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Richard Danielpour

MARGARET GARNER opera in two acts Libretto by

Toni Morrison Piano Vocal score

from the G. Schirmer Rental Library date of printing___________

Associated Music Publishers, Inc. New York, NY


Richard Danielpour

MARGARET GARNER opera in two acts Libretto by

Toni Morrison Piano Vocal score Act I Prologue................................................................................1 Scene 1................................................................................21 Scene 2................................................................................95 Scene 3..............................................................................149 Act II Scene 1..............................................................................201 Scene 2..............................................................................240 Intermezzo.........................................................................269 Scene 3..............................................................................274 Scene 4..............................................................................313 Epilogue.............................................................................322

Commissioned by the Michigan Opera Theatre, Cincinnati Opera Association, and The Opera Company of Philadelphia.

Associated Music Publishers, Inc. New York, NY


Cast of Characters

Principal Roles Margaret Garner*, a slave in her mid-20s, Robert’s wife Robert Garner*, a slave in his early 30s, Margaret’s husband Cilla*, a slave about 50 years old, Robert’s mother Edward Gaines, the handsome and charismatic Master of Maplewood Plantation, in his late 30s or early 40s

Mezzo-Soprano Lyric Baritone Dramatic Soprano Lyric Baritone

Secondary Roles Casey, the Foreman of Maplewood Plantation Caroline Gaines, the daughter of Edward Gaines, engaged to George Hancock George Hancock, engaged to Caroline Gaines Auctioneer, a Professional Salesman [doubles as Judge I] 16 Slave Catchers ** A Foreman/The Hangman 3 Judges** [Judge I doubles as Auctioneer] 2 Militia Officers Margaret’s 2 Children*, a 5-year-old girl and a 2-year-old boy

Dramatic Tenor Light Lyric Soprano Tenor Lyric Tenor

8T; 8Bar (divisi: lyric and Verdi Baritones) non-singing role T, Bar, B non-singing roles non-singing roles

The Townspeople/The Guests (aka, “White Chorus”) The Slaves* (aka, “Black Chorus”)*

SATB: min. 36 voices SATB: min. 36 voices

* Although much latitude is possible in casting, these roles must be sung by Black performers. ** These roles can be sung by members of the White Chorus. The composer has approved the following cuts: Act I, Scene 3: bars 136-144 inclusive Act I, Scene 3: bars 248-250 inclusive Act I, Scene 3: bars 308-327 inclusive Act I, Scene 3: bars 493-501 inclusive Act II, Scene 3: bars 259-263 inclusive These cuts are marked as “Vide” in the score and parts. Also, the composer suggests a single intermission of no more than 20 minutes.


Synopsis Act I, Scene 1: Kentucky, April 1856 The opera begins in total darkness, without any sense of location or time period. A large group of slaves gradually becomes visible, shackled and caged on a trading block. In a call-and-response song, they beg for deliverance from their suffering. The scene shifts to the lively town square in Richwood Station, Kentucky; it is April 1856. In preparation for an auction, members of slave families are separated from each other, so that they can be sold individually. The local townsfolk bid enthusiastically for these “picknies and mammies and breeders and bucks,” even though they consider them nothing more than personal burdens in need of civilizing. In the crowd of onlookers is a handsome man named Edward Gaines, a native of the region but absent for twenty years, accompanied by his daughter Caroline. He interrupts the auction when an “old estate rich in history” is brought to the block, asserting that this property, Maplewood Plantation, belonged to his deceased brother and therefore cannot be sold. As no one disputes the claim, Gaines acquires Maplewood. However, the self-assured Gaines is dismayed to learn that none of the townsfolk remembers him, only his well-respected older brother. The younger Gaines informs them that he has survived life’s challenges; once happily married, he now is a widower with a child to raise. He grandiosely proclaims that he will fill Maplewood with a multitude of possessions, and announces that he intends to retain all the plantation’s “goods and property” (i.e., its slaves). The enslaved who were waiting to be auctioned therefore are reunited with their families. While Gaines signs the ownership papers for Maplewood Plantation, the slaves celebrate with dance and music. The singing of Margaret Garner, an attractive young slave, captivates Gaines; after the crowd disperses, he takes her red scarf, which she had dropped accidentally. He nostalgically recalls his childhood, even though he had been forced to leave town under purportedly disreputable circumstances. He promises himself that this time the townsfolk will not forget him. Scene 2: Harvest time, about six months later Singing a wry, somewhat defiant work song, the slaves head back to their quarters after a day toiling in the fields. Cilla, the mother of Margaret’s husband, Robert, joins the couple for supper; their spirits are light-hearted while they prepare the evening meal. Yet when Margaret insists upon seeing her baby immediately after saying grace, Cilla, warm-hearted yet world-wise, cautions her against such an intense attachment to the child. Margaret persists, however, and sings a Lullaby to the baby while Robert and his mother eat dinner. Casey, the treacherous foreman at Maplewood Plantation, unexpectedly appears at the cabin and delivers shocking news: Robert is being sent away that night to another plantation. Margaret is to remain at Maplewood, but now will work in the plantation’s main house. When Casey tosses a fancy dress at Margaret, it is clear that Gaines expects sexual favors from her. Robert voices his anger, but Margaret reassures him of her faithfulness, and the two pledge their love. Scene 3: Maplewood Plantation, in the early summer of 1858 In the parlor at Maplewood Plantation, a reception is being held to celebrate the marriage of Caroline Gaines to George Hancock. The guests include the local townspeople, whom Edward is very eager to impress. However, a discussion at the party about the nature of love quickly develops into a heated disagreement between Edward and George. To break the tension, the newlyweds begin the reception’s traditional “first dance.” The guests quickly join in the waltz; ironically, only Gaines is without a partner. When the dance concludes, Gaines graciously toasts the couple. But then Caroline accidentally makes matters worse again by asking Margaret, now the house servant, for her opinions on love. The i


guests are outraged that a person of “quality” would ask a slave for her opinion. To show their disapproval of Gaines, and the social manners he seemingly allows at Maplewood, the haughty guests leave the party abruptly. Distressed by their rudeness, Gaines lashes out at Caroline, who ruined what he had hoped would be a proud moment; now, he claims, his neighbors have “more reason to gossip and despise” him. He dismisses her attempts to mollify him, yet watches wistfully as the newlyweds leave for their honeymoon. After the party, Gaines notices Margaret returning to clear the glasses, and lingers to observe her. Unaware of his presence, she continues to reflect upon the nature of love. Edward emerges from his hiding place and accosts her. She resists his advances and begins to struggle vigorously. But Edward is determined to have his way; he overpowers her and drags her forcibly from the parlor. Act II, Scene 1: Maplewood Plantation; Sunday, February 24, 1861, in the early evening Margaret, whose life has been sustained by her quest for freedom, begins to cry when Robert arrives and confirms that they are scheduled to leave in just three hours. He attempts to calm her anxieties, and Margaret is overwhelmed by love for her husband, a man of great moral courage and strength of character. Suddenly, Margaret notices that Cilla is not packing any of her own things. In spite of Margaret’s pleas to join them, Cilla proclaims that she is too old to begin a new life; her joy is simply to see her son’s family safe and living elsewhere. Although sympathetic with Margaret and Robert’s dreams for a free life, Cilla has made peace with her own, and sings of her reliance upon God. Footsteps are heard approaching, and Cilla and Margaret are terrified when Casey storms into the cabin. At the same time, Robert inadvertently walks into the trap when he returns with the children. Casey pulls out a pistol, and Robert impulsively attacks him. A violent struggle ensues, but Robert hesitates and cannot bring himself to shoot Casey. Yet when Casey calls Margaret a “black slut,” Robert strangles him to death. Cilla instantly understands that Robert’s action has doomed the family, and she and Margaret beg him to run, regardless of any personal danger they might be in. Cilla drags Casey’s body away; Robert and Margaret sing of their love and make plans to meet later. Scene 2: In the Free State of Ohio, March 1861 Three weeks have passed since Robert and Margaret successfully escaped from Maplewood, and crossed the frozen Ohio River on the Kentucky border to reach Cincinnati, a city in the “Free State” of Ohio. Now both outlaws, they live with their children in an underground shed, in hopes of avoiding recapture by their masters. Standing outside underneath a huge elm tree, Robert and Margaret discuss speculation about the country’s new President. Margaret shudders when she hears of Lincoln’s belief that the “Union is Sacred” and that “A House Divided Cannot Stand,” for she knows that means war is inevitable. Ever hopeful, and sharing Margaret’s dream for a better future, Robert asserts that freedom is nearly theirs–after all, they now live in a state whose name means “beautiful”! Here, their children will be able to grow up with dignity, and their own marriage will be respected as sacred. He will protect Margaret always, just as the elm tree always protects them. Only moments after Robert insists that they return to the shed because of the potential dangers facing them outside, Edward Gaines arrives, accompanied by slave catchers. He pounds on the shed door, promising that no harm will be done; he just wants to claim his property. Intoxicated, Gaines breaks down the shed door. An exchange of gunfire leaves neither man hurt, but the slave catchers tie up Robert. As he is being dragged outside, Gaines grabs Margaret. He laments that his bed is cold; he wants her to heat it up, just as she once did with hot coals. Breaking loose, Margaret recklessly plunges her bare hands into the ii


fire and grabs several pieces of coal; she lunges at Gaines, attempting to burn him. Gaines yells that she can pretend to be as crazy as she likes, he doesn’t care even if she mangles herself in the process. Margaret sees Robert outside, standing on a tall box underneath the elm tree. A noose has been placed around his neck, and he is surrounded by fiery torches planted in the ground. His cries of love to her are cut off when one of Gaines’s men kicks the box away. Determined that her children not be forced to endure a lifetime filled with slavery’s horrors, Margaret violently attacks and murders them: first slitting the throat of her daughter, then stabbing the younger one. Shocked by the bloody carnage, Gaines and his men surround Margaret. Intermezzo: In this moment “out of time,” total darkness envelops the stage. Gradually, the image of Margaret, alone, becomes visible. With defiant and noble grandeur, she embraces her life’s circumstances. Scene 3: In a Courtroom, in early April 1861 Margaret Garner sits in the middle of a courtroom, surrounded by militia officers. After capturing the runaway slave in Ohio, Edward Gaines had her transported back to Kentucky, where she now stands trial for the “theft and destruction” of the two dead children, considered his property. Local citizens fill the courtroom gallery, for they have followed the case with great interest and curiosity, and eagerly await Margaret’s sentencing by the three presiding judges. Caroline Gaines tries to rationalize with her father, and contends that Margaret stands wrongly accused: a mother who kills her children cannot be said to steal them. The proper charge, she insists, is murder–for Margaret killed human beings. The judges argue vehemently that Margaret’s case is one of “property” and the financial loss suffered by Gaines. Furthermore, Margaret has no legal right or claim to her children; slaves own nothing, least of all their master’s other slaves. The onlookers concur rowdily. Laughing cynically at Caroline’s perceived naiveté, the judges add that the veracity of their beliefs is confirmed and defended by the Bible. Caroline senses the hopelessness of the situation, and makes a personal appeal to her father on Margaret’s behalf. She pleads that a man of her father’s stature could influence the debate on slavery that is tearing apart the country, as well as their family. Margaret is not the only one guilty of a crime, she admonishes; everyone bears some of the blame for the discord. But Gaines merely reiterates that he has committed no crime; society and the law affirm his behavior. When the judges declare that Margaret is to be executed for theft, the onlookers express relief–for it confirms their deeply held conviction that they are superior to Margaret. Having sat quietly throughout the proceedings, Margaret suddenly rises from her chair, and glares at those in the courtroom. She states emphatically that indeed she is not like them; she is a unique individual over whom no one present has any power. Citing their full legal authority, the judges officially sentence Margaret to be executed by sunrise. They quickly recess to their chambers, and the condemned prisoner is led from the courtroom. Dismayed by the verdict, Caroline again begs her father to urge the court for clemency. Betraying no sign of emotion, although secretly disturbed by the trial, Edward coolly states that Margaret must suffer the consequences of what she has done. Caroline retorts that her father also must accept responsibility for his actions, then walks out. Left alone in the silent courtroom, Edward Gaines contemplates the course of his life, and wonders why he feels so troubled. His relationship with Caroline, once so close and loving, has deteriorated badly. Feeling under tremendous stress, Gaines realizes that he must choose between the love of his radical daughter and the traditional way of life to which he has always aspired. iii


Scene 4: In the town square of Richwood Station, Kentucky; the next morning, at dawn A group of local citizens–including the town authorities; Caroline and George; and Cilla, as well as some slaves transported from nearby plantations–processes somberly into the town square. Great sorrow fills the air, for they are accompanying Margaret Garner to her execution. All are sobered by the imminence of death. Seemingly, the only person not in the crowded plaza is Edward Gaines. The hangman brings forth the condemned prisoner, whose hands still are bandaged from the burns she suffered while defending herself against Gaines’s unwanted advances. Margaret is led up the scaffold steps. When she reaches the top of the platform, the hangman places a noose around her neck and positions her on the gallows’ raised platform (or stool). Edward Gaines runs in, excitedly waving a legal document–the judges have granted Margaret clemency! All will be well again, if Margaret admits and repents her crime; she simply will be returned to his custody. Although Caroline is overjoyed and relieved by this turn of events, as well as proud of her father’s decision to seek justice, Gaines’s fails to find any sign of approval or appreciation from his neighbors. The hangman leaves Margaret’s side, and walks over to accept the document from Edward for careful review. Upon hearing the judges’ decree, Cilla immediately offers words of gratitude and praise to her God. Margaret, still standing on the gallows, expresses her desire to live peacefully in a just world. Yet when the crowd is momentarily distracted, she seizes the opportunity for “freedom”–by deliberately kicking away the stool and hanging herself. The crowd is stunned by her suicide, yet a sense of awe permeates their sorrow. Caroline notices Margaret’s red scarf in her father’s front pocket; she removes it, then silently ascends the scaffold and reverently ties it around Margaret’s arm. Edward–as bewildered as anyone by Margaret’s deed – realizes that peace will always elude him. For though he made the “right” choice–to fight for Margaret’s freedom–he did it for the wrong reason. His actions were motivated by a desire to win his daughter’s respect, and not from any deeply held moral convictions. All of the onlookers–townspeople and slaves alike–express their need for repentance; Cilla proclaims her desire to join Margaret soon in heaven. As the curtain descends slowly, the crowd in the town square prays that Margaret’s final journey home be a peaceful one.

—Mary Lou Humphrey

iv


MARGARET GARNER Opera in two acts Act I, Scene 1: Prologue Kentucky, April 1856.

Toni Morrison

Richard Danielpour (2003)

(The opera begins in total darkness, without any sense of location or time period.)

Misterioso = 60–63

7

r. h.

r. h.

(Out of the blackness, a large group of slaves gradually becomes visible. They are huddled together on an elevated platform in the center of the stage.)

13 3

3

6

3

espr.

Premiere: 5/2006 Revised: 04/2007

Copyright Š 2005 by Associated Music Publishers, Inc. (BMI) and G. Schrimer, Inc. (ASCAP) New York, NY International Copyright Secured. All Rights Reserved. Warning: Unauthorized reproduction of this publication is prohibited by Federal law and subject to criminal prosecution.

Property of:

G. Schirmer Rental Library Bellvale Road Chester, NY 10918 SUPPLIED ON LOAN ONLY


2

Act I–Scene 1

17 Cilla:

No,

3

no

more.

No

Margaret Garner: 3

No,

no

more.

No

no

more.

No

Robert Garner:

3

No,

*The Slaves (“Black Chorus”), visible, on stage: *The Townspeople (“White Chorus”), unseen: 3

S No,

no

more.

No

3

A No,

no

more.

No

No,

no

more.

No

No,

no

more.

No

Ch.

T 8

3

B 3

*Although they must not be seen in the opening prologue (mm. 17 through 184), the SATB White Chorus should sing the opening chorus with the Black Chorus.


3

Act I–Scene 1

espr.

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4

Act I–Scene 1

27

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port. 8

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3

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gl.

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Act I–Scene 1

Con energia, with rhythmic vitality 32

= 152 sotto voce

C.

sotto voce M.G.

sotto voce R.G.

sotto voce S

sotto voce A

Ch. sotto voce T

sotto voce B

Con energia, with rhythmic vitality = 152

sempre stacc.

5


6

Act I–Scene 1

38

47

with an “edge”, confident, defiant

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no

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more!

more!

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no,

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with an “edge”, confident, defiant M.G. No,

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with an “edge”, confident, defiant R.G. no,

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Ch.

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with an “edge”, confident, defiant T No,

no,

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with an “edge”, confident, defiant B No,

no,

sempre stacc.

no,

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7

53 C. No, no, no,

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no

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no,

no,

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no, no, no,

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R.G. No,

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S No, no, no,

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B


8

Act I–Scene 1

59 C. No, no, no, no,

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no,

no

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no,

no

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R.G. more.

No,

no,

no,

no

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no,

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no,

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Ch. T

more.

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B


9

Act I–Scene 1

65

sub.

S No,

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no,

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no,

no,

no,

no

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B No,

no,

marcato

no,

no,

no

more!

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sub.

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An

sempre stacc.

kles

cir

cled


10

Act I–Scene 1

77 M.G. 3

with

a

chain.

S No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more.

No, no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more.

No, no

more!

Please, God,

no, no

more!

A Ch. T 8

No,

no,

no

No,

no,

no

more.

B more.

Please, God, no

more!

84 M.G. Skin

bro

ken

by


11

Act I–Scene 1

91

3

.

port

M.G. a

cane.

S No, no, no,

no, no, no,

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more!

No, no, no,

no, no, no,

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no

more.

No

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No,

no,

no

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No

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B

97 M.G. Blood S No,

no,

no,

no,

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more!

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no,

no,

no,

no

more!

A Ch. T 8

No,

no,

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no,

no

more!

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no,

no,

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no

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B

y


12

Act I–Scene 1

103 M.G. pil

lows sub.

S No,

no,

no,

no,

no, no

more!

No, no, no.

more!

No, no, no.

more!

No, no, no.

sub. A No,

no,

no,

no,

no, no

Ch. sub. T 8

No,

no,

no,

no,

no, no sub.

B No,

no,

no,

no.

Please, God,

no

more!

110 M.G. un

der

my

head.


13

Act I–Scene 1

115 M.G.

S No, no,

no

more.

No,

no

more.

No,

no

more.

No, no,

no.

No, no,

no

more.

No,

no

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No, no,

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No,

no

more.

No, no,

no.

A Ch. T 8

B No,

no,

no

more.

No

more.

Dear

God,

no

more!

120 M.G. Wish ing,

pray

ing

I

S No, no, no, no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No, no, no, no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No, no, no, no,

no,

no,

no

more!

A Ch. T 8

B Dear

sotto voce

God,

no

more.

No

more!


14

Act I–Scene 1

127 M.G. 3

was

dead.

sub.

133

Cilla:

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

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No,

no,

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No,

no,

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No,

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No,

no,

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no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more!

No,

no,

no,

no,

no

more!

Robert:

S

A

Ch.

T 8

B


15

Act I–Scene 1

139 C. No, no, no,

no, no, no! Dear God, please,

no

more!

No, no, no,

no, no, no! Dear God, please,

no

more!

No, no, no,

no, no, no! Dear God, please,

no

more!

No, no, no,

no, no, no! Dear God, please,

no

more!

No, no, no,

no, no, no! Dear God, please,

no

more!

No, no, no,

no, no, no! Dear God, please,

no

more!

R.G.

S

A

Ch.

T 8

B


16

Act I–Scene 1

144

147

150

Don’t hurry, più pesante ( = 144 sempre)

S Dear

God,

no

more,

not

more.

Please,

no

more.

Dear

God,

no

more,

not

more.

Please,

no

more.

Dear

God,

no

more,

not

more.

Please,

no

more.

Dear

God,

no

more,

not

more.

Please,

no

more.

A Ch. T 8

B

Don’t hurry, più pesante ( = 144 sempre)

154

Margaret:

Blood

sim.

y

pil

lows

un

der my head;


17

Act I–Scene 1

158 M.G. wish ing,

pray

ing

Cilla: 161

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

no

more.

Robert:

S

A Ch. T 8

B

I

was

dead.


18

Act I–Scene 1

Margaret: 164

Mas

ter’s

brand

is

166

fol

low

ing

me;

full, rich

M.G. rope

169

can

swing

from

Cilla: pleading

Please Robert: pleading

God,

no

more.

Please pleading

God,

no

more.

Please pleading

God,

no

more.

Please pleading

God,

no

more.

Please pleading

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

no

more.

S

A Ch. T 8

B

an

y

old

tree.


19

Act I–Scene 1

172

176 C. Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

Please

God,

no

more.

Please

God,

R.G.

S

A Ch. T 8

B


20

Act I–Scene 1

molto

180 C. no

more.

No

more! molto

R.G. no

more.

No

more! molto

S no

more.

No

more! molto

A no

more.

No

more!

Ch. molto T 8

no

more.

No

more! molto

B no

more.

No

more!


21

Act I, Scene 1: (The lights go up, and illuminate the entire stage. The “elevated platform� on which the slaves stood at the beginning of the opera is revealed now to be a trading block situated in the middle of the busy town square in Richwood Station, Kentucky. It is April 1856. The local townspeople are gathering eagerly for a slave auction. Also in the crowd is Edward Gaines, accompanied by his daughter Caroline.)

(In preparation for the auction, members of slave families are being separated from one another, grouped according to gender and age.)

185

sim.

188

191

194

rall.


22 198

Act I–Scene 1

Auctioneer: come recitativo, freely

= ca. 104

3

8

201

By

the

rall.

3

pow ers in vest ed and by cus toms in gest

ed

I

a tempo

Auc. 8

3

here by de clare and al low:

204 Auc. 8

The

6

6

6

6

206 Auc. 8

3

sale

of

3

3

all

goods

and

cat

tle

and

wood land,

espr.


23

Act I–Scene 1

208 Auc. 8

slaves

and plant ing

fields

3

dark

with

loam.

210 Auc. 8

6

6

espr.

3

212 Auc. 8

I

here by

de clare and al

low

6

6 3

3

214 Auc. 8

3

3

an

old

es

3

tate rich

in

his t’ry

3

is

now on

3

the mar ket for

a

gen tle man’s


24

Act I–Scene 1

216 Auc. 8

pock

et,

a

prize

in

3

espr.

219 Auc. 3

8

the

whole

coun

ty.

6

6

6

3

221 Auc. 8

Your

shrewd

3

eyes

will

light

up

3

3

espr.

223 Auc. 8

3

3

3

3

pound for pound,thebest

est

val

ue

for

miles

a

3

3

dol lar for dol lar,

round.


25

Act I–Scene 1

225

(A foreman approaches the slaves.)

espr.

3

(The foreman cracks his bullwhip, and the slaves immediately assume different positions for inspection: they bare their teeth, expose their backs, stretch out their necks, etc.)

228

Subito più mosso

= 116 6

6

6

6

Slapstick

The Townspeople (“White Chorus”): 232 S How

much?

How

much?

How

much?

How

much?

How

much?

How

much?

How

much?

How

much?

A

T 8

B

6

6


26

Act I–Scene 1

234 S 3

3

3

3

For pick nies and mam mies and breed ers and bucks?

How

much? How much?

How

much? How much?

How

much? How much?

How

much? How much?

3

A 3

3

3

3

3

For pick nies and mam mies and breed ers and bucks?

T.C. T 8

3

3

For pick nies and mam mies and breed ers and bucks?

B 3

3

3

3

For pick nies and mam mies and breed ers and bucks?

6

6

(Slapstick)

6

6

236 S 3

What say? What say?

3

3

3

For milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and 3

A What say? What say?

T.C.

3

3

3

3

3

For milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and

T 8

What say? What say?

3

3

For milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and

B 3

What say? What say?

3

3

3

For milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and

6

6

6

6


27

Act I–Scene 1

238

tutta forza

S 3

can ning and such.

O,

what a

prob

lem

to

de

O, tutta forza

what a

prob

lem

to

de

O, tutta forza

what a

prob

lem

to

de

O,

what a

prob

lem

to

de

tutta forza A 3

can ning and such.

T.C. T 8

3

can ning and such.

B 3

can ning and such.

241 S cide.

O,

what

a

cide.

O,

what

a

cide.

O,

what

a

cide.

O,

what

a

A T.C. T 8

B

6

6

6


28

Act I–Scene 1

243 S bur

den on

our

shoul

3

ders:

for

3

A bur

den on

our

shoul

ders:

bur

den on

our

shoul

ders:

bur

den on

our

shoul

ders:

for

T.C. T 8

3

for

B 3

for

6

6

6

Slapstick

246 S 3

those who have

3

3

no thing, are

no thing, do

3

3

no thing ex

3

cept

for

we

for

we

for

we

for

we

3

A 3

those who have

T.C.

3

no thing, are

no thing, do

3

no thing ex

cept

T 8

3

those who have

3

no thing, are

3

no thing, do

3

no thing ex

3

cept

B 3

those who have

3

no thing, are

3

no thing, do

3

3

no thing ex

cept

3


29

Act I–Scene 1

249 S 3

3

who

3

3

clothe them and feed them and

let

them

3

sleep

3

3

3

A T.C.

3

who

clothe them and feed them and

who

clothe them and feed them and

3

let

them

sleep

them

sleep

them

sleep

T 3

3

8

3

3

let

3

B 3

3

who

3

3

clothe them and feed them and

let

3

3

3

252 S 3

3

3

when they are

ill.

We

teach

them

all

3

they 3

A 3

when they are

T.C.

3

ill.

3

We

teach

We

teach

them

all

them

all

them

all

they

T 8

3

3

3

when they are

ill.

B 3

when they are

3

3

ill.

We

teach

3

3

they

3

3

3

3

they

3


30

Act I–Scene 1

255 S 3

3

3

will ev er know, all they

will ev er know

of

God

and

work

and

of

God

and

work

and

of

God

and

work

and

of

God

and

work

and

3

3

3

A 3

will ev er know, all they

3

will ev er know

T.C. T 3 8

B

3

3

will ev er know, all they

3

will ev er know

3

3

will ev er know, all they

will ev er know

3

3

3 (Hns.)

259 S home! A home!

T.C. T 8

home!

B home!

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


31

Act I–Scene 1

263

Auctioneer:

molto 3

8

By

the

pow ers

3

3

in vest ed and by cus toms in gest ed,

I

265 Auc. 8

3

here by

3

3

de clare and al low this sale

to be now

o

pen!

268 S What say?

What

say?

What say?

What

say?

What say?

What

say?

What say?

What

say?

3

For

A 3

For

T.C. T 8

3

For

B 3

For

(Hns.)


32

Act I–Scene 1

271 S 3

3

3

milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and

3

can ning and such.

3

A 3

3

milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and

T.C.

3

can ning and such.

T 8

3

3

3

milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and

B

3

3

3

milk ing and plow ing and spin ning and

3

can ning and such.

3

can ning and such. 3

3 3

274

3

3

S How

much?

How

much?

For 3

A How

T.C.

much?

How

much?

For 3

T 8

How

much?

How

much?

For 3

B How

much?

How

much?

For

3


33

Act I–Scene 1

277 S 3

3

3

pick nies and mam mies and

3

breed ers and bucks, who know

3

no

thing

of

no

thing

of

no

thing

of

no

thing

of

3

A 3

pick nies and mam mies and

3

breed ers and bucks, who know

T.C. T 8

3

3

pick nies and mam mies and

3

3

breed ers and bucks, who know

B 3

3

pick nies and mam mies and

3

3

3

3

280 S God

and

home!

God

and

home!

God

and

home!

God

and

home!

A T.C. T 8

3

breed ers and bucks, who know

B

3


34

Act I–Scene 1 (Auctioneer brings forth the first slave for sale.)

rit.

283

3

Poch. meno mosso

3

3

3

= 96–104

Auctioneer: come recitativo, freely chanted 287 port.

8

3

this here is Cil la.

Now

3

3

A bout fif ty, she thinks. A cook,a child nurse,laun dress and seam

stress.

colla voce

accel.

ben misurato

290

freely

Auc. 3

8

This bid be gins at two

colla voce

(A customer raises his hand, thereby upping the bid.)

293

a tempo

(accel.)

Auc. 8

hun

dred

dol lars. Do

I hear

two

for ty, two

for ty,

two for ty,

two

for ty?


35

Act I–Scene 1

rall.

295

a tempo

Auc. 8

Yes!

Two

hun dred

emphatically S for

Two

ty.

emphatically A Two T.C.

for

ty.

emphatically

T 8

Two

for

ty.

emphatically B Two

for

ty.

rall.

a tempo

accel.

298 Auc. 8

3

3

for ty. Do I hear three hun dred,three hun dred,three hun dred? I need three hun dred dol

colla voce

lars.


36

Act I–Scene 1

a tempo (enthusiastically)

rall.

a tempo

rall.

a tempo

300 Auc. 8

Yes!

S Three

hun

dred!

Three

hun

dred!

Three

hun

dred!

Three

hun

dred!

A T.C. T 8

B

a tempo (enthusiastically)

302 Auc. 3

8

Three

hun

6

dred

6 6

dol lars. Do I hear

6 6

four

6 6

6


37

Act I–Scene 1

304 Auc. 8

3

3

3

3

hun dred,four hun dred, four hun dred,four hun dred dol

lars‌

excitedly S 3

Four

3

3

3

hun dred,four hun dred, four hun dred, four hun dred,

excitedly A Four

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

hun dred, four hun dred, four hun dred, four hun dred,

T.C. excitedly T 8

Four

hun dred, four hun dred, four hun dred, four hun dred,

excitedly B 3

Four

6

6

6

3

3

3

hun dred, four hun dred, four hun dred, four hun dred,

6

6

6

6

6


38

Act I–Scene 1

Maestoso

306

= 52–54

Auc. 8

impatient, forcefully Edward Gaines:

Hold

on!

Hold

S four

hun

dred!

four

hun

dred!

four

hun

dred!

four

hun

dred!

A T.C. T 8

B

Maestoso

= 52–54

Perc.

più pesante 309 E.G. 3

on!

3

I’m tell ing you to

hold

on!


39

Act I–Scene 1

313

Playfully, but a little agitated = 104–108

(startled, a little nervously) sim.

S Who is it? Who is it? (startled, a little nervously) sim.

Who

Who is it?

Who

A Who is it?

T.C.

(startled, a little nervously) sim.

T 8

What is it?

What is it?

(startled, a little nervously) sim. B What is it?

What is it?

Playfully, but a little agitated = 104–108 3

3

3

3

3 3 3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3 3

always well articlulated 317 S is it?

Who

is it?

is it?

Who

is it?

Who is it?

Who is it?

Who

A Who is it?

Who is it?

T.C. T 8

What is it?

What is it?

What is it?

What is it?

Who is it?

Who is it?

B

3

Who is it?

3

Who is it?

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


40

Act I–Scene 1

321 S is

it?

Who

is

it?

Who

is

it?

Who is

it?

Who

Who

is

it?

Who is

it?

Who

A Who is

T.C.

it?

Who is

it?

T 8

Who is

it?

What is

it?

What is

it?

What is

it?

What is

it?

What is

it?

B Who is

it?

What is

it?

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

L’istesso tempo ( = 104–108) Auctioneer:

8

Ex

S is it?

Who is it?

is it?

Who is it?

A

T 8

3

3

324

T.C.

3

What is it?

What is it?

What is it?

What is it?

B

L’istesso tempo ( = 104–108)

3

3 3 3


41

Act I–Scene 1

328

(polite, but annoyed)

Auc. 8

cuse

me,

sir.

4

331 Auc. 8

Le

gal

bus ’ness is

in pro

gress

here.

poco

335 Auc. 8

3

By

3

3

the

pow ers in vest ed and by cus toms in

gest

ed…

(interrupting the Auctioneer)

Edward:

I

dolce

beg

your


42

Act I–Scene 1

338 E.G. par

don!

Moderato 342

più espr.

= 48

E.G. 3

This

farm

be longed to my bro

ther.

It

dolce

346 E.G. 3

can’t

(

be

sold

to an

oth

er.

)

3

349

= 104 Auctioneer:

meno

3

8

It

3

3

is true.

If

3

3

3

a

3

fam i ly mem ber calls the claim, no

3

3


43

Act I–Scene 1

351 port.

Auc. 8

sale

here

3

3

354

3

can take place

and

now.

3

più sonore

= 63–72

sotto voce

Edward:

I

am a Gaines.

Ed

ward Gaines,

bro

espr.

358 E.G. 3

ther of the de ceased.

(increduously)

363

quasi sotto voce

E.G. 3

Don’t

you re mem

3

ber

me?


44

Act I–Scene 1

Con moto (un poco agitato) = 144–152 Townspeople: (their curiosity aroused)

366 S Ed ward Gaines?

Who is he?

Did

old Gaines have a bro

Did

old Gaines have a bro

A Who is he?

Ed ward Gaines?

T.C. T 8

Ed ward Gaines?

Who is he?

Who

is

he?

Ed ward Gaines?

B Who is

he?

Ed ward Gaines?

Who is he?

Con moto (un poco agitato) = 144–152

369 S ther? A ther?

T.C. T 8

Who

is

he?

Ed

ward

Gaines?

Ed

B Gaines?

Who

is

he?

Ed

ward Gaines?

ward Gaines?

Ed ward


45

Act I–Scene 1

= 72–80 371

Edward: 3 3

I was born

a

mong

3

you

and

now

I’ve

re

374 E.G.

3

turned.

Does n’t

an y one

re mem

ber me? 3

Con moto (un poco agitato) = 144–152 377

sempre stacc.

legato 3

S No, no, no.

No, no, no.

Was

sempre stacc.

it legato

a

3

A No, no,

T.C.

no.

No, no, no.

Was

it

a

sempre stacc.

T 8

No, no, no.

No, no, no.

No, no, no.

No, no, no.

sempre stacc. B No, no.

Con moto (un poco agitato) = 144–152

No, no.

No, no.

No, no.


46

Act I–Scene 1

rall.

380 S long

time

a

go?

long

time

a

go?

A T.C. T 8

No, no, no.

No, no, no.

No.

No.

no, no, no.

No, no, no.

B No, no.

No, no,

rall.

sotto voce

3

Come sopra 384

= 80

full

Edward: 3

You thought I was slow grace note, on the beat

(Perc.)

3

lost,

did n’t you,

in

a

rough

life

of

the


47

Act I–Scene 1

388

sotto voce

E.G. game.

(Well,

You were wrong.

Più mosso

391

= 92

E.G. no,

394

you were n’t…)

Più maestoso = 80

E.G. Well, 6

yes, 6

you 6

were!

6

3

With swing

3

3

= 160

396

3

3

3

3


48

Act I–Scene 1

secco

400

più cantabile

E.G.

3

was

I

just a

3

boy

3

when an y of

3

you

3

last

saw

me.

3

3

404 E.G. 3 3

3

3

But I’ve been

3

3

3

3

3

3

407 E.G. 3

3

3

hap pi ly mar

3

3

3

3

ried

with a

daugh

3

ter

we

both

a dored.

3 3

410 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3


49

Act I–Scene 1

L’istesso tempo 413

3

3

3

3

sub.

416 E.G.

3

Now

I’m

3

3

a

wid

ow

er,

a man

più dolce

420 E.G.

3

3

3

of

3

3

means,

a fa

3

ther

with a

3

child

to

raise. 3

424 3

3

3

3


50

Act I–Scene 1 (pointedly)

428 E.G.

3

What

my

bro

ther

3

3

owned

I

3

have

right

of first

3

full, grand 431 E.G.

3

of

3

fer to

buy.

3

3

3

3

Which I

do

3

now,

friends.

3

434 E.G.

3

3

3

Which I

do

now. 3

3

3

3

437 3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


51

Act I–Scene 1

Auctioneer:

441

8

port 3 .

It

is true.

3

It is

the law.

7

6

445 Auc. 8

S It

is

true.

A It

T.C.

is

true.

It

is

true,

it

is

the

law.

It

is

true,

it

is

the

law.

it

is

the

law.

T 8

It

is

true.

B It

is

true,


52

Act I–Scene 1

447

3

3

3

Auc. 8

We

must

en

ter

tain

3

his

right

un

3

der the

law.

3

3

6

dolce

6

3

450 Auc. 8

secco S Un der the law. secco A Un der the law.

T.C.

secco

T 8

Un

der

the law.

secco B der

Un

3

3

the law.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


53

Act I–Scene 1

453

3

Auc. 3

8

What is

3

3

your pleas ure, Mis

ter Gaines,

sempre stacc. (solicitously)

457

poss.

3

Auc. 8

sir?

What 3

3

461

3

3

3

3

parts

in t’rest you?

3

3

poss.

Edward:

3

3

I want it

3

3

all.

I’ll have it

all.

3

3

3

3

sempre non legato (poco marcato)

465 E.G. 3

Ev

’ry

box

of

Chi

na

3

tea

3

be longs

to

me. 3

sub.

3

3

3

3


54

Act I–Scene 1

469 E.G.

3

Ev

3

’ry bod

3

y,

3

ev

’ry

3

3

3

3

broom,

ev

’ry

3

mule

3

3

3

3

and ev

’ry

loom. 3

3

(pointing at the slaves) molto

472 E.G.

3

all

Keep

the goods

3

3

475 E.G.

3

3

3

and pro per ty

3

to geth er. 3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

479 E.G.

3

3

I’ll

have

it

all. 3 3 3

3

3

3

3 3


55

Act I–Scene 1

482

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

(The auctioneer and Edward shake hands after agreeing on terms for the sale of Maplewood Plantation.)

485

3

3

3

3

3

(Edward shakes hands with his neighbors.)

489

(The auctioneer hands Gaines some legal paperwork to examine, and the townspeople begin to disperse. Several prominent businessmen remain to witness the transaction, as does Edward’s daughter Caroline, who will inherit Maplewood one day.)

3 3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

493

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


56

Act I–Scene 1

(The slave families, now allowed to stay together thanks to Edward’s generosity, celebrate in dance and song.)

498

With rhythmic vitality (like a gospel chorus), but not hurried = 104 Clap (follow piano part); improvise shouts, mm. 498–501

Cilla:

A Clap (follow piano part); improvise shouts, mm. 498–501

Margaret:

A Clap (follow piano part)

Robert:

A Chorus of Slaves: Clap (follow piano part); improvise shouts, mm. 498–501 S A Clap (follow piano part); improvise shouts, mm. 498–501 A A Clap (follow piano part); improvise shouts, mm. 498–501 T 8

A Clap (follow piano part); improvise shouts, mm. 498–501

B A

With rhythmic vitality (like a gospel chorus), but not hurried = 104

claps


57

Act I–Scene 1

502 C. lit

tle more

time,

a

lit

tle more

time,

more

time

lit

tle more

time,

a

lit

tle more

time,

more

time

lit

tle more

time,

a

lit

tle more

time,

more

time

lit

tle more

time,

a

lit

tle more

time,

more

time

lit

tle more

time,

a

lit

tle more

time,

more

time

lit

tle more

time,

a

lit

tle more

time,

more

time

lit

tle more

time,

a

lit

tle more

time,

more

time

M.G.

R.G.

S

A S.C. T 8

B


58

Act I–Scene 1

506

meno

C. with

the

child

ren we

love. meno

M.G. with

the

child

ren we

love. meno

R.G. with

the

child

ren we

love. meno

S with

the

child

ren we

love. meno

A S.C.

with

the

child

ren we

love.

with

the

child

ren we

love,

with

the

child

ren we

love.

T 8

B

time

with meno

our bro

thers.


59

Act I–Scene 1

510 C. We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

M.G.

R.G.

S

A S.C. T 8

B

non legato


60

Act I–Scene 1

514 C. grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

M.G.

R.G.

keep clapping S grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time. keep clapping

A grace

S.C.

of

a

lit

tle

more

time. keep clapping

T 8

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time. keep clapping

B grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

sub.


61

Act I–Scene 1

518

(Cilla, Margaret, and Chorus improvise shouts, mm. 518 through 521)

C. An M.G. An

end claps

522 C. oth

er

sea

son

of

friend

ship

tell ing

sto

oth

er

sea

son

of

friend

ship

tell ing

sto

M.G.

526

più sonore

C. ries,

shar

ing

se

crets by

the

fire.

crets by

the

fire.

più sonore M.G. ries,

shar

ing

se


62 530

Act I–Scene 1

resume clapping

S We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

the

mer

cy

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

resume clapping A We

S.C.

feel

resume clapping T 8

We

feel

resume clapping B We

feel

claps

534

keep clapping

S grace

of

a

lit tle

more

time. keep clapping

A grace

S.C.

of

a

lit tle

more

time. keep clapping

T 8

grace

of

a

lit tle

more

time. keep clapping

B grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.


63

Act I–Scene 1

538

Margaret: full voice

More

nights

to

curl

like

a

vine

542 M.G. in

our

hus

band’s

arms.

Robert: 546

More

days

to

bask

in

the

light


64

Act I–Scene 1

full voice

550

Cilla:

Our full voice Margaret:

Our

R.G. of

our

lov

er’s

eyes.

554 C. fa

thers’

graves

we

can

still at

tend

with

fa

thers’

graves

we

can

still at

tend

with

M.G.


65

Act I–Scene 1

558 C. Sweet

Will

iam

and

col

um

bine.

Sweet

Will

iam

and

col

um

bine.

Will

iam

and

col

um

bine.

Will

iam

and

col

um

bine.

Will

iam

and

col

um

bine.

Will

iam

and

col

um

bine.

M.G.

sempre S Sweet sempre A Sweet S.C. sempre T 8

Sweet sempre

B Sweet


66

Act I–Scene 1

molto 562 C. Lit tle

more

time,

a

Lit tle

more

time,

a

Lit tle

more

time,

a

Lit tle

more

time,

a

Lit tle

more

time,

a

Lit tle

more

time,

a

molto M.G.

Robert:

molto

S

molto A

molto

S.C.

T 8

molto

B

(Hn.)


67

Act I–Scene 1

566 C. lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

with

the

child

ren we

love.

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

with

the

child

ren we

love.

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

with

the

child

ren we

love.

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

with

the

child

ren we

love,

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

with

the

child

ren we

love.

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

with

the

child

ren we

love.

R.G.

S

A

S.C.

T 8

B


68

Act I–Scene 1

570 C. We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

We

feel

the

mer

cy

of

our

R.G.

S

tutta forza A time

with

our mo

thers.

S.C.

T 8

B


69

Act I–Scene 1

574 C. Lord

God

with

the

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

Lord

God

with

the

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

Lord

God

with

the

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

Lord

God

with

the

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

Lord

God

with

the

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

Lord

God

with

grace

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

R.G.

S

A

S.C.

T 8

B the


70

Act I–Scene 1

578

continue clapping

C.

continue clapping R.G.

continue clapping S

continue clapping A

S.C. continue clapping T 8

continue clapping B

poco marc.


71

Act I–Scene 1

(continue clapping)

clapping:

584

end clapping

L’istesso tempo = 104

(Gaines nods in assent to the contract’s terms, then turns to the businessman standing next to him and asks for a pen with which to sign the contract.)

590 (Cl.)

dolce

(Holding a homemade play doll.)

596

Margaret:

tenderly

I

made

600 M.G. doll

for

my

ba

a

lit

tle

play


72

Act I–Scene 1

604 M.G. by,

with

but ton

eyes

and

608 M.G. hair

of

yarn;

dolce

612

full voice

M.G. The

lips

are

made

of

(Distracted from his paperwork, Edward turns around and notices Margaret, who is wearing a red scarf. He is captivated, and grateful for his good fortune to have just purchased her.)

616 M.G. rose – col ored thread.

One


73

Act I–Scene 1

621

meno

M.G. day

will

she

625 M.G. love

it;

I

am

629 M.G. wait

ing

for

her

(Edward turns around again, and finishes signing the contract. The businessmen extend handshakes of con-gratulations to him on the acquisition of Maplewood.)

633 port.

M.G. love

it

to


74

Act I–Scene 1

637 M.G. When

she

is

old

e

(

641

nough

to

(When one of the slaves brings in Margaret’s infant daughter, wrapped in a white cloth, Margaret puts the play doll in her pocket in order to cradle the baby tenderly in her arms.)

= 104)

M.G. hold

it.

647 M.G. I’m

652

watch

ing

this

mys

full, rich

ter

y

resume clapping

M.G. child.

claps

called


75

Act I–Scene 1

a tempo = 104

658

Cilla:

A Robert:

A

S A

A A S.C. T 8

A

B A

a tempo = 104

cresc.


76

Act I–Scene 1

662 C. lit

tle

more

time,

a

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

lit

tle

more

time,

a

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

lit

tle

more

time,

a

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

lit

tle

more

time,

a

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

lit

tle

more

time,

a

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

lit

tle

more

time,

a

lit

tle

more

time,

more

time

R.G.

S

A

S.C. T 8

B

l. h.


77

Act I–Scene 1

666

sub.

C. with

the

child

ren

we

love. sub.

R.G. with

the

child

ren

we

love.

sub. S with

the

child

ren

we

love.

with

the

child

ren

we

love,

A time

S.C. sub. T 8

with

the

child

ren

we

love. sub.

B with

the

child

ren

we

love.

with

our mo

thers.


78

Act I–Scene 1

670 C. We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

R.G.

S

A

S.C. T 8

B


Act I–Scene 1

674 C. gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

R.G.

S

A

S.C. T 8

B

79


80

Act I–Scene 1

678 C. We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God

with

the

R.G.

S

A

S.C. T 8

B


Act I–Scene 1

682

81 end clapping

C. gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

end clapping R.G. gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

end clapping S gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time. end clapping

A gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

S.C. end clapping T 8

gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time. end clapping

B gift

of

a

lit

tle

more

time.

end clapping


82

Act I–Scene 1

686

sub.

S We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God. sub.

A We

S.C.

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God. sub.

T 8

We

feel

the

breath

of

our

Lord

God. sub.

B We

690

feel

of

our

Lord

Cilla:

S mmm A mmm

T 8

breath

poco meno mosso

We

S.C.

the

mmm

B mmm

poco meno mosso

feel

the

breath

God.


Act I–Scene 1

A tempo primo = 104

693

83

C. of our Lord

God.

Margaret:

We feel

the breath

of our Lord

God.

Robert:

We

feel

the breath of our Lord

God.

S With the

A With the S.C. T 8

With the

B With the

A tempo primo = 104


84

Act I–Scene 1 (The slaves exit slowly; Margaret is the last of the slaves to leave.)

700

all slaves clap

S gift

of

a

lit tle more

time. all slaves clap

A gift

of

a

lit tle more

time.

S.C. all slaves clap T 8

gift

of

a

lit tle more

time. all slaves clap

B gift

of

a

lit tle more

time.

molto legato non legato

706

claps

(After completing his transaction with Edward, the auctioneer departs with the businessmen. Caroline remains, cheerfully conversing with their wives.)

712

716

lunga

r. h. clapping ends


85

Act I–Scene 1 (Edward watches the last townspeople leave.)

721

freely Edward: (disappointed, somewhat disgusted)

Moderato = 88–92 (don’t drag)

3

3

Look at them.

They were my neigh

bors

(as needed) 725

(freely)

E.G. 3

3

once.

They pre

tend

they don’t re mem ber me.

3

729

Casey:

8

It

3

3

3

3

3

3

was a long

3 3

732 Ca. 8

a go,

sir.

You’ve

been a way

for twen ty years.

(turning back around, facing Casey)

Edward: (to himself)

Twen

ty years.

time


86

Act I–Scene 1

full voice

736 E.G. They pre tend.

3

3

3

3

They lie,

and they say

3

they don’t re mem ber me.

3

(Margaret’s scarf, still lying on the ground, catches Edward’s attention; he starts walking towards it.)

740

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

(looking in the opposite direction from Gaines)

743

Casey:

8

Some

747

rit.

thing

3

in the past,

Adagio ma non troppo

= 72

Ca. 8

Some thing best for got

(Edward picks up Margaret’s scarf, and mindlessly puts it in his pocket.)

ten?

Edward:

I

rit.

was just

a

Adagio ma non troppo

sub.

boy.

= 72

sir?


87

Act I–Scene 1

751 E.G.

3

The trou

ble I caused was in

es cap

3

3

a ble

for a

boy

Casey:

754

8

But

ev

’ry

3

boy

has an ap pe tite,

3

sir.

E.G. 3

with an ap pe tite.

3

Subito più mosso = 88–92 3

3

3

rit. 3

3

3

757

3

Misterioso = 60 760

6

6

6

6


88

Act I–Scene 1

floating, somewhat lightly

761 E.G.

3

I

un

left

6

6

der

a

6

6

762 E.G. 3

cloud

of

6

sus

pi

6

cion.

6

6

763 E.G. It

6

6

was

6

6

764 E.G. no

thing,

6

no

6

thing

6

to

raise

6


89

Act I–Scene 1

765 E.G. eye

brows.

6

6

6

6

Subito più mosso 766

= 88–92 poco

half voice

E.G. 3

3

The girl 6

was so

young,

3

3

3

3

6

768 E.G.

3

3

3

and from such

770

a

3

fine

3

fam

i

ly;

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

freely, sotto voce (quasi whisper)

not completely in full voice cantabile

E.G. 3

3

things got a lit tle out of hand.

So now

espr.

they pre


90

Act I–Scene 1

Come sopra

773

= 60

E.G. 3

tend

nei ther I

nor it

ev er

hap

pened.

6

6

776

6 6 6

6

6

6

6

6

lunga

778 E.G. What a shame.

I

re mem ber!

I

re mem ber

ev

’ry thing.

Andantino grazioso = 88–92 (wistful, yet still optimistic)

784 E.G. I

re

mem

ber

the

curve

of

ev ’ry

hill,

sim.

the

swans

in

the


91

Act I–Scene 1

789 E.G. pond;

I

ev

’ry

re

mem

ber them

still.

I

re

mem

ber

794 E.G.

799

tree:

ma

ple,

birch,

wil

lows and

più sonoro

E.G. I

pine.

can

see

them now,

shad

ing

3

the drive,

3

804 E.G. shel

t’ring

me

from the

heat.

Ma

ple,


92

Act I–Scene 1

809 E.G. birch

and the

o

dor

of

pine.

I

re

mem

ber

ev

’ry

814 E.G. tree,

but

none

of

them

re

mem

bers

me.

dolce, espr. 820

sub.

824

cantabile

E.G. The

well,

the


93

Act I–Scene 1

829 E.G. creek,

fish

ing by

the lake.

Eve nings

834

of

laugh ter

3

with girls who

full voice

E.G. 3

want

ed

to

play.

I

re mem

ber

839 E.G. ev

’ry

tree,

844

but

none

of

them

(Edward catches Caroline’s glance, and motions for her to join him.)

E.G. mem

bers

me. dolce

re


94

Act I–Scene 1

849

poco rit.

854

a tempo

E.G. 3

They

espr.

won’t

for

get

3

(Edward exits, with Caroline at his side. Casey follows them.)

858 E.G. me

a

gain!

ca. 25’

attacca


95

Act I, Scene 2: Harvest time, about six months later. (The slaves – some of whom are children, barely 10 or 12 years old – return to their quarters after a day of working in the fields. In time with the percussion’s strong, syncopated beat, they perform a series of domestic chores: chopping wood, pumping water, beating rags, etc.)

With rhythmic vitality = 96–100 Congas

8ba

7

13

8ba

18

8

8ba


96

Act I–Scene 2 Robert: full voice

23

Turn my

face

to the dy ing

sun

can’t The Slaves:

S Turn my face

to the dy ing

sun

Turn my face

to the dy ing

sun

Turn my face

to the dy ing

sun

Turn my face

to the dy ing

sun

A

T 8

B

25 R.G. straight en my back

’til the work is done.

S can’t

straight en my back

’til the work is

done.

can’t

straight en my back

’til the work is

done.

can’t

straight en my back

’til the work is

done.

can’t

straight en my back

’til the work is

done.

A S.C. T 8

B


97

Act I–Scene 2 27 R.G. Plowed the field,

baled thehay

S Plowed the field,

baled thehay

Plowed the field,

baled thehay

Plowed the field,

baled thehay

Plowed the field,

baled thehay

A S.C. T 8

B

29 R.G. go in’ to dance

on

the lead mule’s back some

day.

S go in’ to dance

on

the lead mule’s back some

go in’ to dance

on

the lead mule’s back some

go in’ to dance

on

the lead mule’s back some

go in’ to dance

on

the lead mule’s back some

A S.C. T 8

B


98

Act I–Scene 2

31 S day.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban

don

day.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban

don

day.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban

don

day.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban

don

A S.C. T 8

B

8ba

35 S me,

while my sweat still sweets

the rich brown soil

of

dear

old

Ken

me,

while my sweat still sweets

the rich brown soil

of

dear

old

Ken

me,

while my sweat still sweets

the rich brown soil

of

dear

old

Ken

me,

while my sweat still sweets

the rich brown soil

of

dear

old

Ken

A S.C. T 8

B


99

Act I–Scene 2 39

(non dim.)

S tuck y.

O moth er,

O

fa ther, don’t a ban don

me. (non dim.)

A tuck y.

S.C.

O moth er,

O

fa ther, don’t a ban don

me. (non dim.)

T 8

tuck y.

O moth er,

O

fa ther, don’t a ban don

tuck y.

O moth er,

O

fa ther, don’t a ban don

me.

(non dim.)

B me. (Congas)

8ba

44

Margaret:

Boss is hap

py

at his plate

If

S Long as he gets his fowl; A Long as he gets his fowl;

S.C. T 8

Long as he gets his fowl;

B Long as he gets his fowl;


100

Act I–Scene 2

shouted like a gospel singer 47 M.G. I stand

at

his cook ing stove,

Be lieve it! shouted like a gospel singer Robert:

Be lieve it!

S his

sup per

will

be

foul!

his

sup per

will

be

foul!

his

sup per

will

be

foul!

his

sup per

will

be

foul!

A

S.C. T 8

B


101

Act I–Scene 2

50 M.G. O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood

floods

the

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood

floods

the

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood

floods

the

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood

floods

the

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood

floods

the

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood

floods

the

R.G.

S

A

S.C. T 8

B

8ba


102

Act I–Scene 2

55 M.G. vel vet dirt of

dear old

Ken

tuck y.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

vel vet dirt of

dear old

Ken

tuck y.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

vel vet dirt of

dear old

Ken

tuck y.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

vel vet dirt of

dear old

Ken

tuck y.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

vel vet dirt of

dear old

Ken

tuck y.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

vel vet dirt of

dear old

Ken

tuck y.

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

R.G.

S

A

S.C.

T 8

B


103

Act I–Scene 2

60 M.G. don’t

a ban don

me

while

my sweat stillsweets the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken

don’t

a ban don

me

while

my sweat stillsweets the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken

don’t

a ban don

me

while

my sweat stillsweets the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken

don’t

a ban don

me

while

my sweat stillsweets the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken

don’t

a ban don

me

while

my sweat stillsweets the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken

don’t

a ban don

me

while

my sweat stillsweets the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken

R.G.

S

A

S.C. T 8

B


104

65

Act I–Scene 2

=

M.G. tuck y.

R.G. tuck y. (almost shouting)

S tuck y.

Crackuh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

(almost shouting)

A tuck y.

Crackuh back

S.C. (almost shouting)

T 8

tuck y.

Crackuh back (almost shouting)

B tuck y.

Crackuh back

=


105

Act I–Scene 2

70 M.G. Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

R.G.

S

A

S.C.

T 8

B


106

Act I–Scene 2

75 M.G. split uh wood

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

split uh wood

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

split uh wood

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

split uh wood

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

split uh wood

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

split uh wood

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

R.G.

S

A

S.C. T 8

B


107

Act I–Scene 2

tutta forza

80

=

=

M.G. Crack, cut,

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split!

tutta forza R.G. Crack, cut, tutta forza S Crack, cut, tutta forza A Crack, cut, S.C.

tutta forza

T 8

Crack, cut, tutta forza

B Crack, cut,

3

= 3

3

=

3

3 3

3

3 3 3

3


108

Act I–Scene 2

Soprano solo from the chorus: full voice

85

Boss is

hap

py

in his

bed

If

S Long

as his

pil low’s down

y;

Long

as his

pil low’s down

y;

A

S.C. T 8

B


109

Act I–Scene 2

87 (S. solo)

I

stood

by

his sleep y

head

S his

face would be

as

fluf fy.

his

face would be

as

fluf fy.

A

S.C. shouted like a gospel singer T 8

Tell it to me! shouted like a gospel singer

B Tell it to me!


110

Act I–Scene 2

Robert: 89

Plowed the field,

baled the hay

S Plowed the field,

baled the hay

Plowed the field,

baled the hay

Plowed the field,

baled the hay

Plowed the field,

baled the hay

A

S.C. T 8

B


111

Act I–Scene 2

91 R.G. go in’ to dance on thelead mule’s back some day.

S go in’ to dance on the lead mule’s back some

day.

go in’ to dance on the lead mule’s back some

day.

go in’ to dance on the lead mule’s back some

day.

go in’ to dance on the lead mule’s back some

day.

A

S.C. T 8

B

l.h.


112

94

Act I–Scene 2

Margaret:

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t a ban don

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t a ban don

R.G.

S O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t a ban don

me

while my

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t a ban don

me

while my

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t a ban don

me

while my

O

moth er,

O

fa ther,

don’t a ban don

me

while my

A

S.C.

T 8

B

8ba


113

Act I–Scene 2

shouted like a gospel singer

99 M.G. me

Sing it to me!

O

moth er,

O

moth er,

shouted like a gospel singer R.G. me

Sing it to me!

S tears mud dy the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken tuck y.

O

moth er,

tears mud dy the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken tuck y.

O

moth er,

tears mud dy the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken tuck y.

O

moth er,

tears mud dy the rich brown soil of

dear

old

Ken tuck y.

O

moth er,

A

S.C. T 8

B


114

Act I–Scene 2

104 M.G. O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

of

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

of

R.G.

S O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood floods the vel vet dirt of

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood floods the vel vet dirt of

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood floods the vel vet dirt of

O

fa ther,

don’t

a ban don

me

while my blood floods the vel vet dirt of

A

S.C. T 8

B


115

Act I–Scene 2

109

=

M.G. dear

old

Ken

tuck y.

dear

old

Ken

tuck y.

R.G.

(almost shouting)

S dear

old

Ken

tuck y.

Crackuh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

(almost shouting)

A dear

old

Ken

tuck y.

Crackuh back

S.C.

(almost shouting)

T 8

dear

old

Ken

tuck y.

Crackuh back (almost shouting)

B dear

old

Ken

tuck y.

Crackuh back

=


116

Act I–Scene 2

114

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

S chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack uh back

cut uh cane

pull uh mule

A

S.C. T 8

B


117

Act I–Scene 2

119

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

chop uh cot ton

split uh wood;

Crack,

cut,

pull,

chop,

split;

Crack,

cut,

S

A

S.C. T 8

B


118

Act I–Scene 2

=

124 S pull, chop,

split;

Crack, cut,

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split;

Crack, cut,

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split;

Crack, cut,

pull, chop,

split!

pull, chop,

split;

Crack, cut,

pull, chop,

split!

A

S.C. T 8

B

3

= 3

3

3

3

3

129

3

3

3

3

8ba 3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3


119

Act I–Scene 2 (Upon hearing the bell that signals the day’s end, the workers wash up for supper. Cilla is waiting at Margaret and Robert’s cabin to welcome them home.)

134

Moderato, ma non troppo = 80 (don’t drag)

6

Cilla:

141

3

You left the light be hind

you.

3 6 6

145

3

C. Did 6

you have

a

wor ri some day?

6

(Cilla, Robert and Margaret go inside the cabin, and begin preparing dinner.)

148

6 6

meno


120

Act I–Scene 2

Poco più mosso Robert: 151

= 84 full voice

3

Ev

’ry

new

day

3

3

is

like

yes

ter day.

*

154 R.G. 3

Work

the crops,

for get a bout pay.

End

each

meno 6

157 R.G. 3

daylike the one

3

3

be

fore.

Don’t

leave the field

6 6

*A slight interruption of the trill is necessary to facilitate this passage.

’til the light’s too


121

Act I–Scene 2

Più mosso 161

= 92

Cilla:

This Gaines

is

not

like

the last

one.

R.G. poor.

Più mosso

= 92

sub.

165

3

C. A mean

streak

rides his

brow.

più

jokingly

168 C. The oth er one

had

3

a heart—

some times!


122 L’istesso tempo

Act I–Scene 2

= ca. 92 don’t hurry 171

scherzando

Margaret:

No

such thing

as a bos s’s heart. He

can’t

waste

the space. Robert:

If

= ca. 92 don’t hurry

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

174 M.G. 3

out his own 3 heart’s

he would lease

R.G. he could har

vest

corn

3

in his chest,he would lease

6

out his own

6

6

6

6

6

molto rit. (Margaret and Robert laugh heartily.)

176

3

heart’s

6

6

6

Solemn and soulful = ca. 80

6

(Cilla beckons for Robert and Margaret to sit down at the dinner table.)

Cilla:

Ease M.G. place!

R.G. place!

molto rit. 6

6

6

6

Solemn and soulful

= ca. 80


123

Act I–Scene 2

full voice

179 C. your selves,

3

ease

your selves.

183 C. The

ta

ble

is

laid.

The sup

per

is

188

plain

but

(All three sit down to dinner.)

C. warm. Margaret:

3

3 port.

You’ve got milk and

straw

ber ries too.

poco rit.

192

Meno mosso

= ca. 69–72

Cilla:

C. Dear

cant.

Lord

in


124

Act I–Scene 2

197

3

C. Hea

ven,

make

us grate

ful

for our food.

Margaret: (like a responsorial)

Bless ed Lord

Sweet

Je

Sweet

Je

Robert: (like a responsorial)

Bless ed Lord

200

3

3

C. Keep us welland in Your

sight.

Pro

M.G. sus

mmm

sus

mmm

R.G.

tect


125

Act I–Scene 2

203

3

C. those

in

dan

ger,

and

let us be guid

M.G. Take my

hand…

Take my

hand…

R.G.

206

don’t drag 3

3

C. ed byYour Hea

Mmm

ven ly Light.

M.G. Pre cious Lord…

mmm

Pre cious Lord…

mmm

R.G.

don’t drag


126

Act I–Scene 2

210 r po t.

C. 3

A

men.

cant.

A piacere Robert: (exuberantly, quasi parlando) 215 3

You are a har vest time bles sing,ma ma.

ben articulato

218

Moderato

Margaret:

= 72

(to Cilla)

dolce, cantando

How’s 3

3

my ba

by?

3

dolce, espr.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

più espr.

221

3

M.G. Not

cry ing for

me?

How’s

3

dolce 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


127

Act I–Scene 2

224

3

M.G. my sweet

ness?

Not

mis sing

me?

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

227

Cilla: darkly

3

sotto voce

3

ing, Mar g’ret,

She’s sleep

3

sleep

3

5

ing.

Not a frown on her su gar but ter face.

sotto voce

231

A little more lively (poco più mosso)

C. (laughing) Robert:

Did you ev

er

see

a moth er like that?

meno

234

The child

sup

not quite full voice

R.G. 3

3

posed to need the moth er;

now here

dolce

the

3

moth er needs the child

more.


128

Act I–Scene 2

Margaret:

237

3

I

need

3

to smell her breath.

R.G.

241

Cilla:

The ba

by

needs her

rest. 3

M.G. I

need

to

see her eyes,

don’t drag emphatically

245 C.

It’s dan M.G. her smile.

don’t drag

g’r ous, daugh ter,


129

Act I–Scene 2 quick grace note

249 C. to

love

too

much.

The

Più lento

full voice

253

Lord

= 58–60

freely

C. giv eth

and

the

Lord

tak

3

eth

più mosso come recitativo 257

3

C. way.

Come

to your sup per be fore you wake her.

= 80 Margaret: 261 peacefully

She

dolce

is

my

sup per,

the

food

of

my

heart.

a


130 265

Act I–Scene 2

Moderato

Pochiss. più mosso

= 72

(smiling, reaching out to Robert)

M.G. Oh,

no.

Oh,

no.

Robert:

And what am I?

The leav

ings?

Pochiss. più mosso

Moderato

= 72

Subito doppio movimento = 144 (

= )

269

3

M.G. 3

You

3

are

the pulse.

With 3

3

3

3

non troppo pesante

273

3

M.G. out

you

3

I

have no

heart. Robert: 3

3

And

with

out

you

non troppo pesante 3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

I


131

Act I–Scene 2

277

(They embrace.)

R.G. have

3

no

pulse to give. 3

3

3

3

3

3

Il mezzo tempo Cilla:

281

= 72

(interrupting) poco agitato

E nough

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

cresc.

più mosso come recitativo 3

said.

Go get your heart

be fore you break mine.

3

molto cresc.

a tempo (don’t drag)

(As Cilla and Robert eat dinner, Margaret sings tenderly to the child.)

284 (Margaret goes to get the baby.)

espr.

290

Moderato semplice, flowing = 42–44 ( = 84–88) Margaret:

tenderly

Sad

3

things,

3

far

3

a way

3


132

Act I–Scene 2

294

3

3

M.G. 3

Soft

things,

por

3

come

and play

Love

ly

t. by…

ba

sim.

298

3

3

3

M.G. Sleep

in the mea dow,

sleep

in the hay

full, rich 302

3

3

3

3

3

3

M.G. 3

3

Ba by’s

got a dream in’

306

più cantabile

on the

3

way.

Bad

3

3

3

3

M.G. 3

things,

3

3

far

a way

Pret ty

things,

here

to stay


133

Act I–Scene 2

310

molto cantabile, full voice

3

3

3

M.G. 3

3

Sweet

ba

by,

3

3

smile

3

3

Love ly ba

at me

by,

go

to sleep.

più sonoro

314

full, vibrant

less full

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

M.G. Sleep in the mea dow,

sleep in the hay

Ba by’s

3

gon na dream

the night

3

a

full, warm hearted

318

3

3

M.G. way.

Love

ly

ba

by,

pret

sotto voce

dolce

323

3

M.G.

port.

ba

3

3

3

by

Ba by’s gon na dream

dolce

3

3

ty

3

the


134

Act I–Scene 2 (Casey approaches the cabin, armed with a double-barreled shotgun and carrying a satchel. He loiters for a few minutes, passing the time by cleaning his gun.)

327

3

3

(non rit.)

3

M.G. 3

night

a

way.

3

espr.

331

ancora meno mosso (slower still) = 66

Più lento, slower = ca. 72 3

3

3

3

3

M.G. Sleep

in

the meadow,

sleep

in

334

the hay

by’s

M.G. *

dream…

Ba

by’s

gon na dream…

going gradually from closed mouth to partially open mouth.

337

3

M.G.

port.

Ba

by’s

gon na dream…

*mm 335–336 ossia: “mmm” (humming)

gon na

=

3

3

port.

Ba

mmm

ah


135

Act I–Scene 2

341

Subito agitato = 92 (not hurried, ben misurato)

Casey: (quietly, standing in the cabin doorway)

Not

8

to

night.

marcato sempre (Perc.)

sim. 344 Ca. No

bo dy

dreams

to night.

(Perc.)

347 Robert:

What

349

8

d’you say?

(Casey enters the cabin abruptly, and confronts Robert.)

What’s that

Casey: molto

you say?

non troppo

sarcastically

What’s that

I

say?

R.G.

7 7


136

Act I–Scene 2 (Casey points his gun at Robert.)

353

molto

with anger

Ca. 8

357

What’s that

(a)

you

say.

Robert:

Ex

cuse

me, sir.

Yes,

sir.

marcato

360 R.G. What’s that you

rit. 365

8

Quasi andante

say,

= 80

Casey:

Bet ter.

Much

sempre marcato e secco

bet ter.

sir?


137

Act I–Scene 2

369 Ca. 8

What I say

is,

no

hap

py

dark

y dream in’

ta

Sost. sotto voce

373

3

Ca. 8

night.

Mis ter Gaines

has oth er plans…

oth er plans.

(Sost.) 378 Cilla:

What plans,

Mis ter Cas ey?

Ca. 8

I’m

(Grace notes before the beat)

talk in’ to your boy,

Cil la,

Sost. 381

(to Robert)

3 3

Ca. 8

3

not you.

You have been rent ed out,

(Perc.)

(Sost.)

Sost.


138

Act I–Scene 2 quasi parlando, aggressively

384

3

Ca. 8

boy.

Mis ter Gaines

wants you on your way

3

ta night

so you’ll be

(almost shouted)

387 Ca. 8

3

3

3

read y for work at sun rise.

Not Robert: 3

Where,

sir?

Where is he send ing me?

Sost.

391

Più agitato

= ca. 84

Ca. 3

8

your bus

’ness

6

3

to know;

on

6

3

ly

6

3

6

3

your bus ’ness 6

3

6

3

to


139

Act I–Scene 2

a tempo ( = ca. 80)

poco accel.

(almost shouted)

(pointing to the door)

393 Ca. 8

go.

The wa

gon’s on the road.

Hop

to it boy!

L’istesso tempo 396

poco riten.

Margaret:

I’ll

3

get read y.

Hold

the ba

by,

Ma ma.

a tempo

399 M.G. Casey:

8

402

Hold

on,

girl.

You’ll

get read y all

right.

But you won’t need

the wa gon.

(quietly, with innuendo)

Ca. 8

Mis ter Gaines wants you in the house,

his

house.


140 405

Act I–Scene 2

full voice

Ca. 8

408

Ain’t

that nice?

No

more field

più sonoro

work.

Ain’t

that nice?

più

3

po

rt.

Ca. 8

412

3

You can putyour feet up

in his house all day,

3

all

night,

too.

(Casey pulls a stylish housedress out of his satchel. He waves the dress, like a red flag, in Robert’s face, then tosses it at Margaret.) (Casey leaves.)

full voice

Ca. 8

Ain’t that nice?

Ain’t that nice?

Ain’t that nice?

Sost.

slightly faster (Robert and Margaret exchange troubled glances; 416 Cilla rocks the baby.)

(As he walks away, Casey sings a parody of Margaret’s “Lullaby”.)

(laughing derisively)

(mockingly, but coolly)

3

3

Ca. 3

8

La

sotto voce

3

da da da da

3

La

da da day.

3

Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha.


141

Act I–Scene 2

a piacere (Robert tries at first to contain his emotions.)

Robert:

420

(erupting in rage) molto

sotto voce

3

Skunk,

son of a whore.

snake,

Sost.

(Robert paces the room, his anger at the boiling point.)

Con moto, ben misurato

= 126

425

Cilla:

429

Please!

Robert: 433

full voice

Yel

la bel ly!

3

That son of a dog.

Don’t

wake the ba by.


142 436

Act I–Scene 2

Margaret:

Cool

3

down,

Ro bert.

3

He will

hear

you.

440 M.G.

445 Robert: 3

3

I am a man,

ain’t I?

Margaret:

449

Ain’t I?

Ain’t I?

a

man?

quasi

Yes, R.G.

Ain’t I

you are.


143

Act I–Scene 2

453

3

M.G. To me,

456

and to

us.

Robert:

3

I know,

I know,

I

know

what is on

his

mind.

(lovingly) Margaret:

460

It

won’t

R.G. Bas

tard!

464 M.G. pen. It won’t

hap

pen, be lieve

me.

Be lieve

me!

hap


144 468

Act I–Scene 2

Robert:

How

can

you know?

How

can you

be

sure?

472 R.G. You

can’t

con trol

Margaret:

476

His R.G. 3

a

snake

in his own

nest.

480 M.G. He

will

be have.

daugh ter lives there

too.


145

Act I–Scene 2

484

Cilla:

3

Be lieve

her,

son.

It

can’t

be

sotto voce

espr.

488 C. long.

492

Margaret:

We

will

find

497

a

way.

(moving closer to Robert)

M.G. Stay

sempre

strong.

for too


146 503

Act I–Scene 2

mezza voce, legato

M.G. He

is

not

the mas ter

of

me.

511

(Standing downstage center, Robert and Margaret are holding hands. As they sing, they gradually move apart.)

rit.

519

Molto moderato = ca. 54–58

hold back

Margaret:

Hold

me.

transparent dolce cantando

524

a tempo

hold back a tempo

M.G. Robert:

dolce

Stay

sweet.

3

Hold

a tempo

on.

Stay

hold back a tempo

strong.


147

Act I–Scene 2

Poco più mosso = ca. 63

530

meno

M.G. Be

my

moon rise.

You meno

are

my

You

are

my

R.G. Be

my

dawn.

Poco più mosso = ca. 63

legato

535 M.G. shoul

der.

shoul

der.

R.G.

You

are

my cour

age.

You

are

my cour

age.

3

You

are my spine.

540 M.G. And you

are

the sign

That love

R.G.

is the on

ly

mas

ter

the

ly

mas

ter

the

3

That love

is the on


148

Act I–Scene 2

544 M.G. 3

heart

o

beys;

Love

heart

o

beys;

Love

R.G.

is the

on

3

is the

3

ly

mas

ly

mas

3

on

meno

548 M.G.

3

ter

that my

heart

o

beys.

heart

o

beys.

meno R.G. ter

3

that my

cant.

(Evening falls as Robert leaves.)

dolce

(fade to black)

552

ca. 47’

attacca


149

Act I, Scene 3: Maplewood Plantation, in the early summer of 1858. Grazioso con rubato = ca. 126 (Solo piano)

espr.

7

espr.

(The lights go up gradually; the guests begin to enter.) (In the candlelit parlor at Maplewood Plantation, a wedding reception is being held to celebrate the marriage of Caroline Gaines, Edward’s daughter, to George Hancock. The guests — the local townspeople whom Edward is very eager to impress — waltz to the gentle accompaniment of a parlor piano, and enjoy generous amounts of freely flowing champagne.)

13

legato ed espr.

19

espr.


150

Act I–Scene 3

27 (Orchestra)

espr.

34

Edward: 40

3

Please,

may I

have your

at

ten

tion?

Sost. 46

Sost. The Guests: (gathering around)

well articulated

S Mis ter Gaines

wants to

speak.

wants to

speak.

well articulated

A Mis ter Gaines well articulated

T Mis ter

8

Gaines

wants to

speak.

Gath er

wants to

speak.

Gath er

well articulated

B Mis ter

(cresc.)

dolce

Gaines


151

Act I–Scene 3

51 S Gath er ’round our gra cious host.

There is

no thing so

Gath er ’round our gra cious host.

There is

no thing so

A T.C. T 8

’round

our gra cious host.

There is

no thing so

’round

our gra cious host.

There is

no thing so

B

58

dolce

S fine

as

see ing a

cou ple in

love,

a

cou ple in

love!

cou ple in

love!

dolce A fine

T.C.

as

see ing a

cou ple a

cou ple in

love,

a

dolce T 8

fine

as

see ing a

cou ple in

love,

a

cou ple in

love!

cou ple in

love!

dolce B fine

as

see ing a

cou ple in

love,

a


152

Act I–Scene 3

a tempo, grazioso ma poco lento ( = ca. 120)

rit. 66

73

Edward:

I

prom

ised

Car

o line’s moth er

(non troppo

two

things.

a

wid

)

79 E.G. 3

One,

that

I

would

stay

86 E.G. two,

that

I

would

see

to our

daugh

ter’s

fu

ture care.

ow er;


153

Act I–Scene 3

92 E.G. Car

100 E.G. o

line

has

prov en

the

right

ness

of

those prom

is es.

108 quasi E.G. She will in her

it a

sound es tate–

which, I might add, has

grown

from mod est to

(An elegant display of crystal champagne glasses has been set out on a side table for the guests. A few of them replenish their drinks.)

tenderly

118 E.G. grand.

Sost.

And her choice

of

hus

band

is

Sost.

ev

’ry thing

her moth er would have


154

Act I–Scene 3

126 E.G. wished for. The Guests: molto legato

A

man

of

sta ture and

learn

S Beau ti ful words molto legato

from our gen er ous host!

Beau ti ful words molto legato

from our gen er ous host!

Beau ti ful words molto legato

from our gen er ous host!

Beau ti

from our gen er ous host!

A

T 8

B ful words

(The pompous guests blatantly examine the room’s furnishings to judge their quality.)

133

Vi– riten.

a tempo

E.G. ing. S And her

choice

of

hus

band

And her

choice

of

hus

band

And her

choice

of

hus

band

And her

choice

of

hus

band

A T.C. T 8

B

riten.

a tempo

dolce


155

Act I–Scene 3

–de

139

dolce

S is

ev

’ry

thing her moth

er wished for.

is ev dolce

’ry

thing her moth

er wished for.

ev

’ry

thing her moth

er wished for.

ev

’ry

thing her moth

er wished for.

dolce A T.C. T 8

is dolce

B is

espr.

Caroline: espr.

147

And

153

serene

por

t.

fath

you,

er?

what you have

Is he

wished

Edward:

3

3

Ex act ly so,

3

3

pre cise ly so.

3

Am I right,

George?

for me?


156

Act I–Scene 3

George: 159

8

I’m

not

sure

that

I

de serve

her,

but I will spend

my life

meno

165

G.H. 8

try

ing

to serve her and

earn

the de vo tion she

squan

ders on

172 G.H. 8

me. The Guests:

S There

is

noth

ing

so

won

drous

as

be

ing

in

There

is

noth

ing

so

won

drous

as

be

ing

in

There

is

noth

ing

so

won

drous

as

be

ing

in

There

is

noth

ing

so

won

drous

as

be

ing

in

A

T 8

B

Sost.


157

Act I–Scene 3 Caroline: 176

There is

noth ing so

won drous as

be ing in a

mar riage for

love!

There is

noth ing so

won drous as

be ing in a

mar riage for

love!

love. There is

noth ing so

won drous as

see ing a

mar riage for

love,

a meno

love. There is

noth ing so

won drous as

see ing a

mar riage for

love,

a

love. There is

noth ing so

won drous as

see ing a

mar riage for

love,

love. There is

noth ing so

won drous as

see ing a

mar riage for

love,

G.H. 8

meno

S

A T.C. T 8

B

dolce

Sost.

riten.

183 S mar riage for

love.

mar riage for meno

love.

A T.C. T 8

a meno

mar riage for love.

a

mar riage for love.

B

riten.


158

Act I–Scene 3

Meno mosso

= 104

dolce cant.

191 Edward: 3

3

Car

my a

o line,

dor

3

a ble Car o line.

Give

your

dolce cant.

dolce cant.

(Caroline walks across the room to her father, who is waiting with open arms. He embraces her too tightly, however.)

198 E.G. fath

er

a

daugh ter’s em

brace.

a tempo (lightheartedly)

accel. poco a poco Caroline:

204

Oh,

fa

ther,

I

can not breathe.

dim. poco a poco

210

rit.

(Caroline goes to mingle with the guests.)

C.G. 3

(dim.)

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


159

Act I–Scene 3

Più comodo (don’t drag) 214 Edward:

= 92

(Caroline turns to her father upon hearing her name.)

warmly

3

For give me, Car o line,

my arms

are like my love. Strong

brac ing.

(Caroline suddenly lets go of her father’s hands, and turns away from him to walk towards George, who is downstage, on the other side of the room.)

(reassuringly, taking her father’s Caroline: hands in hers) 220 3

Nev er mind,

and all em

warm, pure

fath er.

I

have

pros pered so

much

in your

arms,

sotto voce

più sonoro

225

(George embraces Caroline tenderly.)

C.G. I

can

now

em

brace

an

oth

er.

più cant.

Meno mosso, stately 230 George:

= 84

(sensing that Edward feels somewhat rejected)

8

3

3

There is no

sotto voce

3

ri

val here.

Love

3

does not con quer or dis


160

Act I–Scene 3

(ten.)

234 G.H. 8

3

pose;

it

dou

bles

and

tri ples with use.

(ten.)

237 G.H. 8

3

3

The lan guage of love

3

is

al

ways

con fus

ing.

espr.

240

Poco piĂš mosso

= 92

come recitativo, freely

G.H. 8

3

3

3

dolce

3

3

It can nev er be as clear as the e mo tion it

tries

3

to con

vey.

3 3

3


161

Act I–Scene 3

243 G.H. 8

The

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

(Edward puts up his hand to interrupt George in mid-sentence.)

Con moto

= ca. 152

246

Vi–

–de

G.H. 8

lan guage of love…

251

255

Edward:

The

lan guage of

secco

love

is


162

Act I–Scene 3

259 E.G. an im pos

ter,

hid

ing in

dress

es

of

(emphatically)

262

(full voice) George:

8

The

lan guage of love is

a ma gi

cian,

E.G. verse.

sub.

secco

3 3

3

3

266 G.H. 8

turn

ing

ros

es in

to

doves

3

on the wing.

E.G. The


163

Act I–Scene 3

(not quite full voice) 270 G.H. 8

A

E.G. lan guage of love is an in

fant’s hand in

a

fath

274

er’s glove.

3

G.H. 8

raft

in

a storm

y sea,

off

er

ing

res

cue.

277 G.H. 8

The Guests:

S The

lan guage of love is of ten hard to ex plain.

It may

of fer true joy, but it can

The

lan guage of love is of ten hard to ex plain.

It may

of fer true joy, but it can

The

lan guage of love is of ten hard to ex plain.

It may

of fer true joy, but it can

The

lan guage of love is of ten hard to ex plain.

It may

of fer true joy, but it can

A

T 8

B


164

Act I–Scene 3

281 S end in such pain!

A end in such pain! T.C. T 8

end in such pain!

B end in such pain!

piĂš secco

285

288

8

George:

The


165

Act I–Scene 3

292 G.H. 8

lan guage of love

is a light

house to guide us

o ver heav

y waves.

Edward:

The

296

sub.

E.G.

3

lan guage of love is a thief

re spect

ing no house hold,

3

steal ing the loved ones a way. 3

3

301 E.G. The Guests: S The

lan guage of

love

is too com

plex

to be

known.

What is

The

lan guage of

love

is too com

plex

to be

known.

What is

The

lan guage of

love

is too com

plex

to be

known.

What is

The

lan guage of

love

is too com

plex

to be

known.

What is

A

T 8

B


166

Act I–Scene 3

304 S bought with out price,

can

nev

er

be

owned!

bought with out price,

can

nev

er

be

owned!

bought with out price,

can

nev

er

be

owned!

bought with out price,

can

nev

er

be

owned!

A

T.C. T 8

B

308

310

Vi–

Edward:

The

lan

guage of

love

is

an

im


167

Act I–Scene 3

313

George:

8

…is

a

ma

cian,

gi

turn ing

E.G. pos

ter,

is

an

in

fant’s hand

in

a

fa

316 G.H. 8

ros

es

in

to

doves

3

on

the

wing!

E.G. ther’s

glove. The Guests:

S The A The

T.C. T 8

The

B The

marc.


168

Act I–Scene 3

319 S. lan

guage of

love

is

a

dan

ger ous art.

It can

o pen your eyes

or

it will

lan

guage of

love

is

a

dan

ger ous art.

It can

o pen your eyes

or

it will

lan

guage of

love

is

a

dan

ger ous art.

It can

o pen your eyes

or

it will

lan

guage of

love

is

a

dan

ger ous art.

It can

o pen your eyes

or

it will

A. T.C. T. 8

B.

322 S. 3

tear

out

tear

out

tear

out

your

heart!

your

heart!

your

heart!

your

heart!

A. 3

T.C. T. 8

B.

3

3

tear

out

marc.


169

Act I–Scene 3

–de 325

marc.

(Embarrassed by the argument that has broken out between her father and her new husband, Caroline walks away. She goes over to the side table and picks up a crystal champagne glass.) George:

328

8

Is a ma gi

(getting angry)

Edward:

The

lan guage of love

is

an im pos

ter.

333 G.H. 8

ian.

It’s a light

house to guide

us.

E.G. It’s an in

fant’s hand in a fa

ther’s glove.

sempre sotto voce

It’s a thief


170

Act I–Scene 3 (definitively, ending the discussion)

full voice

338 E.G. re spect

ing

no

house

3

hold,

3

steal ing the loved ones a

way!

cresc.

Grazioso

rit.

= 116–120

(Caroline returns and makes a “grand entrance,” holding her champagne glass up high.) (in a celebratory mood)

342

Caroline:

3

It’s a

clip

per

ship

with

room

af ter room

for danc ing

and

E.G.

(cresc.)

cresc.

(The newlyweds Caroline and George begin the traditional “first dance”; the others join in the waltz one couple at a time. Ironically, only Gaines is without a partner; he is forced to watch the festivities.)

rit.

a tempo

Tempo primo

348 C.G. cakes

and

tea

and

cham pagne!

molto espressivo (cresc.)

= ca. 126


171

Act I–Scene 3

354

(As the guests waltz, Gaines continues to watch alone.)

360

meno

(Margaret enters the room to bring in another tray of glasses. Although she is dressed more nicely now, in the uniform befitting a house servant, she acts in a more subjugated manner. Gaines, standing alone, quietly takes notice of her arrival.)

366

molto espr.

372

espr.


172

Act I–Scene 3

(The guests gradually conclude dancing. Gaines once again plays the gracious host; he toasts the newlyweds as Margaret serves the guests.)

377

Edward: 3

Well,

that is our

an

swer then.

Cham

382 E.G. pagne

heals

all

wounds

and puts all

ar

gu ments to

quasi

bed.

espr.

dolce 387 E.G. 3

Con

grat u

la

tions,

son.

Bless

ings,

espr.

daugh ter.


173

Act I–Scene 3

392

hold back

A tempo

= 92

(Margaret starts to leave the room.)

398

(warmly)

Caroline:

3

Mar

3

g’ret,

wait a mo ment.

404 3

C.G. Come

to me.

What do you

dolce

poco meno mosso (somewhat surprised)

410

sotto voce

Margaret:

Ex

cuse

me,

ma’am?

think?


174

Act I–Scene 3

a tempo 415

Caroline:

What

do

you

420

a bout

think

love?

3

3

C.G. We

were dis cus

sing

the

words

to de

scribe

it.

dolce

425

Edward:

Child!

Dear

child!

6

428

Caroline:

6

6

(to Margaret)

3

3

Do they help 3

sub.

6

3

3

3

us to love? 3

3

3

3

Or hurt us be 3

3

3

3

3

yond 3

re pair? 3

3

3

3


175

Act I–Scene 3

(to her father)

433

3

C.G. I 3

want 3

3

3

to know. 3

3

I 3

3

want to know

what she 3

thinks. 3

3

3

(insistent)

438

Edward:

Child!

Please,

child,

no

more!

The Guests: (almost whispering)

S What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?

What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?

(almost whispering)

A What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?

What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?

(almost whispering)

T 8

What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?

What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?

(almost whispering)

B What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?

sotto voce

What is all this talk a bout, talk a bout?


176

Act I–Scene 3

Poco più mosso = 120

440 E.G.

poco S talk a bout?

What is all thistalk a bout?

Oh, dear. poco

Oh,

dear.

We thought he was

talk a bout?

What is all thistalk a bout?

Oh, dear. poco

Oh,

dear.

We thought he was

talk a bout?

What is all thistalk a bout?

A T.C. T 8

Oh, dear.

Oh,

dear.

Oh, dear.

Oh,

dear.

poco B talk a bout?

What is all thistalk a bout?

Poco più mosso

6

6

= 120

6

443 S. qual

i ty.

Oh, dear.

Oh,

dear.

This is

a mis

qual

i ty.

Oh, dear.

Oh,

dear.

This is

a mis

We thought he was qual

i ty.

Oh, dear.

Oh,

dear.

This is

We thought he was qual

i ty.

Oh, dear.

Oh,

dear.

This is

A. T.C. T. 8

B.


177

Act I–Scene 3

447 S. take

qual

i ty folk would nev

er

make!

take

qual

i ty folk would nev

er

make!

A. T.C. T. 8

a

mis take

qual

i

ty folk would nev

er

make!

a

mis take

qual

i

ty folk would nev

er

make!

B.

450

8

Oh,

dear.

Oh,

dear.

This

is

a pro found

in

sult.

Oh,

dear.

Oh,

dear.

This

is

a pro found

in

sult.

Oh,

dear.

Oh,

dear.

This is

a pro found

in

sult.

Oh,

dear.

Oh,

dear.

This is

a pro found

in

sult.

marc. e secco


178

Act I–Scene 3

riten.

454

a tempo

S. This

is

a mis

take

qual

i ty folk would nev er

make!

This

is

a mis

take

qual

i ty folk would nev er

make!

This is

a mis

take

qual

i ty folk would nev er

make!

This is

a mis

take

qual

i ty folk would nev er

make!

A. T.C. T. 8

B.

a tempo

riten.

più pesante

458

Moderato = 80 (don’t drag)

Edward:

Car

3

o

line,

you

calmo

463 E.G. 3

are too will

ful.

She can’t

an

swer you.


179

Act I–Scene 3

469 E.G. She won’t

475 Caroline:

swer you.

an

a tempo ( = 80)

rit.

legato

3

Why

She has loved

not?

481

me,

served

3

C.G. 3

taught me

in thesefew years;

watch’d o

ver my

sleep.

ad lib. 487

meno

C.G. Who knows bet

3

ter than she

3

how to say

what love

is?

me,


180

Act I–Scene 3

Vi– 493

3

più

3

3

C.G. Can words do it

jus

tice, Mar g’ret?

En cour

age its suc

cess?

sotto voce

cant.

497

scherzando

3

3

–de 3

C.G. Or, as my fa ther

L’istesso tempo

says,

is the lan guage of love

an im

pos ter?

3

A thief in the

= 80

502 C.G. night?

His

Margaret: 3

Beg ging your

sotto voce

par don, Miss Car o line.

Mis ter

Gaines

is the ex pert here.


181

Act I–Scene 3

riten.

a tempo

508 C.G. 3

love is rough,

while

yours

is ten

der.

M.G. (emphatically) espr. Edward: 3

3

You see?

She has no thing to

a tempo riten.

rt.

full voice

po

513 E.G.

3

say

3

on the mat ter.

Love

is not

in her vo

cab

u lar y.

(thoughtfully)

518

Margaret:

Words E.G.

of love are

moths;

eas

y food for

flame.


182

Act I–Scene 3

524 M.G. Ac tions

a lone

say

what

love

529 M.G. be.

poco

= 80 3

535

5

5

3

3

5

5

3 3

3

3

5

3

5

5

5

Subito piĂš mosso agitated, wild

537 Edward:

angrily 3

3

3 3

E nough!

3

3 3

E nough!

We

have all

had e nough of this non sense.

may


183

Act I–Scene 3

542

= 80

E.G.

3

I re fuse 3

5

com ment

5

6 3

to hear a slave

appass.

6

dim.

3 3 3

5

5

545 E.G. 3

on

things

out

547

side

her

scope.

parlando

E.G. Our

6

sempre

6 3

3

guests are right.

6

6

6

3

3

3

Her views

6 3

6 3

3

6 3

are


184

Act I–Scene 3 (to Margaret)

549

sotto voce (parlando) port.

E.G. 3

worth

less.

3

You

are ex

6 3

6

6

6

3

3

3

cused.

Leave

6

6

6

us.

6

Sost. 551

(Margaret exits.)

E.G.

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

Sost.

Poco piĂš agitato

rit.

553

3

Caroline:

Fa

6

556

6

= 84

ther,

you

shame

me.

6

3

C.G. She is as com plete

8

a

hu

3

man

3

as

you George:

are.

3

Since she is a moth er,


185

Act I–Scene 3

(The parlor clock strikes 10 o’clock. A few of the guests realize that the late hour now gives them an alibi to leave the party.)

560 C.G.

G.H. 8

3

may be more

(to Caroline)

so.

Edward:

You

dis ap

564 E.G. point

me.

How

could love ex ist in a slave?

3

Pas sion, per haps.

(pleading with her father to be reasonable)

569

Caroline:

There E.G.

3

But how

would she know the

3

dif f’rence?

are


186

Act I–Scene 3

(looking into each other’s eyes)

574

port. 3

C.G. 3

man y kinds of love,

fa

ther.

And

man

And

man

George:

8

578

molto espr.

C.G. y

kinds

of

lov

ers.

kinds

of

lov

ers.

molto espr. G.H. 8

y

6


187

Act I–Scene 3

Poco agitato = 144–152 (ben misurato) 582

The Guests: leggiero e stacc.

S This

is too sub leggiero e stacc.

tle

for

me,

and

me,

and

me. Per

This

is too sub leggiero e stacc.

tle

for

me,

and

me,

and

me. Per

This

is too sub leggiero e stacc.

tle

for

me, and me,

and me,

and you, and

me.

Per

tle

for

me,

and me,

and you, and

me.

Per

A and

you,

T 8

B This

is

too

sub

6

sempre stacc., ma leggiero

588 S haps

it

is

time

to

say

good night,

good

night and

good

night.

haps

it

is

time

to

say

good night,

good

night and

good

night.

haps

it

is

time

to

say good night,

good night.

Ar

gu ment chills

a

haps

it

is

time

to

say good night,

good night.

Ar

gu ment chills

a

A T.C. T 8

B


188

Act I–Scene 3

594 S Good

night,

good

night,

good

night,

good

night

and

good

Good

night,

good

night,

good

night,

good

night

and

good

par

ty.

Good

night,

night,

good night,

good night

and

good

par

ty.

Good

night,

night,

good night,

good night

A T.C. T 8

B

(The guests leave, bowing stiffly; they disapprove of Gaines’s behavior and act coolly towards him. He is angered and annoyed by their early departure.)

600

Molto moderato = ca. 66 Edward:

quasi parlando

Fools, S night. A night.

T.C. T 8

night.

B good

night.

and

Molto moderato = ca. 66

3

id i ots.

What


189

Act I–Scene 3

604 E.G. 3

do they

know 3

3

a bout

“qual

3

i 3

3

3

ty”

3

folk? 3

3

cant.

3

(to Caroline and George, with regret)

come recit.

608 E.G.

3

This

was to be a proud

mo

ment.

Now

you

have

cant.

612 E.G. 3

giv en my neigh

3

bors

more

rea son

to gos sip

3

and de

spise

espr.

3


190

Act I–Scene 3

Più mosso 616

= 72

Caroline:

3

I

am sor George:

8

ry, fa

Don’t think

por

ther,

us

if

un grate

I up

ful

set

you.

3

forthis cel e bra

t.

E.G. me.

Più mosso

3

= 72

Poco più animando = 80

621 C.G.

We

did

not

mean

to

be rude,

We

did

not

mean

to

be rude,

G.H. 8

tion.

624 C.G. on

3

ly

to

say

what

we

be

lieve.

ly

to

say

what

we

be

lieve.

G.H. 8

3

on

cant.


191

Act I–Scene 3

627 C.G. Hon

es

ty

should not

of

Hon

es

ty

should not

of

G.H. 8

= 126

630 C.G. fend

you.

fend

you.

G.H. 8

Edward: come recit.

agitated 4

I

633

am

cantabile

7

E.G. not so weak as to be of fend

ed by

in

no cence.

But


192

Act I–Scene 3

poco

636 E.G. 7

I have a rep u ta

tion

to main tain.

like a church chorale

640

= ca. 63 Caroline:

Fa

ther,

please

try.

E.G. 3

My

sweet

Car o

643 E.G. it

does n’t

mat

ter.

All

is well.

line,


193

Act I–Scene 3

(kissing Caroline tenderly)

646

(shaking George’s hand)

more personal

E.G. 3

Take care

ofyour selves.

Good bye,

take

5

649

5

(Caroline and George leave, eager to depart on their honeymoon. Gaines pauses, and somewhat wistfully watches them walk away.)

E.G. care.

boldly

(regaining his inner strength)

breve

654 E.G. It

3

does n’t mat

3

ter at all.

I

3

have suc ceed

ed

just

3

3

as I said I would. breve


194 Adagio

Act I–Scene 3

= 72

Più mosso

= 80

Adagio

= 72

658 Edward: 3

En

vy

3

3

is the true price of wealth…

Ancora più mosso

which I eas

3

i ly,

= 80

664 E.G. 3

pi ly pay.

poco espr. (inwardly)

671

= 60

E.G. 3

A rich

6

man

has

man y

rem e dies.

6 6

6

8ba (Edward begins to leave, but when he notices Margaret returning to clear the champagne glasses, he lingers in a hiding place.)

675

6

6 6

6

8ba

hap


195

Act I–Scene 3

(Margaret picks up a glass and holds it to the light, peering into it as if it were a crystal ball.)

680

poco

Andante

= 84–88 (looking at the glass)

686

Margaret:

Are 3

3

there man y kinds 3

3

of love?

Show

me

3

3

691

dolcissimo

3

3

3

3

3

3

M.G. each and ev

’ry one.

can

3

3

3

3

3

696

You can’t,

3

3

por

3

3

3

3

t.

M.G. you?

For

there is just

cant. 3

3

kind.

3

dolce

3

one

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


196

Act I–Scene 3

Con moto = 104 ( = 52)

701 M.G. sempre cantando

3

706

3

3

3

3

3

with simplicity

M.G. On ly

un har

nessed hearts can sur

712

vive

a locked down life. Like a

riv

er

più sonoro

M.G. rush ing from the

719

grip of its banks, as

3

light

es

capes

the

cold

est

star;

sonoro

3

M.G. A qual i ty love–

the love of all loves–

will

break

a

espr. cresc.


197

Act I–Scene 3

725

3

M.G. way.

When

sor row clouds

the mind,

the spine

grows strong; no pret ty words can soothe or

dolce

732 M.G. cure what

heav y hands can break. When

sor row

is

deep,

the

se cret soul

keeps

dolce

739

3

3

M.G. its weap on of choice:

the love of all

sotto voce

loves.

espr.

745

espr.

M.G. No pret ty 3


198

Act I–Scene 3

751

3

M.G. words can ease or

cure

what heav y hands can

allarg. 757

When sor row is

deep,

L’istesso tempo (don’t drag) = 104

full voice sonoro

3

do.

M.G. the se cret soul keeps its

3

qual

i ty

love.

cresc.

764 M.G. When

sor

row

is

deep,

the

se cret soul

espr.

770

sotto voce

3

3

M.G. its weap on of

choice:

the love of all

loves!

dolce espr.

keeps


199

Act I–Scene 3 (Edward slowly emerges from his hiding place and walks towards Margaret, looking her over with unmistakable intent. She is unaware of his presence, however, as she is looking down at the glass in her hand.)

775

sotto voce

780

= 80

(coolly; unintentionally startling Margaret)

Edward:

Such

fine

sen

ti ments.

misterioso

pedale sempre

784 E.G. Too

(He gently takes the glass from her hand. Assuming an air of gentility, Edward then takes Margaret’s red scarf from his pocket and slowly ties it around her neck.)

fine,

I

think,

for a

full voice

787 E.G. slave.

But

I

have

my

remedies.


200 790

Act I–Scene 3 quasi

(Margaret resists his advances.)

E.G. A man

has

man y

rem e dies.

marc.

più cresc. molto cresc.

Più largamente 794 Margaret:

= 72

agitated

They

can not touch the

se

cret

soul. (losing control)

molto E.G.

Più largamente

(Margaret begins to struggle vehemently. But Edward overpowers her, and throws her forcibly to the floor.)

797 E.G.

Your soul

= 72

is

Più maestoso

3

not on my mind. 5

3

(The curtain falls slowly.)

800

(a2)

ca. 73’


Act II, Scene 1: Maplewood Plantation. Sunday, February 24, 1861, in the early evening.

201

(Fast curtain: in silence and darkness. Lights up on downbeat of measure 1.) (Anticipating a visit from Robert, who has been meeting her secretly on Sunday nights, Margaret goes to Cilla’s cabin. She is disturbed to find Casey lurking nearby.)

Con moto, poco agitato

= 104–108

Cilla:

Margaret:

Not

yet.

3 6

Has he come?

6

3 3

5

cresc. poco a poco

6

6

6

6

3

6

6

3

8 C. Not

yet.

But

soon.

M.G. Is he here? Has he come?

3 3

(Margaret suddenly notices that Cilla is packing a carpetbag.)

Agitato, ma meno mosso 12

= 84–88

unsettled

M.G. 3

What are you

do

ing?

Where

are

the

chil

dren?


202

Act II–Scene 1

rit.

16

Cilla: 20

A tempo

= 84–88

(with assurance)

Rob

ert

is

my

son

and

sotto voce

his

word

is

gold.

sempre

Sost. 28

più cantabile

C. Calm

your

self.

Your

sempre

daugh

ter

is

with

più cantabile

as needed

as needed (Margaret begins to search the room for signs of the children. She becomes increasingly anxious when she realizes they are not there.)

Subito più mosso = 104–108

quasi

34 C. Kate.

So

is the lit tle one. 3


203

Act II–Scene 1

38

L’istesso tempo = 104–108

41

Margaret:

agitated

3

Why

are you fold

ing

their

as needed 44 M.G. clothes?

You’re

pack

ing

3

them a way!

What

legato edespr.

Poco meno mosso = 92

47

M.G. 3

aren’t

as needed

3

you tell ing me? Has

Cas

ey

been here?


204

Act II–Scene 1

50 M.G. Is

he

tak

ing

them

a

way?

= 52–54 54

Cilla:

Mar

(

60

g’ret,

you

have changed

so.

Each time

you

3

vis it

I see

as needed)

a tempo

move forward

poco rit.

3

C. less of

64

you

and more of a wet

3

hen.

Moderato, flowing = 112

C. Don’t

cut up

so.

3

The

3

news

is

3

good.

3


205

Act II–Scene 1

67 C. Margaret:

3

What news?

Please, 3

3

3

3

Cil

la.

What

3

3

is

hap

3

3

pen ing? 6

6

6

6

70 6

6

Più maestoso 74

6

6

= 104

Cilla:

It’s time,

dar

Quasi Adagio

3

ling

girl.

At

= 60

78 C. 3

the time has

come.

The

plan

is set.

last,


206

Act II–Scene 1

83

3

3

3

3

C. That’s why your hus band is

late.

He is

mak

ing sure

that

all is

in place.

3

sim.

poco allarg.

87

a tempo

C. You’re leav

91

Lively

ing

to night!

più espr.

= 120

C. Sweet er than syr up and right

Margaret:

Sweet

Je

sus!

sub.

94 C. on

time.


207

Act II–Scene 1

97

Margaret:

Sleep

my ba

bies in the

100 M.G. mead ow,

Sleep

my ba

bies in the

hay;

My

103 M.G. ba

bies

got

some

dream in’

106 M.G. ’cause

free

dom’s

on

the way.

to do


208

Act II–Scene 1

109

marc.

Cilla: 111

with joyful exuberance

Sleep bies in the mead ow, my ba Margaret: with joyful exuberance

Sleep

my ba

bies in the mead ow,

Sleep

my ba

bies in the

Sleep

my ba

bies in the

114 C. hay;

My

ba

bies

got

some

hay;

My

ba

bies

got

some

M.G.


209

Act II–Scene 1

117 C. dream in’

to do

’cause

free dom’s

on

the

way.

dream in’

to do

’cause

free dom’s

on

the

way.

M.G.

120 C.

M.G.

(Robert arrives, and immediately embraces Margaret.)

123

marc.


210

Act II–Scene 1 (feigning anger at Robert)

127

Margaret:

You

did n’t say a word

last

Sun day. (taking her seriously)

Robert:

I could n’t.

I

stacc. sempre

(teasing)

131 M.G. You ought to tell me what R. had to be

sure.

(

)

(

)

(

)

(

)

marc.

134 M.G. you’re

do

ing...

some times!

R. You

( )

(

)


211

Act II–Scene 1

meno

138 R.

to keep it qui et in

need

here.

(

)

141

(

)

(

)

(

)

(

)

cresc.

= 72 143

Margaret:

Al

(

)

(

)

(

right.

) 6

146

6

=

M.G. 3

When

do

we

leave?


212 149

Act II–Scene 1

Half tempo

= 72

Margaret:

O

Lord,

I

Robert: 3

Three

152

hours

from

now.

3

3

M.G. am gon na cry.

as needed

155 Robert: 3

You?

3

Not you!

3

My

sol

dolce

dier girl’s

go ing

to cry?

legato e dolce


213

Act II–Scene 1

poco rall.

(Robert tries to embrace Margaret, but she pulls away, 158 embarrassed to show her tears.)

R.G. 3

3

It’s al

3

3

right.

It’s al

right.

dolce, cant.

Moderato ( = 84)

162

= 42 tenderly

R.G. light, transparent

Go

cry,

girl,

you have won

your tears;

go

sempre legato

166 R.G. cry,

girl,

o bey your ten

der years.

The string

is

cut,

170 R.G. 3

know.

Don’t

think

I don’t

know.

cant.

the tale

is told.

I


214

Act II–Scene 1 più cantabile

174 R.G.

The gate

cant.

is

o pen,

the

3

178 R.G. way

is

clear;

the work

is

done

and the time

has

come,

I know.

Don’t

più sonoro

182 R.G. 3

think

I don’t know.

Go

cry,

girl.

(Margaret feels overwhelmed with love for Robert.)

186 R.G. Girl,

go

cry.


215

Act II–Scene 1

cantabile

190

(Drawing closer, they kiss.)

194

Con moto

= 104

(recovering her composure, but still anxious) 198 Margaret: 3

Where

will we

go? Robert:

(reassuringly)

Are there oth ers?

3

3

It’s al

più mosso 201

right.

espr. 3

It’s al

3

M.G. Do R.G. right.

we have mon ey?

Where

will we hide?


216

Act II–Scene 1

a tempo 204

Robert:

emphatically

3

It’s al

3

I

right.

am in charge

now.

ort. (teasing) p

207 R.G. Ev

’ry

3

3

3

thing is read y—

ex

cept

you.

Now

you help

ing

for the

3

211 R.G. 3

ma ma fin ish pack

3

ing.

I’m

go

6

(Cilla looks around the room one more time, to make sure that all of Robert and Margaret’s belongings are packed.) (He leaves.)

213 R.G. child

ren.

riten.


217

Act II–Scene 1

Andante comodo = 72

217 (locking the last bag) Cilla:

All

done.

I’m

through. Margaret:

3

Where are your things?

220 C. Dar

3

ling girl,

I

M.G. I don’t see your things,

223

ma ma.

3

3

C. am

dolce

too old

to tread

new

wa ters.

I am bound

to stay


218

Act II–Scene 1

226 C. here.

229

Cilla:

No, più espr.

Margaret:

Ma ma!

232

You have

to come with us.

3

C. don’t.

You

know

I

won’t.

dolce

as needed

I


219

Act II–Scene 1 (Briefly overcome by painful emotions, Cilla looks away from Margaret, who is attempting to make direct eye contact with her mother-in-law.)

235

Recitativo, poco più mosso = 76

239

Cilla:

See

244

3

ing

you,

my

son

3

and my grand child

ren

3

C. gone from this place,

a

way

from

Sa tan’s breath

is

my bless ing.

248 C. Don’t

sotto voce

mourn me.

When my fam

sotto voce


220

Act II–Scene 1

253

meno

3

legato

C. 3

i ly is

safe,

I

will be

on ly near

the cross—

not

on

it.

5

259

quasi

Adagio 264

= 54

Cilla:

più cant.

floating

C. He

is by,

for

ev

er by

267

me.

In

His shad ow

I will lin ger on a

floating

C. while

’til

He calls

me.

He

is

by,

for


221

Act II–Scene 1

piĂš espr.

271 C. ev

er by

me.

trum

No

pets

or

streets

of

cant.

sub.

274 C. gold.

He

will

come

in

si

lence

277 C. me

in

espr.

His

arms.

cant.

and

gath

er


222

Act II–Scene 1

280

Cilla:

cantabile

is

He Margaret:

by,

for

ev

er

by

me.

cantabile 3

Please don’t con fine us

to

the

edge of your mind

in shad ow.

più cantabile

283 C. No

trum

pets

or

streets

of

gold.

We don’t want trum

pets

or

streets

of

gold.

He

will

come

M.G. As

espr.

286

(full voice)

C. in

si

lence

in

si

lence,

and gath

er

me

in

His

us

your

(full voice) M.G. we leave molto cantabile

give


223

Act II–Scene 1

poco rit.

Poco più mosso

= 72

289 C. arms.

M.G. arms.

espr.

Poco meno mosso

= ca. 60

293 C.

port

.

A

men.

M.G. port.

A

296

Con moto, ma non troppo = 108

men.

Margaret:

3

It ’ll

break

my

heart

know ing


224

Act II–Scene 1

300

3

M.G. that you are

still

here.

We

304 M.G. can’t

be

free

308

3

with

out

you.

3

M.G. Rob

ert

will in

sist.

Cilla: 312

Hush,

child.

Hear

me now:

Don’t waste mus cle where none is want


225

Act II–Scene 1

316

3

C. ed.

You will need

ev

’ry

bone

320 C. 3

and sin ew

plus your mind

to

3

get a

way

324 C. from

here.

Fol

low your hus band.

328 C. Save

your child ren, moth er!

meno


226

Act II–Scene 1

332 C. Rear

336

up,

now.

(They hear footsteps approaching the cabin.)

3

C. Help Rob

ert

with the chil

dren.

Here

340

=

C. 8va

cresc.

L’istesso tempo 344

he comes.

(Margaret and Cilla are shocked when Casey, not Robert, storms into the cabin.)

(Casey glances around the cabin, then picks up one of their carpetbags and throws it across the room.)


227

Act II–Scene 1

Pochiss. meno mosso = 96 rit.

347

Casey:

8

freely

Plan

350

6

ning a lit tle trip?

3

Ca. 3

3

8

Or

Poch. più mosso

just

clean in’ out

the sty?

= 104–108

(offstage)

353

Robert: 3

The child

ren

are com ing!

cresc.

cresc.

Subito agitato

= 120+

(Upon entering the cabin, Robert halts abruptly when he sees Casey.)

356 R.G. ren

are…

The child


228

Act II–Scene 1

Come sopra 359

8

= 96

Casey:

quasi parlando

Well, I’ll

be.

Well, I’ll

be.

= 48 ( = 96) 362 Ca. 3

8

Look

what

crawled

out

of

the

woods.

365 Ca. 8

Pap py bear.

Com

in’

3

to get

mam

my

bear

and all

the

(to Cilla)

369 Ca. 8

lit tle cubs?

I guess

3

you must be

Gold

i

locks.


229

Act II–Scene 1

373 Ca. 8

378

Seems

the

Pochiss. più mosso = 100

ridge

por

is

all

et

up.

3

Ca. 8

Let me

382

3

see

what I

(pulling a pistol out of his coat)

can

of

fer

3

Ca. 8

you.

Gun pow der might be a lit tle dry,

(Casey points the pistol at Cilla’s mouth.)

385 Ca. 8

3

but

Gold

sub.

i locks

got

to

eat,

don’t

she?


230

Act II–Scene 1

389

(motioning to Robert and Margaret with his free hand)

393

Casey:

darkly

3

8

Let’s just line

up

o

ver there.

dim.

(Impulsively, Robert attacks Casey. A violent struggle ensues, during which Robert manages to wrest away Casey’s pistol.)

398

Più agitato

= 108

sub.

(Robert grabs Casey from behind, yet hesitates to shoot him.)

400


231

Act II–Scene 1

402

3

3 3

poco rit. 406

dolce

dim.

= 92 412

quasi parlando Casey:

3

8

You

kill

piĂš cant.

3

me,

both

3

of us

is dead.

416 Ca. 8

fam

i ly

too.

(livid, filled with rage)

Robert:

And if you live,

will they?

Your


232

Act II–Scene 1

420

Margaret:

Don’t dolce

kill him.

He’s al

3

read y dead.

425 M.G. (to Margaret)

Casey: 3

8

You black

slut!

Don’t

ya beg

for

molto agitato

me!

forcefully

429 Robert:

Dog

with out teeth!

Re

mem

ber


233

Act II–Scene 1

Molto agitatissimo

432

= 126

R.G. hell?

Go

436

(Casey struggles to break free from Robert’s grasp.)

R.G. home

to

it

now!

(Robert strangles Casey to death.)

molto allarg.

440

(When Casey’s body begins to crumple to the ground, Robert finally lets go of him.)

Più maestoso

= 80

443

dim.


234

Act II–Scene 1

dolce espr. e legato 448

dim.

453

Più calmo = 72

Cilla:

3

Lap of God,

Rob ert.

What have you done? molto cant.

sub.

Come sopra = 72 457

Più largamente

(clasping her hands)

= 54

Cilla:

For give

Robert:

3

Proved my worth

as a man

and

your son.


235

Act II–Scene 1

460 C. him,

Fa ther.

This

3

may be the end. Margaret:

No!

No, we can’t

quasi parlando

463 M.G. change what is done.

Quick! Rob ert, you have to run! Robert:

3

I

466

can’t leave

3

M.G. Tell

3

me where to meet

R.G. 3

you all

here!

cant.

you.

Then go!


236

Act II–Scene 1

469 M.G. agitated R.G. The bot tom‌

by the mi mo

sa.

The grass is

poco espr.

473 R.G.

3

tall there.

When the moon

hits

the

477

top

of the

Cilla:

Hur ry, meno R.G. pines,

the

wag on

3

will be there.

3

son!


237

Act II–Scene 1 (She covers Casey’s body.)

481

molto rit.

3

C. 3

Make tracks, now!

484

Tranquillo

= 66

We’ll han dle God’s

out

cast.

Robert:

3

Mar

488

Margaret:

R.G.

3

sweet,

lov ing

wom an!

Oh, my

’ 3

espr.

g’ret.

The bot tom…

tall

grass… mi mo

sa…


238

Act II–Scene 1

491 M.G. …touch

es

pine.

…touch

es

pine.

R.G. 3

Be

there

when the

moon

light…

495 M.G. …wag

on

wheels.

for the wag

on

wheels.

a bit more anxious R.G. Lis ten

3


239

Act II–Scene 1

498 M.G. …moon

light.

R.G. 3

Watch for

Più largamente 502

freely

the moon

= 60

a piacere

light.

(Robert kisses her.)

almost whispered

3

M.G. We’ll meet you

(Robert runs away.)

506

in the

moon

light.

Go!

(Lights out.)

breve

ca. 24’


240

Act II, Scene 2: In the Free State of Ohio, three weeks later. (At twilight, on an evening in late March 1861. Three weeks have passed since Margaret and Robert successfully escaped from Maplewood, and crossed the frozen Ohio River on the Kentucky border to reach Cincinnati, a city in the “Free State” of Ohio.)

(Robert is standing underneath a huge elm tree, near the entrance to an underground shed where he and Margaret, now both outlaws, are hiding with their children in an attempt to avoid being recaptured and returned to their masters. Glimmering hot coals can be seen in a hole in the shed’s earthen floor.)

Misterioso, ma con moto = 92–96

5

(offstage Trumpet)

5

3

3

3

sub.

3

10

poco

17

(Tpt.)

Moderato 21

3

meno

= 80

(emerging from the shed)

Margaret:

What else

3

3

have you heard?

What are they say (Tpt.)

ing

a


241

Act II–Scene 2

Poco più mosso

24

= 84+

M.G. bout him? Robert: 3

3

3

They say this new

Pres i dent

does n’t hiss

dolce

sempre

(Tpt.)

sempre

28 R.G.

3

3

like a

snake;

that he talks

like

a

man.

sotto voce

Come sopra 33

= 80

Margaret: 3

What else

6

have you heard?

6

6

6

6

6

6


242

Act II–Scene 2

35

3

M.G. What

has

he

PiĂš mosso

said?

= 84 poco

38

Robert: 3 3

That a house

di

vid

ed

can not 3

3

3

3

3

stand.

3

3

3

full voice

40 R.G.

3

And

3

3

that

3

the

3

42 R.G. red.

dolce cant.

Un

ion

3

3

is

3

sac

3


243

Act II–Scene 2 Margaret: 45

come recitativo 3 3

That

means war‌

Poco meno mosso

48

You bet ter make your spir it read y, dar ling.

= 72

M.G. 3

Oh, 6

6

3

6

3

3

Ro

6

6

3

3

bert,

6

3

sempre 51 M.G. The 6

3dren are

chil

6

6

trou

bled.

6

6

6

3

3

(

3

3

3

3

sempre) ossia

cry

54 M.G. They

cry

6

in

6

6

3

3

(

sempre)

6

3

3

their

6

6

3

3


244

Act II–Scene 2

57 M.G. sleep. 6

6

6

6

3

3

3

(

3

sempre) cresc. poco a poco

59 Robert: 3

3

I know,

6

I know,

6

rit.

I

know,

I

know.

But

6

free

dom is

in our

6

PiĂš andante = ca. 76 (with hope)

62

Margaret:

3

Tell me a R.G. teeth.

espr.

3 espr.

gain:

What is

the


245

Act II–Scene 2

65 M.G. name

of

this place? Robert: 3

3

O

hi

3

o.

It

means

“beau

ti

ful.”

3

68

3

M.G. Is it?

Is

it beau

ti

molto cantabile

ful?

R.G.

3

So

I

hear.

A

3

71

beau

ti

cantabile

Margaret:

Tell R.G. place

for a fu

ture.

me.

ful


246 75

Act II–Scene 2

poco riten.

come recitativo 3

3

A tempo

= ca. 80

M.G. Tell me what the fu ture will be

like.

Robert:

not quite full voice

’ 3

It will be 3

with

legato 3

’ 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

molto cant.

più sonoro

78 R.G.

3 3

you as my wife

no oth er man

can

touch

3

or claim.

It

will be

3

accel. poco a poco 82 R.G.

3

3

the child ren

seat

ed, not bent.

3

Seat ed

in school rooms,

not


247

Act II–Scene 2

= 88–92

(accel.)

(più sonoro) 86 R.G.

3

3

3

bend ing through rows

of

corn.

It will be

me

paid for my la bor

cresc.

poco riten. 90

Grazioso

= 60

Margaret:

molto

Will I plant a

R.G.

gar den?

3

with

coin

of the realm.

(cresc.)

93 M.G. Mend your shirts by lamp

light?

Will I watch from a win dow

Robert: 3

It will be just so.


248

Act II–Scene 2

97

3

M.G. 3

our chil

dren

3

espressivo

tum bling in clov er and rose mar y? Robert:

Trust

Più mosso 100

me, Mar

= 80

Margaret: quasi

3

3

3

Will they swim in clear wa

ter

R.G. g’ret.

It will be

just so.

3

3

più

104 M.G.

3