALTH SERVICE MASSAGE

INMAN OASIS

243 HAMPSHIRE ST., (617) 491-0176 INMANOASIS.COM

Inman Oasis began as a combination of founders Jo and Renee’s passions for massage therapy and hot tub soaks. Renee would later pass her part of the business on to Jo’s spouse, Jenny, who now runs the business with Jo. Fourteen years since it was founded, the Oasis is a popular relaxation spot and was once featured in an indie rom-com for its role as “an iconic place in the metro Boston queer community.” ACUPUNCTURE

ACUPUNCTURE TOGETHER

2564 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 499-9993 ACUPUNCTURETOGETHER.COM

Not just an acupuncture clinic, but a community acupuncture clinic that charges for its treatments on

a sliding scale, so “our patients are empowered to decide to pay whatever works for them,” says licensed acupuncturist Justine Myers. She says they also pride themselves on being flexible and setting appointments on short notice, and for having a highly trained staff proficient in a wide array of treatments for different health conditions. And making patients feel better is the most imortant thing, says Myers. “I love it when patients are feeling better and able to live fuller, more active lives as a result of their treatments,” she says. “Even though it happens all the time, it never gets old hearing them tell me how much better they feel.”

FOR CHOOSING US AS YOUR FAVORITE HOLISTIC HEALTH SERVICE! Best Holistic Health Service

DENTIST

HARVARD STREET DENTAL 287 HARVARD ST., (617) 492-3535 HARVARDSTREETDENTAL.COM

PHYSICAL THERAPY

SPAULDING CAMBRIDGE 1575 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 876-4344 SPAULDINGREHAB.ORG

515 MEDFORD ST (MAGOUN SQUARE) • 844-44-FLOAT

FLOATBOSTON.COM

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 19


SCOUT’S HONORED

FOOD

Gustazo LATIN AMERICAN

2067 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. (617) 487-8296 GUSTAZO-CUBANCAFE.COM/ CAMBRIDGE Chef Patricia Estorino and her husband Adolfo de la Vega opened their first restaurant—a small place in Belmont—it was a practical decision. “I think we were just really, really hungry for Cuban cooking, and we couldn’t see many choices for that,” says Estorino with a laugh. Both natives of Cuba who came to America in 2001, when de la Vega received a scholarship to the Longy School of Music at Bard College. The couple now find themselves satisfying many more appetites for Cuban cuisine at Gustazo, where she runs the kitchen and he manages the house. The result of their teamwork has been embraced by the food lovers of Cambridge. And while there were many places to find good Latin American cuisine in and around the city before Gustazo, Estorino says she wanted to offer the kind of hearty, flavorful food she learned to cook from her family growing up. “My grandmother was a fantastic cook,” she says. “I remember her in a tiny kitchen where she would make these amazing gourmet creations in such a limited space.” And a couple of years ago, when her mother moved to Cambridge after the couple had a baby, Estorino was reminded of just how talented she was, too: “It was sort of like a new discovery of what a good cook she is.” Now when she steps into Gustazo’s kitchen, Estorino strives to offer her guests both the honest style of Cuban home-cooking,

20 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

and new interpretations of the ingredients her mother and grandmother relied upon. If you’re new to Cuban food, she might suggest ropa fieja, a shredded beef dish that’s cooked for a long time with sofrito—the Latin cousin of French mirepoix, a combination of garlic, onions, and peppers. Or she’d suggest arroz con pollo, a classic chicken and rice dish. “I think it’s very hearty and flavorful,” she said of Cuban cooking. “It uses a lot of spices, but it’s not necessarily spicy. Everything has a lot of cooking processes and ... I like to think of it as an honest way of making food.” But she also loves to experiment. For instance, both her mother and grandmother would cook with cangerjo (crab) and cachucha peppers, which Estorino described as looking like a Scotch bonnet but without the heat. However, they weren’t something usually used in the same dish. Estorino

brings them together in enchiladas de cangerjo. “It has nothing to do with a Mexican enchilada,” she explains. “It just means ‘cooked with chiles.’ I cook the crab with sofrito, allspice, cumin, and then we stuff the peppers with the crab and serve them with some watercress, shredded carrots, and beet crème fraiche. I think the crab and peppers are very authentic to Cuban cuisine, but not necessarily put together.” Because the couple also both have a background in the arts, they wanted to incorporate that into the restaurant, as well. Thus, on the walls of Gustazo you will find reproductions of movie posters—but look closer and you’ll notice that while they look familiar, they aren’t the ones Hollywood released. “In Havana we have a very vibrant arts scene in general. There’s an important film festival and an institute of cinematic arts,” she says. “They had artists that worked for the institute that

Best Latin American Food

would create original posters whenever a movie would be shown there from America, or from the Soviet Union or Eastern Europe. We find them quite special.” With Gustazo winning over diners and their original location now in Waltham, not to mention a young child at home, Estorino said she and de la Vega feel like their plates are full. “We are plenty busy now,” she says in response to an inquiry about future plans. “We’re very happy to be in Cambridge. I think it’s a very special city.”

Gustazo photo courtesy of Gustazo. Veggie Galaxy photo courtesy of Veggie Galaxy. Formaggio photos courtesy of Formaggio.


RESTAURANT IN NORTH CAMBRIDGE

THE TABLE AT SEASON TO TASTE

2447 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 871-9468 CAMBRIDGETABLE.COM

RESTAURANT IN HARVARD SQUARE

ALDEN & HARLOW

40 BRATTLE ST., (617) 864-2100 ALDENHARLOW.COM

RESTAURANT IN AREA FOUR

BREAKFAST RESTAURANT IN KENDALL SQUARE

AREA FOUR

THE FRIENDLY TOAST

500 TECHNOLOGY SQ., (617) 758-4444 AREAFOUR.COM

1 KENDALL SQUARE, (617) 621-1200 THEFRIENDLYTOAST.COM

RESTAURANT IN CENTRAL SQUARE

RESTAURANT IN HURON VILLAGE

505 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 945-1008 LITTLEDONKEYBOS.COM

344 HURON AVE., (617) 354-6699 FULLMOONRESTAURANT.COM

LITTLE DONKEY

FULL MOON

Formaggio Kitchen GOURMET OR SPECIALTY FOOD

VEGETARIAN OR VEGAN

VEGGIE GALAXY

450 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 497-1513, VEGGIEGALAXY.COM

What’s traditional diner food like without the meat, or cheese, or ice cream? That’s the question that Veggie Galaxy owner Adam Penn wanted to answer when he went vegetarian but didn’t want to give up his love for diner food. Hence, Veggie Galaxy was born, combining vegetarian and vegan recipes with classic dishes, plus a sci-fi flair. Veggie Galaxy also has a completely vegan bakery, with vegan donuts on weekends.

RESTAURANT IN EAST CAMBRIDGE

LONE STAR TACO BAR

635 CAMBRIDGE ST., (857) 285-6179 DEEPELLUM-ALLSTON.COM/LONESTAR

The barbacoa recipe in Lone Star tacos is the same as it was before the first location opened, when co-owners Max and Aaron used to have taco and margarita parties in their house. After opening their first location in Allston, Lone Star Taco Bar made its way to Cambridge and pairs its taco selection with beer, tequila, and mezcal. FOOD TRUCK

BON ME

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, (617) 989-9980 BONMETRUCK.COM

What started as a fun challenge at the City of Boston’s Food Truck Contest in 2010 has expanded to

10 trucks and eight restaurants, across the Cambridge and Boston area for the winner, Bon Me. The trucks feature “fun, unique flavors that play with a wide range of Asian inspirations,” according to D.J. Pollard, marketing and community specialist for Bon Me. BRUNCH

HENRIETTA’S TABLE 1 BENNETTE ST., (617) 661-5005 HENRIETTASTABLE.COM

Henrietta’s Table prioritizes food that is fresh and local—so much so that they grow their own herbs and raise their own honeybees on-site. The restaurant’s breakfast menu boasts classic dishes like waffles and hotcakes, fresh eggs and omelets, plus a selection of “New England Favorites.” The menu regularly rotates based on seasonal, fresh ingredients.

244 HURON AVE., (617) 354-4750, FORMAGGIOKITCHEN.COM General manager Julia Hallman says Formaggio Kitchen knows the best way to get the most amazing foodstuffs for their customers is to import

them directly. So she travels to find delicacies that are so hyperlocal, they’re often made by one person and have never left their home country or region. And that leads to things like …

SCHWERTER MUSTARD, GERMANY: “It just will completely blow your mind,” says Hallman. “It’s the kind of mustard you open up, take a big spoonful, put it on a sausage, and just go to town.”

QUINOA SOUFFLÉ BY DINETTE NATIONALE, QUEBEC: “I tasted it and, oh my God, it was great! It has a little tamari in it, it’s sweet and savory, it’s gluten free. It’s almost like a toffee, in a way, but the quinoa puffs are folded in so it’s crunchy.” OREGANO TAGETUS FROM DAPHNIS AND CHLOE, GREECE: “Our spice purveyor gave us an insider tip on where to go, and we went to a mountainside where one of their herbs is grown. It’s really phenomenal, especially in summertime with all the fresh produce we have. You’d think using a dried spice is counterintuitive on fresh ingredients, but it really works.” scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 21


SCOUT’S HONORED

Ana Sortun, Oleana CHEF RESTAURANT OVERALL MIDDLE EASTERN RESTAURANT IN INMAN SQUARE OUTDOOR DINING 134 HAMPSHIRE STREET (617) 661-0505 OLEANARESTAURANT.COM

The moment that set Chef Ana Sortun on the path that would lead to Oleana happened, appropriately enough, at the table. “Back in the ‘90s I was invited to go to Turkey and study with a woman who was randomly having dinner with my boss at the restaurant I was working at,” recalls Sortun. “She said she would teach me everything she knew about Turkish cuisine.” That woman was the food journalist Ayfer Tuzcu Unsal, and she took Sortun under her wing— first for a few weeks in her own home kitchen, and then introducing Sortun to the Ferda Erdinc, the chef and owner of Zencefil (“ginger” in

BAR FOOD

ROXY’S GRILLED CHEESE

292 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 945-7244 ROXYSGRILLEDCHEESE.COM

A hot griddle and some butter can turn bread into a religious experience, especially when cheese is involved. Once relegated to childhood comfort food status, today it is recognized as worth of top-billing on menus. Ham and Cheese: Put copious amounts of three cheeses between slices of pan de mié, and it’s the short road to nirvana. For this sandwich, Roxy’s also stuffs it full of Black Forest ham, pickles, caramelized onions, and their signature sauce. Divine! Poutine: You can only envy Canada’s health care system, but at least we can eat their poutine! Perfectly cooked fries are the foundation upon which a generous helping of cheese curds from 22 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

Turkish) in Istanbul. “It was a crossroads for me,” says Sortun. “It completely changed everything I wanted to cook and do.” She’s still exploring and cooking with those flavors she fell in love with, and travels to Turkey every year to continue discovering new dishes, spices, and techniques … all of which pay handsome dividends to her guests at Oleana. She also finds inspiration from the people around her. The spice grinder Oleana uses, for example, introduced her to a black cumin that she describes as “really funky.” She put it to work in a dish called fatteh—a crispbread sandwiched with caramelized onions and seared cauliflower. “It’s not traditional, even though fatteh has caramelized onions and crispbread,” she says. Another inspiration came from an armenian friend who made her his version of topik, a stuffed hummus. “I’d been familiar with it for years, but he made it one night and it really moved me,” says Sortun. “I changed my version to be more like

his version, and it stuck.” Made with tahini, cumin, and onions (or leeks when they’re in season), it will remind guests of hummus. But it also has pine nuts, currants, allspice, and cinnamon. “It’s still soft and creamy, but not as thin as hummus,” she says. “And we have really crispy shoestring potatoes underneath it, so when you take your fork to it you get a really crunchy element to it, too. “There’s so many ways I’m inspired,” she adds. “Sometimes an ingredient, sometimes a spice blend, sometimes a person. It’s never consistent, and that’s how true inspiration comes. Even after 18 years of running Oleana, Sortun says she is still floored by the five Scout’s Honored categories in which Oleana garnered the top spot. “Oh my God, it feels awesome!” she said of the appreciation she sees from the neighborhood her restaurant calls home. “It’s what we live and breathe to do, right? We aspire to be part of the community and a place people love and adore and feel like is their own.”

Maplebrook Farm are heaped, then the whole thing is blanketed with rich, dark gravy. O, Canada!

topped with daiya mozzarella, citrus-balsamic baked tofu, roasted garlic, and a dash of fresh basil.

PIZZA

ASIAN

1238 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 547-0836 ALLSTARPIZZABAR.COM

1933 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 868-4200 SUGARSPICES.SQUARESPACE.COM

ALL STAR PIZZA BAR

Huge slices of pizza (basically a quarter-pie) and Star Wars lunch boxes on the counter, in a neighborhood joint with a laid-back vibe. What more could you want? Start with these …. Funky: It’s a blue plate lunch on a pizza crust—shaved steak, creamy mashed potatoes, bacon gravy, pickled red onions, jack cheese, and a sprinkling of fresh cilantro. You’ll wonder why you never put gravy on pizza before. Baked and Tofused: The vegan yin to Funky’s meaty yang. A sauce made from sun-dried tomatoes,

SUGAR & SPICE

Think you know Thai cuisine? Trust us, you don’t—not the genuine regional cuisines of Thailand. Lucky for you, Penjan Janburiwong, head chef and owner of Sugar & Spice, has recently revamped the menu to reflect those four distinct regions and their unique dishes. Stunning colors, passionate flavors, gorgeous platings await you. And the allnatural, authentic ingredients— with evocative names like butterfly pea flower and sea melody—will amaze your palate. From the tiniest bite to the heartiest platter, you get to discover Thai food all over again. Oleana photo by Kristin Teig. Grafton Street photo courtesy of Grafton Street.


Grafton Street BURGER

1230 MASSACHUSETTS AVE, (617) 497-0400 GRAFTONSTREETCAMBRIDGE.COM

Best Chef

Joseph Henderek became the executive chef at Grafton Street in August 2018, and right at the top of his list from coowners Patrick and Peter Lee was developing a truly great burger. “One of the first things the Lee brothers wanted to do was to really nail down that specific Grafton Street burger—not just lettuce, tomato, cheese, onion, pickle,” says Henderek. So they sourced hormone-free beef from Brandt Farms, found an Irish cheddar cheese (from a cheesemaker called Grafton Village Cheese, coincidentally), slab bacon from Neuske’s in Wisconsin, caramelized onions, a house-made sauce … and, of course, the bun. “We went to LaVallee in Malden, the gold standard of brioche buns on the East Coast,” says Henderek. The resulting burger is both something special, but also something that felt natural—all of the elements go together. And that’s important, he says, because Grafton Street’s clientele is nothing if not burger-savvy. “Absolutely,” he says. “It’s based solely on the fact we’re adjacent to the Harvard campus. We have people coming not only from all over the country, but all over the world. And when you travel, you like to try the local speciality.” And can there be a more

American food than the hamburger? “I like to think we’ve carved out this niche where if you want a good American burger and you’re visiting Harvard, visiting Cambridge, we’re the place to go,” says Henderek. Henderek says his burger philosophy has definitely evolved over time, and he has found inspiration in restaurants as diverse as Au Cheval in Chicago (“There’s not a lot of bells and whistles—a garlic aioli, cheddar cheese, and one, two, or three patties.”) to the Eagle Cafe at Boston College (“When we were revamping our burger, that was one of the places we had to go.”). And, of course, he wanted to ensure that Grafton Street’s burger had the perfect sides … but in his mind, that didn’t necessarily just mean fries or the like. For Henderek, the most important accompaniment is the atmosphere of the place you get your burger. “When you want a burger and go into a bar, you want a cold beer, friendly service, and good food,” he says. “It’s almost carnal. You get caught up in a game and who cares if it’s Cincinnati and Utah State who are playing, it’s a close game! You want to say, we enjoyed where we were, the food was great, and we stayed an hour longer than we meant to. That’s my goal as a chef, really—to check all those boxes.” scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 23


SCOUT’S HONORED

EH Chocolatier

SWEET TOOTH SATISFIER

145 HURON AVE., (617) 284-6096 EHCHOCOLATIER.COM

Best Sweet Tooth Satisfier

If chocolatiers were accorded authority in line with level of ecstasy their confections provide, then Elaine Hsieh and Catharine Sweeney might just rule the world. Co-owners of EHChocolatier, they have been feted repeatedly for their flavors, methods, and presentation, and just to walk into their little shop is to see all of your chocolate-flavored dreams come to life. Hsieh says she loved candy as a girl, but it wasn’t until she went to culinary school and studied pastry making, and then opened her own dessert shop, that she embraced the true potential of chocolate. “I think, for me, chocolate is much more than eating chocolate—it’s working with it, it’s really a beautiful medium,” she says. “In some ways by limiting ourselves to just chocolate, it opens you up wider in terms of being creative within the structure of chocolate.” And that creativity is on clear display in the glass-front cases at EHChocolatier, in ways both familiar and startlingly new. CARAMELIZED WHITE CHOCOLATE BAR: Starting with Valrhona white chocolate, Hsieh says the process of caramelizing it is long and involved. A tray of chocolate goes into a low-temperature oven for a few hours, and every five minutes or so it has to be pulled out and mixed to ensure it stays smooth. Eventually the milk proteins caramelize and you get “this

24 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

dulce la leche phenomenon,” she says. They add a little salt to the chocolate before tempering, then added crushed-up candied cacao nibs for texture and a hint of bitterness. The result is a white chocolate utterly unlike anything you’ve experienced. DARK CHOCOLATE GRANOLA: A newer addition to their offerings, the homemade granola started out with a mix of honey and maple syrup for their binding and sweetening power. But

when a customer asked if it was vegan, they decided to experiment with taking the honey out and adding more maple syrup. When testing proved it to be just as good as the original, they made the switch permanent. “If there isn’t a difference in taste,” Hsieh says of such experimentations, “we’re happy to make the switch so more people can enjoy it. PECAN CLUSTERS: Call them turtles, call them

pralines, this classic confection of nuts, caramel, and chocolate has been tweaked in EHChocolatier’s signature manner. “The caramel we make for our clusters, we take it darker,” explains Hsieh. “We use Knob Creek Bourbon in it so it has more depth. And we always, always, always roast and candy our pecans with maple syrup and salt. Each part we try to touch on so when they all come together, our goal is for them to feel like it’s the best pecan cluster they’ve ever had.”

EH Chocolatier photo courtesy of EHChocolatier. Highland Fried and Life Alive photos by Adrianne Mathiowetz. Giulia photo courtesy of Giulia.


CATERING

TAKEOUT

2447 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 826-9037 SEASONTOTASTECATERING.COM

225 HAMPSHIRE ST., (617) 547-8272 PUNJABIDHABA.CO

SEASON TO TASTE

PUNJABI DHABA

KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT

BUTCHER

32 CHURCH ST., (617) 864-6100 BORDERCAFE.COM

92 KIRKLAND ST., (617) 576-6328 SAVENORSMARKET.COM

BORDER CAFÉ

SAVENOR’S MARKET

SERVICE STAFF

BAKERY

1755 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 714-4944 ABBEYRESTAURANT.COM

190 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 225-2525 FLOURBAKERY.COM

THE ABBEY

FLOUR BAKERY & CAFÉ

COFFEE SHOP OR CAFÉ

SUSHI

1369 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 576-1369 1369COFFEEHOUSE.COM

1105 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 492-0434 CAFESUSHICAMBRIDGE.COM

1369 COFFEE HOUSE CHEAP EATS

CHARLIE’S KITCHEN 10 ELIOT ST., (617) 492-9496 CHARLIESKITCHEN.COM

CAFÉ SUSHI GREEK

GREEK CORNER RESTAURANT

2366 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 661-5655 GREEKCORNER.US

AMERICAN

HIGHLAND FRIED

1271 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 714-4662 HIGHLANDFRIED.COM

Giulia

PLACE TO SPLURGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT IN PORTER SQUARE

1682 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 441-2800, GIULIARESTAURANT.COM

GLUTEN-FREE

LIFE ALIVE

765 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 354-5433 LIFEALIVE.COM

Chef and owner Michael Pagliarini of Giulia believes that the secret to the restaurant’s popularity rests in the fact “we’ve remained true to ourselves” since opening almost seven years ago. “From the beginning it was honest, authentic, hard-working, and dedicated to the craft and art of being a good cook, which is a pursuit for us. We’re chasing after it every day,” says Pagliarini. “Having a genuine, warm spirit of hospitality that makes people feel welcome. People walk into Giulia and feel like it’s their restaurant, and that’s a dream for me.” He believes that Giulia offers a level of execution and craft on par with like-minded institutions of fine dining around the country, and this is accomplished by focusing on “an elevated experience.” Which means never growing complacent. “I think you stagnate if you don’t try to elevate your craft, elevate your menu,” he says. “You try to wrap it in an experience

that’s warm and inviting, that fits your lifestyle right now. This is the way people like to engage in our community.” For Pagliarini, one important aspect of the craft is working with local producers. Not only does that mean knowing he’ll have quality in-season ingredients, but sometimes there will be surprises. “One of our farmers from Dartmouth showed up with the best muskmelons I’ve ever experienced,” he says. It took him three or four years to develop these melon plants.” In fact, when they cut open the melons to taste them, the farmer scooped out the seeds to take back with him so he could keep growing the varietal. Pagliarini served the melon with prosciutto di Parma, some toasted pine nuts, and a pine bud syrup from the Dolomite Mountains in Italy. “And that’s where we’re at our best,” he says. “When we have the confluence of hyperlocal telling the story of where you are, and also the experience of the best of the Italian table.” scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 25


SCOUT’S HONORED

DRINKS

BARISTA

1369 COFFEE HOUSE - LIP 1369 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 576-1369 1369COFFEEHOUSE.COM

Best Brewery

Lamplighter Brewing Co. BREWERY

284 BROADWAY (617) 945-0450 LAMPLIGHTERBREWING.COM After eight or nine years of homebrewing, Lamplighter Brewing Co. co-founders Cayla Marvil and AC Jones decided that Cambridge could use more than one brewery. It took another three years to open the doors at their location, which used to be the auto repair shop Metric System, and Lamplighter has continued to grow and be a place for beers, coldbrews, and Cambridge community since it opened in 2016. The name Lamplighter is a tribute to the gas lamps around downtown Cambridge, as well as the origin of many catchphrases (“We love Lamp”). Their beer selection, which is all made in-house, is constantly changing as they rotate and develop new flavors. “For us, we want to rotate

26 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

everything, to always have something new in the taproom that goes out to distribution as well,” Marvil says. “We want to match Cambridge in a sense and be really fun and different and innovative and diverse.” The beers—which are developed by Lamplighter brewmaster Tyler Fitzpatrick— include IPAs, fruited sours, and seasonal specials. There’s no guarantee that a beer will stick around between your visits to Lamplighter Brewing Co., but some favorites, like Rabbit Rabbit and Birds of a Feather, make frequent appearances. “We look at the market and what consumers want to drink and what’s popular, so that of course ties into IPAs, which is a huge chunk of our menu,” Marvil says, “but then also what we want to be drinking and what’s going to round out our tap list, and do we always have something for everybody on that list, ranging all the way from lager to bourbon barrel aged stout.” And Cambridge seems to have embraced this approach.

Within their first two years, Lamplighter added a second back taproom in a space that was originally set aside for production, to accommodate the crowds. They distribute to 250 liquor stores and 30 bars and restaurants in the area. On an average week, Lamplighter invites local businesses or entrepreneurs into their kitchen and taproom for pop-ups; they might host five of these pop-ups in a week. As Lamplighter Brewing Co. approaches the third anniversary of their Broadway location, Marvil says that they hope to increase the ways that Lamplighter gives back to the community. Beginning September, every month Lamplighter will feature one beer themed around a nonprofit organization or cause. For each beer purchased, one dollar will be donated to that organization. “As we’re maturing as a company, we’re trying to do more and more to give back and be an integral part of the community through donations and outreach,” Marvil says.

Hometown: Milford, Connecticut Barista since: 2017 Favorite drink to make: A latte! (Specifically a 12 oz. one in a forhere mug.) Fun fact about you: I wrote a book of poetry about My Chemical Romance; it’s called We’ve All Seen Helena (Game Over Books) and you can buy it at the Harvard Book Store! Best thing about working at 1369 Coffee House: The community! Both my coworkers and our regulars are some of the best people I know, and they always manage to brighten up my day! BARTENDER

GRAFTON STREET PUB & GRILL - MORGAN

1230 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 497-0400 GRAFTONSTREETCAMBRIDGE.COM

In his 15 years at Grafton Street Pub & Grill, Morgan Carney has served scholars, regulars, tourists, and even an occasional celebrity. Carney ended up at Grafton Street after getting his engineering degree, while studying for his law degree. He’s been told that he “thrives under pressure,” which might explain why he would willingly repeat the busiest day of his restaurant career, when the pub served 1,500 people for the 2014 Head of the Charles. LIQUOR STORE

CAMBRIDGE WINE & SPIRITS

202 ALEWIFE BROOK PKWY., (617) 865-7171 CAMBRIDGEWINESPIRITS.COM

WINE SHOP

CENTRAL BOTTLE* 196 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. * NOW SOCIAL WINES

Lamplighter Brewing Co. photo by Sasha Pedro. Lip photo courtesy of 1369 Coffee House.


Best Asian Food

Discover the regions of Thailand with our new menu. 1933 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge • sugarspices.com • (617) 868-4200


SCOUT’S HONORED

BEER PROGRAM

BUKOWSKI TAVERN

1281 CAMBRIDGE ST., (857) 529-9791, BUKOWSKITAVERN.NET

FLYING DREAMS: CUCUMBER GOSE “They do a rotating sour series,” Lily Dromgoole, the bar manager at Bukowski Tavern, explains of the Flying Dreams brand. “They’re self-distributed from Massachusetts. Really cool stuff. Goses are sour beers with salt, so the cucumber gives it a really interesting pickle-y quality. I love pickles. It’s definitely one of the more out-there ones, but it’s really tasty.” PRAIRIE: PINK GUAVA FUNK “This Pink Guava Funk is super tasty,” Dromgoole says. “It’s refreshing. It’s definitely very fruitforward, because it also has brett, which does give it a funkiness that some people find off-putting. It’s like a barnyard-y kind of quality. But I think it works really well with the pink guava and they balanced it in a way that you still sort of get those interesting character notes without it being unpleasant to some people.”

Best Cocktails

Brick & Mortar COCKTAILS

567 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 491-0016, BRICKMORTARLTD.COM MEXICAN RADIO Tequila, pomegranate liqueur, lime, and ginger combine in this drink to form what bartender Humar Miranda calls “a play on a margarita.” The fact that the pomegranate flavor has some liquor to back it up means that this drink can pack a punch without an overwhelming tequila taste—it tastes strong, but in a good way. The Mexican Radio is also less sugary than margaritas can be, thanks to the ginger syrup, which introduces slight sweetness alongside the ginger flavor. DOLLYWOOD Sip the Dollywood slowly—the flavors morph in your mouth, presenting different facets of the cocktail one by one. 28 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

Four Roses Bourbon is at the heart of this drink, with orgeat introducing almond into the mix. Combined lemon and orange juices—fresh squeezed daily—and shaken with a single ice cube, this drink is served over a mountain of crushed ice and garnished with mint. THE BORDER TRILOGY This three-part drink is not for the faint of heart. Order this and you’ll be served a Mexican beer, a tequila shot, and a shot of housemade sangrita—a mix of juice, homemade tabasco, and homemade habanero sauce that Miranda ranks at 7.5 on a spicy scale of one to 10. The sangrita is designed to be a delicious, spicy chaser to the already sippable Tequila Ocho.

PORTICO: GRADUAL DIAGONAL “The company’s not in Cambridge, but they have ties to Cambridge,” Dromgoole explains. “One of the brewers grew up in Cambridge, so it’s cool to support hometown people. This is one of their first IPAs that they’ve done. It’s got like a juicy hop quality to it. It’s not super hazy so I wouldn’t call it a super typical New England IPA, but it’s still got that tropical fruit quality to it. It’s really smooth, super tasty, a nice bright hoppiness to it.” BOCKOR: CUVEE DE JACOBINS PRESTIGE “We age some beers in-house, which is one of the advantages we have with having a pretty decent sized space,” Dromgoole explains. “We can kind of sit on some stuff and see how it ages and how that changes the beer. This one is a Belgian sour. It’s a traditional blended Belgian sour where they take the same base recipe and they age it. It’s pretty sour, but the brettanomyces give it more than just a clean sour that you’d see with some of the kettle sours. There’s an oaky quality to it and a yeasty quality to it that makes it super complex.” BARRELED SOULS: SUPERMAN PUNCH “They actually put Kool-Aid in it, so that’s pretty cool,” Dromgoole explains. “It’s definitely out there. It pours bright red. It’s not that sweet. I was really surprised. It is very sour, and it’s got like a dry finish to it, which I was expecting something sticky tasting. It’s definitely way more sour than I thought it was going to be but still really good.” WHITE LION: SUMMER SECRETS “This is their summer ale with mango,” Dromgoole says. “I would say it’s smooth and tropical. It’s got a nice fruit quality without being super sweet. It’s very refreshing and drinkable. They also do a lot of cool New England IPAs. Their single hop series is good.” Brick & Mortor photo courtesy of Brick & Mortor.


Disease Prevention Restorative Dentistry Cosmetic Dentistry Implant Dentistry Children’s Dentistry Our goal is to help you maintain your beautiful smile and dental health for a lifetime.

Best Dentist

Specializing in preventative dentistry, quality restorations and cosmetic dentistry, we use the latest technology in combination with a thoughtful approach to provide you with the best dental care. Best Dentist

Best Dentist

Best Dentist

2016

2015

Thanks for voting us Best Dentist! 287 Harvard Street, Cambridge

Best Asian

287

H

HARVARD

We are committed to the doctor-patient partnership and will provide you with the information you need to play an active role in the maintenance and treatment decisions along the road to optimal oral health.

STREET

DENTAL

Dr. Keith Foley

www.harvardstreetdental.com

Food

BEST A SIAN

BE

ST

hi

SUS

Best Sus

HI

617-764-5556 • EBISUSHI.COM 290 SOMERVILLE AVE, SOMERVILLE

FREE PARKING AT MIKE’S AUTO ALL DAY

BES

T CHE

F - JOSE Best Sushi

MON–THUR: 11:30AM-3:30PM, 5-10PM FRI: 11:30AM–3:30PM, 5–10:30PM SAT: 11:30AM–10:30PM • SUN: 11:30AM–10PM

Best Sushi

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 29


SCOUT’S HONORED

BEAUTY

Judy Jetson Hair HAIR SALON HAIRCUT HAIR COLOR

1765 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. 617-354-2628

Best Hair Salon

Best Haircut

Scout Cambridge: How did you get started with cutting hair? Judy Jetson: I went to school at the Wilfred Academy. That was a long time ago, 1976. Right out of high school. S: And where did you get your haircut when you were growing up? J: At a barbershop, believe it or not. When I was a little kid, my mom took me. I loved the smell of it. I think that’s what made me get into hairdressing, and cutting my Barbie dolls’ hair. S: If someone is coming in with a request for a haircut, how much do you take what they’re asking for versus you put in? J: Like what they see on YouTube or on the magazine? I go by the shape of the face. And the type of hair they have. Hair will speak to me—it sounds silly, but it does. So if your hair grows a certain way, I’m gonna follow that direction of the hair, where it

30 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

Best Hair Color

grows. So that’s the best haircut. People aren’t going to spend 45 minutes blow-drying the hair. It’s not necessary. It’s a good haircut, it falls right into place. S: What do you think this salon brings to the community? J: We’re an icon, we’re like a staple. We’re the, ‘Oh Judy Jetson, the one on the corner. I live down the street.’ So people use us as a marker. We’re like the water tanks in New York City. Everybody knows, because I’ve been here so long, that I’ve done the parents’ hair before they were married. I do the children. Now, I’m doing their grandchildren. That’s how long it’s been. So to me, it’s like that stable staple store. That small business. S: Have you ever created a personal connection with someone whose hair you cut? J: We had one client, she’s been coming to us since the previous owner, probably about 60 years. I did her sister’s hair. Her sister had cancer, it makes me cry. She

had an apartment across the street from the Mass General. I went there and cut her hair and it was kind of one of those heartwarming [moments] ... and then she passed away. I felt so close, you know? That’s how it is when you’re a hairdresser; you get really close to people. I had another client that had died of AIDS. And I was around when the AIDS ... I would have to wear gloves, and I didn’t want to. Many of those clients are dead now. They used to say coming here was the gay culture. Everybody knew to go to Judy Jetson. I would hand out condoms. S: How did that start? J: My sister was gay. I guess that made me accept it more, and it’s personal now. It’s my sister, it’s my cousin. People refused to cut people’s hair, because [a] girl was gay. And that, to me is disgusting. That’s why they come here—this is a safe place here. I got every flag. I used to have flags in the window. That was back in 1985.

S: Did you ever get pushback from the community for having so many flags? J: No, because I was too ballsy. You know what I mean? I don’t give a f***. You can go somewhere else and get your haircut if you don’t like it here. I’m a woman-owned business, you understand that? I had a guy once come in, a sales rep, and said, ‘Can I speak to the owner?’ And I said, ‘I am the owner.’ He almost fell over because it was a woman. This is how long I go back. S: After 45 years, what is your favorite part of cutting someone’s hair? J: Talking to people. I still love cutting hair. I love the feel of the hair. But I like talking to people, what they did, what they do. I think people are fascinating. They’ve been places I haven’t been, or done things I haven’t done. You kind of live vicariously through them.

Judy Jetson Hair photo courtesy of Judy Jetson Hair. Redemption Tattoo photo courtesy of Redemption Tattoo.


Redemption Tattoo TATTOO OR PIERCING

Best Jewelry

Best Jewelry

2090 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 576-0097, REDEMPTIONTATTOO.COM The area around Porter Square Shopping Center might be at the top of your mind when it comes to places to grocery shop, pick up some kitchen supplies, or even catch a European soccer match at a pub with friends. But it’s also home to the best tattoo shop in Cambridge. Located in the heart of Porter Square, along the stretch of Massachusetts Avenue that ambles its way into Cambridge from Arlington, Redemption Tattoo is home to more than a half dozen of the Boston area’s most celebrated tattoo artists. From the colorful animals and emotive human faces on sleeves designed by Erick Lynch, to the intricate designs of natural and industrial

images by Dierdre Doyle, to the iconic characters and scenes of Adam Lo Russo, Redemption Tattoo has a style for anyone looking to get some ink. With a spacious storefront and plenty of its artists’ work on display inside, the tattoo shop offers a welcoming environment for both first-timers as well as those more experienced in the culture. Open seven days a week, Redemption offers walk-in consultations (but they do encourage appointments when possible). And if you’ve got a friend considering finally coloring in a chest piece, or a relative who’s always wanted a tattoo but never taken the initiative, Redemption has you (literally) covered—just buy them a gift certificate.

BARBERSHOP

Each service also comes with a complimentary shoulder massage, which Carreiro calls an “uncommon but an amazing way to end your day.”

FLOYD’S BARBERSHOP

1672 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 492-0936 FLOYDSBARBERSHOP.COM

“Every day is a wonderful adventure,” Rebecca “Bexi” Carreiro, stylist and shop manager of Floyd’s Barbershop in Cambridge, says. Floyd’s launched in Denver, Colo., in 1999 as a rock and roll barbershop and has since expanded across the country.

FACIAL

LA MOON THAI SPA

220 CONCORD AVE., (617) 714-5319 LAMOONTHAICAMBRIDGE.COM

CAMBRIDGE 617.864.1639

BOSTON 617.874.7711

NORTHAMPTON 413.584.0905

www.rebekahbrooks.com

We love you too Scout readers!

“Wherever I looked I saw hands over mouths and bodies bent over shaking with laughter” “It’s chaotic, it’s crass, it’s fun, and it’s a show that certainly should not be missed”

WEST END WILMA

“Theatre for people who hate theatre. I hated it beyond words!”

EVENING STANDARD

HARVARD CRIMSON

MANICURE

BEAUTY SPA CAMBRIDGE

1766 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 868-4778 BEAUTYSPACAMBRIDGE.COM

the

rockwell DST

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 31


SCOUT’S HONORED

SHOPPING

NOMAD

Best Home Decor

HOME DECOR

1771 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 497-6677, NOMADCAMBRIDGE.COM Deb Colburn, the founder and owner of NOMAD, handpicks each exotic household good—from colorful drinkware hand-blown in Mexico to bright woven pillow cases—to fit seamlessly together in her store. “I try to pick what I like,” Colburn explains. “I look at going to some of these international artisan fairs as almost like I’m painting a picture. I’ll choose from different fabrics and different items, like painting a picture that I would put in my store. There’s a lot of stuff out there, so I try to be careful of what I choose.” NOMAD has offered fair trade jewelry, clothing, accessories, and household items from around the world for nearly 30 years, but Colburn developed her appreciation for art and culture long before. After returning home from travels to places like South America, Morocco, and India,

32 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

Colburn hosted trunk shows in her home to share the crafts she had picked up along the way with her friends. Now, Colburn runs NOMAD in much the same spirit, traveling twice a year to stock the store with items she discovers abroad and supporting artisans who create their goods by hand and keep crafting traditions alive. Colburn uses her firsthand knowledge of the origins of each household item both to teach customers as they shop and to guide her staff. “My background was in teaching, and I actually do still look at retail as a teaching experience,” Colburn says. “I couldn’t just be selling anything. It’s really fun to be able to show you something, and I know the person who made it, and how it’s made, and sort of try to impart the pride that these people have in their craftsmanship. There’s a lot to learn!” “It’s sort of like taking a course in anthropology,” she

adds. “A lot of my employees have felt that. It’s a learning experience.” After customers repeatedly expressed interest in joining Colburn on her travels, she started leading what she calls “Art and Soul” cultural tours, too. In February Colburn will lead her next tour to Ecuador, where participants will partake in art, culture, and shopping excursions. Though NOMAD is an artful explosion of color, pattern, and texture, Colburn believes hand-crafted decor can brighten any style of home. “A lot of the tribal pieces work very well into modern environments,” Colburn says. “It’s not just bohemian homes. One or two strong weavings or sculptures look beautiful in a modern or mid-century space. People come in and always find something, and it’s always a surprise. It’s always something people have never seen before.”

JEWELRY

REBEKAH BROOKS JEWELRY 17 BRATTLE ST., (617) 864.1639 REBEKAHBROOKS.COM

Rebekah Brooks wants to bring something unique for each customer, whether she is repurposing a grandmother’s diamond and giving it new life as an engagement ring, or handengraving jewelry. She started at age 4 making dandelion necklaces, and after growing up she designed and sold jewelry to boutique shops and department stores. After a decade of running her own shop, Brooks says she’s still amazed by the array of interesting people who come through her doors—and gratified when she sees someone wearing one of her necklaces or earrings on the subway.


GIFT SHOP

BLACK INK

5 BRATTLE ST., (617) 497-1221, BLACKINKBOSTON.COM

Black Ink will hold your attention from the moment you walk in—from endless stacks of greeting cards to jars of tiny toys and colorful printed papers, the small store is stuffed with hidden gems waiting to be discovered.

KITCHEN SUPPLIES

ELMENDORF BAKING SUPPLIES & CAFE

594 CAMBRIDGE ST., (617) 945-0045 ELMENDORFBAKING.COM

Alyssa and Teddy Applebaum, the husband and wife duo behind Elmendorf Baking Supplies & Cafe, have designed their storecafe fusion to foster a happy community of bakers. “We definitely wanted to be community focused, we wanted to be a place where we know the customers and they know us, and I really think that we’ve achieved that,” Alyssa explains. “It’s fun to hear about what people are baking and what they’re excited about. Bakers are just really friendly, happy people. You can’t really be angry if you’re baking, so we kind of reflect that with the shop, just a happy place to be.” The Applebaums opened

Elmendorf in November after nearly two years of planning the menu and building their brand, and with the help of the free, volunteer-based business counseling organization Score. The pair fell in love with retail after working at Formaggio Kitchen, Alyssa says, and wanted to give customers access to all aspects of baking—half of Elmendorf ’s cozy space is a cafe with fresh cookies, sandwiches, and coffee, while the other half is filled to the brim with kitchen utensils, cookbooks, and handy gadgets like blenders and popsicle molds. The kitchen supplies Alyssa and Teddy stock include their own baking favorites, ranging from hickory syrup they discovered while traveling to practical Nordic Ware cake pans. The cookbooks, though, are what Alyssa enjoys testing and stocking the most.

NOMAD photo by Shane Godfrey. Rebekah Brooks Jewelry photo courtesy of Rebekah Brooks Jewelry. Black Ink photos by Abbie Gruskin.

Assorted mini notebooks, packs of three. $11.50.

Choose Your Player painted dog mugs. $12.50.

Sitting cat kitchen sponges, striped or floral. $6.25.

Happy Helpings and Happy Cookin’ wooden utensils. $4-$4.50.

Mini hands. 75¢.

City map illustrated tote bag. $18.50.

“There are so many books out there, and there’s so many good books and so many bad ones,” she says. “A lot of it’s like ‘Alright, let’s try this recipe out and if it works, it’s good,’ or ‘Do we have friends who know this?’ or ‘Can someone really vouch for it?’” Elmendorf is quickly growing its fan base, according to Alyssa, because customers love the warm customer service and hands-on appeal of brick and mortar retail.

“We have a lot of regulars, I think customer service is a big part of it,” Alyssa explains. “We know them, they trust us, we trust them.” “It’s hard to be a retail shop these days, but we think there’s still a need for it, people still want to talk to other people and interact with the world,” she adds. “And it’s different when you go in and actually pick something up physically and fall in love with it rather than Google searching something.” scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 33


SCOUT’S HONORED

BOOKSTORE

PORTER SQUARE BOOKS 25 WHITE ST., (617) 491-2220 PORTERSQUAREBOOKS.COM

“We’re not really selling objects, we’re selling ideas, emotions, stories, and experiences, we’re selling jokes for the water cooler, entertainment for relaxing over the weekend, as well as paths forward from trauma and the materials for personal growth and change,” says Josh Cook, co-owner of Porter Square Books. Along with enough printed material to easily fill up your reading list, Porter Square Books sells a variety of bookish accessories and also houses Cafe Zing. Additionally, Cooks says that 11 current or former Porter Square Books booksellers are published authors.

MEN’S CLOTHING

DRINKWATER’S

2067 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 547-2067 DRINKWATERSCAMBRIDGE.COM

HARDWARE STORE

TAGS HARDWARE

29 WHITE ST., (617) 868-7711 ACEHARDWARE.COM/STORE- DETAILS/16390

THRIFT OR VINTAGE

THE GARMENT DISTRICT

Broadway Bicycle School Best Bike Shop

200 BROADWAY, (617) 876-5230 GARMENTDISTRICT.COM

WOMEN’S CLOTHING

SUSANNA

1776 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 492-0334 SUSANNACAMBRIDGE.COM

KIDS’ SHOP

HENRY BEAR’S PARK 17 WHITE ST., (617) 547-8424 HENRYBEAR.COM

EYEWEAR SHOP

WARBY PARKER

39 JOHN F. KENNEDY ST., (617) 300-0770 WARBYPARKER.COM

RECORD SHOP

CHEAPO RECORDS

538 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 364-4455 CHEAPORECORDS.COM 34 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

BIKE SHOP

351 BROADWAY, (617) 868-3392, BROADWAYBICYCLESCHOOL.COM “We were kind of this, like, weird hippie shop back then. And we’re still in some ways like a weird hippie shop now,” Jessie Calkins says of Broadway Bicycle School, which opened its doors in 1972. The shop, whose mission is part education, part repairs,

and part social justice, has been worker-owned for the entirety of its near-50-year existence. “When the shop was first opening, people would sleep in the rafters back in the ‘70s, and they just wanted it to be a community space for people to fix bikes,” Calkins says. The shop is full service and offers bike repairs as well as a selection of new and used bikes. But their specialty is their classes, where bikers of all backgrounds can learn to build or repair their bikes. Broadway Bicycle School also rents out stand time (where people can repair their own bikes) in the shop, can provide oneon-one instruction, and can accomodate off-site classes. Today, the shop prioritizes serving Cambridge and

protecting marginalized communities. Signs at the front of the shop read “Black Lives Matter” and “Trans Lives Matter,” and a sign inside the store asks that customers address employees using gender-neutral language. Broadway Bicycle School hosts classes specifically for those of marginalized genders, and Calkins says they try to keep their prices accessible. “We try to find a middle way between being the most inclusive space that we can be, taking a stand on social justice and other issues in a way that you might not think of for brick and mortar business, and, you know, doing what a bike shop does, which is fix people’s bikes at a reasonable cost in a reasonable amount of time,” she says.

Broadway Bicycle School photo courtesy of Broadway Bicycle School. Drinkwater’s photo by Adrianne Mathiowetz.


FAMILY RECIPES WITH MODERN TWISTS.

SERVING SOMERVILLE HAND-CRAFTED LATIN AMERICAN CUISINE MADE WITH THE FRESHEST INGREDIENTS

FROM THE WINNERS OF BEST TACOS AND BEST RESTAURANT IN MAGOUN SQUARE Best Tacos

Best Restaurant in Magoun Square

JOIN US FOR TACO TUESDAYS!

3 TACOS & A MARGARITA

$15

505 Medford St. Somerville • 617-776-2049

ALL-NATURAL & FRESH INGREDIENTS Try Michelada recipes from Mexico, Colombia and our native El Salvador. Our cocktail menu features delicious traditional Latin cocktails and American Best Tacos cocktails with a Latin twist.

ORDER ONLINE on our website: laposadasomerville.com

YOUR ONE STOP SHOP FOR ALL YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS

OPEN SUNDAYS ~ FREE PARKING

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 35


SCOUT’S HONORED

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

American Repertory Theater KID-FRIENDLY ENTERTAINMENT

MAUD MORGAN ARTS

20 SACRAMENTO ST., (617) 349-6287 MAUDMORGANARTS.ORG

PERFORMING ARTS

Best Performing Arts

LOEB DRAMA CENTER, 64 BRATTLE ST., (617) 547-8300 AMERICANREPERTORYTHEATER.ORG Renowned not just locally but also both nationally and internationally, the American Repertory Theater (or A.R.T.), conveniently tucked away at the Loeb Drama Center on Harvard Square’s picturesque Brattle Street, has been bringing theater both old and new, traditional and experimental, to the people of Cambridge for almost 40 years. Under the leadership of current artistic director Diane Paulus, the Harvard University affiliated company has won multiple Tony Awards— including consecutive awards for Best Revival of a Musical for 2012’s “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess” and 2013’s “Pippin.” Some of the company’s

most popular shows are often reinterpretations of beloved classics. The theme of the current season is “Tyranny and Liberation,” and features shows exploring the untold stories of the wives of Henry VIII, a musical adaptation of Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick,” and a Paulus-directed revival of the classic Broadway musical “1776.” But A.R.T. has also built a reputation on bringing new work to the stage. To that end, the company will bring to the stage Emily Mann’s “Gloria: A Life,” a biographical work about the feminist icon Gloria Steinem, to the Loeb Drama Center stage in early 2020. And A.R.T.’s memorable 2018 production, “Jagged Little Pill,” directed by Paulus and set to the music of

Alanis Morissette, debuts on New York City’s Broadway this fall. Oberon, A.R.T.’s smaller venue at 2 Arrow St., closed its most famous production early this September. “The Donkey Show,” the company’s immersive disco-themed re-imagining of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” will no longer be the Saturday night show there. But with experimental shows featuring Mary, Queen of Scots (better known as “Bloody Mary”), finding a new life as a stand-up comic, or a meditation on black female desire and ambition as seen through the character of Lady Macbeth and set to classic rock songs, you can rest assured that Oberon will continue to make it weird.

“Every child is an artist,” Picasso famously said. Cory Shea, director of Maud Morgan Arts, is committed to helping kids stay artists for as long as they want. “I’ve considered myself an artist since I was 3 years old,” he explains. Named after the abstract expressionist Maud Morgan, known as “Boston’s Modernist Doyenne,” the arts center aims to serve children, families, and professional artists, through a variety of classes, events, and programs. “I feel our most exciting days are always the first days of programming,” Shea says. “Everyone approaching our studios is entering into a new experience—you can feel the creative buzz in the air.” Maud Morgan Arts maintains its Equity and Access Scholarship Fund to offer financial assistance to students of all ages, with a goal of ensuring economic status isn’t a barrier to learning art. “I love Cambridge’s appetite for learning and inclusivity,” says Shea. “ I think the greatest compliment is when students keep returning to our studios and classes, and bring their friends and families to our community events.” MUSIC VENUE

THE LILYPAD

1353 CAMBRIDGE ST., THELILYPADINMAN.COM

EVENTS SPACE

THE SINCLAIR

52 CHURCH ST., (617) 547-5200 SINCLAIRCAMBRIDGE.COM 36 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

ART photo by Evgenia Eliseeva. Gallery 263 photo courtesy of Gallery 263.


ART GALLERY

GALLERY 263

263 PEARL ST., GALLERY263.COM

Gallery 263 likes to think of itself as “the living room of the neighborhood,” a place where Cambridge can come not just to see art, but to participate in events that bring artists and artisans into the community. Allison Gray, the gallery’s communications director, says that spirit has been around since it was founded as an informal, volunteer-run exhibition space, but as the years passed Gallery 263 was able to expand its programming and refine its vision for the arts. “Our mission is to advance the endeavors of artists and performers, while fostering public engagement, enrichment, and exchange,” Gray says. “Through diverse programs including juried shows, artist-curated exhibits, music, dramatic arts, and residencies, Gallery 263 empowers

LOCAL TOUR

OFF THE BEATEN PATH FOOD TOURS

HELLO@OFFTHEBEATENPATHFOODTOURS.COM OFFTHEBEATENPATHFOODTOURS.COM

Lizzie Bell and Sam Schlussel founded Off the Beaten Path Food Tours after going on a food tour in Arashiyama, Japan, and they describe the business as “completely home-grown.” Off the Beaten Path offers four different tours in Cambridge: the Harvard Square Chocolate Tour, Harvard Square Food Tour, Central Square Food and Mural Arts Tour, and Kendall Square Food and Innovation Tour. The tours combine “food, travel, and local history” and are customized to each neighborhood.

artists and nurtures innovation.” The gallery has found many ways to engage with the Cambridge community, starting with residents showing their art in the space, viewing the exhibitions, attending artist receptions, and making art there during its summer residency program. The gallery also provides space for music shows, comedy shows, yoga classes, and drawing sessions hosted by Life Drawing Boston. Gallery 263 is holding its Eighth Annual Members’ Exhibition through September, where member artists display their works; and the following month there will be an exhibition of artist Lennon Michelle Wolcott Hernandez, exploring the role of artists in the workplace through the lens of her Mexican Native family history. And the gallery is also planning its annual Harvest Banquet, which will feature gallery co-founder and expert forager David Craft partnering with chef Paul Lang to create a meal sourced from foraged and local ingredients.

MOVIE THEATER

KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA

Fall Classes for all ages begin 9/16 and 10/15 Thank you!

355 BINNEY ST., (617) 621-1202 LANDMARKTHEATRES.COM/BOSTON/ KENDALL-SQUARE-CINEMA

Guests at Kendall Square Cinema might find themselves sipping wine while watching a foreign language film, or lounging in a comfortable seat at a documentary screening. The theater, which is owned by Landmark Theatres, underwent renovations in 2017 and recently added a bar, updating its intriguing style. The theater hosts film festivals and benefit screenings along with its regular movie programing.

Cambridge’s center for artists and creators of all skill levels 20 Sacramento Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 www.MaudMorganArts.org | 617.349.6287 MMA is a program of Agassiz Baldwin Community

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 37


SCOUT’S HONORED

WILD CARDS Best Eco-Friendly Business

Pemberton Farms Marketplace ECO-FRIENDLY BUSINESS GARDEN SUPPLIES

2225 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 491-2244, PEMBERTONFARMS.COM More than 89 years after starting as a small fruit and vegetable shop, Porter Square’s Pemberton Farms hasn’t stopped growing. “We never get comfortable. We’re always innovating and changing with trends and times,” says third-generation owner Tom Saidnawey. “We’ve expanded our physical presence as well as gotten far more in-depth with all categories in our store. So people can come in here and shop us like a supermarket ... like a Whole Foods kind of store, only better.” The key to competing with bigger, but still ecologically focused, chains like Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s?

38 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

According to Saidnawey, it’s keeping everything local. “Whether it’s vegan, plants, wine, or anything, we just work with as many local purveyors as possible. We try to stay as niche as possible.” But the specificity doesn’t prevent Pemberton from having a wide range of choices for its customers. “We’re all-inclusive under one roof,” he says. “You can come in here, get a bouquet of cut flowers, a bottle of wine, a box of pasta, everything you need.” And if you want to reduce waste by eliminating the bottle and the box? That’s where the fourth generation of Pemberton Farms comes in. Greg Saidnawey, the market’s general manager, is spearheading an effort to reduce

waste store-wide. To that end, Pemberton Farms now stocks a wide array of zero-waste products, which customers can buy without any packaging. This is for both the dedicated eco-consumer, as well as for “people who want to try something new,” according to Greg, the younger Saidnawey. This is because, to him, the key to reducing waste isn’t just providing less wasteful products, but making waste reduction more accessible in everyday life. That’s why Pemberton’s coffee comes in both compostable and recyclable cups. “How many people have access to compost bins if they’re taking their coffee to their office? They can more easily find a recycling bin. Recycling is much more accessible to more of our shoppers,” says Greg. He wants Pemberton to provide as many opportunities as possible to reduce waste, and

then let customers decide which methods work best for them. One particular initiative that’s proven successful at the market is something called “boomerang mugs,” an Australian idea Greg found on social media. “It’s really taken off,” he says. “It’s a mug library. ‘Take a mug, leave a mug,’ bring in some old mugs you want to donate and then you get 25 cents off your coffee if you decide you want to use one of these randomly donated mugs. We wash everything in-house, and now we’re washing 30-plus mugs a day.” While the mugs are for the library and not technically for sale, some people do ask to buy them. “If you want to take home a mug, you can just donate two dollars to the library and that allows us to go down to China Fair or Goodwill and replace it,” explains Greg, never failing to take advantage of a chance to name-drop a fellow local business. Every option serves to help the store divert as much waste to compost from landfills as possible. While the store has no official numbers on waste reduction ready yet, Pemberton hopes to be able to release them soon. “Now that other countries won’t buy our trash, it either goes into the ocean or a landfill or we need to make less of it,” says Greg. The elder Saidnawey, however, remains optimistic about the future: “Hopefully we’ll get this place to be 150 years old,” says Tom. “We’re one of the very few family operations left in the city.”

Pemberton Farms photo by Sasha Pedro.


UPGRADE TO LOCAL Upgrade to East Cambridge Checking Our only personal checking account has no monthly fees, pays interest, and makes every ATM yours via fee reimbursements. Easily upgrade your bank online at ecsb.com/upgrade or by visiting any of our 10 local banking centers. To open, please visit us at any of our 10 local banking centers. Details and hours can be found at ecsb.com/locations.

Harvard Book Store OLD FAVORITE

1256 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 661-1515, HARVARD.COM “I hope Heaven is based on your bookstore,” author David Mitchell once tweeted at Harvard Book Store. The independent bookstore has been a landmark of Cambridge since 1932, when Mike Kramer borrowed $300 from his parents

to start a bookstore. Since then, the business has moved, expanded, and opened and closed its second location. Recently, it made headlines for being one of the first places in the country to print the released Mueller Report in book form.

PLACE TO PEOPLE WATCH

woman explains. They have tea and spring rolls. A man draws in a big black sketchbook covered in stickers, wearing big black headphones the whole time. When he leaves, he keeps the headphones on and stashes the sketchbook in his bike basket before pedaling away. A man at the table behind me tries to convince his friends to buy a time capsule on Craigslist. The outcome was inconclusive. Outside the cafe, there’s a steady stream of foot/bike/car traffic. A woman in full fitness attire sits on a bench and reads very intently from a bright pink planner. She leaves and is replaced by a man with a ponytail wearing two very different shoes. A man in bright orange unlocks a matching bike. And that’s just on a Monday.

CAFE ZING

25 WHITE ST., (617) 491-2220 PORTERSQUAREBOOKS.COM/CAFE-ZING

There are plenty of options for people watching in Porter Square Books’ Cafe Zing: the big patio tables outside; the small tables inside that are dwarfed by mismatched chairs; the countertops by the windows, which offer a direct view outside plus full earshot of the cafe. Inside, two women sit down next to me, obviously related and with enough of an age gap to be mother and daughter. They’re both wearing white linen shirts. They talk about swimming while pregnant and why freelancing beats a traditional work structure. “Authority is stupid,” the older

Member FDIC | Member DIF

Thank you for voting us

Best Frame Shop! • Established on September 2, 2008, celebrating 11 years in business. Best Fram • Family-owned and operated e Shop small business. • Founding member of the East Cambridge Business Assn. • Offering the highest-quality in custom framing - guaranteed. • Providing creative direction for complex projects. Cambridge Art & Frame 41 Second Street, Cambridge, MA (617) 547-5944 • www.cambridgeartandframe.com

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 39


SCOUT’S HONORED

DATE NIGHT SPOT

CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL OF CULINARY ARTS

2020 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 354-2020 CAMBRIDGECULINARY.COM

Chef Sean Leonard, CEO and coowner of the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts, remembers the first time they offered a couples’ class. “We were thrilled that we sold out the class, registering six couples,” he says. “Imagine our surprise, when actually 12 couples—24 people—showed up to our first class!” That registration snafu just highlighted the appeal the school offered, and 18 years later the couples’ classes are still among their most popular, making them

a date night staple for some. “The best compliment we can get is your return for another class! We love seeing familiar faces here,” Leonard says. LATE-NIGHT HAUNT

CHARLIE’S KITCHEN 10 ELIOT ST., (617) 492-9496 CHARLIESKITCHEN.COM

NEIGHBORHOOD TO WORK

HARVARD SQUARE

NEIGHBORHOOD TO SHOP

KENDALL SQUARE NEW BUSINESS

GUSTAZO CUBAN CAFE

2067 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., (617) 487-8296 GUSTAZO-CUBANCAFE.COM/CAMBRIDGE

NEIGHBORHOOD TO RESIDE NEIGHBORHOOD TO DINE

INMAN SQUARE

40 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

CSCA photo by Ellen Callaway Photography. Inman Square photos by Sasha Pedro.


• FAMILY AND COSMETIC DENTISTRY • TEETH WHITENING • CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK • RESTORATION OF DENTAL IMPLANTS • VENEERS • CLEAR ORTHODONTIC ALIGNERS

Best Dentist

DR. KATIE TALMO, D.M.D. 617.864.6111 • 180 HIGHLAND AVENUE

Best Dentist

Best Dentist

2018 WINNER

2017 WINNER

2016 WINNER

2015 NOMINEE

2014 WINNER

11TH ANNUAL / 2019 ONE VIBRANT WEEKEND ACROSS CAMBRIDGE SATURDAY & SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 12–6PM & SEPTEMBER 29, 11AM–5PM PREVIEW PARTY

Thursday, Sept. 26th 5:30–7:30pm Cambridge Art Association 25 Lowell Street

MORE INFO:

cambridgeartscouncil.org/ openstudios scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 41


CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER 8 | ART

Painting by Noah Grigni.

ART FOR REPARATIONS BENEFIT AUCTION 5 to 8 p.m.; Free 257 Elm St., Somerville Add to your art collection while donating to the Black Power Blueprint organization at the Art for Reparations Benefit at Diesel Cafe, where over 70 works of art will be available for auction. Funds raised will go towards black community programs based in St. Louis, Missouri, according to the group’s Facebook page.

OCTOBER 10 | FOOD

Photo courtesy of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology.

SEPTEMBER 8 | ENTERTAINMENT

Photo courtesy Cambridge Carnival.

27TH ANNUAL CAMBRIDGE CARNIVAL 12 to 6 p.m.; Free Cambridge The annual Cambridge Carnival will once again take to the streets of the city with a parade of masqueraders, a long list of cultural presentations and performances—including by the Tempo International Steel Band—and food and craft vendors from around town. The parade begins at 12:30 p.m. on River Street and Blackstone Street.

OCTOBER 3-4 | ENTERTAINMENT

Photo by Quinn Cox.

SEPTEMBER 20-29 | ENTERTAINMENT

Photo courtesy of Concert for One.

CONCERT FOR ONE Noon to 6 p.m., Free Harvard University, Cambridge Harvard University’s Science Center Plaza will host two small, custom listening rooms where a variety of musical artists will perform one-minute concerts, each for just one person. Some 5,000 individual concerts will be performed over 10 days. For more details, visit ConcertForOne.org.

Photo by Tim Plenk.

LOCAL CRAFT SPIRITS FESTIVAL 4 to 7 p.m., $50+ University Park, MIT, Cambridge More than 25 New England craft distilleries and breweries will be serving up their creations at this annual event. Admission gets you 20 tasting tickets to sample drinks (plus free nonalcoholic drinks), and local restaurants will be offering food samples for $6 or less. And there will be a local cocktail throw-down competition, with local ingredients quite literally thrown into the mix.

SEPTEMBER 28 | FOOD & DRINKS

Photo courtesy of Open Kitchens Project.

42 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

HONK! FESTIVAL Free Somerville Every year, brass musicians from around the country gather in Somerville to celebrate the art of street performing with a purpose—not only is the festival about music, but activism is also at the forefront. “These bands don’t just play for the people; they play among the people and invite them to join the fun,” the HONK! website proclaims.

OCTOBER 12 | ENTERTAINMENT

WHAT THE FLUFF? FESTIVAL 3 to 7 p.m.; Free Union Square, Somerville Celebrate the 107th birthday of marshmallow Fluff—a little piece of Somerville history— in Union Square, where it was created by Archibald Query in 1917. This year’s actionpacked day is dedicated to celebrating diverse backgrounds with the theme “Fluff Travels: All Roads Lead to Fluff.”

CLIMATE, SEASONALITY, AND AUTHENTIC CUISINE 6 to 9 p.m.; $40 500 Kendall St., Cambridge Head down to CultureHouse in Kendall Square for riveting conversation about climate change while enjoying an array of Ethiopian delicacies prepared by chef Meqdes, an Ethiopian immigrant. The event is limited to 30 guests and tickets are 15 percent off until September 22.

THE MARTHA GRAHAM CRACKER CABARET 8 p.m., $25 and up Oberon, 2 Arrow St., Cambridge Like Nina Simone? How about Black Sabbath? Maybe a little Prince? Drag queen Martha Graham Cracker and her four-piece band will mash-up all of these and more at the Oberon in the kind of over-the-top performance that earned Cracker the title “The Drag Queen King.” Each night features a unique show.

OCTOBER 8-11 | ENTERTAINMENT

SEPTEMBER 21 | ENTERTAINMENT

Photo courtesy of What the Fluff? Festival.

MOLINILLOS AND CHOCOLATE IN CONTEMPORARY MEXICO 3 to 4:30 p.m., $8+ Peabody Museum, Harvard The molinillo is a wooden whisk-like tool that has been used in Mexico for centuries to mix chocolate beverages to a frothy consistency. Join Ana Rita García-Lascuráin, founder and Director of the MUCHO-Chocolate Museum in Mexico City, and master woodworker Juan Alonso Rodriguez as they discuss the history of chocolate production, the use of the milinillo, and whip up several varieties of traditional chocolate beverages for you to try.

OCTOBER 13 | ENTERTAINMENT

Photo courtesy of Harvard Square Business Association.

OKTOBERFEST Noon to 6 p.m., Free Harvard Square, Cambridge Trinken Sie Deutsch? Beer isn’t just on the menu, it is the menu at the annual Oktoberfest in Harvard Square. Well, yes, there will also be food, and crafts, and dancing in the streets (highly encouraged), but when you get right down to it, all of that happens in support of the beer.


Please join us for our

Best Liquor Store

Thank you for voting us Best Liquor Store in Somerville! We appreciate local folks shopping local. ome c l e W ck, ba ts! n stude

Annual Grand Wine Tasting Sat, Sept 28 • 1pm - 5pm Taste from 100+ wines from around the world Take home a free wine glass from the tasting.

20% OFF

ALL 750 ML BOTTLES WITH PURCHASE OF 12 OR MORE

Come join the fun, meet the Downtown family and experience the Downtown difference...cheers!

DOWNTOWN WINE & SPIRITS

225 Elm St., Somerville • (617) 625-7777 downtownwineandspirits.com


Please consider shopping with these and other Scout sponsors.

REAL ESTATE DIRECTORY TEAM JEN & LYNN

Thalia Tringo & Associates Real Estate Lynn 617-216-5244, Jen 617-943-9581 TeamJenandLynn@ThaliaTringoRealEstate.com

Bringing our expertise and good humor to help you find a perfect home or say good-bye to your old one.

RESTAURANT DIRECTORY LEONE’S SUB AND PIZZA

292 Broadway, Somerville 617-776-2511, leonessubandpizza.com Pizza and subs fit for a king since 1954. Now being delivered by Dash!

SUGAR & SPICE THAI RESTAURANT

1933 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 617-868-4200, sugarspices.com This sleek, modern Thai local supplies a broad range of standards for dine-in, takeout & delivery.

TACO PARTY MIKE’S FOOD & SPIRITS

IRENE BREMIS THE IBREMIS TEAM

617-905-5232, irenebremis.com irenebremis@gmail.com Real Estate Consulting, Listing, Marketing, Sales & Rental Specialist. iBremis Realty, Inc. powered by LAER.

Jennifer Rose

Residential Sales Specialist, ealtor R ® cell/text Jennifer@ThaliaTringoRe alEstate .com

Lynn C. Gr aham

Residential Sales Specialist, ealtor R ® cell/text Lynn@ThaliaTringoRe alEstate .com

CHARLES CHERNEY REALTOR AT COMPASS

CambridgeRealEstate.com 617-733-8937, cc@compass.com Helping You Buy the Right Home and Sell for the Best Price in Cambridge and Somerville, MA.

THALIA TRINGO & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE

617-616-5091, thaliatringorealestate.com

Our agents strive to make your experience of buying and selling as smooth as possible. From start to finish, we are here to help you. Free classes.

SHOPPING DIRECTORY PORTER SQUARE BOOKS

25 White St., Cambridge 617-491-2220, portersquarebooks.com Porter Square Books is your fiercely independent source for great books, magazines, fun gifts and more.

9 Davis Square, Somerville 617-628-2379, mikesondavis.com Pizza, Pasta, Seafood, Burgers and more! Dine in our casual dining room open to Davis Square or watch a game at the bar!

OPA GREEK YEEROS

378 Highland Ave., Somerville 617-718-2900, opayeeros.com Authentic Greek cuisine and a lively atmosphere. Expanding soon!

711 Broadway, Somerville 617-764-0683, tacopartytruck.com Building tacos from the ground up.

LA POSADA RESTAURANT

505 Medford St., Somerville 617-776-2049, laposadasomerville.com Somerville’s spot for delicious, hand-crafted Latin American cuisine.

MASS AVE DINER JULIET

21 Union Sq., Somerville 617-718-0958, julietsomerville.com Juliet is the place for you. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, or brunch. Casual dining and special ocassion options available. All in one tiny space.

HEALTH & WELLNESS DIRECTORY DR. KATIE TALMO, D.M.D.

180 Highland Ave., Somerville 617-864-6111 Dr. Talmo provides a personalize approach to dental care. Come enjoy a comfortable dental experience in her newly renovated office space.

906 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 617-864-5301, massavediner.com Since 2010 Serving Killer Brunch and Diner Fare. Now Open Late and Serving Craft Beer and Wine!

O2 YOGA

1001 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 288 Highland Ave., Somerville o2yoga.com Athletic, empowering, energizing practice improving body, mind and spirit.

BLISS BRAIN

64 Union Square, Somerville 617-821-5560, bliss-brain.com Learn how to utilize your brain’s natural neuroplastic abilities to create the life you strive for through NeuroSculpting and meditation.

SUPPORT LOCAL MEDIA. ADVERTISE WITH SCOUT. Contact Holli at hbanks@scoutmagazines.com

44 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com


MEET THE SCOUT TEAM

MEET THE SCOUT TEAM

SASHA PEDRO STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER S asha Pedro would like a dog. But as a onewoman professional photography business who also works at MIT and keeps active in the local music scene, well ... “I don’t have the time,” she laments. A South Shore native who lives in Weymouth, Pedro (which she pronounces with a long “e”) grew up in a family where everyone was artistically inclined but nobody did it full-time. That family trait expressed itself in her through photography; she saved up money from her paper route to get her first camera, a Canon Rebel XTI, an early digital SLR. “I just always had a camera on me, and more and more people would ask me to take photos until, over time, I realized how much I enjoyed it

and turned it into a full-time gig,” says Pedro. In addition to playing guitar in Charmed and Strange, a four-piece rock/punk band, Pedro documents women and nonbinary gendered musicians. “I just love working with the music community because you can be creative in a way that you can’t necessarily be when you’re doing mainstream portraits,” she says. She has also, on and off over the years, been documenting her own generation—Pedro is 30—as they struggle to find a way to create a home of their own in the one of the costliest housing markets in the country while burdened by expensive school loans and faced with a limited job market. Whether it’s photographing local businesses for Scout, creating an imaginative wedding shoot, or documenting local musicians, Pedro finds the work endlessly interesting. “I like the variety of photography a lot,” she says. “Photography genuinely never has gotten boring to me in the way that other jobs have, thus the drive to want to keep doing it.”

Top left: Sasha, photo by Meghan Ireland. Bottom left: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico. Bottom right: Part of a project reflecting on climate change and the future of nature; shot in her Rockland, Mass., studio.

scoutcambridge.com | Scout’s Honored 2019 45


DO-GOODERS, KEY PLAYERS & GAME CHANGERS

DO-GOODERS, KEY PLAYERS, AND GAME CHANGERS

CAMBRIDGE IN MOTION

DAWN OLCOTT

C

ambridge in Motion wants to make being healthy easy and accessible for everyone. And by everyone, it means everyone, from elementary schoolers who want to see their family recipes in the cafeteria to older adults looking to make their commutes more eco-friendly. The Public Health Department initiative is part of the Mass in Motion program, meaning that Cambridge and 60 other communities in Massachusetts receive a statewide grant aimed at “increasing opportunities for healthy eating and active living in the places we live, learn, work, and play,” according to the Mass in Motion website. 46 Scout’s Honored 2019 | scoutcambridge.com

Cambridge in Motion began in 2011, and it “works on a level of policy systems and infrastructure changes,” according to Dawn Olcott, manager of public health nutrition services for Cambridge. Olcott works alongside a program specialist and a nutritionist to develop initiatives or choose programs to support. “The whole point is to make the healthy choice the easy choice for people, and for us—for residents and everyone who lives, works, goes to school, plays in Cambridge,” Olcott says. One way that Cambridge in Motion does this is through its work in cafeterias and food service in Cambridge public

BY JESSICA BLOUGH

schools. Building on the work that the public health department began in 2005, Cambridge in Motion has assisted schools in installing salad bars, expanding their healthy menu options, and starting a farm-to-school program. “And that way, when they have a new healthy dish on the menu, that makes the food available to every student within the Cambridge public schools. So with one dish, or new salad bars in all the cafeterias, that makes healthier food available throughout the population,” Olcott says. Olcott adds that Cambridge in Motion is looking for family recipes to inspire additions to the cafeteria menus so that offerings can be more reflective of Cambridge culture. Recipes can be sent to cambridgeinmotion@ challiance.org. “The students are from many places around the world, either in the current generation or previous generations, and represent so many wonderful culinary offerings, and we’re looking to make the school lunches, school breakfast menus more reflective of wider Cambridge culture,” Olcott says. “It’s a way to make children and their family cultures be recognized and valued.” Cambridge in Motion’s efforts expand outside schools as well. For example, the SNAP Match Coalition program offers matching funds to SNAP shoppers at farmers markets, so SNAP shoppers can double their spending ability on fresh and local foods. Its Healthy Markets Program helps local stores promote healthy food options, and Cambridge in Motion is working with the city council to expand urban farming and beekeeping. As part of its focus on active living, Cambridge in Motion

supports the Safe Routes to School program, which provides hands-on training for public school students on how to bike to school. Cambridge in Motion has also developed a guide for cycling as an older adult. Many of the programs that Cambridge in Motion supports are in response to demands from the community. The city did a community health assessment in 2014 that informed a five-year community health improvement plan, which will be reviewed and renewed this fiscal year. The assessment helped identify healthy eating and active living as priority areas for the public health department. Cambridge in Motion also reviews health surveys from public schools to help chart its programs. “We’re always looking at the data from [the surveys],” Olcott says. “What’s that telling us? What are the directions we need to go in? We really try to identify the needs. And then also, what are people asking for? And where does that intersect? How can we better meet people’s needs for healthy eating and being?” In the future, Olcott hopes Cambridge in Motion can expand its impact on the community and become integral to healthy living efforts in the city. “I would love to see Cambridge in Motion be an integrated part of most city programs and city activities, so that when there’s an eating occasion or physical activity is being discussed or expanded, the people are really thinking about how do we make that healthy choice, the easy choice for the people that we’re serving, so that everybody in Cambridge has access to healthy food and the ability to be fit.” Olcott says. “I really think we’re on track for that.” Photo by Jessica Blough.


Find your place in the world. 85 Sherman Street Unit 11 Cambridge $895,000 2 BR 1.5 BA 1,334 SF The Carol Kelly Team 617.835.5008 thecarolkellyteam@compass.com

Currier, Lane & Young 617.871.9190 currierlaneyoung@compass.com

304 Allston Street Unit 2 Cambridge $700,000 2 BD 1 BA 869 SF

62 Tainter Street Medford 2 BD 1.5 BA 1,507 SF Listed: $560K

Sold: $645K

Erik Hook 617.461.4691 erik.hook@compass.com

Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.

compass.com

True Home Partners Lisa J. Drapkin & Team 617.930.1288 lisa.drapkin@compass.com


Oepktoberfest S t 4th- O c

t 30th

Wednesday, September 4th

Every Wednesday

TRADITIONAL CEREMONIAL KEG TAPPING TO KICK OFF THE 9-WEEK CELEBRATION

GERMAN-INSPIRED MENU, 5-11PM

Saturday, September 28th

TRADITIONAL GERMAN ROAST

• GERMAN FOOD SERVED ALL DAY STARTING AT NOON • CEREMONIAL KEG TAPPING AT 1PM – HACKER PSCHORR • LIVE GERMAN BAND FROM 12-3PM AND 6-9PM AS ALWAYS THERE IS NO COVER.

Every Sunday

Each Beer Chosen will have a Promotional Event Each Beer Chosen will be available in .5LTR and Full Liter Mugs

10 DIFFERENT GERMAN OKTOBERFEST BIERS

ONE FREE APPETIZER OF YOUR CHOICE WITH THIS COUPON. DUPLICATES NOT ACCEPTED. 1 PER TABLE. UP TO $12 VALUE. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER DISCOUNTS. 518 Medford St. • Somerville, MA 02145 • (617) 776-2600 • www.magounssaloon.com

518 MEDFORD STREET, SOMERVILLE • 617.776.2600 • MAGOUNSSALOON.COM

FOLLOW US!

Profile for Scout Magazines

Scout Cambridge Sept/Oct 2019  

Our Scout's Honored issue, where we share your picks for the best of everything in Cambridge!

Scout Cambridge Sept/Oct 2019  

Our Scout's Honored issue, where we share your picks for the best of everything in Cambridge!

Advertisement