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WEST OAKLAND’S NEWSWEEKLY www.spinalcolumnonline.com

4/25/12

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Financial advisor Matthew T. Golba opens new business — page 21

DDA: 100 percent of Main Street storefronts filled By Michael Shelton staff writer

Ambulance, library millage renewals going on Waterford ballot — page 13 County board OK's placement of SMART millage before voters — page 26

That’s what HE said: "This is simply a renewal, not an increase, and otherwise we lose one of our paramedic transports and 13 firefighters." — Waterford Township Fire Chief Ron Spears on a millage ballot proposal that will be in front of township voters in the Nov. 6 general election now that the Board of Trustees has approved its ballot language.

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The Milford Downtown Development Authority (DDA) is riding a wave of momentum heading into the spring and summer seasons. DDA Executive Director Ann Barnette is reporting that the downtown storefronts at street level along Main Street are 100 percent leased for the first time in more than 20 years. Among the new additions are three new restaurants, including a tequila bar, Tequilarita’s, featuring a Tex-Mex menu. It’s slated to open in mid-May. Meanwhile, The Blue Grill will offer Mediterranean meals at the former Deli 7 space, while The Palate will be located at the former O’Callaghan’s Irish Pub location. This comes after the DDA and Milford Village recently teamed up with Huron Valley State Bank to refinance bonds used for infrastructure and streetscape improvements downtown. The refinanced bonds will save the village and DDA more than $70,000 over the next six years remaining on the bonds.

White Lake mulls police, fire, parks millage options By Angela Niemi staff writer

Two millage ballot language proposals initially appearing on the White Lake Township Board of Trustees Tuesday, April 17 meeting agenda were removed before the meeting, according to Supervisor Greg Baroni. The ballot language pulled from the board’s agenda involved the police and fire departments, as well as a parks and recreation millage for 20122016. Baroni said township officials needed a bit more time to go over the different options available in reviewing and approving the ballot language.

According to Milford Downtown Development Authority (DDA) Executive Director Ann Barnette, street-level storefronts along Main Street in downtown Milford are now 100 percent leased for the first time in more than 20 years. One new addition to the area is Tequilarita’s (above), which will feature a TexMex menu when it opens next month. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/ Amy K. Lockard)

The bonds, which totaled $870,000, were issued by the village and payable by the DDA in 1999 and 2002. The interest rate was reduced from 4.755.75 percent on the previously issued

bonds, down to 2 percent. For more information on the new stores and restaurants opening in downtown Milford, visit meetmeinmilford.com. ❏

However, he said he believes police and fire millage ballot language will definitely go before the township’s voters this year. According to the township Clerk’s Office, White Lake currently levies five millages for police services, and four millages for fire services. Clerk Terry Lilley said three existing millages are up for renewal this year — two fire millages and one police millage. “We’re still in discussion about the form the (ballot) language will take,” he said. “We’ve had some tentative discussion on whether we will go out for three separate renewals or combine them into one public safety millage.” Baroni will be meeting with the White Lake police chief and fire chief this morning, Wednesday, April 25, to go over what direction they want to take on the millages and associated ballot language.

Like most communities in the state, White Lake has seen declining property values which has negatively affected revenues generated from property taxes. “We’re still experiencing revenue losses from the property tax devaluation. We’re still trying to deal with future planning,” said Police Chief Ed Harris. Lilley agreed. “Whatever form these millages take, whether they are individual renewals or a combined public safety millage, we need them to maintain our current level of staffing in the departments,” he said. The township must have the ballot language determined and submitted by May 29. The Board of Trustees plans to hold a special meeting on Thursday, May 3 to address potential ballot language. ❏


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Fostering community, culture Manna strives to promote Chaldean-American business

M

artin Manna, 39, is the executive director of the ChaldeanAmerican Chamber of Commerce and is helping to spread the word about a community that is prominent in the world of southeast Michigan business, including West Bloomfield Township. Manna was just awarded the Community Excellence Award for Businessperson of the Year at the West Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce Awards Dinner on Tuesday, April 24. Born in Detroit after his family immigrated from Iraq, the homeland of the Chaldeans, Manna grew up in West Bloomfield and graduated from West Bloomfield High School in 1990 before earning a degree from Wayne State University. Having previously worked in finance, Manna now heads an organization that not only works to increase networking among its Chaldean and nonChaldean members, but to also to advocate for Chaldean refugees. Married to his wife, Tamara, and the father of four children, Manna recently spoke about his role with the chamber, who Chaldeans are and what role they are playing in the community. First off, congratulations on being named the Businessperson of the Year at the West Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce Awards Dinner. What does it mean to you to receive this honor and how did you earn it? MM: It’s more of an honor for our organization and our community. We’ve been active in many local municipalities as it pertains to getting our community more involved in working with small businesses, and West Bloomfield is one of those communities. It has a large concentration of Chaldeans and a large concentration of Chaldean-owned businesses. We do have a relationship with the chamber. We’re trying to partner on various events, maybe collaborate on specific issues, and a lot of the residents and business owners in West Bloomfield are also members of the ChaldeanAmerican Chamber of Commerce. Many of those are non-Chaldeans — about 20 percent of the Chaldean Chamber membership is composed of non-Chaldeans. What was it like growing up as a Chaldean-American and how did you become interested in business? MM: I’ve always had an interest in business. I was originally in the finance field. I worked for a brokerage house and always had a knack for business. Our family owned a small business, we had a convenience store in West Bloomfield where I worked most of my

Q

Q

time. Most of the Chaldeans, like my parents who came here in the late 1960s, did everything they could to support their family, so a lot of them bought businesses, would work 80, 90, 100 hours a week to provide for their families and give their children something better than they were able to have when they came here really with nothing. A lot of the community now has evolved from stores into many other things, but I was involved in the store business and learned how to run a business at a young age. That’s why so many Chaldeans I think, like me, are entrepreneurs. They were taught that. It’s almost an edict in our community.

NE MINUTE

INTERVIEW Every survey shows that two-thirds of our households own at least one business, and 39 percent of our households own two or more businesses. We are a community of about 120,000 that owns more than 15,000 businesses in Michigan. You’re credited with helping create the the Chaldean-American Chamber of Commerce. What inspired you to form this group? Tell us a little about the chamber’s mission? MM: I wasn’t necessarily responsible, I was just part of a group. We have so many wonderful members of our community that stepped up I think about eight, nine years ago to fill a void. I think many didn’t understand who Chaldeans are, and part of the mission of the chamber was to help advocate for and help people understand the contributions Chaldeans are making in

Q

this region, so that was one of the objectives. And in doing so, we had 15 members of our community who invested some money to help launch the chamber. Those 15 now have become over 900 members and from there, they’ve helped establish some affiliates. We have a foundation, a total budget of about $2 million dollars a year that helps with our refugee population. We also have other issues that we deal with such as advocacy. We do a lot of networking. We do what we can to work for our members, and protect the interests of small-business owners. When we do a survey of why people join the Chaldean-American Chamber of Commerce, (we see it) is because they want to support the community they live in and they also want to have the ability to network with others. So a lot of what we do at the chamber, besides providing them cost-effective programs that can help their business, is to help introduce them to other businesses so they can do business with each other. Lastly, since we launched nine years ago, our foundation has donated almost $300,000 to organizations or communities in which Chaldeans live, work or worship, not just to Chaldean organizations, but to organizations where we own businesses. My mother and father and five of my brothers and sisters came in 1968 and then the last three of us were born after that year in the states. Iraq has had a history of turmoil, so they left as the Ba’ath Party came into power. That’s when a lot of Chaldeans migrated to the United States. Detroit was chosen because of the automotive industry and the ability to try and get a job with Ford and Chrysler at the time. Before the chamber, I was involved in doing some charitable work in the community on a volunteer basis. I wasn’t necessarily ever involved with the chamber, but I was always involved in organizing and helping to tell the positive contributions of the stories of the Chaldean community. On the community side I always volunteered with community organizations, so this is just an opportunity to do something I really was passionate about and I think we have a great group of people who work here now, almost 20 folks, that are carrying on that mission today. ❏ By Michael Shelton

Read more of this interview at www.spinalcolumnonline.com.


APRIL 25, 2012

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LAKES AREA NEWS

Baroni, Sprader file for supervisor post in White Lake By Angela Niemi staff writer

The race for White Lake Township supervisor has officially kicked off with Matt Sprader and current Supervisor Greg Baroni both filing to run for the position in the Republican primary election slated for Aug. 7. Baroni became supervisor to fill the void left when Mike Kowall was elected to the state Senate in 2010. Before that, Baroni had been chosen to fill a vacant trustee position that was created when former trustee Jay Brendel was appointed treasurer to fill the vacancy left when Beverly Spoor retired from the treasurer’s post in October 2010. Baroni said that in the 15 months since he took over as supervisor, he has been a part of striking a shared information-technology service agreement with Waterford Township and negotiated three union contracts. “I love the job, and I love serving the residents of White Lake Township,” he said. Baroni has 34 years of managerial experience at General Motors, was the past president of the White Lake Historical Society and is the current township liaison to that organization. He is also president-elect for the Huron Valley Optimist Club Board of Directors, a board member of Commerce United Methodist Church, and co-creator of White Lake Community Garden. Sprader, who is the owner of Sprader’s on the Lake, has also filed to run for supervisor. He has previously shown interest in the supervisor position when the township board was taking applications for the open supervisor post after Kowall left for the state Legislature. “As a long-time resident and local business owner, I have watched our community leaders make questionable decisions regarding the financial expenditures of the township,” Sprader said. “I feel it is important as a citizen to take action in making a positive change rather than to sit back and criticize others. It is my personal experiences as a business owner and citizen that have prompted me to seek office. “If I am elected to township supervisor, I will make common sense decisions and reduce frivolous spending to meet the needs of the community as a whole rather than the needs of a

Paid-on-call firefighters (from left) Ron Dubois, Tim Easley and Zack Schwartz from the Commerce Township Fire Department and others helped raise over $40,000 by having their heads shaved for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation on Saturday, April 21 at the Walled Lake Fire House. The St. Baldrick’s foundation is a childhood cancer charity funding the most promising research to help find cures for kids with cancer. Emily Macbeth coordinated the event and is in charge of the Lakes Area St. Baldrick’s chapter. (Photo submitted by Stacy Gross/Commerce Township Fire Department)

select few,” said Sprader, who noted that he encourages his fellow residents to attend the township board meetings and become involved in the processes of local government. If elected supervisor, Sprader said he would work to get the monthly board meetings televised and would reduce the number of closed sessions to the “absolute minimum required.” The filing deadline for those interested in running for an elected township position is May 15. The White Lake supervisor serves four-year terms and currently earns $75,000 annually. ❏

Eagle Scout will build pavilion at Dodge Park No. 5 By Angela Niemi staff writer

The Commerce Township Board of Trustees has granted approval for Nathan Cox to go ahead with his Eagle Scout Service Project plan to build a pavilion in one the township’s parks.

While both the Byers Homestead and Dodge Park No. 5 were considered, Cox decided to build the structure on the north side of Dodge Park. The Byers Homestead was deemed too small for the pavilion. Meanwhile, two sites were considered for the placement of the pavilion at Dodge Park. One of the sites, a clearing near the park entrance, was deemed unsuitable for the pavilion because the park’s master plan has that area listed as a future parking lot. The other site, which is an area over the bluff, is considered an “ideal” location because it doesn’t pose a conflict with the master plan and can still be seen from the roadway. According to township documents, the site provides for parking near the proposed pavilion, which is expected to measure 40-feet by 30-feet. The estimated price of the project is between $7,000 and $10,000. To begin an Eagle Scout project, one must plan, develop and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to religious, educational, or community organizations other than the Boy Scouts. The project must be

approved by the organization selected, two scout masters, and one scout district council person. To work up to the Eagle Scout level, a candidate must complete a leadership project where others assist in the process. ❏

Milford Village to see change in waste pickup days By Michael Shelton staff writer

Both the Milford Village Council and the Milford Township Board of Trustees have approved new waste hauling contracts with Richfield Equities LLC. The Village Council took action at its Monday, April 16 meeting to approve an agreement with Richfield, which submitted the low bid of $1.68 million for a service contract that runs from July 1 through June 30, 2017.

FOR MORE LAKES AREA NEWS SEE PAGE 12


PAGE 8

By Leslie Shepard staff writer

SPECIAL REPORT

W

ith spring in full swing, lakes area residents can soon head out to the crop of nearby farmers markets to pick from the freshest plants and produce available. Farmers markets have become increasingly popular now that families are gravitating toward healthier food choices and choosing to shop local while supporting Michigan farmers. Whether you’re looking for sun-kissed tomatoes straight off the vine, vibrant greenhouse flowers or flavorful homemade jams and organic items, the local farmers markets carry a vast variety of freshly cultivated perennials/annuals, plants, and produce, along with garden tools and decor. The following is a list of farmers markets in or around the lakes area, what they will be showcasing, and their hours of operation for the upcoming season. OAKLAND COUNTY The Oakland County Market, located at 2350 Pontiac Lake Road in Waterford Township, is open yearround. From May through Christmas, the market is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. From Dec. 26 through April, it’s open only on Saturdays from 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Vendors include purveyors of produce, flowers, plants, spices, jams/jellies, honey, aromatherapy candles and soaps, baked goods, garden decor and eco-friendly and soil management products. “Right now we’re featuring seasonal fruits and veggies and getting in asparagus and lettuce shortly,” said Dan Stencil, executive officer of Oakland County Parks and Recreation, which is taking over management of the county’s market. “Currently we’re working with the Michigan State University Cooperative Extension and the Oakland County Public Health Department to promote healthy eating.” Gardening and cooking demonstrations are planned this year in conjunction with the County Market, which is being transferred to Parks and Recreation control on June 2. “The staff is in place and beginning the transition. For all intents and purposes we are managing the market,” Stencil said. The Oakland County Market is nearly 100-years-old. It was launched in 1922 in downtown

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A brand new season West Oakland farmers markets about to open

Scenes like the one above are typical at the nearly century-old Oakland County Market, which is open year-round. It was launched in 1922 in downtown Pontiac and relocated to Waterford Township in 1953. Over 300,000 visitors come to the market annually. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

Pontiac and relocated to Waterford Township in 1953. Over 300,000 visitors come to the market annually. “It began as a means to provide a place for the general public to get a variety of seasonal fresh fruits and flowers,” Stencil said. “We are looking to expand it.” The County Market will be used as a gateway to the Waterford Oaks county park, a 14-acre site, to cross promote other activities like the Waterford Oaks greenhouse, water park, Paradise Peninsula Playground and many amenities the park offers, according to Stencil. One of the changes being implemented at the county park is having staff and volunteers direct traffic and act as porters to convey goods to patrons’ cars. The market provides 90 vendor stalls; however, there is a waiting list given that over 130 vendors have signed up. “First we want to give the site a makeover and completely repaint the inside and outside and brand it as an Oakland County park,” Stencil said.

The plan is to enhance the customer experience by establishing a small picnic area and rolling out new programming and special events. “This summer, as part of launching special events, we will use our mobile recreation units that provide inflatables, climbing towers, and stages, and then engage individual entertainers like guitarists and soloists,” Stencil said. Most vendors travel from outside Oakland County to sell their products at the County Market. “Unfortunately, Oakland County doesn’t have as much agricultural presence as it once had,” Stencil said. One long-time vendor, Prielipp Farms, hails from Britton, Mich. The 3,000-acre farm has been familyowned and operated since 1870 and has been conveying fresh grown produce and plants to the Oakland County market since 1975. Co-owner Dan Prielipp said during the off season, the farm’s greenhouse allows the family to sell produce and Christmas decorations such as wreaths, roping, loose

greens, and memorial blankets at the County Market. Right now they are selling varieties of pansies, Gerber daisies, and potted Dahlias. In May, there will be more to choose from like hanging baskets, bedding plants, flats, and accent plants. Come summer they will add sweet corn, tomatoes, melons, peppers, and cucumbers. “We only bring what we grow and produce doesn’t come in until late June or early July,” Prielipp said. For more information on the County Market, visit oakgov.com/cmarket. WALLED LAKE This year’s 10th annual Walled Lake Farmer’s Market will open on Wednesday, May 2 and continue through Oct. 31. The market will be open from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Wednesday at the city’s event field adjacent to the the Walled Lake Fire Station on E. West Maple. Market Master Janell Joyce said the market continues to grow every year. “It has tripled in size from when we took it over seven years ago from the Downtown Development Authority (DDA),” Joyce said. “More residents stop in who want to ‘buy Michigan.’”


APRIL 25, 2012

been a loyal attendee of the Walled Lake market since it’s genesis in 2002. “It’s a homey market — just the way a farmer’s market should be — and offers a wide array of items,” Hatfield said. “We’ve been coming since the beginning because it’s a close radius to our customer base.” Springbrook Farms owns a 13acre farm in Howell and a greenhouse in Farmington. It’s been in the business since 1932. “We’re an old Oakland County grower — there are very few of us left, as most come from Romeo, Armada and a few from Ann Arbor,”

including the rare Mountain Fresh tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, squash, corn, green beans, potatoes, onions, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and cucumbers. Apart from flats of perennials/annuals, hanging bushes, and porch pots, premier roses will be available for purchase. “We grow a lot of rosebushes and are the only one who produces in the area,” Hatfield said. Springbrook is renowned for growing highly coveted roses such as David Austin, Knock Outs, and Floribundas varieties. Another rare find are the

Hand-crafted soaps (above) are among the many items that can be purchased at the Milford Farmers’ Market, which will be held on Thursday afternoons from 3 to 8 p.m. beginning on May 10 and running through Oct. 18. Twenty-eight vendors are expected on opening day. (Photo submitted by Kelley Kirchner/Milford Farmers’ Market)

Hatfield said. Both John and and his brother, Rick, are horticulturists who pride themselves in their hands-on and knowledge-based approach. “We don’t use pesticides and don’t believe in using animal manure because of the risk of salmonella — that could run into bacterial problems,” Hatfield explained. Instead, they use a scientific approach to grow their crops and monitor their soil closely. “We use a cultivator every two weeks to work the weeds up — it’s very labor-intensive,” Hatfield said. “We know when our plants need calcium or the soil needs a change in acidity because we have the capability to test them. “We also have sweet water in our aquifers to help with maturing the crops, and that is very rare among farmers,” he said. Springbrook Farms will be showcasing a wide range of produce and flora at this year’s farmer’s market,

Traverse City Benjamin Twig cherries that Springbrook Farms has exclusive rights to sell in lower Michigan. Other cherry products sold will include jams/jellies and vinaigrettes. WIXOM Wixom will be rolling out its fourth annual Farmers Market on May 24 from 3 to 7 p.m. at Sibley Park on Pontiac Trail, directly across from City Hall. From that time forward, the market will be held every Thursday until Oct. 4 from 3 to 7 p.m., with summer concerts immediately following. The Wixom Farmers Market debuted in 2009 at the corner of Old Wixom Road and Pontiac Trail as a community service, but was relocated two years ago due to parking constraints. Since its inception, the market has progressively grown. “We get a steady crowd of people because we tie in with Wixom theme nights and the concerts,” said Wixom Parks and Recreation

PAGE 9

Director Deanna Magee. “We’re marketing it as activities here on Thursdays and the whole idea is to patronize the businesses and participate in downtown activities.” This year Magee said she anticipates about 20 vendors doing business at the city’s market. Only 15 have signed up so far, but it’s early yet, she said. “We have quite a few new vendors this year and we’re really trying to recruit more because more is better,” Magee said. “We want to progressively grow the market and keep it where there’s a diverse selection of items — something for everyone.” This year vendors will set up camp showcasing flowers, fresh fruits and veggies, honey, eggs, cheese, meats, breads, jams and jellies, pottery, candles, jewelry, woodworks, garden decor, soaps, iron works, photography, and more. “To encourage economic growth in Michigan, we favor vendors that produce in Michigan,” Magee said. There will be kids activities available at the market, such as arts, crafts, and inflatables. In addition, cooking demonstrations are planned and master gardeners from the Michigan State University Extension will be on site weekly. For more information on the Wixom Farmers Market, visit wixomparksandrec.com and click on the Farmers Market link. WHITE LAKE The White Lake Farmer’s Market will be entering into its second year of operation this May. The market will be open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. from Saturday, May 5 to Oct. 6. Huron Valley Recreation and Community Education, in conjunction with White Lake Township, hosts the market at the Huron Valley Lakeland High School campus off of Bogie Lake Road. The market showcases a variety of vendors and features fruits and vegetables, baked goods, plants, yard and garden materials, and candy, as well as hand-made crafts. Current vendors for 2012 include those from the lakes area, as well as Novi and Hartland. The rental of vendor space is restricted to those whose principal production site is within 200 miles of the White Lake Farmer’s Market location. The booth fee is $16 per week for one space, while renting a space the day of the market is $21 per day per space on a first-come-first-serve basis. PAGE 11 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯

SPECIAL REPORT

This year the vendor list has expanded. New to the market this season is Keith Swan with Swan’s Farm of Commerce Township, who will be selling fresh produce; Bonnie George, who will be selling homemade pot holders and aprons for garden and kitchen use; and Randy Lipman’s Mystic Kettle, a purveyor of kettle corn. Mystic Kettle is based in Huntington Woods. Lipman and her husband run the fledgling business that was launched only a year ago. “We heard the Walled Lake Farmer’s Market is wonderful and we want the opportunity to position ourselves throughout different communities,” Lipman said. Mystic Kettle’s all-natural, Michigan-grown and Michigan-made gourmet kettle corn is both slightly sweet and salty, a snacker’s dream. “Our kettle corn is unique — we use mushroom-style kernels that pop rounder,” Lipman said. “When the kernels are placed in hot oil, we add the sugar that caramelizes and the salt binds to the surface. After popping we filter out the unpopped kernels and crumbs so you get a nice bag full of corn.” Mystic Kettle’s primary goal is to sell a product that its customers enjoy in the local area, and giving a portion of its proceeds to charitable causes. “We do a lot of work with fund-raisers like the Berkley Instrumental boosters and the ‘Pink Fund’ for breast cancer survivors who have financial hardships,” Lipman said. “Our motto is ‘Don’t Settle for any Kettle — Mystic Kettle.’” To date, there are 30 vendors purchasing a booth at the market, a slight increase from last year. Hospitality House will make a special showing in mid-July to man a booth in order to glean donations for the not-for-profit organization that serves area households in need. Market shoppers can choose from a range of products and produce, including perennials/annuals; honey; Great Harvest bread/cookies; knives, cutlery, and garden tools; leather goods; baked goods; jams/jellies (some sugar-free); homemade soaps and bath products; aromatic oils; hot dogs; kettle corn; homemade taco chips; homemade salsa and barbecue sauces; birdhouses; aprons/bibs; garden decor; and solar lights. Vendors hail from anywhere between Farmington Hills and Belleville, from Howell to Armada. “VanHoutte Farms is a long-standing vendor and very popular, so is Springbrook Farms,” Joyce said. John Hatfield, the farmer’s market coordinator for Springbrook Farms, said the Michigan-based company has

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PAGE 11

SPECIAL REPORT

Farmers markets ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 9

Those interested in becoming a vendor should contact Huron Valley Recreation and Community Education at 248-676-8390 or Kevin Lawrence at 248-755-1195. Entertainment will also be provided at the White Lake Farmer’s Market on certain dates this summer. Luti, a music group from Milford, will be at the market from 10 a.m. to noon on May 19, June 2, 9, and 23, and on Aug. 18. Luti performs “folk music with a European flair.” Meanwhile, Leah Giesey will be providing vocal music from noon to 1 p.m. on July 14 and 28, and Aug. 11 and 25. For more information go to whitelakefarmersmarket.weebly.com. MILFORD The Milford Farmers’ Market will be held on Thursday afternoons from 3-8 p.m. beginning on May 10 and ending Oct. 18. This season will be the market’s fourth year, and will once again feature fresh and locally-grown produce as a means to support local vendors. Vendor booths will be set up on E. Liberty Street between S. Main and Union. There will be public parking on all nearby streets, along with parking lots on either side of Main Street. The only exception will be on Aug. 9 during Milford Memories, when the farmer’s market will be held at South Side Park next to the Milford Fire Station. “The number of vendors vary from week to week depending on the season and what Mother Nature has to offer, but typically we have anywhere from 25 to 30 vendors — 30 is our capacity, although we are looking for additional space,” said Linda Lowe, the market’s chairperson. “Because our vendors vary, we do have spots available and we do keep a waiting list.” Kelley Kirchner, the market’s events coordinator, added that she expects 28 vendors on opening day and that the market is working on a plan to expand into another area this year during the bounty of the season. According to Kirchner, artesian breads and spices, free-range meats, farm-fresh eggs, and plants are just some of the items that will be sold at the market, as well as baked goods, fruits, vegetables and produce. Homemade items such as soaps and other beauty products will also be available. “The establishment is intended to bring local farmers to a community

A patron at the Oakland County Market (above), 2350 Pontiac Lake Road in Waterford, browses through a vendor’s goods. “It began as a means to provide a place for the general public to get a variety of seasonal fresh fruits and flowers. We are looking to expand it,” said Dan Stencil, executive officer for Oakland County Parks and Recreation, which is taking over management of the county’s market. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard) location and to provide this venue to goes right back into the market to local people. In addition to being able pay for entertainment, advertising, to get great local produce and prodtents, promotions, and other necesucts, it seems to be like a local gathsities. ering place for people, like a piazza in She added that most of the venItaly,” Kirchner said. dors are from metro Detroit, includA vendor has four payment ing Milford, South Lyon and options; $20 per week for one space, Hartland. a flat fee of $17 per week for one The Farmers’ Market will also space for vendors that make a fullhost a series of events and concerts season commitment but want to pay beginning on May 10 with a “May week-to-week, a 6- to 12-week preDay” celebration with activities for payment option of $16 per week for children. one space, or a 13-24 week pre-payThe event will include a “May ment option of $14 per week for one Day” pole for children to wrap a ribspace. bon around to commemorate the end Kirchner said that the workers at of the winter harvest and going into the market are all volunteers and all the bounty of the summer harvest, the booth fees from the vendors according to Kirchner.

The Farmers’ Market’s fourth birthday party will also be held during the May 24 market with games, prizes and birthday cake from the Milford Baking Company available from 4 to 6 p.m. Live concerts will also be held from 5 to 7:30 p.m. every week beginning with a performance by Pato Margetic during the “May Day” event. Margetic will also play on July 19 and Sept. 20. TJ Kelly will perform on May 17, July 12 and Aug. 16, while Julie Haven will perform on May 24 during the market’s birthday party. Also performing will be Chris Breest (May 31 and Aug. 2), Pete “Big Dog” Fetters (June 5), Robin Horlock (June 14, July 26, Aug. 30 and Oct. 4), The Spoonful Blues Band (June 21 and Sept. 13), Cass Dufrin (June 28 and Sept. 6), and Annie & Rod Capps (July 5, Aug. 9 and Sept. 27). On May 31 and Aug. 2 there will be a cooking demonstration provided by Cooking with Dawn Bause, and the second annual Farmers’ Market Chili Cookoff will be held on Oct. 11. Kirchner added that “Shop, Chop and Dine” with Chef Brian Polcyn of Cinco Lagos will also be back this year. The Farmers’ Market is held in conjunction with the Michigan Farmers’ Market Association. For more information, visit milfordfarmersmarket.org. WEST BLOOMFIELD HENRY FORD HOSPITAL While West Bloomfield Township itself does not host a farmers market, Henry Ford Hospital in West Bloomfield does host a year-round weekly farmers market from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesdays inside the hospital. Sally Ann Brown, senior public relations specialist for Henry Ford Health System, said the market is part of Main Street Live and that its goal is to offer a sustainable, foodbased, produce-driven market that provides education and enjoyment to the community. Brown added that during the state’s growing season, the market provides plants and produce from area growers and community groups, along with healthy prepared foods such as baked goods and jams that are aimed at maintaining a healthy diet and following the hospital’s guidelines. The market even offers pet treats to help animals maintain proper nutrition. ❏


PAGE 12

Obituaries CHARLICK, ROBERT W. “BOB”; a resident of Hillman, MI, formerly of Highland for 75 years, passed away on Sunday morning, April 15, 2012 at the age of 91. CLARKE, MICHAEL ANDREW; age 31, of Waterford; passed away suddenly on April 14, 2012. DECLERCQ, DIANE MARIE; age 58, of Wixom, died peacefully surrounded by her family on April 11, 2012. GATES, MARY “JOANNE”; age 83 and a long time resident of Highland, died on April 15, 2012. LIPTACK, NANCY J.; age 77 of Commerce, passed away peacefully at West Lake Health Center, on Thursday, April 12, 2012. PAUL, DOROTHY; a resident of West Bloomfield, died on April 14th, 2012 at the age of 87. PRESSEL, VERN THERON; of Waterford, died April 13, 2012 at 66 years of age. Loving husband of Thelma E. Pressel for 40 years. SAGE, ROSE; a resident of West Bloomfield, died on April 16th, 2012 at the age of 96. SCHNEIDER, NAOMI W.; was born April 18, 1916 and died April 13, 2012 at the age of 96. SWISHER, IVAN “BUD” A.; of White Lake, April 16, 2012, age 90. Beloved husband of “Louise” for 50 years. THARP, WILLIAM “BILL” E.; of Waterford, died April 13, 2012 at 74 years of age. Beloved husband of Nina S. Tharp for 56 years. WOOD, EARL S. “SMILEY” JR.; of Commerce was born on May 17, 1928 and died April 13, 2012 at age 83

To place an obituary in the Spinal Column Newsweekly please call the Classified Department at 248-360-7355 or email: lorisnyder@thescngroup.com

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LAKES AREA NEWS

Debbrecht, Dean vie for seat Wife of ex-police chief running again for 51st District Court By Leslie Shepard staff writer

A

51st District Court judge may be facing competition in the primary election set for Aug. 7, with one challenger filing for the race thus far. Former Oakland County assistant prosecutor and long-time Waterford Township resident Andrea Dean recently filed candidacy paperwork to run for Judge Jodi Debreccht’s bench seat. Debreccht must run in this year’s election since she was appointed by former Gov. Jennifer Granholm in 2010 to replace Judge Phyllis McMillen, who Dean was appointed to an open seat on the Oakland County Circuit Court. Debbrecht, a Waterford resident, formerly served as a Macomb County assistant prosecutor and as a magistrate/court administrator Debbrecht for the district court in Berkley. Debbrecht’s resume also includes work as a caseworker in a juvenile detention facility and a victim’s advocate for a women’s shelter, as well as lobbying for domestic violence and sex-

Waste contracts ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 7

One stipulation of the agreement is moving garbage pickup from Thursdays and Fridays to Mondays and Tuesdays. The agreement also includes a freerecycle rewards program; porch pickup of refuse for handicapped residents; and a free of charge, one-trip per month visit by each village resident to the Richfield landfill. Village Manager Arthur Shufflebarger said Richfield will submit a letter of credit, but it will be for a lesser dollar amount than the village

ual assault legislation. Debbrecht graduated from the University of Missouri with degrees in psychology, human development and family studies, public policy and mediation, and law. “I want to retain my seat,” Debbrecht said. “I have the experience along with my commitment to the community, involvement and integrity. I have been the sitting judge, (and) that gives me the experience above and beyond my opponent. I am committed and compassionate to my litigants, and passionate and motivated to make a difference.” Debbrecht’s involvement also includes starting mock trials in the high schools, work with the Waterford Coalition for Youth, and active membership with the Waterford Optimist Club, Waterford Area Chamber of Commerce, and Waterford Youth Assistance. She also works closely with MADD as a trained facilitator, and launched several town hall forums as a community outreach effort. “This is something I’m most passionate about right now,” she said. “I’m constantly seeing issues with our young people and held a forum on Spice/K-2 on March 22 and will be holding one on Adderall and Ritalin in the fall. “My involvement is more than just being a member of something, it’s about doing and making a difference,” she said. Dean is an attorney who has 18 years of experience in criminal, probate and family law. She also served as an Oakland County assistant prosecutor for 14 years. “My work ethic, knowledge of the law and demeanor are what will make requested. Shufflebarger said that the deal would provide savings that would help self-insure the difference. The council will set the refuse millage rate to help feed an emergency fund over a 2- or 3-year period should a situation arise. The council selected Richfield over three other bids, including one from its current provider, Waste Management, which submitted in the second-lowest bid of $2.13 million for five years. Then at its Wednesday, April 18 meeting, the Milford Township Board of Trustees approved its own agreement with Richfield, its current waste collection provider, for five years span-

a difference on the bench, as well as my knowledge of the community,” Dean said. She has taught at the Oakland Police Academy and worked as a training instructor for new prosecutors with the Prosecuting Attorneys Association of Michigan. Dean is currently a member of the Waterford Coalition for Youth, a lifetime member of the Waterford Historical Society, a member of the Waterford Area Chamber of Commerce, and a former member of MADD. “There are some programs I’d like to continue, like court in school, where court takes place in a middle school where real cases go before a judge,” Dean said. “Cases like minors in possession and drinking and driving cases are conducted so it gives students a real view of the consequences to decisions and shows them that decisions can affect their lives both positively and negatively.” This is not the first time Dean has run for election as a judge. She lost a 2002 race for 51st District Court bench seat to Richard Kuhn, Jr. District court judges, who run in non-partisan elections, serve six-year terms and are paid $138,272 per year. The filing deadline for judicial candidates is May 1. In order for a primary election to occur, a minimum of three candidates must file. The two highest vote-getters would advance to the November general election. If only two candidates file for the seat, they would automatically advance to the Nov. 6 general election. ❏ ning July 1 through June 30, 2017. In its bid, Richfield proposed servicing the township’s 3,030 residential units with a refuse collection rate of $2 per week in the first year and increasing each year of the agreement to $2.08 per week in the fifth year. The recycling collection rate for the township will be 55 cents in the first year and 63 cents in the final year. The official contracts between the township, village and Richfield have not yet been signed. ❏

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PAGE 13

LAKES AREA NEWS

Walk for Israel in W. Bloomfield set for Sunday, May 6 By Michael Shelton

All in it together Volunteers to rehab veteran’s home

staff writer

By Leslie Shepard

Temple Shir Shalom in West Bloomfield Township will host its seventh annual Walk for Israel on Sunday, May 6, with the program beginning at 11 a.m. and culminating with a walk down Orchard Lake Road. According to the event’s official website, walkforisrael.org, the mission of the event is to “unite the metropolitan Detroit community to celebrate the establishment of the modern Jewish state of Israel and support its right to live in peace and security.” Temple Shir Shalom is located at 3999 Walnut Lake Road at the corner of Orchard Lake and Walnut Lake roads. The event will begin, rain or shine, with a lecture by Gary Kenzer, executive director of HonestReporting.com, in the Dave & Joyce Sakwa Family Sanctuary at 11 a.m. and will be followed by a free kosher lunch at noon. The walk will begin at 1 p.m. at the temple and head down Orchard Lake Road to Orchard Lake Middle School before heading back up Orchard Lake Road to the temple. The program will also provide Israeli music and entertainment, as well as information about the country and issues currently impacting it. There will also be inflatables for children, as well as a raffle for a round-trip ticket to Israel. This year marks Israel’s 64th birthday, as it will celebrate its independence day tomorrow, Thursday, April 26. The temple has traditionally held the march to coincide with the country’s formation. As part of its consent agenda, the West Bloomfield Township Board of Trustees at its Monday, April 23 meeting approved a resolution to conduct the event, as well as an outdoor gathering permit and a waiver of fees. “It’s grown in popularity and those who participate are of all races and religions,” said township Trustee Steve Kaplan, who participates in the event. “It keeps expanding and it speaks highly of the event. There will also be police officers on (the) route.” ❏

staff writer

I

n the spirit of community giving, a collective of Wixom volunteers and members of the Walled Lake Eagles will be working side-by-side to rebuild an underprivileged resident’s home during the city’s 6th Annual Rebuilding Oakland Together Day, set for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 28. Together the 50+ volunteers will be rebuilding a home at 2886 Benstein in Walled Lake. By the time the event rolls around, Wixom Parks and Recreation Supervisor Linda Hinkley anticipates about 60 volunteers. “We’re still getting in applications,” Hinkley said. “We’ve been working with the Walled Lake Eagles for six years now and they’ve been gracious to come over here for the last five, so we want to reciprocate and work on a home in their area.” The beneficiary is one of the Walled Lake Eagles club members. “He’s one of our members and served some time in the war,” said Keith Erdman, president of the Walled Lake Eagles. The planned improvements to the interior include bathroom renovations, where a shower stall, vanity, and medicine cabinet will be

Sidewalk sale in Milford will feature first Vegas tent By Michael Shelton staff writer

The Milford Village Council at its Monday, April 16 meeting approved a charitable gaming license for the Milford Business Association (MBA), which will be presenting a revamped edition of sidewalk sales scheduled for July 13-15. The event formerly known as “Shop, Rock and Stroll” and “Sidewalk Sales” will now be known as “Milford’s Summer Palooza.” It will include a Vegas tent for the first time in the event’s history. The tent will be located in front of either the Palate restaurant or in front of Cinco Lagos and New Grille. Patrons

installed, in addition to American with Disabilities Act (ADA) improvements. New flooring will be installed in the kitchen, dining room, and bedroom, courtesy of Modern Floors. The kitchen, living room, and bathroom will be given fresh coats of paint. New blinds will be hung, and plumbing and electrical work will be conducted. Planned exterior enhancements include yard work, deck improvements, painting a shed, and installing a flagpole. Each of the Rebuilding Oakland Together projects is intended for low-income Oakland County residents who are either elderly, disabled, military veterans, or families with children that are unable to do the work themselves and meet lowincome guidelines. The group’s mission is to bring volunteers and communities together to improve the homes and lives of low-income homeowners. Rebuilding Together Oakland County was founded in 1992. It has rehabilitated over 584 homes and a number of non-profit facilities, adding over $5.5 million dollars in market value to neighborhoods and communities while allowing homeowners to remain in their homes. ❏ will have their choice of playing on six Blackjack tables, three Poker/Texas Hold’em tables, one “Let it Ride” table, and one Roulette table. Other games being proposed include Craps, Seven-card Stud, and Omaha Hi Lo. A community service group would be selected to manage the tent and the MBA would then split the proceeds with that group or pay it a set fee. The revamped event is also scheduled to include a tent with entertainment, food, and beverages in a vacant lot near the Main Street Grill and Dick’s Barber Shop, where a band will play July 13-14. Not only will the traditional sidewalk sales take place at downtown Milford businesses, but children will also be able to play on six bouncers, as well as scale a rock climbing wall and dunk someone in a dunk tank. ❏

ALS, library levies headed to Aug. 7 Waterford ballot By Leslie Shepard staff writer

Voters in Waterford Township will be asked to decide two millage proposals during the Aug. 7 primary election. The ballot language for both proposals was unanimously approved by the Board of Trustees at its Monday, April 23 meeting. The first is a ballot proposal asking residents if the township should renew an advanced life support (ALS) emergency medical transport millage at 0.63 mills, from 2013 through 2022. “We want to make sure it’s clear that their (local taxpayers’) money stays in Waterford,” said Supervisor Carl Solden, referring to the township Fire Department recently taking over fire services in neighboring Pontiac via a service contract. If the millage is renewed, the revenue it generates would pay for ALS services in Waterford only. The proposed levy would help the township continue to provide ALS emergency transportation services, as well as to maintain current staffing levels. By levying such a renewal, the township would generate an estimated $1.2 million in the first year of the renewed collection. “A few years back, the fire department decided to do transports, and to keep that in existence, it must make $1.2 million a year,” said township Treasurer Margaret Birch. “It must at least take in that revenue to be viable.” This particular millage supports one of the four township paramedic units. “We are a millage-based fire department,” said Fire Chief Ron Spears. “This is simply a renewal, not an increase, and otherwise we lose one of our paramedic transports and 13 firefighters.” In Waterford Township, paramedics serve in a dual capacity. “These paramedics/firefighters will go on a medical run and next be called out to a house fire, so they serve a dual role. It’s important to keep the staffing level where it’s at,” Spears said.

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LAKES AREA NEWS

Waterford millages ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 13

The second ballot proposal seeks to renew the township’s library millage at 0.9118 mills, from 2013 through 2022. The tax revenue from the millage would be used to pay for operation and maintenance of the Waterford Township Public Library. By levying this millage, it’s estimated the township would generate $1.76 million in the first year of the renewed collection. “The library exists solely on this

millage. No money is taken from the (township) general fund,” Birch said. “The library has had to make cuts over the last three years — like closing on Fridays — as taxable (property) value has gone down.” At one time the library took in $2.7 million a year. It now operates on $1.7 million from the existing millage, according to Birch. “We have a wonderful library and it’s a quality of life issue for seniors and young individuals,” she said. A mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of taxable property value. The

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owner of a township property with a taxable value of $100,000 ($200,000 market value) would pay $63 a year in property taxes under the renewed ALS emergency medical transport millage. The owner of the same property would pay just over $91 a year to support the library under the renewed library millage. ❏

Highland to hold hearing on future pathway priorities The Highland Township Board of Trustees will be holding a public hearing on a proposed non-motorized pathway master plan on Wednesday, May 9, beginning at 7:30 p.m. The Highland Township Planning Department has been assembling a master plan looking to incorporate non-motorized pathways in the township. According to Jenny Frederick of the township’s Planning Department, the sidewalk master plan was initiated after township planners finished a recreation plan in 2009. “After we did the recreation plan, citizens said one of the priorities was

to get pathways in Highland,” Frederick said. “So, in some ways, this is like an addendum to the recreation plan.” The need for a master plan for sidewalks also partly arose from the township hoping to get state and federal funds through the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHA) Safe Routes to Schools program — which would cover the majority of Highland’s priority areas. The plan calls for 27 miles of proposed pathways to be added over the next decade. The first five include adding 10 miles of pathway along the following roadways: • One mile along Downey Lake Road; • One-half mile along North Duck Road; • One-quarter mile of Harvey Lake Road; • Three miles along Highland Road; • One-and-a-half miles on Livingston Road; • Three miles along Milford Road; and

FOR MORE LAKES AREA NEWS SEE PAGE 16

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LAKES AREA NEWS

Sidewalk hearing ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 14

• One mile on E. Wardlow Road; This connected system of trails and greenways throughout the township is expected to connect residents to adjacent communities; the county’s linked path and trail system; and to “natural, cultural, and civic destinations within Highland Township” while serving a wide range of users including walkers, joggers, and bicyclists. The draft non-motorized master plan can be found on the township’s website at highlandtwp.com. ❏

May 21 hearing for Orchard Lake’s $2.5M budget The Orchard Lake City Council will be holding a public hearing on May 21 to receive public feedback before adopting a Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13 budget that calls for a nominal increase to the community’s fund balance and a decrease in the city’s overall millage rate thanks to this year’s retirement of the Orchard Lake Nature Sanctuary debt. “The budget is supported by a levy of 8.82 mills, an overall decrease of 1.41 mills based upon the sanctuary debt being satisfied,” said Director of City Services Gerry McCallum. “The levy includes an increase in the general fund from 5.46 (mills) last year to 6.19 mills this year to accommodate wage increases mandated by contracts, (state) Tax Tribunal allocation for future refunds ($70,000), retiree health care funding, and road repairs.” The fund balance — which will grow from 16 to 17 percent of the city’s planned expenditures — at the beginning of the fiscal year on July 1 is projected to be $487,556. By the end of the fiscal year on June 30, 2013, it’s forecasted at $381,556 after about $100,000 is allocated from it for road resurfacing. The budget calls for allocating $250,000 to the local road fund for resurfacing city streets. “This amount is insufficient to satisfy critical needs of the roads and I recommend further subsidy to it from the capital improvement fund in the amount of $100,000,” McCallum said. Total operating revenues for the city are expected at about $2.5 million. Most of the city’s revenue comes from property taxes ($2 million). Estimated expenditures are $2.5 million. The bulk of the expenditures are for police ($747,000), employee and retiree benefits ($641,000) and the Department of Public Works and roads ($427,540). ❏


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 17

EDUCATION

WBS bus vandals force closure of schools April 18 By Michael Shelton staff writer

For the second time in less than three months, the West Bloomfield School District was forced to cancel school last week after a number of its school buses were disabled and vandalized the night before at the district’s bus garage lot in Orchard Lake Village. The district canceled classes for Wednesday, April 18 after it was discovered around 5:30 a.m. that 20 of its buses had fuses pulled and had some had wires cut. All district elementary and middle school extracurricular activities were also canceled, but all West Bloomfield High School extracurricular activities were expected to proceed as scheduled. West Bloomfield Schools Public Relations and Marketing Coordinator Pamela Zajac said the vandalism took place when suspects entered the yard at 10:24 p.m. and left at 10:40 p.m.

on Tuesday, April 17. “We have video surveillance and we saw three people on film. We are working with Orchard Lake Police Chief Joe George and Detective Darrell Betts,” Zajac said. “We are also enhancing our surveillance system at the bus lot, but it hasn’t been installed yet. Everything is on order and it should come in any day.” The district’s schools reopened on Thursday, April 19 for classes, and Zajac said that the district’s updated security system will be installed “any day now.” George said the incident is still under investigation and, as of Tuesday, April 24, Zajac said that no suspects have been identified or apprehended. According to Betts, the Orchard Lake Police Department has been running down some leads, but no warrants have been issued or requested. “I’ve interviewed about eight people already and everyone is denying knowledge,” Betts said. He added that most of the people interviewed were West Bloomfield High School students. This is the second incident of school bus vandalism in the district’s

bus lot this year, with the first occurring on Jan. 29, when 18 buses were vandalized. Between 9:30 and 10:05 p.m. that night, suspects let the air out of the tires on three buses, while the remaining buses were vandalized by the perpetrators pulling fuses out of fuse boxes or ripping out various cords. The vandals also unplugged heating elements from batteries. The district was forced to cancel classes on Jan. 30. Zajac said that no suspects have yet been apprehended in that incident, either. ❏

Central student earns top honors in essay contest The Walled Lake Consolidated School District has announced the winners of the Lakes Area Optimist Club Essay Contest, with Walled Lake Central High School student Sandeep Siva named the winner. The theme of the written contest was “How my Positive Outlook Benefits My Community.”

“Sandeep Siva did a wonderful job of articulating this year’s theme,” said Scott Liebold, the chairman of the essay contest. “He expressed himself well through the essay and deserved the honor of first-place. With the success we experienced this year, we definitely will be moving forward next year and bringing this program to lakes area students again with a whole new topic.” Siva was awarded a medallion and a certificate. His essay will next be entered at the next level to compete against the other Optimist Club winners in the club’s district. The winner at the club district level receives a $2,500 scholarship and goes on to compete at the international level. The winner of the international competition receives an engraved plaque and recognition in The Optimist magazine. Other Walled Lake Consolidated Schools winners include second-place winner Haley Wagner from Sarah Banks Middle School, and third-place winner Nicole Muhleisen, also from Sarah Banks. Lia Ann Stevens from Walled Lake Central and Akhila Manu from Sarah Banks received honorable mentions for their essays. ❏


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 19

EDUCATION

HOT, Kettering teams headed to world finals By Leslie Shepard staff writer

T

wo lakes area robotics teams will be competing beginning today, Wednesday, April 25 through Sunday, April 29 at the world championship in St. Louis, Missouri. Waterford Township Kettering High School’s FIRST robotics team, Team 3098, competed at the Michigan Championship Tournament held Saturday, April 14 and Sunday, April 15 in Ypsilanti. The team placed eighth in the state. Huron Valley Schools’ Heroes of Tomorrow (HOT) Robotics team was crowned the victors at the state tournament, where 64 teams competed. Both will now advance to the FIRST World Championship, where they will take on 395 teams from around the world. The HOT team was seeded second. Las Gorillas, Team 469, from the International Academy Central in Bloomfield was seeded first and chose the HOT Team as part of its three-team alliance. Team 830, the Ann Arbor Huron High School Rat Pack, was chosen as the third alliance partner. “You must qualify based on points accumulated at district events,” said HOT team mentor Lori Gleason. “Points are then given by placing or winning awards so only the best teams attended. The cool thing is that you’re competing against the best.” Robots were built during a 6week period prior to the competition season. Each team was assigned to build one robot that

Waterford Schools tackling bullying policy revisions The Waterford Schools Board of Education was presented with a draft copy of the district’s revised bullying policy at its Thursday, April 19 meeting. The amended policy will come back to the board for approval at its Thursday, May 3. The policy is being updated to fol-

Members of the Huron Valley Schools’ Heroes of Tomorrow (HOT) Robotics team (above) were crowned state champions at the Michigan Championship Tournament held Saturday, April 14 and Sunday, April 15 in Ypsilanti. Waterford Township Kettering High School’s FIRST robotics team, Team 3098, also competed in the tournament and took eighth-place. Both will now head to St. Louis, Missouri, where they will compete at the world championship starting today, Wednesday, April 25. (Photo by Abbey Senczyszyn)

would play a 3-on-3 basketball game. “There were four nets and you get more points if you get the ball in the highest one rather than the lowest,” Gleason explained. “At the end of the game, you had to balance your robot on these teeter totters and then get a certain number of points. Our alliance could fit all of our robots to balance and got the maximum points.” The HVS alliance earned the highest number of points during the competition, scoring 111 points in the first round alone. The HOT team also received the highest award during the competition,

the GM Industrial Design Award, given to the team that celebrates form and function in an efficiently designed machine that effectively achieves the game challenge. “Some of the business sector’s top brass judges them and decides who is worthy of the award,” Gleason said. The HOT Team, a member of FIRST International, is comprised of 42 students from Milford High School, Lakeland High School, and the International Academy West who pair up with 20 mentors from the General Motors Proving Ground and Huron

Valley Schools. The mission of FIRST and the HOT Team is to inspire students’ interest in science and technology. The mentors and students work in unison to build products that are judged in FIRST Robotics regional competitions and the championship event. Products include a robot capable of playing a game designed by FIRST; documentation of the success of the team with multimedia technology; and an animated short created using the same software used by the motion picture industry. ❏

low Public Act (PA) 241 of 2011, which requires all districts to adopt a policy prohibiting bullying at school no later than June 6. A copy of the policy states that bullying will be strictly prohibited among only by students, but also parents, staff and school board members. It would apply to all “at-school” activities in the district, including school-run activities outside the district. Bullying is defined in the policy as any gesture or written, verbal, graphic or physical act (including through

electronic devices) that is intended to harm a student. In complying with PA 241, otherwise known as Matt’s Safe School Law, the district’s updated policy would prohibit retaliation or a false accusation against a victim of bullying, a witness or another person with reliable information about an act of bullying. The policy also includes a procedure for providing notification to the parents or legal guardians of a victim of bullying and a perpetrator of bully-

ing, as well as a procedure for a prompt investigation of a report of a violation of the policy or a related complaint with the school’s principal or principal’s designee in charge of the investigation. Confidentiality will also be maintained as legally permitted during an investigation. Schools are also required to document any prohibited incident reported and report all verified incidents of bullying and their consequences to the school board on an annual basis. ❏


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PUBLIC NOTICE

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SPRING HYDRANT FLUSHING Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday, Starting April 9th, 10th, 11th & 12th, 2012 and ending Wednesday, May 18th, 2012 THIS WORK WILL BE PERFORMED BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 7:30 P.M. - 11:30 P.M. and flushing will occur for 6 weeks Customers may experience some discolored water.Please run cold water to clear your lines and avoid doing laundry until the water is clear. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your cooperation. For Further Information Contact: Waterford Township Department of Public Works at 248-674-2278 or Gerald Ward, (Water Treatment Foreman) at 248.618.7483 or email at Gward@twp.waterford.mi.us S.C. 4-11, 4-18, 4-25, 5-2, 5-9 & 5-16-12

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The White Lake Township Water Department will be conducting the Spring Fire Hydrant flushing during daytime hours Monday through Friday from April 1, 2012 through May 15, 2012. Fire hydrant flushing signs will be posted one day in advance and the day of flushing at the entrance to each subdivision/development. Caution should be observed around any hydrant discharge. Minimizing water usage is recommended during the day of flushing in your area. Customers may experience some discolored water. Please run cold water to clear your lines and avoid doing laundry until the water is clear. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your cooperation. Any questions should be directed to White Lake Township Water Department at 248-698-3300 ext. 8 or www.whitelaketwp.com. S.C.: 3-28, 4-4, 4-11, 4-18, 4-25, 5-2 & 5-9-12

Josh Oliver (dark shirt) and George Holland (white shirt) of Oak Valley Middle School used a kick net on Wednesday, April 18 to collect macroinvertebrates from the bottom of Lake Sherwood. They were taking part in the GREEN Water Monitoring Program, a collaboration with Earth Force and General Motors. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

WBS board to mull privatization of services April 30 By Michael Shelton staff writer

The proposed privatization of the West Bloomfield School District’s custodial and transportation services is expected to come up before the district’s Board of Education at its Monday, April 30 meeting. School Board President Bruce Tobin said that contrary to popular belief, the board has not yet decided to move forward with privatization. “We’re expecting a recommendation from the budget committee on whether to privatize or not,” Tobin said. “The committee has been reviewing bids, doing its due diligence on proposals and meeting with the bargaining units.” This comes after a special board meeting was held on Tuesday, April 17 to discuss potential privatization. During that meeting, Deputy Superintendent Thomas Goulding gave a presentation outlining the district’s reasons for researching outsourcing the transportation and custodial services. He also notified those in attendance that on Wednesday, April 11 and Thursday, April 12, the district interviewed transportation and custodial vendors to clarify bids submitted for

consideration. In a Powerpoint presentation, Goulding pointed out that the district’s fund balance ended up at $551,562 on June 30 last year, and that it’s estimated to be at $947,736 on June 30 this year. He added that not only is student enrollment declining, but financial assistance from the state also has been reduced by $729 per-pupil since the 2008-09 school year. He also pointed out that the district’s mandatory pension rate continues to rise, with its current rate at 24.46 percent expected to jump to 27.37 percent. Goulding added that the district already outsources for services such as substitute employees, skilled trades and snow removal. The presentation noted potential savings through proposed bids from four potential transportation service providers, such as Durham and First Student, and five different custodial providers, such as GCA Services Group and Enviro Clean. According to Tobin, privatization could save the district as much as $6 million over the next three years. While acknowledging the positives of outsourcing, the presentation also addressed the disadvantages, including re-establishing relationships with the school community, as well as employee displacement and declining morale and perceived quality of service by the vendor. ❏


APRIL 25, 2012

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PAGE 21

LOCAL MATTERS business notes ❐ After serving the Oakland County area in financial planning services since 2008, financial advisor Matthew T. Golba has opened his own business, Golba Financial Group. With a new office located at 1550 N. Milford Road, Ste. 102B just north of downtown Milford, Golba is excited about the prospect of serving the surrounding community in all of their financial planning needs as an independent advisor. He is a registered representative with Golba Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., one of the most highly acclaimed Broker/Dealer organizations in the country. At Golba Financial Group, they pride themselves on developing long-standing relationships with clients and their families. They have experience in a wide variety of planning services including but not

WEST OAKLAND COUNTY

SHOP LOCAL • THINK LOCAL • LIVE LOCAL

Support yourself and your community – shop locally! The choices that you make about where to shop are powerful statements to your community. By choosing locally owned & operated businesses, you support: Schools • Police and Fire • Libraries • Parks & Recreation • Roads

Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce members met Wednesday, April 18 at Ronnie’s Jewelry and Loans, located at 7716 Cooley Lake Road in Waterford Township, for one of the chamber’s Spotlight Lunch networking events. The chamber typically arranges Spotlight Lunch events at member restaurants, where attendees come to mingle and buy lunch. However, Nicole Fink of Ronnie’s recently approached the chamber and offered to host and sponsor a Spotlight Lunch event, including buying food to feed all the attendees. Pictured above (left to right) are Dave Pickering, chamber Executive Assistant Carol Bitner, Linda Legris, chamber Board of Directors Vice President Carol Wagner, Gail Cresswell, Nicole Fink of Ronnie’s Jewelry and Loans, chamber Executive Director Jo Alley, Ronnie Fink of Ronnie’s Jewelry and Loans, Romy Shubitowski, Chris Nesbitt, and Tony Barnett. Learn more about Ronnie’s Jewelry and Loans by visiting ronniesjewelryandloans.com, or about the Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce by visiting lakesareachamber.com. (Photo submitted by Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce)

You have a choice! Spend it here. Keep it here.

toward his Certified Financial Planner™ certification. For more information about Golba Financial Group, please visit www.golbafinancial.com, or call 248-529-6288 to set up an appointment. Registered Representative. Securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment Advisor Representative. Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. Cambridge and Golba Financial Group are not affiliated.

limited to 401K review, life insurance, college savings plans, long-term care insurance, and both Traditional and Roth IRA’s. Golba graduated with his bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University, and obtained his Accredited Asset Management Specialist designation through the College of Financial Planning. He is also currently working

benefits ❐ Building Blocks Preschool located at 340 Harvey Lake Road in Highland Township is asking for financial support from businesses in the area for its Natural Playscape Outdoor Classroom Project. Refurbishment of the playground to a natural green playscape is already

Invest in our future – buy local, live local, and volunteer local too.

under way and a team of local parents and volunteers have been putting in a lot of hard work planning, designing, and fundraising. Building Blocks, through their partnership with MITHRA International, is able to offer contributing businesses the benefit of a tax writeoff and as a sponsor; your name or company name will be posted on Building Blocks’ web site and newsletters, and will be featured in a learning story geared toward parents which will include advertisements. Sponsorships are of a Gold, Silver and Bronze level or Buy-a-Brick will give you a 12-by-12 brick with your company name on it. In-kind donations of building materials, equipment, labor and/or funds would also be appreciated. For more information contact PTO@buildingblocksschool.com or Suzanne Gabli at 248-798-9803. ❐ Open Door Outreach Center is holding a special fundraiser on Saturday, April 28, at Roma Rose

Garden located next door to the Open Door Resale Store at 7120 Cooley Lake Road in Waterford Township. A 50s Party will feature cocktails (cash bar) at 6 p.m. followed by dinner at 7 p.m. and dancing at 8 p.m. There will be prizes for those who drive their classic cars or dress in their 50s clothing (optional), as well as a live auction. Each dollar raised for the Open Door Outreach Center will be matched by the Art Van Million Dollar Challenge, up to $10,000. Admission is $40 per person. For tickets and information please call Rhonda at 248706-0849 or Sharon at 248-3602930.

chamber notes ❐ The Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce (HVCC) is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, visit www.huronPAGE 22 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LOCAL MATTERS

Continued ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 21

vcc.com. • Ribbon cutting, 8:30 a.m. Thursday, May 3, O’Reilly Auto Parts, 131 S. Milford Road, Milford. • The Coffee Club, 8 a.m., Friday, May 4, The Digital Document Store, 1100 E. Commerce, Milford. Join us for this free morning mixer. • Ambassador Meeting, 10 a.m Wednesday, May 9, Milford Police Department’s conference room, 1100 Atlantic Street, Milford. • Business 2 Business Expo. Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce and the LaFontaine Automotive Group invite you to participate in the Business 2 Business Expo that will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 10 at the LaFontaine Automotive Group, 4000 W. Highland Road, Highland. Designed to help you reach out to more of your potential clients and customers, the cost is only $50 for Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce members and Highland-White Lake Business Association (HWLBA) members to participate and $75 for non-chamber members. WDIVChannel 4 will be doing a live broad-

REGISTER NOW! THE BILL COMPTON SUPPORT OUR TROOPS 5K RUN & 1 MILE FAMILY FUN WALK Sunday, May 27th, 2012

RUNNER AND SPONSOR APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE ONLINE Contact: Walled Lake Downtown Development Authority

248.926.9004 Fax: 248.926.9029 Email: Events@DowntownWalledLake.org www.DowntownWalledLake.org

South Town Market recently celebrated their grand opening with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 211 S. Main Street in Milford. This is a cooperative venture of small creative businesses — mainly local — offering chocolates, tea, coffee, pottery, spices, home furnishings and much, much more, all produced straight from the artisans/manufacturers. They will also be offering a variety of day and evening classes, from tea tastings, cooking, arts and crafts, to gardening, and more. South Town Market will be open from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. on Thursday. For more information, visit www.southtownmarket.com.

cast during the event to promote it and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s on-site free bone marrow testing event. • Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce’s 36th Annual Golf Outing, June 13, at Dunham Hills Golf Course located at 13561 Dunham Road in Hartland. Registration/ Breakfast, 7:30 a.m.; Shot Gun (Scramble) Start, 9 a.m. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Rotary Club of Milford. Early Bird Single Golfer, $90 (paid by May 15); Early Bird Foursome, $360 (paid by May 15). After May 15, single golfer is $100 and a foursome is $400. Tee or Green (Hole) Sponsor only $100. Golf includes 18 holes with cart, continental breakfast, lunch at the turn compliments of Perriez Custom Catering, one beverage ticket, games, prizes, goody bag, a BBQ dinner and awards ceremony. Sponsorship opportunities are still available. Contact HVCC Sponsorship Manager Jennifer Barrett at jennifer@huronvcc.com. ❐ The Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce (LACC) is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber

events, call 248-624-2826 or visit www.lakesareachamber.com: • Ambassadors Meeting, 9:15 a.m. Friday, April 27, chamber offices, 305 N. Pontiac Trail, Suite A, Walled Lake. • The Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce’s Spring Golf Scramble will be held on May 14 at Edgewood Country Club, located at 8399 Commerce Road in Commerce Township. Sponsorship reservations ranging in price from $100 to $1,000 for this event are now being taken. For more information, call the chamber at 248-624-2826 or e-mail info@lakesareachamber.com. The deadline is May 11. ❐ The Waterford Area Chamber of Commerce (WACC) is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, call 248-666-8600 or visit www.waterfordchamber.org: • Luncheon at Outback, 11:30 a.m. Thursday, April 26, 6435 Dixie Highway, Clarkston. Katrina Campau with Dynamsis will present “Top 10 Things To Do In ‘12.” Register at waterfordchamber.org or call 248666-8600.

• Perking Up Networking, 8 a.m. May 1, Poor Boy Choppers, 4763 Dixie Highway in Waterford. Networking and continental breakfast. Ten-dollar advance registration for members; $15 at the door and for non-members. Register at http://bit.ly/dDg0p0 • Business Person of the Year. Last call for nominations. Submit your nomination today. The award will be presented at the Waterford Recognition Breakfast on Thursday, May 10, at Oakland Community College. The WACC, in partnership with Waterford Township, is proud to recognize our members who have demonstrated excellence in their business or profession and commitment to the business community. Email info@waterfordchamber.org; send to the Waterford Area Chamber of Commerce, 2309 Airport Road, Waterford, 48327; or fax to 248666-3325. ❐ The Greater West Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce’s complete calendar of chamber events is available on line at www.westbloomfieldchamber.com or by calling 248-6263636.


APRIL 25, 2012

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PAGE 23

PUBLIC SAFETY

Man assaulted Victim says he was beaten with a bat By Leslie Shepard staff writer

W

alled Lake police are investigating an assault and battery incident that resulted in one man being hospitalized. The incident reportedly occurred on Sunday, April 15 in the 1700 block of East West Maple Road. According to Walled Lake Police Department reports, when officers arrived at the scene they found a man lying in an apartment complex parking lot with his cell phone close to his face, which was reportedly covered with blood. The man, who was reportedly barely coherent, managed to state that he had been beaten with a baseball bat. Officers interviewed a couple standing nearby. The woman told police that the victim had been touching her and a fight ensued between her father and him. The father fled the scene immediately following the encounter, according to the police report. The woman’s boyfriend told police that the victim had hurled objects at their apartment door and threatened them. The boyfriend said he became upset and punched the side of the garage rather than hitting the victim, but when police checked the garage wall, they found no damage. The boyfriend’s hand, however, was discolored. The victim was transported to Henry Ford Hospital in West Bloomfield Township. ❏

Motorist charged with possessing heroin By Michael Shelton staff writer

A 24-year-old Milford man was arrested on Monday, April 16 for alleged possession of heroin. The suspect was pulled over in his 2000 Chrysler Cirrus in an area off of Ravineside Drive and South Hill Road at 11:30 p.m., according to a Milford Police Department report. The driver said that he was coming home from work at an area pizzeria. However, a Law Enforcement Information Network (LEIN) check showed his license to be expired, and he was arrested. A search of the vehicle found an uncapped syringe behind the passenger seat, a metal spoon with a white residue on the floorboards, and a capped syringe in the driver-side door pocket. At the police station, the suspect was asked to remove his jacket, shirt and shoes. Then a clear plastic baggie with a white substance fell on the floor, to which the suspect reportedly said “Where did that come from?” In an interview, the driver reportedly stated that he was previously in an 11-day recovery program at Brighton Hospital and that he contacted a supplier in Detroit to purchase heroin. He also allegedly admitted to using

heroin three times in the past week, including the day of the incident. The suspect was arraigned on charges of possession of heroin and narcotic paraphernalia and for driving with a suspended license. He posted $10,000 bond. ❏

Merchandise valued at $1,346 stolen from store By Michael Shelton staff writer

Over $1,000 worth of purses and wallets were stolen from the Nana’s Nitch and Corner shop on Main Street in Milford on Thursday, April 12. Store owner Wendi Slotnik told police that she had one employee working in the store at the time. The employee reportedly stated in an interview that she was working the cash register when a white female, 40- to 50-years-old with brown curly hair, came in and looked in the section with Vera Bradley brand purses and wallets. The woman said that she was looking for a gift and did not need help. The employee said she then went to the back to put away extra inventory, but when she came back out, the woman was gone and merchandise valued at $1,346 was missing. Two other customers were in the store at the time, but the employee said that they were in the back of the store and it appears they were involved in the incident. ❏

WEST OAKLAND COUNTY

SHOP LOCAL • THINK LOCAL • LIVE LOCAL

Support yourself and your community – shop locally! The choices that you make about where to shop are powerful statements to your community. By choosing locally owned & operated businesses, you support: Schools • Police and Fire • Libraries Parks & Recreation • Roads If you purchase from non-locally owned and operated businesses or the internet, tax dollars are going to someone else’s community - possibly in a completely different state. Invest in our future – buy local, live local, and volunteer local too.

You have a choice! Spend it here. Keep it here.


PAGE 24

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

TRANSPORTATION

Supreme Court tosses lawsuit against RCOC By Leslie Shepard staff writer

After several years of litigation, a lawsuit against the Road Commission for Oakland County (RCOC) has been dismissed by the Michigan Supreme Court, which held that the agency can’t be sued over loose gravel that resulted in a serious motorcycle accident in White Lake Township. “The Supreme Court took this case for review so it defines the issue if there is a case in the future that’s similar. Now it will serve as a guiding precedent and that will be true all over the state, so from our perspective it has been an important case decided by the Supreme Court,” said RCOC Attorney Paula Reeves. Joseph Paletta, 52, filed a lawsuit against the RCOC in 2008 stating that while riding his motorcycle northbound on Union Lake Road near Glasgow Drive, just south of Elizabeth Lake Road, he lost control of his bike after striking a patch of loose gravel in the travel portion of the road. He alleged that the RCOC created the hazard by improperly scraping the road’s gravel shoulders and failing to sweep the debris from the road in accordance with industry standards. Paletta’s attorney, Glenn Oliver, said his client, “hit the gravel, his back tire spun out, he went headover-heels and ended up in the ditch”

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during the August 2006 accident. He said Paletta tore a rotator cuff in his shoulder, fractured bones in his left leg, suffered a herniated disc requiring surgery, and suffered numerous other broken bones and dislocations. “He just had his fourth surgery in March — it’s hard to explain to my client,” Oliver said of the court decision. “It’s a political decision by John Engler appointees who ruled in favor of big business instead of individuals.” Two courts previously found the RCOC could be sued in the case since it was a road commission crew that had deposited the gravel in the roadway. The road commission had argued that Paletta’s attorneys couldn’t establish that the RCOC had “actual or constructive notice of the condition” of the roadway to be held legally responsible for the accident. The RCOC also argued that “the presence of gravel on a roadway is not a ‘defect’ and does not make a roadway unreasonably unsafe for public travel,” according to a Michigan Court of Appeals opinion last July. “Basically the law states that a defect must be in the traveled portion of the road and the higher courts interpretation is that it must be in the road bed itself and the gravel was simply a dusting on the surface of the road that you would see anywhere on a daily basis,” Reeves explained. Government agencies are protected under the law to mitigate frivolous lawsuits that cost the taxpayers money. “According to long-standing Michigan law, a government entity is immune from tort liability unless there’s an exception and it’s narrowly construed,” Reeves said. “Government immunity has to do with taxpayers and if they want them to pay for lawsuit upon lawsuit that can cost between $40,000 to $150,000 whether they win or lose.” “We just wanted our shot to present the case to a jury and didn’t get it because of government immunity,” Oliver said. Michigan law established that if snow and ice are on a roadway, the RCOC is not liable for any damages. Subsequently the Supreme Court last week issued an opinion stating under Michigan Law the agency is not culpable in this incident since RCOC is responsible for keeping the roadway in “reasonable repair,” and loose gravel on a roadway does not fall under this definition. “The courts took this logic and extended the law to apply to gravel,” Reeves noted. ❏

COMMERCE ROAD (Commerce Township) • Closure: Commerce Road between Carroll Lake and Union Lake roads, but no date for the closure has been identified. • Notes: The project involves reconstruction of the roadway, as well as traffic signal upgrades and drainage improvements. Motorists should expect delays. • Completion date: Unknown • Cost: $2.6 million BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION: I-96 EAST OF MILFORD ROAD, WEST OF KENT LAKE ROAD (Milford) • Completion date: Fall • Notes: A series of bridge reconstruction projects will be facilitated in the general vicinity and will be carried out in phases. Currently crews are constructing the inside of the Milford Road bridge. There will be shifts on I96 at both Milford and Kent Lake roads. One lane in each direction of Milford Road will be open during the project. • Cost: $15.5 million for the entire project


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 25

ENVIRONMENT

Park master plan up for comment through May 2

or residents can visit the Waterford Oaks Administration Building at 2800 Watkins Lake Road in Waterford Township to review the master plan draft and fill out a paper survey. For more information on Oakland County Parks and Recreation’s Waterford Oaks draft master plan, visit the park planning page at DestinationOakland.com. ❏

By Angela Niemi staff writer

The Oakland County Parks and Recreation Department is looking for county residents to review and offer comments on the Waterford Oaks County Park master plan draft that is now available online. “We are proud of Waterford Oaks’ history as a park where innovative recreation concepts are introduced,” Parks and Recreation Executive Officer Dan Stencil said. “With this park master plan draft, we can develop a vision for the future of the park to be shared by all of our recreation enthusiasts.” Waterford Oaks was established in 1967 and since then has continued to acquire parcels of land to add to the park. A recent land acquisition in 2009 brought the park total up to 185 acres. Waterford Oaks features 4.5 miles of trails, a waterpark, a bicycle motocross track, the Paradise Peninsula Playscape, sand volleyball

Stewardship days will target invasive garlic mustard

Oakland County residents have the opportunity until Wednesday, May 2 to offer comments on the Waterford Oaks County Park (above) master plan draft that can be viewed as DestinationOakland.com. The park’s master plan is designed to provide a clear vision of the desired character and future direction of Waterford Oaks to staff, park users, the public, and park decision-makers. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

courts, platform tennis, an activity center, a banquet facility, a sledding

lake levels LAKE LEVELS Following are the lake level readings for lakes and rivers across the western Oakland lakes area, as compiled by Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner John P. McCulloch’s office. Legal levels are denoted by elevation in feet from sea level; current levels are denoted as plus or minus the legal in hundredths of feet. River depths are measures from the river bottom, at point of measurement. WATERWAYS Cass Cedar Island Commerce Dawson Mill Pond Duck Fox Huron River Long Loon* Maceday-Lotus Middle & Lower Straits Mohawk Oakland-Woodhull Orchard Oxbow Pontiac Shawood-Walled Lake Schoolhouse Scott Sylvan-Otter Union Upper Straits Watkins White Williams

LEGAL LEVEL 927.87 933.50 906.30 928.60 1016.63 930.00 1.08 933.00 949.30 966.70 930.70 949.30 957.50 930.50 942.75 962.83 932.80 949.30 951.00 928.60 927.07 930.80 950.00 1019.10 965.42

4/6/12 +1.16 +.48 +.82 +.97 –.07 +.22 +.36 +.23 +.14 –.20 –.19 +.25 –.05 +.13 –.16 +.22 +.30 +.20 –1.05 +1.03 –.24 +.37 –.49 –.08 –.43

4/13/12 +1.22 +.50 +.86 +1.15 –.08 +.10 +.12 +.20 +.09 –.18 –.22 +.20 –.10 +.08 –.15 +.22 +.20 +.15 –1.11 +1.16 +.04 +.27 –.48 –.15 –.42

*Reading for Loon Lake, in Waterford Township, also applies to Mohawk–Wormer Schoolhouse, Silver and Upper Silver Lakes.

4/20/12 +1.37 +.61 +.92 –.08 +.07 +.28 +.34 –.32 +.32 –.03 –.12 +.34 +.10 –.08 +.22 +.52 +.30 +.30 –.95 Legal +.11 +.32 –.48 –.13 –.34

hill, picnic shelters, a greenhouse, and the Oakland County Market. “Our goal is to provide memorable, quality recreation experiences for all our visitors,” Stencil said. “The master plan expresses the efforts we are undertaking to accomplish that goal.” The park’s master plan is designed to provide a clear vision of the desired character and future direction of Waterford Oaks to staff, park users, the public, and park decision-makers. The plan includes information about the principles and vision that guided the development of the plan, information about the individual facilities in the park, as well as a strategies to support the long-term sustainability of the park’s finances. The plan also identifies 12 facilities in the park and the role each facility will play within the context of the entire park in the future. Also outlined within the plan are ways for Oakland County Parks and Recreation to enhance recreational and other uses, implement site-appropriate improvements, and develop improved business strategies for each facility. Residents are encouraged to comment on the Waterford Oaks master plan draft through Wednesday, May 2. An online survey is available at http://ocparks.polldaddy.com/s/waterford-oaks-master-plan-public-comment,

A pair of upcoming volunteer stewardship days to remove invasive garlic mustard will be held at the Proud Lake Recreation Area and the Highland Recreation Area. The Friends of Proud Lake will be meeting at the Powers Unit Oak Shelter off of Wixom Road just north of the Huron River on Saturday, May 5 and then working from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call Dee Pasquantonio for more information at 248-624-6054 or 248961-9538. A volunteer steward will be leading a group effort in pulling the non-native garlic mustard from the woodlands within the Highland Recreation Area on Sunday, May 6 from 1 to 4 p.m. Volunteers are asked to meet at the bike trailhead parking lot on the north side of Livingston Road between Duck Lake and Waterbury roads. They are asked to arrive on time since caravanning to a different location may be necessary. More information on these stewardship days, as well as registration forms, can be found by clicking on the “Calendar of Volunteer Stewardship Workdays” link on the state Department of Natural Resources website at michigan.gov/dnrvolunteers. ❏ WEST OAKLAND’S

NEWSWEEKLY

IS NOW ON

Simply search for “Spinal Column Newsweekly” on Facebook and add our page to participate.

AND

Follow @scnewsweekly to get breaking news from western Oakland County, as well as updates about stories.


PAGE 26

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

COUNTY

SMART levy OK’d for 2012 primary election ballots By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

C

ommunities in the lakes area and across Oakland County will have the opportunity to put before their respective electorates with a familiar funding proposal for Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART) bus services during the Aug. 7 primary election. The Oakland County Board of Commissioners approved on Wednesday, April 18 a resolution granting the communities the authority to put a 0.59-mill, twoyear millage collection on the primary election ballot. The millage would be levied next year and in 2013. According to Farmington Hills City Manager Steve Brock, who is also chairman of the Oakland County Public Transportation Authority, communities “opting in” to the SMART millage vote by placing the millage question on the ballot would receive bus service if a majority of voters in all communities voting on the proposal — regardless of whether a majority of their voters approve the millage — endorse the collection, which is expected to generate about $16 million annually. SMART Spokeswoman Beth Gibbons said the 0.59-mill levy is a renewal that would fund general operations for the transit system that has operated in as many as 23 Oakland County communities over the last 17 years, including the city of Walled Lake and West Bloomfield Township, both of which have SMART millages currently levied

Another chapter in redistricting battle begins By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

Democrats are taking their case to court over district lines approved by the Republican-controlled Oakland County Board of Commissioners earlier this month in the latest chapter of the political saga revolving around the

The Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART) — which is governed by a board of directors made up of representatives from Oakland, Wayne, Macomb and Monroe counties that selects the general manager to hire its day-to-day operations — boasts that it provides access through its transportation services to more than 59,000 businesses and 850,000 jobs. The Oakland County Board of Commissioners approved last week a resolution allowing communities to place before their voters a two-year, 0.59-mill levy for the bus services in the Aug. 7 primary election. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

that are set to expire at the end of the calendar year. Last approved by voters in the Aug. 3, 2010 primary election, the levy received overwhelming support from the electorate, with 78 percent (97,850) of voters in the communities that “opted in” supporting it, while just shy of 22 percent (27,443 voters) cast “no” votes. Services are generally widely available in a concentrated area in the

southeast portion of the county, but they are also available west of Telegraph Road in communities like West Bloomfield and Walled Lake, as well as Farmington and Farmington Hills, among others. The agency — which is governed by a board of directors made up of representatives from Oakland, Wayne, Macomb and Monroe counties that selects a general manager to oversee day-to-day operations — boasts that

it provides access through its transportation services to more than 59,000 businesses and 850,000 jobs. A mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of a property’s taxable value, which is generally equal to half the property’s market value. The owner of a property with a taxable value of $100,000 ($200,000 market value) would pay $59 in the first year of the levy. ❏

redistricting process that, until recently, was controlled by Democrats for the first time in the county’s history. The nine members of the county board’s Democratic Caucus — including county Commissioner Marcia Gershenson (D-West Bloomfield), the lone Democrat representing a portion of the lakes area — are plaintiffs in the lawsuit. The suit alleges the new district map for the county’s governing body, which under a new state law upheld by the state Supreme Court has been trimmed from 25 to 21

members, fails to meet the requirements of state law. The Democrats’ lawsuit filed with the state Court of Appeals contends that the district lines approved by the county board earlier this month violate Public Act (PA) 261 of 1966 based on the number of communities divided into multiple county commission districts (12 in the Democrats’ map vs. 16 in the GOP’s); a lower population deviation (7.3 percent compared to 8.3 percent in the GOP’s map); and more majority-minority dis-

tricts (two in the Democrats’ map vs. one in the GOP’s). Democrats also argue that the Republicans’ map, which the lawsuit contends “is reasonably expected to result in a Commission with 14 Republicans and 7 Democrats,” is gerrymandered, something that’s prohibited under PA 261. The legal challenge asks the state Court of Appeals to direct the county board, acting as the county Apportionment Commission, to adopt PAGE 28 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


APRIL 25, 2012

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PAGE 27

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

COUNTY

Redistricting ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 26

Commissioner David Woodward’s (DRoyal Oak) proposed district lines. “As we have repeatedly seen Republicans in Oakland County do not care about playing by the rules or following the law,” said Oakland County Democratic Party Chairman Frank Houston. “They were rebuked four times by courts in their pursuit of protecting Republican control in Oakland County. They changed redistricting laws and it should be no surprise that now they ignore the law. Following the letter and spirit of the law means you should adopt the plan that most closely follows the law, regardless of political considerations... I’m anxious to see the Court of Appeals address this outrageous partisan overreach.” The new commissioner district map was recently adopted by the county board under PA 280 of 2011, which was approved by Republican lawmakers who argued that it saves Oakland County about $250,000 annually in salaries and benefits for county commissioners by shrinking the board’s size, but Democrats decried it as political maneuvering to maintain Republican control of the county board after Democrats controlled the redistricting process required every 10 years following release of U.S. Census data. Democrats held the majority over the redistricting process after the 2008 elections of Prosecutor Jessica Cooper and Treasurer Andy Meisner. They, along with county Democratic Party Chairman Frank Houston, were required under law at the time to serve as members of the county Reapportionment Commission, which approved county board district boundaries a year ago. Those boundaries were challenged by Republicans on their constitutionality, but the state Supreme Court didn’t take up the case because an appeal to an affirmative Court of Appeals decision wasn’t filed prior to the required deadlines — which fell right around the time the state Legislature was taking up House Bill 5187, the enacting legislation for PA 280. “I’m not surprised by the Democrats filing the lawsuit,” said Board of Commissioners Chairman Mike Gingell (R-Lake Orion), the sponsor of the Republicans’ map that was approved Friday, April 13. “I believe the map that was adopted (on April 13) was proper and we’ll let the court process play out.” The attorney representing the Democrats has asked for an expedited process because the filing deadline for county board candidates is May 15. ❏


APRIL 25, 2012

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COUNTY

Haines, others on board with sign pledge for 2012 A group of local elected officials serving at the county and state level, as well as a candidate for the 51st District Court, are vowing to not put up campaign signs until a month before the Aug. 7 primary election. State Rep. Gail Haines (RWaterford, West Bloomfield), who is spearheading the pledge initiative, said public displeasure over signage in Waterford Township led her to take the pledge. “I have heard from countless community members and business owners about the barrage of yard signs so early in the campaign season and I wanted to address their concerns,” she said. “Many local ordinances previously prohibited putting up yard signs until one month prior to an election. Some ordinances allowed for even less time. Signs were then required to be removed within a week after the election date. We are making this voluntary pledge to respect the wishes of the local residents and

honor the spirit of the previous ordinance.” She said recent court rulings have allowed for campaign signs to be displayed at any time of the year, therefore overriding local rules regulating when candidates’ signs can go up before an election. Others joining in on the pledge include state Sens. Mike Kowall (RWhite Lake, Commerce, Milford, Highland, West Bloomfield, Orchard Lake, Wixom, Walled Lake and Wolverine Lake) and David Robertson (R-Waterford); state Rep. Eileen Kowall (R-White Lake, Highland); county Commissioners John Scott (RWaterford, West Bloomfield), Jim Runestad (R-Waterford, White Lake), and Tom Middleton (R-Waterford); and Andrea Dean, who is running for the 51st District Court seat currently held by Judge Jodi Debbrecht, appointed to that position by former Gov. Jennifer Granholm. “I understand that candidates use campaign signs for name recognition but one month before the election is more than adequate,” Rep. Kowall said. “Any longer than that and the signs become an eye-sore.” “This is important to local resi-

dents,” Robertson said. “If a candidate wants to serve these communities, it should be important to the candidate, as well.” All the officials currently signed onto the pledge except Runestad and Middleton have endorsed Dean in the race, according to Dean’s website, deanforjudge.com. Debbrecht, whose campaign signage can be seen throughout Waterford months ahead of the Aug. 7 primary election, said her signs — some of which she said are disappearing — are up because of requests from area residents and business owners. “I get calls every single day, or requests every single day for the big 2-by-8 signs and for lawn signs,” Debbrecht said. “I’m well in compliance with their ordinances. I obviously had checked those out early on. The attorney that drafted the ordinance is on my (campaign) committee.” Any negative feedback she’s had about the signs has come from “only the individuals that one would expect to react negatively — people affiliated with my opponent or opponents, for that matter. I’m not going to feed

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that negativity. I’m going to run on my credentials,” Debbrecht said. She added that she is grateful for the support she is receiving in the campaign. “I really want to thank everyone for their support in everything I’m trying to do,” she said. ❏

Circuit Court field grows to four as Pernick joins fray The field of candidates seeking an open seat on the Oakland County Circuit Court bench has grown to four. Jason Pernick, 51, joins Sahera Housey, Layne Sakwa and Karen McDonald in vying to fill the vacant seat created because Circuit Court Family Division Judge Edward Sosnick is barred from seeking re-election due to state age limitations on judicial candidates. Whoever fills that seat will earn approximately $140,000 annually and serve a six-year term. The filing deadline for non-incumbent judicial candidates is May 1. ❏


PAGE 30

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

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PAGE 31

COMMUNITY LIFE academic honors ❐ Michael Welsh, a 7th grader at Muir Middle School in Milford, is to be congratulated for his efforts on behalf of the school’s Special Education Program. He works with the program when he can and he wanted to organize a 5K Fun Run/Walk to raise money for basic funding needs. He and his parents, Erin and Michael Welsh, met with the principal and the head of the department, so the “Hawkeye Hike” was scheduled to help finance their Community Based Instructional Unit. The event will be held on Sunday, April 29, at the Carls Family YMCA and the Milford Recreational Trail. For more information, e-mail Erin Welsh at emwelsh1@yahoo.com ❐ Raquel Postic, age 17, daughter of Lionel and Rebecca Postic of Commerce Township, has been selected to represent Michigan at the 2012 Miss American Teen Pageant. She will be attending the national pageant for her age group at Disney World in Florida during the week of Thanksgiving. Raquel will compete for the national pageant title of Miss American Teen and thousands of dollars in cash awards, prizes and schol-

arships. Raquel is a home-schooled junior in high school and welcomes opportunities for community service. She cheers on the r e i g n i n g national champion team, “Nitro,” a competitive cheer and dance team from Midwest Xplosion, also of Commerce.

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50 YEARS AGO April 26, 1962 The West Oakland YMCA Extension Branch activities are receiving an enthusiastic response from the people in the Walled Lake Consolidated School District. Saturday youth gym activities at Clifford H. Smart Junior High School have been well attended, with as many as 100 young people taking part in a single day. This is expected to increase as more people become aware of the program that is being offered by the newly-formed Extension Branch YMCA. Adult activities, so far, are limited to a gym night each Tuesday at the Smart School from 7:30 to 9 p.m. for men and women. 40 YEARS AGO April 26, 1972 Duff Chamberlain and Karen Noble have been named valedictorian and salutatorian, respectively, for the Class of 1972 at Walled Lake Western High School. Duff is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Chamberlain of Welch Road, Commerce Township; and Karen is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Noble of Ladd Road, Walled Lake. Other students who ranked academically in the top 20 of the class included Ann Edwards, Kenneth Moore, Nancy Blum, Barbara Carl, Michelle LaFave, Ronald Melzer, Catherine Drumheller, Alice McArthur, Denise Rose, Daniel Bridges, Gordon Beatty, Marcia Schaffer, Robert Mihos, Neva Heliker, Moira Stein, Diane Mitchell, Marianne Dewey, and Gregory Murray. 30 YEARS AGO April 28, 1982 A 43-year-old Waterford resident charged with the attempted murder of his wife is scheduled to appear in 51st District Court on Monday, May 3. James Meyers, of 2344 Jones, is charged with assault with intent to commit murder and possession of a firearm in the commission of a felony. Waterford police said Meyers and son James, 14, returned on Thursday, April 15, from California. Meyers and his wife, Elizabeth, started arguing “that someone was seeing someone else,” according to a police department spokesman. At approximately 2:30 p.m.

Meyers allegedly grabbed a small handgun and proceeded to shoot his wife in the hip, according to police reports. Once shot, Mrs. Meyers ran out of the house, telling her children to call police. Home at the time of the incident were James and a 12year-old sibling. Police state Meyers tried to run after his wife when she fled the house, but James tackled him, allowing his mother to escape. 20 YEARS AGO April 29, 1992 State and local officials are trying to contain a fuel oil spill near Elizabeth Lake in Waterford Township in the wake of a last weekend’s discovery of a micro-thin sheen of petroleum floating on the lake’s surface. Waterford Township police and fire departments, along with state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) officials, were called to a home in the 4900 block of Cooley Lake Road Saturday, April 25, after neighbors discovered the oil slick. Although officials said only one or two gallons of fuel may have actually drained into the lake, they fear that as much as 250 gallons of fuel oil may have seeped into soil around the lake. A Waterford Township Police Department report states that a 91year-old man living in the house called Marathon Fuels in Birmingham on March 1 to report problems with his fuel oil heating system. A receipt from the company reportedly shows the man was billed for a plugged fuel line, which was cleared by a serviceman. A separate receipt reportedly shows the fuel oil tank was filled with about 250 gallons of oil. Fuel oil began leaking from the tank shortly after that, according to the report.

Headlines of the Past


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

STATE

Clawson’s entry brings House race to seven hopefuls By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

Commerce Township Republican Albert Clawson is joining an already crowded GOP primary field seeking the party’s nomination for the newly-drawn 39th state House of Representatives seat. Clawson ran in the 2010 Republican primary election for the current 39th state House District seat, which represents West Bloomfield and Commerce townships and Wolverine Lake, and is currently held by Democratic state Rep. Lisa Brown, who defeated eventual Republican nominee Lois Shulman. Clawson lost in the 2010 GOP primary when he received 17 percent of the vote (1,648), compared to Shulman’s 53 percent (4,987) and Karl Sipfle’s 28 percent (2,673). “I believe in giving back to the community and serving the people,” Clawson said of what sparked him to enter this year’s Republican primary.

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“Some of my key issues are bringing high technology to Michigan.” He highlighted an effort by Google and other companies to create vehicles that effectively drive themselves. “Right now, the only state in the union that has addressed laws that will be needed for these cars is Nevada,” Clawson said. “It bothers me that other states are adopting and allowing and encouraging automotive technologies before Michigan. I want those cars to be built, tested and sold here.” In addition, he is calling for eliminating barriers to innovation, improving Internet availability, and protecting the state’s water resources, among others. “Another issue that I know a lot of people are having a problem with is the blight from these foreclosed homes. I have far more boots-onthe-ground experience (in that) than the other candidates.” Republican hopefuls already in the race include Nicholas Kennedy of Wixom, Klint Kesto of Commerce, Bubba Urdan of West Bloomfield Township, and Kristine Zrinyi of Commerce. On the Democratic side, Pam Jackson of Commerce and Regina Strong of West Bloomfield are seeking the nod from their party’s voters. State representatives serve twoyear terms and are currently paid $71,685 annually. The primary election is slated for Aug. 7, and the general election is scheduled for Nov. 6. The filing deadline for candidates is May 15. ❏

PPT repeal effort reinvigorated with new Senate bills By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

The gloves are off in the battle to repeal the state’s personal property tax (PPT) imposed on business equipment, now that Republicans in the state Senate have put forward a plan to do just that. In a legislative package unveiled last week, the upper chamber’s GOP Caucus is proposing to begin phasing out on Dec. 31 the PPT for commercial or industrial businesses that have personal property valued at less than $40,000, thereby eliminat-

ing between 75 and 80 percent of the PPT filings, according to Republicans. Eligible manufacturing personal property bought after Dec. 31 would not be taxable beginning Dec. 31, 2015. Also on that date, any personal property 10-years-old or older will no longer be taxed, an exemption that will continue until all personal property is exempt. Many argue that axing the PPT will remove an onerous financial liability for companies looking to invest in new equipment or retool, but some in local government have been concerned about a possible loss of revenue. Legislative analysts say the proposal, consisting of Senate Bills (SBs) 1065 through 1072, would hit the state and local property tax revenues significantly: Roughly an $840 million loss 10 years from now. But the GOP plan has a mechanism in place to shore up those losses, consisting of a reimbursement fund administered by the state Department of Treasury that would begin receiving annual appropriations from the state Legislature based on estimated revenue losses. “It is important to understand that these bills do not cut businesses tax at the expense of taxpayers, but rather this legislation takes aim at businesses tax credits. Many of the changes in this package of legislation do not take place effect until 2016, which is when the MEGA (Michigan Economic Growth Authority) and battery tax credits expire,” said state Sen. Jack Brandenburg (R-Harrison Township), a sponsor of two of the bills in the legislative package. “The expiration of these credits will mean that the state will be receiving more tax dollars. A portion of the increased tax revenue will be placed in a fund to help replace personal property tax revenue; local officials will then decide how the money should be distributed.” As a way of replenishing some of the lost revenues, each local taxing unit would have to submit to the Treasury Department the specific taxes levied on commercial personal property and industrial personal property. The department would estimate PPT revenue losses in excess of 2 percent of total local unit revenue, legislative analysts say, meaning that local units of government that receive less than 2 percent of their revenue from the PPT would receive no reimbursement.

That figure for distressed governments is 1 percent. State Sen. Mike Kowall (RCommerce, Highland, Milford, Walled Lake, Wixom, Wolverine Lake, White Lake, Orchard Lake, West Bloomfield) said the proposal is a way to get a conversation started about repealing the PPT. “I want to bring in the local units of government and have them fully understand what the timelines are,” Kowall said, highlighting communities like Walled Lake, Wixom and Novi, where the PPT constitutes significant portions of those communities’ budgets. “There’s a lot of preparation that has to be made.” State Sen. David Robertson (RWaterford) said Senate Republicans plan to have the state reimburse “89 percent of the revenue that would be lost” to local units of government, although a distribution formula for that reimbursement still has to be devised. “We can’t eliminate it without replacement revenue for them. That’s a significant part of this, and phasing it out is vitally necessary,” Robertson said. But Senate Democrats blasted the GOP’s plan as one that would siphon nearly $1 billion from local governmental units, including schools and police departments, in favor of “lining the pockets of those already at the top,” said Senate Majority Leader Gretchen Whitmer (D-East Lansing) in a written statement. “This legislation is guaranteed to raise taxes on Michigan’s families while additionally cutting the most critical services our communities rely on,” she said. “Republicans already rushed through a wholesale overhaul of Michigan’s tax structure that gave a $1.8 billion handout to large corporations last year, and despite lacking even a single metric to claim that their plan has created a single job or a dollar of economic growth in our state, today they are taking us back down that same misguided road,” Whitmer said. “This legislation would take nearly $1 billion more away from our schools, our public safety and our neighborhoods and hand it over to businesses with no questions asked, no promises of new jobs and no metrics of success required.” The legislation is being deliberated in the state Senate Finance Committee, which Brandenburg chairs. ❏


APRIL 25, 2012

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MAIL BAG

Supporting Obama From Denise “Chip” Black, Milford: President Obama continues to demonstrate why we need him to serve for another four years. His courage and wisdom saved an industry, created jobs, and provided health care for millions of people. Recently, our President showed his willingness and ability to compromise by supporting women’s health care, and defending American religious freedom. At the same time Rush Limbaugh was denigrating Sandra Fluke, the President was supporting her. This is just one example demonstrating that President Obama has the ability to help families, defend our Constitution, and keep our nation secure with his intelligence, wisdom, compassion and empathy. ❏

Rehiring veterans From Oakland County Commissioner Jim Runestad (R-Waterford, White Lake): I read with pleasure about the hiring of returning National Guard Sergeant Ed Lasseigne by the Oakland County Sheriff’s Department. Lasseigne was part of the 1775th Military Police Company returning from Kandahar (in Afghanistan). I was honored to be invited to represent Oakland County as a county commissioner at the Feb. 4 welcome home event at the Waterford Mott High School gym. It was a very heart-warming experience to observe the loving embraces of the reunited families and to hear about all the achievements and accomplishments of this hometown unit. The one disappointing aspect I found hard to accept was talking to one of the generals about the job prospects for these returning heroes. Since most are returning National Guard, they won’t collect full military pay and many have no jobs to which they can return. With 30 percent of veterans between the ages of 18 and 24 unemployed, it is a travesty that these citizens, who have made such scarifies, are not put at the front of the line for job openings. I hope we as a country can persuade more public and private employers to take a look at veterans as a first priority for employment. Here is a link to the national Veterans Job Bank: https://www.nationalresourcedirectory.gov/home/veterans_job_bank. ❏

Dispatch questions What is the real cost for Waterford? From Debra Hall Retired Waterford Township dispatcher

R

ecently in the media there has again been some discussion about absorbing the Waterford Township Police Department Communications Division into the Oakland County Sheriffs Department. Trustee Anthony Bartolotta has been quoted in both (another media outlet) and the Spinal Column (Newsweekly) regarding this and I would like to address the information in both articles. He is quoted as using Wixom as a comparison in this absorption issue. According to the 2010 Census, Wixom has a population of 13,498. Waterford Township has a population of 71,707. That does not include the number people who come to Waterford from other communities to work. Is that a fair comparison? I would believe that their calls for service in relation to public safety are markedly different. According to the Oakland County 911 Service District 2012 Report to the State 911 Committee, a combined total of 108,000 incoming calls were received in the Communications Center. This includes 911 land lines, 911 cell lines and non-emergency land lines. These phone calls resulted in 28,800 dispatched police runs and 6,000 dispatched fire runs or calls for service. The professional police/fire dispatchers, who are also emergency medical dispatchers, receive every one of these calls and they are trained, certified and mandated to prioritize then utilize township personnel and equipment in a safe and efficient manner. They also spend a great deal of time on the phone addressing the needs of the citizens with a myriad of concerns. As for the projection of cost to the taxpayers whether the “calls” Mr. Bartolotta refers to are one or the other, clearly there will be additional costs to this alleged solution. Have the costs been tallied based on real statistics? How will overtime be charged to the township? Are there other costs still not investigated? How much will be saved? How have other communities with similar statistics contracting the Oakland County fared, cost-wise, over time? Does such a comparison exist? I am certain that the communications agents at Oakland County are dedicated, hard working employees. The issue is, what will the real cost be for Waterford Township? I would respectfully ask that the Waterford Township Board (of Trustees), and in particular, Mr. Bartolotta, thoroughly investigate all these issues before making a decision that is going to seriously alter the lives of dedicated employees. If they are hired by the county, will they be forced to take a pay cut? How will pensions they have worked so hard toward be affected? In these challenging economic times there are many things to be considered, including what the real cost may actually be in dollars and in services. ❏

‘Unethical actions’? From Oakland County Commissioner Jim Nash (DFarmington Hills): ...I believe it is one of our duties of office to investigate unethical actions and potential legal violations by our county government. I believe the actions of the Board (of Commissioners) chair, the Oakland County clerk/register of deeds and the office of the Oakland County executive, in their efforts to pass and defend Public Act (PA) 280, rise to that level... A number of weeks ago the

board (Republican) Caucus chair chastised (county board members) for passing around and signing a letter in support of a grant for our local Alliance for Healthy Communities because she said board rules demand we transmit board positions to other levels of government only through resolutions and the committee structure. Technically she was right, but the PA 280 e-mails recently uncovered through the FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) show the board majority ignored those rules in pursuance of a political goal, PA 280, to ensure they kept their majority

after this year’s elections. In secret communications between the board chair, county clerk, chief deputy county executive, county executive lobbyist and two state legislators, the real reasons for pushing for PA 280 were discussed: “Members need to understand…They (Democrats) would ruin OC (Oakland County) & destroy what decades of exemplary leadership took to build.” This is what was discussed as the rationale to be used when lobbying Republican legislators and legislative leaders. They also discuss how to avoid legislative rules and ram through the legislation: “the quicker things move the better, ‘cause it’s gonna be ugly.” The “talking points” then discussed apparently were the money savings and fairness of commissioners designing their own districts (the attachments were absent). The talking points have since been used to justify the (law) to the public, and the reasons shared among the Republican officials and used to influence Republican legislators who controlled the House and Senate, were never spoken in public. Especially disturbing and exposing potential Open Meetings Act violations, or at the least breaking board rules, was the Oct. 4, 2011 unpublicized letter written by the county executive (on county letterhead) to the governor, concerning support for what was to be PA 280. The first sentence of that letter reads: “With the support of a majority of the members of the Oakland County Board of Commissioners, Oakland County will soon be proposing new legislation that would allow Oakland County to reduce the size of its government by limiting the number of elected commissioner positions.” Since the Board Minority Caucus was never informed of the majority caucus’ actions over a period of months concerning this important issue, and all communications between the executive’s office, clerk and board chair regarding it were secret, it was improper to claim board majority support without informing the whole board and public. Board rules state any board position must be taken through resolutions and the committee structure, as the majority caucus chair pointed out. Did the (county) executive have inside information

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MAIL BAG

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF COMMERCE 2009 TOWNSHIP DRIVE COMMERCE TOWNSHIP, MI 48390

Nash letter

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Township Board of the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan, will meet at a Regular Board meeting on the 8th day of May, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., at the Township Hall, located at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390, to determine if the following Special Assessment District will be established and to receive PUBLIC COMMENTS, if any, regarding creation of the following Special Assessment District: Special Projects No. 34 The proposed Special Assessment District involves the following property located in the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan:

Water Sewer 17-08-126-040 17-22-256-003 17-28-426-005 17-19-280-001 17-12-451-006 17-12-452-008 17-01-277-018 17-08-177-005 17-02-205-007 Plans showing the improvement, the location, and the legal description are on file with the Township Clerk for public examination. In order to appeal the amount of any special assessment, affected owners or parties with an interest must protest the proposed assessment. This may be done by appearing in person at the hearing or having an agent appear at the hearing on behalf of an owner or party in interest, or in writing by filing a letter of protest before the hearing, addressed to the Township Clerk at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390. An owner or party having an interest in the real property affected by the special assessment may file a written appeal of the special assessment with the Michigan Tax Tribunal within 30 days after the confirmation of the special assessment roll if the special assessment is protested at the hearing held for the purpose of confirming the special assessment roll. Please direct any questions you may have to the Charter Township of Commerce Building Department at (248) 960-7060. Daniel Munro, Clerk Charter Township of Commerce

SC:

4/25/12; 5/2/12

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and privately transmit it to the governor without board approval? How did he determine the board majority supported that legislation? For the majority caucus to take a position, they have an obligation to hold public meetings or inform the public of communications. There is at least the possibility of violations of the Open Meetings Act. By claiming majority support, the (county) executive led the board majority caucus into breaking board rules in service of the partisan goal of ensuring the minority caucus could not gain majority. Since the letter also admitted “to date only Oakland County” would be affected, and the final legislation was datespecific. That brings into question the idea presented by attorneys paid for by the county’s taxpayers, that this law could also impact other counties? I will continue to bring up questions concerning the actions taken to support PA 280, and I call on those involved to make public their answers to my inquiries.

Of course, if there were violations of the Open Meetings Act and board rules, the (county) executive has the right to ask for a law exempting Oakland County from those rules, too. It worked once. ❏

CORRECTIONS An article appearing in the April 18 edition of the Spinal Column Newsweekly under the headline “Central thespians to shine: Students tuning up for Friday performance of ‘Music Man’” should have stated that performances begin at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 20; Saturday, April 21; Friday, April 27; and Saturday, April 28; and at 2 p.m. on April 21, Sunday, April 22, and April 28. • An article appearing in the April 4 edition of the Spinal Column Newsweekly under the headline “Use statistics mixed: Libraries coping with sputtering economy” should have stated that the Wixom Public Library has 18 computers with Internet access. In addition, it should have stated that donations and miscellaneous revenues amount to $13,000, including approximately $10,000 in annual funding from the Friends of the Wixom Library. ❏

by Colin Bartlett only if you have a

Hi Kit, i’m going to volunteer at the state park for the day

cool, can i come?

strong will to work

awwww!

and better the world

i don’t have either of those

AROUND THE LAKES AREA

haha! just kidding anyone can volunteer

A special feature of the Spinal Column Newsweekly

WE’RE ASKING… What is the silliest or worst gift you have ever received? "On my 30th birthday, being in the fashion industry, everybody gave me a Barbiethemed birthday party. There was a Barbie cake." — Mary Parks, Milford

"I remember getting a a vacuum cleaner for Christmas. That's not a good thing."

— Karen Burns, Commerce

"A Chia Pet. My kids and I passed around this Chia Pet for years."

— Barbara Moceri, Milford

"I got a lava lamp as a wedding present, and I wasn't married in the 1970s."

— Tracy Goodnough, Highland


APRIL 25, 2012

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IN OUR OPINION

A promising starting point Latest take on personal property tax reform an improvement F

or at least the third time in the last year, Michigan Senate Republicans have introduced legislation that would phase out, if not eliminate altogether, the state’s personal property tax (PPT) — a tax paid by businesses on their various equipment, including everything from furniture and computers to factory machines and research lab equipment. In early February after the introduction of different PPT reform legislation, we acknowledged the need to nix the tax that many claim is a business expansion and retooling killer, but asked that local governments be reimbursed in some way for the loss of PPT revenue. Therefore, we’re relieved to see the latest PPT reform proposal — a beefy package of eight separate bills — includes a local government reimbursement component, albeit partial reimbursement. This new legislation represents a better starting point for a comprehensive dialogue on getting rid of the PPT. In a legislative package unveiled last week, the upper chamber’s GOP Caucus is proposing to eliminate on Dec. 31 the PPT for commercial or industrial businesses that have personal property valued at less than $40,000, thereby eliminating between 75 and 80 percent of the PPT filings, according to Republicans. Under the package, eligible manufacturing personal property bought after Dec. 31 would not be taxable beginning Dec. 31, 2015. Also on that date, any personal property 10-years-old or older would no longer be taxed, an exemption that will continue until all personal property is exempt. Legislative analysts say the proposal, consisting of Senate Bills (SBs) 1065 through 1072, would set back state and local property tax revenues significantly: Roughly an $840 million loss 10 years from now.

But the GOP plan has a mechanism in place to shore up those losses for local units of government — a reimbursement fund administered by the state Department of Treasury that would begin receiving annual appropriations from the state Legislature based on estimated revenue losses. The department would estimate PPT revenue losses in excess of 2 percent of total local unit revenue, legislative analysts say, meaning that local units of government that receive less than 2 percent of their revenue from the PPT would receive no reimbursement. That figure for distressed local governments is 1 percent. According to state Sen. Jack Brandenburg (RHarrison Township), a sponsor of two bills in the new PPT package, the legislation won’t cut businesses taxes at the expense of individual taxpayers, since some of the tax reform provisions are timed to coincide with the expiration of exiting Michigan Economic Growth Authority battery industry tax credits. That means firms with those tax credits will begin paying more in taxes to the state at the same time PPT exemptions begin to kick in. Many argue that axing the PPT will remove an onerous financial liability for companies looking to expand or invest in new equipment. They note that business sometimes hold off on buying new equipment since they would pay more PPT each year on upgraded equipment. That can stymie business upgrades and even ventures into new industries. Yet, local governments and schools have been concerned about another loss of revenue, given years of declining revenues from taxes on real property (actual land and any structures or fixtures permanently affixed to land). According to state Sen. David Robertson (R-

Waterford), 89 percent of the revenue lost by local units of government through the new Senate legislation would be reimbursed, although a distribution formula for reimbursements has yet to be developed. Not surprising, Senate Democrats have railed against the GOP package as one that would whack nearly $1 billion from local governments, including schools and police departments. The new legislation is being deliberated in the state Senate Finance Committee, which Brandenburg chairs. Overall, Senate Republicans’ latest PPT package sounds much more promising and reasonable than previous proposals, specifically because of the reimbursement provisions. However, we remain leery of the negative impact the legislation could have on local governments, including public schools, which rely on PPT collections. If Robertson’s citation of reimbursing most local units for 89 percent of their lost revenue holds true, that’s far better than flat out eliminating the tax and providing no level of reimbursement. If that’s not going to be the case, then lawmakers should get back to work to find a way to replace most, if not all the PPT revenue that local governments and schools desperately need. While we know it may be a longshot in an election year, lawmakers from both sides of the political aisle and representatives of municipal governments and schools should immediately engage in a thorough discussion on the latest PPT package. A change this fundamental should be the focus of exhaustive debate and analysis, including an eye toward ensuring local governments and schools aren’t devastated by any enacted change. ❏

Addressing WBS vandalism W

est Bloomfield School District parents and students were surprised when they woke up on Wednesday, April 18 to find that school had been canceled due to vandalism targeting 20 buses during a 15-minute window the night before, marking the second time in less than three months that the district was forced to cancel classes due to disabled school buses. The district is taking immediate action to enhance its surveillance system at the bus lot, but it may need to look into hiring permanent overnight surveillance personnel to patrol the bus yard if similar incidents of vandalism happen again. The vandalism — which was accomplished by pulling fuses from buses and cutting wires — prompted not only the cancellation of classes for the day, but also all district elementary and middle school extracurricular activities.

Classes, as well as those activities, resumed as normal the following day, Thursday, April 19. This is the second incident of school bus vandalism in the district’s bus lot this year, with the first coming back on Jan. 29, when 18 buses were vandalized, again prompting the cancellation of classes on Jan. 30. According to district administrators, no suspects have been apprehended in that incident. While the district currently has someone monitoring the bus yard overnight as it awaits receipt and installation of new and improved surveillance equipment, that might not be enough to deter more vandalism incidents in the future — although we certainly hope it is. But if not, the district needs to seriously consider hiring one or more people to monitor the bus yard during the overnight hours on a permanent basis, in spite of the fact that it would cost precious

dollars during tight fiscal times. With this being the second time such an incident has happened this year, we understand not jumping the gun on hiring a new employee or two to monitor the bus yard. However, a third incident should prompt the school board to get moving on addressing the issue not just with technology, but also a flesh-and-blood deterrent. In addition, another thing to make possible vandals think twice is, when and if the suspect(s) in both incidents are caught, officials need to ensure that the full force of the law is brought to bare on them. Disrupting the day-to-day schedules of not only the district’s 6,600 students, but also their parents and guardians, who also have to change their schedules at a moment’s notice when such incidents take place, and district faculty and staff warrants the most severe punishment possible under the law. ❏


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

COMMUNITY CALENDAR ■ Making Strides Against Breast Cancer: Meet and Greet informational meeting, 6 p.m. Thursday, April 26, Little Daddy’s Restaurant, 39500 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills. Registration. 248-561-6909 or visit www.cancer.org/stridesonline. ■ Huron Valley Council for the Arts: Cantare String Quarter concert, “A Spring Romance,” 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 28, 206 W. Livingston, Highland. huronvalleyarts.org or 248-8898660. ■ Waterford Genealogical Society: 9th annual “Lock-in,” 6 p.m.-midnight, Saturday, April 28, Waterford Township Public Library, 5168 Civic Center Drive, Waterford. Registration. 248-6257731 or wgsgenealogylockin.com. ■ Huron Valley Council for the Arts: Cantare String Quartet in concert, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 28, Highland Station, Steeple Hall Performance Center, 205 W. Livingston Road, Highland. Tickets. huronvalleyarts.org or 248889-8660. ■ Michigan Veterans Support Group: Comedy Night with Kevin Kramis and Norm Stulz with cash bar and 50/50 raffle, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 28, VFW Oxbow Post 4156, 321 Union Lake Road, White Lake. $15 tickets in advance; $20 at the door. 248-894-4994. ■ Bethany North Oakland Singles: “Spring Fling,” dance, 8 a.m.-midnight, Saturday, April 28, St. Dan’s Church- Cushing Center, 7010 Valley Park, Clarkston. $15 admission includes refreshments. 248-891-8938. ■ Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: Neighbor To Neighbor Giveaway, free clothing, furniture, games for kids, bedding, and other household items for families and individuals in need, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, April 28, 5464 Waterford Road, Clarkston. Email n2nlds@gmail.com. ■ Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints: Neighbor to Neighbor Giveaway, Saturday, April 28, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5464 Waterford Road, Clarkston. Clothing, household items and more for free. Facebook.com/NeighborToNeighbor for more information. Free event. ■ Huron Valley Special Olympics: Volunteers needed for district track meet on May 19 at Huron Valley Lakeland High School. Sign-up deadline is May 11. Volunteers asked to attend a 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 1 meeting. If interested, email Coach Gradinscak at gradinscakj@huronvalley.k12.mi.us or call 248-345-7086. ■ City of Walled Lake: Farmers Market, 7 a.m.1 p.m. Wednesdays, May 2 through Oct. 31, Walled Lake City Event Field on E. West Maple between Decker and Pontiac Trail, Walled Lake. 248-624-4847. ■ Walled Lake Central High School’s Student Council: Fundraiser/activities for ages 3-6, crafts, games, dancing, character greets, noon-4 p.m. Saturday, May 5, Walled Lake Central Café, 1600 Oakley Park Road, Walled Lake. Funds will go toward school-sponsored extra curricular activities, anti-bullying endeavors, and graduation events. WLCStuCo@wlcsd.org.

■ Williams Lake Church of the Nazarene: Parking Lot Sale, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, May 5, 2840 Airport Road, Waterford. $15 parking lot space. 248-673-5911 ext. 18.

❐ AA Meetings: 8 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays, Four Towns United Methodist Church, 6451 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford. 248-682-0211.

■ White Lake Farmers Market: Open every Saturday, May 5-Oct. 6, 1500 Bogie Lake Road, White Lake. whitelakefarmersmarket.weebly.com or 248-755-1195.

❐ C.A.S.A.: Kleptomaniacs and Shoplifters Anonymous, 7 p.m. Thursdays, Wesley Room, Commerce United Methodist Church, 1155 N. Commerce Road, Commerce. 248-358-8508 or kleptomaniacsanonymous.org.

■ Oakland Schools Technical Campus Southwest: 40th Annual Anniversary Garden Center Sale, 8-9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, May 7-June 15; 9 a.m.-noon, Saturday and Sunday, May 12-20, 1000 Beck Road, Wixom. 248-668-5634 or email bailey.garwood@oakland.k12.mi.us. ■ Walled Lake Central High School: Jazz Band Benefit, Italian dinner/concert, 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 11, Walled Lake Central High School Café, 1600 Oakley Park Road, Walled Lake. 148-9564700. ■ Walled Lake Northern PTSA: Mom2Mom sale, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, May 19, Walled Lake Northern High School gymnasium, 6000 Bogie Lake Road, Commerce. $1 donation at door, 6foot tables to rent for $15. For more information, call Darrell Schwartz at 248-438-6629, or email darrellschwartz@formtech2.com. ■ (Breakfast) Optimist Club of Waterford: Meeting, 7:15 a.m. Thursdays, Big Boy Restaurant, M-59 and Airport Road, Waterford. 248-673-3493. ■ Catholic Social Services of Oakland County: Senior companion volunteers needed to support adults with developmental disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, chronic mental illness, as well as the physically frail and homebound. 248559-1147, ext. 3434. ■ Dads of Foreign Service: Bingo, 5:30 p.m. Sundays, VFW Post No. 4156, 321 Union Lake Road, White Lake. www.vfw4156.org or 248698-8302. ■ Friends of Byers: Byers’ Antique Barn now open noon to 5 p.m. Sundays, volunteers are needed at 213 Commerce Road, Commerce. For more information visit byershomestead.org or call 248-363-2592. ■ Grace Hospice: Volunteers with reliable transportation needed to visit terminally-ill patients and family members in our communities. Free training and classes are now forming. 1-888937-4390. ■ Rotary of West Bloomfield: Meeting, 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Henry Ford Medical Center, second floor, southwest corner of Farmington and Maple roads. 248-520-0095. ■ Waterford Rotary Club: Meeting, noon, Tuesdays, The Shark Club on M-59, Waterford. 248-625-4897.

SUPPORT GROUPS ❐ Age with Grace: Caregiver support group meeting 6 p.m. the first Monday of the month beginning May 7, 2230 E. Highland Road, Highland. 248-529-6431.

❐ Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous: Meeting, 6 p.m. Fridays, Crossroads Presbyterian Church, 1445 Welch Road, Commerce. 248-8078667 or foodaddicts.org. ❐ MOMS Club of Waterford South: Support group for mothers at home, weekly activities, monthly meetings, third Friday of the month, Waterford area. momswaterfordsouth.webs.com. ❐ Over-Eaters Anonymous: Recovery from compulsive eating, 12-step program, meeting, 6 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 5301 Hatchery Road, Waterford. ❐ Postpartum Depression Support Group: Meeting, 6:45 p.m. Thursdays, DMC Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital, Commerce. 248-937-5220.

SENIOR ACTIVITIES ❐ Senior Helpers of Southeast Michigan: Free dementia program, “Letting Go of the Past: Learning to Live in the Here and Now,” Thursday, April 26, Glen Oaks, 30500 13 Mile Road, Farmington Hills. R.S.V.P. 248-865-1000 or email amarkiewicz@seniorhelpers.com. ❐ Calvary Lutheran Church: In conjunction with St. Joseph Mercy Oakland, “Senior Fit,” free exercise program for ages 55 and up, 11 a.m. to noon, Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9101 Highland Road, White Lake. Registration. 1-800372-6094 or 248-625-3288. ❐ Dublin Senior Center: Drums Alive! 10:30 a.m. and Zumba Gold, 2 p.m. Tuesdays, 685 Union Lake Road, White Lake. Registration. 248-698-2394. ❐ Foster Grandparent Program of Oakland County: Volunteers needed age 55 and older to provide tutoring, mentoring and nurturing youth with special needs. Volunteers receive a non-taxable stipend, mileage reimbursement, a meal or meal reimbursement, training. 248-559-1147, ext. 3424. ❐ Highland Adult Activity Center: Ask the Nurse, blood pressure checks, 10 a.m. Wednesday, May 2; Mother’s Day Brunch by Baker’s of Milford and entertainment by Mario Messina, 11 a.m. Friday, May 11, 209 N. John Street, Highland. Mother’s Day program, $7 admission. 248-887-1707. ❐ Richardson Community Senior Center: Knitting and crochet group, 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays, 1485 E. Oakley Park, Commerce. Registration. 248-926-0063 or commercetwp.com. ❐ Sylvan Lake Lutheran Church: Senior Stretch and Tone, 11 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30 a.m. Fridays, 2399 Figa Ave., West Bloomfield. 248-682-0770. ❐ West Bloomfield Parks and Recreation Senior

Programs: Line dancing, 11 a.m. Fridays at the Corners, 4640 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield. Registration. 248-451-1900. ❐ Wixom Senior Center: “Come As You Are Chorus,” Wednesdays, 49015 Pontiac Trail, Wixom. 248-624-0870.

PARKS ❐ Indian Springs Environmental Discovery Center: Boy Scouts: Bird Study Merit Badge Part 1, 8 a.m.; Wolf Scouts: Tie It Right, 1 p.m.; Woodcock Walk, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, April 28; Boy Scouts: Bird Study Merit Badge Part II, 8 a.m. Sunday, April 19, Indian Springs Metropark, White Lake. Registration. 810494-6026. ❐ Kensington Farm Center: Spring Festival with horse-drawn hayrides, candle dipping, wool spinning, weaving, a Border collie demonstration and entertainment by Rosco the Clown, Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29, Kensington Metropark, Milford. 248-6848632 or 1-800-477-3178. ❐ Kensington Nature Center: Kensington Coffee Wander and Wonder, 10 a.m. Saturday, April 28; Volunteers needed to pull garlic mustard invasive plant, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, April 28 and Saturday, June 9, Kensington Metropark, Milford. Registration. 248-685-1561. ❐ Oakland County Parks & Recreation: Free woodchip pickup, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays, April 28, May 26, and June 23, Orion Oaks Park, parking lot on Clarkston Road between Baldwin and Joslyn roads, Orion Twp. DestinationOakland.com.

LIBRARY EVENTS

❐ Highland Township Public Library: Pokemon League, teen program, 5 p.m. Monday, April 30, 444 Beach Farm Circle, Highland. Registration. 248-887-2218. ❐ Milford Public Library: PAN (Poetry Art Night) Exhibit, Thursday through Monday, April 26-30, 330 Family Drive, Milford. 248684-0845. ❐ Walled Lake City Library: Classical Music with “Fabs” Kaldobsky, adult music appreciation, 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 1, 1499 E. West Maple, Walled Lake. Registration. 248-624-3772. ❐ Waterford Township Public Library: Honor Flight Michigan: the Legacy Project, documentary film celebrating our WW II heroes, 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 30, 5168 Civic Center Drive, Waterford. Registration. 248-674-4831. ❐ West Bloomfield Township Public Library: “A Mexican Fiesta” by Chipotle Grill, food tasting, adult program, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3, 4600 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield. Registration. 248-682-2120 or www.wblib.org. ❐ White Lake Township Library: Adult Book discussion, Jamie Ford’s “ Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet,” Tuesday, May 8, 7527 E. Highland Road, White Lake. Registration. 248698-4942.


SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Walled Lake Northern’s Agatha Weddle (white jersey) challenges Walled Lake Western’s Nicole Spackman on Thursday, April 19 at Northern. Weddle would score the game’s only goal on a penalty kick as the Knights defeated the Warriors to clinch the Walled Lake City Championship. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

Northern gets bragging rights Knights defeat Warriors 1-0 to claim city championship By Michael Shelton staff writer

Walled Lake Northern officially claimed the Walled Lake City Championship in girls soccer with a 10 victory at home over Walled Lake Western on Thursday, April 19. Agatha Weddle scored the game’s only goal on a penalty kick, while Nicole Jablonski picked up the shutout in net for the Knights. The game was a matchup of last

season’s Kensington Lakes Activities Association (KLAA) North Division champion, Western, and the division runner-

View VIDEO CLIPS relative to this story at www.spinalcolumnonline.com

up, Northern. Last season, Western defeated Northern, 5-2, before the teams played to a 1-1 tie in their second meeting.

Western won the division with an undefeated record in division play. With last Thursday’s win, Northern (4-1-1) moved into first-place in the North Division with a 2-0 record, good for 6 points. Mott is in second-place with a division record of 1-0-1, good for 4 points, while Western (2-2-1, 1-1) has 3 points and is in third-place. Northern began its week with a 4-1 victory at Walled Lake Central on

Tuesday, April 17. Weddle scored two goals in the first half for the Knights while Brianna Tabaczka and Ashley Donohue each scored a goal. The Knights then traveled to Holly on Saturday, April 21 and came away with a 4-0 victory. Jablonski and Allison Zarek combined for the shutout in net for Northern. PAGE 38 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


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Still unbeaten

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Weddle scored 2 goals on the day with the first coming on a corner kick by Allison Smith and the second coming off an assist from Mackenzie Moran. Sophomore Kendall Juhnke also scored a goal while Taylor Nutting also scored off another Smith corner kick. Meanwhile, Western began its week with a 3-2 victory at Huron Valley Lakeland on Tuesday, April 17. Western played at Waterford Kettering on Tuesday, April 24 after press time and will host Waterford Mott tomorrow, Thursday, April 26. Meanwhile, Northern played at Lakeland on April 24 and will travel to Waterford Kettering on April 26.

Mott blanks rival Kettering; Western upends Lakeland By Michael Shelton staff writer

Waterford Mott posted an impressive 5-0 shutout against rival Waterford Kettering on Tuesday, April 17. Hannah Messar had a hat trick for the Corsairs (5-0-1 overall, 1-01 in the Kensington Lakes Activities Association North Division) while Sarah Golfis and Meggy McConkey each scored a goal. “I don’t think anyone could’ve predicted 5 goals, but after having the opportunity to scout Kettering several times, we were very confident before the match with the game plan we were able to put together,” said Mott Head Coach Evan Baker. “Hannah is in for a big year if she continues to take players on one-on-one with that type of confidence. Meggy had the vision and soccer sense to draw defenders in and then play dangerous balls into our other attacking players, earning her 2 assists on the evening.” Mott and Huron Valley Lakeland then played to a 1-1 draw at Lakeland on Thursday, April 19. Megan Kalanik scored Lakeland’s goal in the first half off an assist from Morgen Kroezen, who passed through several Mott defenders. Mott tied the score in the first half on a penalty kick by Messar. Lauren Reiter made 3 saves in net for the Eagles. Meanwhile, Kettering (1-2-1, 0-

Lakers win three to stay undefeated By Michael Shelton staff writer

Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes remained undefeated on the season after notching three wins last week. On Monday, April 16, the Lakers defeated Marine City Cardinal Mooney at Clarkston Everest, 9-1. Lindsay Straw and Anna Robb each had a hat trick for Our Lady (5-0-1), while Ava Doetsch scored two goals. Our Lady then defeated Macomb Lutheran Northern, 3-2, on Tuesday, April 17. Doetsch scored in the first half for the Lakers before Lutheran North scored two straight goals to go up 2-1 at halftime. But, Brianna Topolewski scored the game tying goal in the second half before Doetsch scored her second goal and the game-winner. Luttinen had 10 saves in net for the Lakers. Our Lady then finished its week with a 8-0 shutout victory over Allen Park Cabrini on Thursday, April 19 at Clarkston Everest. Doetsch, Robb, Rachelle Poplewski and Lindsay Straw each scored twice for the Lakers, who played at Bloomfield Hills Cranbrook-Kingswood on Tuesday, April 24 after press time and will host Riverview Gabriel Richard at Everest tomorrow, Thursday, April 26. 1-1) played Walled Lake Central to a 33 tie on Thursday, April 19 at Kettering. It was a tale of two halves, as Allison Dicknell, Shelby Watts, and Hannah Huff each scored in the first half to give the Captains a 3-0 halftime lead. But, the Vikings’ Allison Rettig, Kara Birrell and Kennedy McMurren each scored in the second half to give Central a stunning tie. Mott currently sits in second place in the KLAA North Division with 4 points, just 2 behind Walled Lake Northern. Mott played at Walled Lake Central yesterday, Tuesday, April 24 after press time and will travel to Walled Lake Western on Thursday, April 26. • Huron Valley Lakeland (2-2-1 overall, 0-1-1 in the KLAA North) began its week with a 3-2 loss to Walled Lake Western at home on Tuesday, April 17. The Warriors took a 2-0 halftime lead on goals by Rachel Good and Madison Schram. Megan Kalanik scored Lakeland’s first goal in the second half off an assist from Amanda Lock before Angela Cataldo scored Western’s third goal. Kroezen then scored on a penalty kick to pull Lakeland to within one goal, but that was as close as it would get. Rachel Gilmore had 7 saves in net for Lakeland, which was outshot by Western 16-12.

BASEBALL

Warriors improve to 7-2 with win over visiting Mavs By Michael Shelton staff writer

Huron Valley Milford and Walled Lake Western faced each other in a memorable game in which the Warriors rallied on their home diamond to capture an 87 victory in 9 innings on Wednesday, April 18. It was an exciting finish to end a game that was dominated by Western (7-2) early, as the Warriors jumped out to a 6-0 lead after four innings. However, the Mavericks didn’t back down and responded with two runs in the fifth inning, followed by three runs in the sixth. Trailing 7-5 after the sixth inning, Milford (2-4) then tied the game with two runs in the seventh and extra innings would be required. Both teams then went scoreless in the eighth inning before the Mavs went three-and-out in the top of the ninth. In the bottom of the ninth, Western’s Cam Vieaux put down a suicide squeeze, bringing home Alec Hamilton to give the Warriors the win. Niklas Heglin also hit 2-for-4 with a pair of RBIs for the Warriors, while Mike Schmidt also hit 2-for-4 with two RBIs. Alex Larson, Trevor Emme and Jacob Lee each hit an RBI for Milford, while

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Jacob Bravo had two hits and two runs and the Mavs had a season-high 11 hits on the day. Milford’s starting pitching was roughed up early as Dan Jaklic gave up 4 earned runs in the first inning before pitching three shutout innings. Brad Howe came in relief and gave up an earned run on 3 hits in three innings. Western began its week on a high note with an 8-3 victory over Livonia Churchill at home on Monday, April 16. Heglin hit a perfect 3-for-3 with an RBI and scored 2 runs for Western, while Vieaux was strong on the mound as he struck out nine batters and only walked two in five innings of work. Both teams were scheduled to play division games on Friday, April 20, but heavy rain postponed Milford’s home doubleheader against Kensington Lakes Activities Association (KLAA) West Division opponent Grand Blanc and Western’s KLAA North road doubleheader against Walled Lake Northern. No makeup dates have been announced for those games. However, Western returned to its home diamond on Saturday, April 21 to host a doubleheader against North Farmington from the Oakland Activities Association (OAA). In the opener, Western had a 2-0 lead before the Raiders bounced back to take a 4-2 lead after four innings. Western responded to take a 5-4 lead in the fifth inning before North Farmington scored 2 runs in the sixth to pick up the win. Heglin hit 3-for-4 with a double for the Warriors. The nightcap would be a different story, as Western grinded out a 3-2 victory. Brandon Christie came up big on the mound for the Warriors, as he gave up only 2 runs over five innings in picking up his first varsity victory. Heglin also hit 3-for-4 with a pair of RBIs for Western, which scored all three of its runs in the second inning. Western was scheduled to play at Howell on Monday, April 23 after press time. The Warriors will next host their biggest rival, Walled Lake Central, in an early KLAA North doubleheader showdown today, Wednesday, April 25. The Warriors will then host a nonleague doubleheader against Edsel Ford on Saturday, April 28. Milford was scheduled to host Waterford Kettering on Monday, April 23 after press time. The Mavs will next play a doubleheader at Hartland today, Wednesday, April 25 before playing at Waterford Mott on Monday, April 30.


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Eaglets succumb to powerhouses in pair of twin bills By Michael Shelton staff writer

Orchard Lake St. Mary’s is looking to recover after dropping two doubleheaders to Detroit Catholic League opponents last week. The Eaglets fell in two games to Detroit Jesuit, 6-3 and 12-3, at home on Wednesday, April 18 before falling at Bloomfield Hills Brother Rice in a doubleheader, 5-2 and 102, on Saturday, April 21. St. Mary’s is now 3-10 overall and 1-6 in Catholic League Central Division play after facing what many consider to be two of the top teams in the league and possibly the state. View VIDEO CLIPS relative to this story at www.spinalcolumnonline.com

Last Wednesday, the Eaglets fell in the opening game to University of Detroit Jesuit after starter T.J. Shook struck out 11 St. Mary’s batters to pick up the win for the Cubs (7-1 in the Catholic League Central). Tyson Smith and Luke Rodgers each hit a solo home run for the Eaglets, which was the only damage St. Mary’s could inflict on Shook. The nightcap was not as competitive. In the third inning, Luke Rodgers hit an RBI double before Will Salter hit a double that drove in two runs, which amounted to the Eaglets’ only three runs of the game. “I give Coach (Jim) Mancuso all the credit in the world, U-of-D will continue to give teams in the

BASEBALL

Strong pitching helps Central go 3-1 on the week Walled Lake Central continued its strong start to the season last week by going 3-1 in four games, including a victory over the team it will have to contend with for the Kensington Lakes Activities Association (KLAA) Lakes Conference title. The Vikings began the week with an 8-3 loss against Plymouth for their second defeat of the season. James Sullivan hit 2-for-3 with a home run while Jutura Brown hit 2-for3 with 2 doubles and Zach Percha hit 2-

Tyson Smith of Orchard Lake St. Mary’s hits a solo home run against the University of Detroit Jesuit on Wednesday, April 18. The Eaglets would only manage three runs as they dropped the first game of a doubleheader against the Cubs, 6-3, before losing the nightcap, as well. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

Catholic League, as well as the state, a lot of problems,” said St. Mary’s Head Coach Matt Petry. “Their pitchers throw strikes, they make the routine plays, and with the new bat standards, that is more than half the battle,” he added, referring to high schools across the country changing their existing bat rule to match the standard followed by NCAA baseball, in which all non-wood bats used must meet a standard comparable to wood bats.

The Eaglets then traveled to Brother Rice on April 21 for a doubleheader and fell in the first game. Craig Gorski hit 2-for-3 with a double while Rodgers hit 2-for-2 with a walk and a sacrifice bunt for the Eaglets. In the second game, St. Mary’s had a 2-0 lead after Salter hit a single to drive in two runs. But the Warriors would go on to score 10 straight runs to secure the victory to remain unde-

feated in the Central Division at 8-0. St. Mary’s played a non-league game against West Bloomfield yesterday, Tuesday, April 24 after press time. The Eaglets will jump right back into Catholic League play today, Wednesday, April 25, when they travel to Warren De La Salle. St. Mary’s will then host Novi Detroit Catholic Central on Saturday, April 28.

for-3 with a double. Central (7-2) had nine hits for the day, but it was not enough to overcome Plymouth. On Wednesday, April 18, the Vikings then hosted Hartland, the team that defeated them to win the Lakes Conference title last season before it won the overall KLAA championship. However, Central would have its day against the Eagles in a 3-1 victory. Brandon Cichocki, who is expected to officially sign to play with Baldwin University tomorrow, Thursday, April 26, was dominant on the mound as he gave up only 1 run on 2 hits. Meanwhile, Zach Leimbach hit 2-for3 on the day while Sullivan hit 2-for-4. Central was then scheduled to host Waterford Kettering for a KLAA North Division doubleheader on Friday, April

20, but heavy rain postponed the games. The Vikings then traveled to Farmington Hills Harrison for a doubleheader on Saturday, April 21, and Central swept both games. The opener saw Central win 7-6, as Leimbach and Kyle Russ each hit 2-for3 while Matt Boulus hit 2-for-4 with a pair of RBIs. Central made sure that there were no doubts in the nightcap, as the Vikings won 13-2. Brad Prahl hit 2-for-3 with 2 RBIs, Zach Percah went 2-for-4 with 2 RBIs, and K.J. Schultz hit 2-for-4. Tyler Croteau had a strong game on the mound as he had a no-hitter until the fourth inning and finished giving up only 1 run and striking out 4 batters in four innings of work. Central played a doubleheader at Brighton on Monday, April 23 after press time.

The Vikings will next travel to face rival Walled Lake Western today, Wednesday, April 25 for a crucial doubleheader that could go a long way toward deciding the KLAA North Division title. Central will then play at Grand Blanc on Friday, April 27 before traveling to Livonia Churchill for a doubleheader on Saturday, April 28 and hosting Pinckney on Monday, April 30.

Captains squeak by Grand Blanc with 6-5 victory Waterford Kettering picked up a 65 victory at home over Grand Blanc on PAGE 40 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


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BASEBALL

Kettering baseball ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 39

Wednesday, April 18. Billy Eller threw 6 innings for the Captains and only gave up 2 earned runs, while Brandon Dupuis and Matt Wasnich each had a home run and Brett Mortimore hit the game-winning single in the bottom of the eighth inning. Kettering’s doubleheader at Walled Lake Central was rained out on Friday, April 20, with the Captains and Vikings tied at 2-2 in the fifth inning of the opening game. The game will be resumed at a later date. The Captains then lost two games on Saturday, April 21 at Troy, falling 8-5 in the opener and 11-1 in the nightcap. Pat Hubbell hit 2-for-4 with two RBIs in the opener and 2-for-3 in the nightcap. Kettering played at Huron Valley Milford on Monday, April 23 after press time and will host a doubleheader against Waterford Mott today, Wednesday, April 25 and a doubleheader against Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes on Saturday, April 28. • Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes won its first four Catholic League Intersectional Division games this past week. The Lakers (6-4 overall, 4-0 in the Catholic League) swept a doubleheader at Marine City Cardinal Mooney on Tuesday, April 17. Our Lady won the opening game, 5-0, before taking the second game, 7-4. Our Lady then swept a doubleheader against the West Bloomfield Frankel Jewish Academy on Thursday, April 19 at home, winning the opener, 13-0 and taking the second game, 7-2. Our Lady’s game against Royal Oak Shrine on Friday, April 20 was rained out. The Lakers then split a doubleheader with Novi Franklin Road Christian on Saturday, April 21. The Lakers fell in the opening game, 10-6, before rebounding to win the nightcap, 6-5.

Mott sails to top of KLAA North with win over Lakeland Waterford Mott now sits alone in firstplace in the Kensington Lakes Activities Association (KLAA) North Division after a 2-1 victory over Huron Valley Lakeland at home on Friday, April 20. The game was called after six innings due to rain and the second game of

The Waterford Mott Softball program has dedicated a newly purchased scoreboard. Through several fund-raising efforts by the Corsairs Softball Booster organization and a donation by Peter and Lisa Boyer of Earth 2 Earth, an $8,500 scoreboard was installed at the varsity softball field. The purchase was a collaborative effort with the Booster organization, Earth 2 Earth, and the Waterford Schools Athletic and Facilities departments. The parentrun booster organization raised over $6,000 since last November by hosting a Bowl-A-Thon, a Comedy Night, and by selling corporate banners for display on the outfield fence. None of that would have mattered if it weren’t for Earth 2 Earth, which donated $4,500. Pictured above (adults left to right) are Assistant Coach Nick Davis, Peter and Lisa Boyer of Earth 2 Earth, Coach Tom Cuthrell, Athletic Supervisor Rick Dorn, and Mott High School Principal Craig Blomquist with the Waterford Mott Varsity and Freshmen Teams. (Photo submitted by Rhonda Lessel, Waterford Schools)

what was supposed to be a doubleheader was postponed. Justice Bolling hit a pair of RBIs for Mott while Austin Maas went 2-for-3. On the mound, Trevor Bonnivier allowed 1 run on 2 hits while striking out 5 batters for Mott. The Corsairs began the week with a 7-6 victory at home over Pinckney on Wednesday, April 18. Mott trailed 2-1 after the second inning before tying the game at 2-2 in the bottom of the fourth. But, the Pirates scored 4 runs in the top of the fifth before Mott responded with 3 runs to pull to within 1, 6-5. Mott completed the comeback with 2 runs in the bottom of the sixth. Austin Meredith and Bonnivier each had two hits for Mott, while Tyler Vaughan struck out 10 batters to earn the complete game victory. Meanwhile, Lakeland began its week with a 14-9 victory over Fenton on the road on Monday, April 16. The victory was spearheaded by

Mikail Sizen and Bobby Schumacher, who each had 3 hits, while Kevin Lechner picked up the win on the mound. But, Lakeland then fell, 7-2, at home to Brighton on Wednesday, April 18. Mott played at Grand Blanc on Monday, April 23 after press time and will play at Waterford Kettering in a doubleheader today, Wednesday, April 25 before playing at the Lake Orion Invitational on Saturday, April 28 and hosting Huron Valley Milford on Monday, April 30. Lakeland played at Pinckney on April 23 and will host doubleheaders against Walled Lake Northern today, April 25 and against North Farmington on April 28. • Walled Lake Northern suffered a 102 loss at home to Howell on Wednesday, April 18. Northern trailed 3-0 in the bottom of the third before putting its first run across the board. Howell then scored four runs in the top of the fifth and Northern could only

manage 1 more run in the bottom of the fifth before the Highlanders pulled away. Ted Lilley hit a perfect 3-for-3 on the day for Northern, who saw its doubleheader at home against Walled Lake Western on Friday, April 20 postponed due to rain. The Knights played at Hartland on Monday, April 23 after press time and will play at Huron Valley Lakeland today, Wednesday, April 25 and will host Anchor Bay for a doubleheader on Saturday, April 28.

SOFTBALL

Offense in high gear in Lakeland’s home opener win Huron Valley Lakeland continued its strong start to the season with two wins last week. PAGE 42 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


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SOFTBALL SOFTBALL The Eagles began the week with their home opener on Wednesday, April 18 against Brighton and put on a show for their fans with an 11-1 victory in five innings. Kelly Merkle had a three-run double, Meghan Jacobs hit a two-run home run, and Lauren Brouillard hit a two-run single for Lakeland (5-1 overall, 1-0 in the Kensington Lakes Activities Association North Division). Annika Wiesinger allowed only 2 hits with 1 earned run, 1 walk and 3 strikeouts in a strong pitching performance for the Eagles. Lakeland then hit the road east for Waterford Mott on Friday, April 20 to open Kensington Lakes Activities Association (KLAA) North Division play with a doubleheader. The Eagles began the day with a 7-3 victory in the opener, as Madison Burgess hit 2-for-3 with a pair of RBIs. Wiesinger turned in another complete game as she struck out 12 batters for Lakeland. The second game of the doubleheader was called due to inclement weather and will resume at a date yet to be determined.

BLACK

CEDAR

Lakeland played at Pinckney on Monday, April 23 after press time and will host a doubleheader against Walled Lake Northern to resume KLAA North play today, Wednesday, April 25. The Eagles will then play at the Swartz Creek Invitational on Saturday, April 28 before hosting Grand Blanc on Monday, April 30.

Kus’ no-hitter helps W. Bloomfield in defeat of Adams West Bloomfield picked up three wins last week thanks in part to strong pitching performances from its ace, including a no-hitter. The Lakers first took on Rochester Adams at home in a doubleheader on Wednesday, April 18. West Bloomfield (3-2) won the opener, 1-0, as Allyson Kus pitched a no-hitter, striking out 8 batters in addition to hitting the winning RBI. The Lakers then followed up with a 3-2 victory in the nightcap as Kus struck out 5 batters and allowed only 1 hit. For the day, Danielle Kus hit 3-for-5 while Catherine Langfor hit 2-for-6 and Claire Forhan hit 2-for-6. Taylor Rose had 5 stolen bases on the day.

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The Lakers then took on Detroit Renaissance on Friday, April 20 and won 5-3 in six innings. Allyson Kus struck out 12 batters and gave up no earned runs, while Alaina Skotak hit 2-for-4 with two RBIs and Forhan drove in a pair of runs. • Walled Lake Northern fell to 1-3 last week after a 5-2 loss to Howell at home on Wednesday, April 18. Sam Kern had three hits while Karly Knapp hit 2-for-3 for Northern. Corrina Rotondo picked up the loss in the pitcher’s circle. Northern hosted Walled Lake Western at home on Friday, April 20, but the game was rained out with the Knights leading 10-0 in the top of the fifth in the first game of a doubleheader. No makeup date has been announced. The Knights played at Hartland on Monday, April 23 after press time and will play at rival Huron Valley Lakeland

for a doubleheader today, Wednesday, April 25 before hosting Brighton on Monday, April 30.

Corsairs sweep Pinckney in twin bill to move to 7-7 Waterford Mott began its week with a doubleheader sweep at home over Pinckney on Wednesday, April 18. The Corsairs (7-7, 1-1 in the Kensington Lakes Activities Association North Division) first won the opener, 4-3, in 10 innings. Eliana Brinson hit 3-for-4 with an RBI, while Becca Mathers hit 2-for-2 with a double, triple and an RBI. Jenna Ciennik hit the game-winning RBI in the bottom of the 10th.

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PAGE 42

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ELECTION NOTICE SPECIAL ELECTION MAY 8, 2012

Softball roundup

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF WEST BLOOMFIELD Bloomfield Hills School District To the Qualified Electors: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Special Election will be held in: CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF WEST BLOOMFIELD County of Oakland, State of Michigan

TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2012 THE POLLS will be open 7 o’clock a.m. until 8 o’clock p.m. ALL POLLING PLACES ARE HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE BRAILLE AND AUDIO VERSION OF THE VOTING INSTRUCTIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE POLLING PLACES LISTED BELOW: West Hills Middle School, 2601 Lone Pine Rd - Handicapped Entrance – N. Side of Bldg. Precinct 6/16 Precinct 13 Lone Pine Elementary School, 3100 Lone Pine Rd - Handicapped Entrance – Main Entrance Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, 4800 Orchard Lake Rd- Handicapped Entrance - S. Side of Bldg. Precinct 17 Counting Center West Bloomfield Township Hall, 4550 Walnut Lake Road FOR THE PURPOSE OF: BLOOMFIELD HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT – BOND PROPOSITION Full text of the proposals may be obtained from: CATHERINE SHAUGHNESSY, TOWNSHIP CLERK West Bloomfield Township 4550 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield, 48325 248-451-4848 COUNTY TREASURER’S STATEMENT AS REQUIRED BY ACT NO. 62 OF THE PUBLIC ACTS OF 1933 AS AMENDED I, Andrew E. Meisner, County Treasurer of the County of Oakland, State of Michigan, do hereby certify that according to the records in my office, as of March 20, 2012, the total of all voted increases in the tax rate limitation above the 18 mills established by Section 6 of Article IX of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 affecting taxable property in the Township of West Bloomfield, in said County, is as follows: LOCAL UNIT West Bloomfield Township

VOTED INCREASE 1.00 .25 .3892 .2200

West Bloomfield School City of Pontiac School City of Bloomfield Hills School District

City of Birmingham Schools

.59 .6586 .2415 3.12378 2.85 18.00 5.1603 18.5 1.50 11.7041 20.00 .74 8.46 11.3111 7.98

Farmington Public Schools

18.00

Walled Lake School District

13.5735 .50 18.00

County School District Of Oakland County County of Oakland Oakland Community College _________________________

3.6483 .2415 1.00 .7811

SOFTBALL

YEARS INCREASE EFFECTIVE Unlimited 2004 - 2013 Incl. 2008 – 2017 (Parks & Rec. Renewal) 2011-2020 (Renewal of Parks & Rec.) 2010 - 2013 2012 – 2026 2012 – 2021 2012 – 2021 2011 - 2021 2004 - 2014 Incl. 2004 - 2014 Incl. 2007 – 2016 2004 - 2013 Incl. 2006 - 2015 Incl. 2006 - 2015 Incl. (Non-Homestead) 2014 - 2018 July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2012 2007 – 2016 July 2, 2012 to June 30, 2022 2011 -2015 Incl. (Non-Homestead) 2011 -2015 Incl. 2004 – 2013 Incl. 2006 – 2015 Incl.

Unlimited 2012 to 2021 Incl. Unlimited Beg.7-1-2012(10yrs) Dated: March 20, 2012

ANDREW E. MEISNER, TREASURER OAKLAND COUNTY As a registered voter, you may obtain an absentee voter ballot if you are: • age 60 years old or older • unable to vote without assistance at the polls • expecting to be out of town on election day • in jail awaiting arraignment or trial • unable to attend the polls due to religious reasons • appointed to work as an election inspector in a precinct outside of your precinct of residence. A person who registers to vote by mail must vote in person in the first election in which he or she participates. CATHERINE SHAUGHNESSY TOWNSHIP CLERK S.C. 4-25-12

❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 41

Mott then hammered the Pirates, 13-5, in the nightcap. Ashley Mondock hit 2-for-4 with an RBI, while Devin Schomberg hit 2for-4 with two RBIs. Mott then dropped the first game of a doubleheader at home to Huron Valley Lakeland, 7-3, on Friday, April 20. The second game was postponed due to rain. The Corsairs then played at the Anchor Bay Invitational the next day, Saturday, April 21 and defeated Marine City, 8-1; St. Clair Shores Lakeshore, 3-2; and Port Huron Northern, 3-2. Mott also dropped two games in the invitational. In the tournament, Mondock hit 4for-9 with 5 RBIs and 2 doubles, while Rachael Waynick hit 5-for-12 with 2 RBIs and 7 steals. Mott played at Grand Blanc on Monday, April 23 after press time and will play a doubleheader against rival Waterford Kettering on the road today, Wednesday, April 25. The Corsairs will play at the Lake Orion Tournament Saturday, April 28. • Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes fell on the road on Thursday, April 19 to Birmingham Detroit Country Day, 7-5. Our Lady fell behind 1-0 in the first inning before tying the game at 1-1 in the second inning. The Lakers then scored 4 runs in the top of the fourth to grab the lead. But, the Yellow Jackets scored 2 runs in the third, 1 in the fourth and took the lead in the fifth inning. Angie Mastromatteo hit 2-for-4 with a double for Our Lady, while Abby Kline walked 5 batters and struck out 1. However, the Lakers bounced back in a doubleheader against Bloomfield Hills Sacred Heart by cruising 20-1 in the opener and then 15-0 in the nightcap. The Lakers are now 7-4 and hosted Ann Arbor Gabriel Richard yesterday, Tuesday, April 24 after press time. Our Lady will next play at Bloomfield Hills CransbrookKingswood on Friday, April 27. • Walled Lake Central fell to Hartland, 14-4, at home on Wednesday, April 18.

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Central’s doubleheader against Waterford Kettering on Friday, April 20 was postponed due to rain. Central traveled to Brighton on Monday, April 23 after press time and will play a doubleheader at Walled Lake Western today, Wednesday, April 25 before traveling to Grand Blanc on Friday, April 27. • Waterford Kettering fell at home to Grand Blanc, 4-3, on Wednesday, April 18. The Captains played at Milford on Monday, April 23 after press time and will host rival Waterford Mott for a doubleheader today, Wednesday, April 25. Kettering will then host Howell on Monday, April 30. • Huron Valley Milford went 1-3 last week as the Mavericks continue to adjust to playing under first-year Head Coach Meg Dyer. The Mavericks (3-4 overall, 1-1 in the KLAA West) began the week on Monday, April 16 against South Lyon in a doubleheader. Milford fell in the opener, 8-7, before dropping the nightcap, 11-5. Milford played at Walled Lake Western on Wednesday, April 18 and won the opening game, 13-2, before falling in the second game, 9-5. The Mavericks then hosted Grand Blanc on Friday, April 20 for a doubleheader in KLAA West Division play, with Milford falling 11-1 in the first game. The nightcap was postponed by rain. “As a new coach to the program, I have noticed much that needs to (be improved) on but (I’m) very optimistic,” Dyer said. “The girls need to play every inning, and never let up. Most of the games that we have lost have been a result (of) a bad inning within the game, mental errors that seem to snowball. The coaching staff is in the process of teaching the girls how to bounce back from an error and play the game that they know how to play instead of letting the error multiply, playing consistently.” Milford played at Waterford Kettering on Monday, April 23 after press time and will play a doubleheader at Hartland today, Wednesday, April 25 to resume KLAA West play before playing at Waterford Mott on Monday, April 30.


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

COMMUNITY LEGAL NOTICES

PAGE 43

Notice of Posting

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF COMMERCE

for Charter Township of Commerce Township Board 1. Synopsis of April 10, 2012 Regular Township Board Meeting

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The above synopsis shall be posted (in its entirety) at the following locations: (1) Office of the Township Clerk 2009 Township Drive (2) Main Township Library 2869 North Pontiac Trail (3) Township’s website www.commercetwp.com

2009 TOWNSHIP DRIVE COMMERCE TOWNSHIP, MI 48390

Notice is hereby given that the Township Board of the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan, will meet at a Regular Board meeting on 8th day of May, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., at the Township Hall, located at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390, to determine if the following Special Assessment District will be reestablished and to receive PUBLIC COMMENTS, if any, regarding reestablishment of the following Special Assessment District:

Lower Mount Royal Snow Plow S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D. shall include the following parcels:

Daniel P. Munro Township Clerk SC: 4-25-12

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF COMMERCE 2009 TOWNSHIP DRIVE COMMERCE TOWNSHIP, MI 48390

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the Township Board of the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan, will meet at a Regular Board meeting on 8th day of May, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., at the Township Hall, located at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390, to determine if the following Special Assessment District will be reestablished and to receive PUBLIC COMMENTS, if any, regarding reestablishment of the following Special Assessment District:

Midwood/Lower Straits Lake Aquatic Weed Control S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D. shall include the following parcels:

Plans showing the improvement, the location, and the legal description are on file with the Township Clerk for public examination. This Special Assessment District is being reestablished to continue financing the costs of aquatic weed control measures within the District. The costs associated with the proposed Special Assessment District are of such a nature that periodic redeterminations of the costs will be made from time to time without further notice to record owners or parties with an interest in property located within the Special Assessment District.

Plans showing the improvement, the location, and the legal description are on file with the Township Clerk for public examination. This Special Assessment District is being reestablished to continue financing the costs of snow plowing services within the District. The costs associated with this proposed Special Assessment District are of such a nature that periodic redeterminations of the costs will be made from time to time without further notice to record owners or parties with an interest in property located within the Special Assessment District.

In order to appeal the amount of any special assessment, affected owners or parties with an interest must protest the proposed assessment. This may be done by appearing in person at the hearing or having an agent appear at the hearing on behalf of an owner or party in interest, or in writing by filing a letter of protest before the hearing, addressed to the Township Clerk at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390. An owner or party having an interest in the real property affected by the special assessment may file a written appeal of the special assessment with the Michigan Tax Tribunal within 30 days after the confirmation of the special assessment roll if the special assessment is protested at the hearing held for the purpose of confirming the special assessment roll. Please direct any questions you may have to the Charter Township of Commerce Building Department at (248) 960-7060.

In order to appeal the amount of any special assessment, affected owners or parties with an interest must protest the proposed assessment. This may be done by appearing in person at the hearing or having an agent appear at the hearing on behalf of an owner or party in interest, or in writing by filing a letter of protest before the hearing, addressed to the Township Clerk at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390. An owner or party having an interest in the real property affected by the special assessment may file a written appeal of the special assessment with the Michigan Tax Tribunal within 30 days after the confirmation of the special assessment roll if the special assessment is protested at the hearing held for the purpose of confirming the special assessment roll. Please direct any questions you may have to the Charter Township of Commerce Building Department at (248) 960-7060.

Daniel Munro, Clerk Charter Township of Commerce

Daniel Munro, Clerk Charter Township of Commerce

SC: 4/25/12, 5/2/12

SC: 4/25/12, 5/2/12


PAGE 44

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF COMMERCE 2009 TOWNSHIP DRIVE COMMERCE TOWNSHIP, MI 48390

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Lakeside Subdivision Lighting S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Notice is hereby given that the Township Board of the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan, will meet at a Regular Board meeting on 8th day of May, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., at the Township Hall, located at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390, to determine if the following Special Assessment Districts will be reestablished and to receive PUBLIC COMMENTS, if any, regarding reestablishment of the following Special Assessment Districts: Homestead Shores Lighting S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Carrol Hills Subdivision Lighting S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Commerce Estates Lighting S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the

Marotta’s Sub Lighting S.A.D.

following parcels:

Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Lake Pine Lighting S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Homested Industrial Lighting S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 45

Wise Court Lighting S.A.D.

Commerce Crossing Lighting S.A.D.

Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Plans showing the improvements, the locations, and the legal descriptions are on file with the Township Clerk for public examination. These Special Assessment Districts are being reestablished to continue financing the costs of maintaining and operating the street lighting systems within the Districts. The costs associated with these proposed Special Assessment Districts are of such a nature that periodic redeterminations of the costs will be made from time to time without further notice to record owners or parties with an interest in property located within the Special Assessment Districts. In order to appeal the amount of any special assessment, affected owners or parties with an interest must protest the proposed assessment. This may be done by appearing in person at the hearing or having an agent appear at the hearing on behalf of an owner or party in interest, or in writing by filing a letter of protest before the hearing, addressed to the Township Clerk at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390. An owner or party having an interest in the real property affected by the special assessment may file a written appeal of the special assessment with the Michigan Tax Tribunal within 30 days after the confirmation of the special assessment roll if the special assessment is protested at the hearing held for the purpose of confirming the special assessment roll. Please direct any questions you may have to the Charter Township of Commerce Building Department at (248) 960-7060

Golf Lane Lighting S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Daniel Munro, Clerk Charter Township of Commerce

More news about our lakes in our sister publication www.oaklandlakefront.com

We’ve Gone DIGITAL!

Regular Board Meeting – Synopsis – April 17, 2012 Approved: Approved: Presentation: Presentation: Approved: Approved: Approved: Tabled: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Approved: Tabled: FYI: Approved:

Meeting called to order at 7:00 p.m. Seven board members and attorney present. Changes to Agenda Consent Agenda Swearing in of New Officer, Michael Zorza Auditor’s Financial Report Audit Report Minutes, March 6, 2012, March 15, 2012 w/corrections, March 20, 2012 Resolution #12-005, Sugden Lake Goose Round-Up Second Reading, Solicitation Ordinance Move to Second Reading, Ordinance No. 57 w/modifications Move to Second Reading, Ordinance No. 47 w/modifications Move to Second Reading, Ordinance No. 126 w/modifications Move to Second Reading, Ordinance No. 32-A Move to Second Reading, Ordinance No. 129 Agreement Between White Lake & Oakland County (Board of Canvassers) Purchase of Swing Set for Hawley Park Movie in the Park, Final Contract Cost Job Descriptions Repairs to Tanker #1 in amount of $7000.00 Bids for Demolition of house at 7515 Highland Road Sewer Hook-Up Costs for Townships Offices and Library Proposed Architectural Plans for White Lake Township Adjournment into Executive Session Meeting adjourned at 9:47 p.m. Terry Lilley, Clerk White Lake Township S.C. 4/25/12

WEST BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP’S

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE EVENT (open to West Bloomfield, Orchard Lake and Sylvan Lake Residents only)

If you’d like to receive our full edition in your email box, send your request to: signmeup@thescngroup.com

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF WHITE LAKE

SC: 4/25/12, 5/2/12

Saturday, April 28, 2012

9am – 2pm at West Bloomfield Civic Center 4550 Walnut Lake Road INFORMATION HOTLINE 248-451-4834 (Taped message only) www.wbtwp.com and Civic Center TV15 ACCEPTABLE ITEMS GARDEN/GARAGE - Fungicides, Herbicides, Insecticides, Pesticides, Automotive Fluids, Gasoline, Diesel, Kerosene, Car Batteries, Polishes, Bug Spray WORKSHOP - All Paints, (Maximum 10 gallons per vehicle), Paint Solvents, Glues (solvent based), Wood Preservatives, Fluorescent Light Bulbs, Varnish KITCHEN/BATHROOM - Thermometers, Chemical Cleaners, Furniture Polish, Nail Polish, Expired Medication MISCELLANEOUS - Pool Chemicals, Household Batteries, Moth Balls, Solvents, Muriatic Acid ELECTRONICS - Computers, Monitors, Typewriters, Microwave Ovens, Phones, Pagers, Printers, Fax Machines, Scanners, PDA’s, Stereos, Radios, Cassette Players, Walkmans, CD Players, MP3 Players, Clocks and TV’s. A “Certificate of Recycling” and a “Certificate of Hard Drive Destruction” are available from vendor at no extra charge. Electronics should not be in boxes. SHREDDING: On-site shredding of PERSONAL documents will be available – max. 50 pounds SALVATION ARMY: The Salvation Army will be on site for a “Donation Drive”. NO HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES WILL BE ACCEPTED WE CANNOT ACCEPT Computer monitors with broken glass, Appliances, Water Heaters, Humidifiers, Dehumidifiers, Air Conditioners or Tires. Please contact your trash hauler directly for disposal options on items not accepted. USED SYRINGE COLLECTION at BEAUMONT MEDICAL CENTER - FRIDAY, April 27, 2012, from 11:00 am.-1:00 pm A free community service for the collection of home-generated needles, syringes and lancets. All needles, syringes and lancets must be placed in rigid containers with lids. For further information call Matthew Gillette at: 248-898-3680. Location of event is: Beaumont Medical Center (rear loading dock), 6900 Orchard Lake Road, West Bloomfield - DO NOT BRING SYRINGES TO THE CIVIC CENTER SITE; FOR PUBLIC HEALTH REASONS, WE ARE UNABLE TO ACCEPT THEM AT THIS LOCATION. S.C. 4-25-12


PAGE 46

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF COMMERCE 2009 TOWNSHIP DRIVE COMMERCE TOWNSHIP, MI 48390

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY Oakley Latham Dust Control S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Township Board of the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan, will meet at a Regular Board meeting on 8th day of May, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., at the Township Hall, located at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390, to determine if the following Special Assessment Districts will be reestablished and to receive PUBLIC COMMENTS, if any, regarding reestablishment of the following Special Assessment Districts: Burnet Road Dust Control S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Ford Road Dust Control S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Idlewild Dust Control S.A.D.

Village of Commerce Dust Control S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Massena/Grove/ Greenlawn Dust Control S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Luneta Court Dust Control S.A.D. Property Description: The S.A.D.shall include the following parcels:

Plans showing the improvements, the locations, and the legal descriptions are on file with the Township Clerk for public examination. These Special Assessment Districts is being reestablished to continue financing the costs of dust control measures within the Districts. The costs associated with the proposed Special Assessment Districts are of such a nature that periodic redeterminations of the costs will be made from time to time without further notice to record owners or parties with an interest in property located within the Special Assessment Districts. In order to appeal the amount of any special assessment, affected owners or parties with an interest must protest the proposed assessment. This may be done by appearing in person at the hearing or having an agent appear at the hearing on behalf of an owner or party in interest, or in writing by filing a letter of protest before the hearing, addressed to the Township Clerk at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390. An owner or party having an interest in the real property affected by the special assessment may file a written appeal of the special assessment with the Michigan Tax Tribunal within 30 days after the confirmation of the special assessment roll if the special assessment is protested at the hearing held for the purpose of confirming the special assessment roll. Please direct any questions you may have to the Charter Township of Commerce Building Department at (248) 960-7060. Daniel Munro, Clerk Charter Township of Commerce

SC: 4/25/12, 5/2/12


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

CITY OF ORCHARD LAKE VILLAGE

COMMUNITY LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at the April 16, 2012 Regular Meeting of the City of Orchard Lake Village Council the second reading and adoption was held on the amendments to the Woodlands Tree Preservation Ordinance No. 12.07.00 The ordinance provisions will take effect ten (10) days following publication of this notice. Complete copies of the full text of Ordinance No. 12.07.00 are available for inspection by and distribution to the public between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at City Hall. Rhonda R. McClellan CityClerk@CityofOrchardLake.com SC 4-25-12

CITY OF ORCHARD LAKE VILLAGE

SUMMARY OF THE REGULAR COUNCIL MEETING April 16, 2012 At the April 16, 2012 Regular Council Meeting, Council took the following action: • Approved a request to the Zoning Board of Appeals for a lakeside setback variance for construction of an addition at 3330 Wards Pointe; • Appointed Planning Commissioners; • Approved the Sheriff’s contract for St. Mary’s Fair; • Approved the business license for St. Mary’s Rowing Regatta; • Authorized renewal of several business licenses; • Accepted bid for City Hall lawn maintenance; • Held the first reading revisions to the Animal and Dog Control Ordinance; • Held the first reading of the Super Drunk Ordinance; • Held the second reading and adoption to modifications of the Woodlands Tree Preservation Ordinance; • Appointed Election Commissioners; • Accepted the proposed 2012-13 Budgets and scheduled a Public Hearing on the budgets at the May 21, 2012 Regular Meeting • Approved the Master Plan for distribution; • Approved fees added to the tax roll; • Held a roll call vote for a Closed Meeting regarding pending litigation; and • Accepted all department reports. Bruce H. McIntrye, Mayor

Rhonda R. McClellan, City Clerk S.C. 4-25-12

CITY OF WIXOM

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

PAGE 47

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The West Bloomfield Township Woodland Review Board will hold a public hearing at the Township Board Room, 4550 Walnut Lake Road on Wednesday, May 2, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following Woodland Permit Applications: CASE #PWD11-0270 CRYSTAL HOMES Parcel: Lot 143, Wyndham Pointe Sidwell #18-30-277-014 Location: 5650 Branford Dr. Request: An after-the-fact request for restoration of disturbance within a recorded woodland preservation area. Applicant: Crystal Homes, Inc. CASE #PWD11-0271 CRYSTAL HOMES Parcel: Lot 141, Wyndham Pointe Sidwell #18-30-277-012 Location: 5658 Branford Dr. Request: An after-the-fact request for restoration of disturbance within a recorded woodland preservation area. Applicant: Crystal Homes, Inc. CASE #PWD12-0273 LOYER Parcel: Lot 87, The Hills of Chelsea Park No. 3 Sidwell #18-32-153-003 Location: 6866 Carlyle Crossing Request: An after-the-fact request to maintain an existing lawn, sections of brick paver patios and the planting of a tree within a recorded woodland preservation area. Applicant: Vince Loyer CASE #PWD12-0274 DTE ENERGY Parcel: Lot 31, 32, & 33, West Bloomfield Estates Sidwell #18-33-301-003, #18-33-301-004, #18-33-301-005 Location: 7160 Muerdale, 7180 Muerdale, 7200 Muerdale Request: A request to remove more than two (2) trees six (6) inches or larger in diameter within a thirty (30)-foot length of a proposed woodland construction envelope for an essential service/utility. Applicant: DTE Energy CASE #PWD12-0275 FLOAREA Parcel: Lot 260, Maple Creek Sidwell #18-34-251-005 Location: 6974 Falcon Ct Request: An after-the-fact request to remove a drainage pipe and restore disturbances within a woodland preservation area. Applicant: Jason Floarea CASE #PWD12-0276 COLEY Parcel: Lot 8, North Woods Forest Sidwell #18-21-103-008 Location: 4558 Forest Edge Ln Request: An after-the-fact request for tree cutting, maintained lawn/playscape and disturbances within a recorded woodland preservation area. Applicant: Ricky and Deniece Coley Detailed plans are available for inspection at the West Bloomfield Township Environmental Department, 4550 Walnut Lake Road, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. A staff report, as prepared for the Woodland Review Board, will be available for review the Friday prior to the meeting. If you have any questions on this matter, contact the Environmental Department at (248) 451-4818. John Roda, Environmental Manager

The Wixom Zoning Board of Appeals will conduct the following public hearings at their next regular meeting scheduled for Monday, May 14, 2012 for the following topics:

S.C. 4.25.12

ZBA CASE #011-12: GENERAL RV CENTER. 48500 TWELVE MILE ROAD, WIXOM, MI 48393: The applicant is seeking a temporary use permit to erect balloon figures and 2 vinyl signs for each event. The events are scheduled for the following dates: 5/16/12, 6/18/12, 7/16/12, 8/20/12 with each event lasting one week. The Wixom Municipal Code, Section 18.22.060, requires approval from the Zoning Board of Appeals for this request. The property is located at 48500 Twelve Mile Road and zoned B-3, General Business. The tax parcel number is 22-08376-031.

The Township will provide necessary, reasonable auxiliary aids and services to individuals with disabilities at a public meeting upon two weeks notice in writing or by calling the Township Clerk or Environmental Director at (248) 451-4800.

ZBA CASE #012-12: ENTA SUPPLY COMPANY, 29949 BECK ROAD, WIXOM, MI 48393: The applicant is seeking a temporary use permit to conduct a parking lot sale on June 9 & 10, 2012. The Wixom Municipal Code, Section 18.22.060, requires approval from the Zoning Board of Appeals for this request. The property is located at 29949 Beck Road and zoned M-1, Light Industrial. The tax parcel number is 22-05-0476-016.

NOTICE OF ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS

ZBA CASE #013-12: PATRICK BISSETT, 39402 VILLAGE RUN DR., NORTHVILLE, MI 48168: The applicant is seeking a temporary use permit to have a grill outside and serve food inside the Wixom Market for one year. The Wixom Municipal Code, Section 18.22.060, requires approval from the Zoning Board of Appeals for this request. The property is located at 31100 Wixom Road and zoned VCA, Village Center Area. The tax parcel number is 2205-105-015. The Zoning Board of Appeals meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will be held in Wixom Council Chambers, 49045 Pontiac Trail. Persons having any questions regarding these matters are urged to attend this meeting or contact the Building Department at (248) 624-0880. Catherine Buck, City Clerk City of Wixom (248) 624-4557 S.C. 4-25-12

NOTICE TO THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THE CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF WEST BLOOMFIELD Notice is hereby given that the Public Accuracy Test for the May 8, 2012 Special Election for the Bloomfield Hills School District has been scheduled for Thursday, May 3, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. in the Township Hall at 4550 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield, Michigan. The Public Accuracy Test is conducted to demonstrate that the computer program used to record and count the votes cast at the election meets the requirements of law.

CATHERINE SHAUGHNESSY TOWNSHIP CLERK West Bloomfield Township 248-451-4848 S.C. 4-25-12

VILLAGE OF WOLVERINE LAKE

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to Michigan Public Act 110 of 2006, the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act, as amended, the Village of Wolverine Lake Zoning Board of Appeals will consider the following appeal at their Regular Meeting on Tuesday, May 15, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at 425 Glengary, Wolverine Lake, Michigan 48390. ZBA CASE #12-604 Douglas & Amber Sirls, 2306 Indiana, Wolverine Lake, MI 48390 BASIS FOR APPEAL: 1270.08(b)(1)D.1 Ordinance requires fences located in a required or unrequired front yard not to exceed 30” in height. Applicants proposes to install a 6’ front yard fence. Sharon A. Miller Village Clerk

SC: 04-25-12


WEST OAKLAND SUPER WANT ADS SUPER RATES! SUPER REACH! IN PRINT and On-Line 24/7 WANT ADS APPEAR ON www.spinalcolumnonline.com

NOTICES 01-08

REAL ESTATE 12-22

MOBILE HOMES 42-43

RENTALS 45-57

ABSOLUTELY FREE WANT ADS • Absolutely Free (#90): An item must be offered FREE to appear in this category. The want ad is FREE to you. One item per ad, one ad per family on any given week. Column is for non-commercial ads only. • Items under $25: Advertise an item for $25 or less and a 10-word want ad is FREE. Special rates for items over $25. • Used Vehicle: Five weeks FREE for private party vehicles. Charge your first week and we schedule it for 5 more weeks. Call to cancel when sold. • Found: Found a lost item? We will run an ad for FREE (#3/Found) to help you find the owner.

MERCHANDISE 89-138

LEISURE TIME 142-159

RECREATION

BOATS 162-179

CARS, TRUCKS CYCLES 181-196

• Reunions (#4): Published FREE for 4 weeks.

HELP WANTED 60-75

JOBS WANTED 77-86

HIGHLIGHT YOUR AD For further emphasis add an icon or shade your ad for only $5.

☺★

GARAGE SALE KITS – With payment for your advertisement you get a FREE Garage Sale Kit with street signs, balloons, price stickers and tips on having a successful garage sale.

PERSONAL

SERVICES

REPAIR IMPROVEMENT

SERVICES

DEADLINES PHONE 248.360.7355 Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5 FAX 24/7

MONDAY AT 5 • Word Ads • One-Column Ads

FRIDAY AT 5 • Display Ads • Free Ads • Cancellations/Corrections

CHARGE IT

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE Advertising published is subject to rate card or contract conditions, copies of which are available from the publishing group. Ads are subject to approval before publication, only publication constitutes acceptance. We reserve the right to edit, reject, cancel or reclassify any ad. If an error by the newspaper should occur, the newspaper’s responsibility for that portion of the advertisement in error is limited to cancellation of the charge or publication in the following issue. The publishing group shall not be liable for any loss or expense that results from publication or omission of an advertisement.


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

NOTICES Bulletin Board

1



Houses For Sale

SUPPORT WOMEN POLICE Paid for by Gerald Plas

Reunions

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

4

West Oakland area school reunions. FREE for 4 weeks within a 13 week period (27 word limit). Other Reunions Published 4 weeks for a total cost of $20 for 15 words; each additional 4 words $2.

SPRING CLEANING? Let us Help you get the job done by the help listing those unwanted items in the Classified Section. Call 248-360-SELL. Get the Results

11

NOW is the time to: •PURCHASE A NEW HOME •SELL YOUR CURRENT ONE. Contact Arlene at Keller WIlliams for more details

248-912-4628 mihome4u.com Hartland

 LAKEFRONT OPPORTUNITY! Private hilltop setting & scenic views of all sports Maxfield Lake. Comfortable 1500 sq. ft. home w/3 bedrooms. Living room, family room & Florida room. Many updates! $138,000.

England Real Estate (248)887-9736

Hartland

 PEACEFUL SETTING! Wonderful home on 2.4 acres. 2600 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2 1/ 2 baths, kitchen/dining area w/ snack bar & wood floors. Formal dining, living room, great room with stone fireplace, 1st floor office, walk-out basement. Finished 3 car garage. $320,000.

England Real Estate (248)887-9736 Highland

MOBILE HOMES Mobile Homes for Sale

Houses/ Condos

PAGE 49 55

WEST BLOOMFIELD 42

Fawn Lake Pontiac Trail at Maple Pre-Owned Homes: $6,000 - $25,000 Rent: $385 - $400

PLUS MOVE-IN DISCOUNTS On Select Homes

(248) 624-0709

960 sq.ft. ranch on golf course, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, basement, 2 car attached garage, Walled Lake Schools, beach access available. $925 per month

248-669-9170 Looking to rent a house or condo?

call Arlene Keller Williams Realty mihome4u.com 248-912-4628 Apartments

56

LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT! Desirable Dunham Lake access w/this gorgeous 1.5 story home situated on 1 acre setting. Well planned with 3076 sq. ft. Gorgeous kitchen w/butler’s pantry, granite counters & terrazzo floor. Spacious great room w/2 story see through stone masonry fireplace. 1st floor master suite. 1338 sq. ft. in finished w/o LL includes family room w/fireplace & addl. 2 car garage/ workshop. Extensive landscaping. $499,000.

England Real Estate (248)887-9736

RENTALS Houses/ Condos

55

COMMERCE 3 bedroom ranch, 2.5 bath, 2 car attach garage, deck, fireplace, finished basement.

$1,350/ mo After 7pm 248-360-7702

Highland Newly renovated, small complex in quiet area. Separate entrances. 2 bedroom, available May 1st. Duck Lake and Warlow, No pets. 3434 Oakridge $525/mo.

248-514-5858

Milford Road/ 96 Area Newly renovated deluxe 2 bed apartment available in quiet country setting. $650 per month plus security. No pets

248-553-4466

HELP WANTED General/ Help Wanted

65

CHILD CARE CENTER Seeking Child Care Provider. Early childhood or child related field degree preferred. 35-40 hours a week. Must be able to work until 6 p.m. Commerce Twp area. Call 10a.m.-3p.m.

248-669-6880 REAL ESTATE POSITION OPENING •In-house personalized training. •Flexible work hours w/ unlim ited earning potential. •Agent-friendly commission plans. •Benefits Program, including retirement. •Your own in-house marketing assistant. Achieve a quality of life tailored to meet your professional goals. Contact: Kathy Solan

248-363-8300 248-348-6430 kathysolan@ realestateone.com

General/ Help Wanted

65

DH TOOL & DIE In Commerce, MI 48390, needs

Grinder Hand/Surface for die details, minimum five years experience. Full benefits.

Call 248-363-5115 Fax 248-363-6444 Email d.h.die@sbcglobal.net

OFFICE CLEANING

248-313-9880

DRY CLEANER

Looking for Counter Help

Cement Contractor with 30 years Experience in Wixom Marcucci Construction Needs: 1 general laborer 1 experience cement finisher Pay based on experience.

248-486-5900 marcucciconstructioninc.com

The Independence Village of White Lake Is now hiring for P/T Cook Apply in person at: 935 Union Lake Road or fax resume: 248-360-7626 Attn: Jason EOE

67

DIRECT CARE Both full time and part time. Up to $9.03 per hour to start, with Benefits. Small group home setting. Must be Patient & Reliable.

Holly Area

74

PART TIME landscaping helpUp to 5 hours per day in the afternoon. 5 to 6 days per week. No experience necessary. West Bloomfield. 248326-1898

Busy Podiatrist Office in Waterford seeking detail oriented, outgoing assistant with computer skills. previous medical office experience preferred.

Fax resume to: 248-666-7709

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE Used/Wanted

89

Office/ Clerical

Aluminum .30-.60¢/lb. Copper $2.00-$2.60/lb. Brass .80¢- 1.50/lb. Auto Rads. .80¢-1.10/lb. 1011 Decker, Walled Lk

69

SECRETARY Full time secretary needed for manufactured home community in Wixom. Good computer skills & general office skills required. Must like working with the public. Fax resume to Tom @ 248-684-0953

Mann Metals Corp. (248)960-1200 SEA-DOO JET Skis wanted dead or dying. 1995 on ups. $200- $1400. Top $ for XP's & 947/951 or larger motors. Call Steve at 231-943-4152

Municipal Accountant

and Presser. Full or Part Time. 248-694-4933

248-486-5368

Part Time/ Temporary

67

SCRAP METAL

EVENING HOURS MONDAY- FRIDAY NOVI AREA/ CORPORATE CLEANING GROUP

Medical/ Dental

Medical/ Dental

Milford Township is accepting candidates for a full-time accounting position. Duties include governmental accounting and budgeting and general office duties. Prefer municipal accounting and software experience and/or related Associates Degree. For consideration submit in person or by mail a letter of interest, resume and references with salary requirements (EOE) to the Charter Township of Milford, Clerk’s Office, 1100 Atlantic Street, Milford, Michigan, 48381 by May 11, 2012. Job description is available upon request, 248-685-8731. S.C. 4-25 & 5-2-12

CAMP DEARBORN

Summer Employment POSITION

RATE

Camp Laborers $8.00/hr. Lifeguards $8.50/hr. Concession Helper $7.40/hr. Recreation Assistant $8.00/hr. Bookkeeping Assistant $8.00/hr. Camp Cashier $8.00/hr. Head Lifeguard $10.00/hr.

MINIMUM AGE

18 16 16 16 16 16 16

Details of positions and applications are available at Camp Dearborn, 1700 General Motors Road, Milford (248) 684-6000 or at City of Dearborn, Human Resources Department, 4500 Maple, Dearborn, MI 48126, or www.cityofdearborn.org. EOE


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CUSTOM BUILT ALL SPORTS MACEDAY LAKEFRONT •4 bed, 4 ba, all brick, fin w/o, 5,200 sq ft •1st & 2nd flr master, volume rooms, 3 car #211017553 EXT. #296 •KEY #248341

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Zillow - Preferred Agent

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$139,900

$139,000 SHARP RANCH - LARGE BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED LOT •1,408 sq ft, 3 bed, 2 ba, oversized 2 car gar •1st flr laundry, lg shed, patio, Walled Lk schools #212011148 EXT. #285 •KEY #fm256j

$378,800

$385,000 10+ ACRE HORSE/HERB FARM WITH CIRCA 1880 FARMHOUSE •2,200 sq ft 2 sty, 4 bed, 2 ba, full basement •14 stall barn, 10 fenced pastures, coop, 8 car #212034718 EXT. #201•KEY #248379

Janet Direct: Steve Direct: 248-755-7600 248-755-7500

$294,900

$495,000 RARE BUILDING OPPORTUNITY ALL-SPORTS UNION LAKEFRONT •75’ sandy shoreline, 200’ deep lot, seawall •Possible walkout site, existing 2br, 2ba home #212017000 EXT. #205 •KEY #248367 . WP ET RC E MM CO

$574,900

VI NO

GORGEOUS, MOVE-IN READY 2-STORY WITH FENCED YARD •1,849 sq ft, 4 bed, 2.5 ba, LR, DR & FR •Big mstr., fp, vaulted rms, huge deck, 2 car #212034288 EXT. #289•KEY #266255

D IEL MF O BLO ST WE

P. TW CE ER M M CO

CLIFFS OF LOON LAKE SUB – SUB BEACH AND PARK •2,515 sq ft, 4 bed, 2.5 ba, granite hardwood •SS appl., 3 car, part f-bsmt, in-ground pool #212034421 EXT. #214 •KEY #268871

$374,900 CUSTOM QUALITY BUILT 1.14 PRIVATE ACRE ESTATE •FF master, 4 bed, 4 full ba, 2,900 sq ft •Fin. daylight bsmt, 3 car, 35’x30’ workshop #211110916 EXT. #241•KEY #248360

$399,900

UPPER STRAITS LAKEFRONT INVESTMENT SPECIAL •4 bed, 3.5 ba, 2,746 sq ft + f-bmt, 1st fl mstr •Wet bar, deck, 2nd buildable lot + 4 other lots #212032232 EXT. #245 •KEY #260513

$344,900

OR

. WP ET RC E MM CO

HILLS OF BOGIE LAKE SUB CLUBHOUSE AND POOL •3,303 sq ft + fin daylight bsmt, 5 bed, 4.5 ba •Ff laundry, 3 car gar., large raised deck #211116381 EXT. #255•KEY #267493

M XO WI

HURON HILL SUB - WAY BACK IN SUB TREED PRIVATE LOT •2 story w/2,594 sq. ft., 4 lg. bed, 2.5 baths •Fp, ff laundry, 3+ car, part fin daylight bsmt #212037708 EXT. #224•KEY #248384

F TER WA

Lakes Area’s #1 Team!

LD FIE OM O BL

$318,900 66 FT. OF ALL-SPORTS WOLVERINE LAKEFRONT SPECIAL •1,900+ sq ft, 3 bed, 2 full + 2 half ba, 2 sty •Fin. walkout, fp, tiered decking, 2+ car #212037690 EXT. #206•KEY #248398

2900 Union Lake, Suite 210, Commerce, MI 48382

STUNNING 90 FT. OF MAIN LAKEFRONT ALL-SPORTS CASS LAKE •2,778 sq ft, 3 bed, 2.5 ba, 2 fp, jet tub mstr. •2+ gar, 3 decks, dock, shed, W. B. schools #212009502 EXT. #231 • KEY #248358

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STONE HOLLOW SUB - CUSTOM BUILT 2.62 ACRE LOT •5 bed, 3.5 ba, 3,671 sq ft+1,627 sq. ft. w/o •Attached 3 car + 2.5 car carriage house gar #211127827 EXT. #265 • KEY #248347

$499,900

$449,900

ILL

V RD

$725,000

248-366-7200

LD FIE OM LO B ST WE

BIRKDALE SUB - 2006 BUILT - STATELY 2 STORY - BACK TO TREES •3,679 sq. ft. with 4 bed, 3 full+2 half baths •Daylight bsmt, 3 car gar, deck, ff laundry #212036689 EXT. #230•KEY #248392

E RIN

P. TW RD O LF MI

$759,900

$289,900 DEEDED BOAT DOCK ALL-SPORTS COMMERCE LAKE •2,417 sq ft, fin lower level, 4 bed, 3.5 ba •Lg treed lot, elev. deck, Walled Lake schools #212041147 EXT. #229 •KEY #248374

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

janet@TheStocktonTeam.com

. WP ET RC E MM CO

steve@TheStocktonTeam.com

800-396-5204 + Ext. # for recorded message Text Key # to 90210 for text message Call today for a private consultation.

ALL-SPORTS UNION LAKEFRONT SPECIAL •2-3 bedroom brick ranch, fin w/o, brick fp •2 car attached gar, elevated deck, patio #212034479 EXT. #215•KEY #276273 . WP DT OR F TER WA

$199,900

$219,900

GORGEOUS GERUNDEGUT BAY WALKOUT RANCH ON ALL-SPORTS CASS LAKE ALL-SPORTS CLARK & CARROLL LAKES •1,353 sq ft + 950 sq ft in fin. w/o, 3 bed, 2 ba •Remodeled ranch, stone fp, dining rm •2 fp, mstr w/ba, courtyard garage, shed •Corian counter kitch, tile, crown molding #212027022 EXT. #243•KEY #264094 #211103417 EXT. #280•KEY #248373

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$164,900

$79,900

SPACIOUS COLONIAL WITH LARGE BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED DECK ON NICELY TREED LOT CONDOMINIUM TOWNHOUSE •1,933 sq ft, 3 bed, 1.5 ba, bsmt, ff laundry, fp •2 bed, 1.5 ba + fin-bsmt, granite kitch •FR, master w/walk-in closet & bath access •Ceramic/hdwd, LC terms, clubhouse, pool #212026605 EXT. #279 •KEY #256965 #212009441 EXT. #259 •KEY #262565

With property inventory down, mortgage rates remain low and home pricing on the rise...

There’s No Better Time To Sell! We are full time professionals... •Meeting Client’s Needs Since 1977 •Dedicated Listing & Buyer’s Agents •150+ Negotiated/Closed “Short Sales”

Our performance speaks for itself!

www.TheStocktonTeam.com


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

EN OP

PAGE 51

-3 Y1 DA N SU

– MILFORD VILLAGE – CHARMING AND WELL UPDATED HISTORIC HOME JUST 2 BLOCKS FROM DOWNTOWN! 210111484 $249,900

– 1150 WINDMILL - HARTLAND – BEAUTIFUL FENCED 10 ACRES COUNTRY LIVING IN THE CITY! 212039423 $229,900

– HIGHLAND – ENDLESS, CAPTIVATING VIEW OF WHITE LAKE! 211111348 $369,900

– NORTHVILLE – SHORT DISTANCE TO QUAINT DOWNTOWN NORTHVILLE! 211114550

– HIGHLAND – ALL UPDATED SUPER COTTAGE WITH 125 SQ. FRONTAGE ON DUCK LAKE CANAL! 212007826 $120,000

– HIGHLAND – PRISTINE! BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED! 4 BEDROOMS, 2.1 BATHS - MOVE IN READY! 212009879 $290,000

– HIGHLAND – A HIDDEN JEWEL ON LOW TRAFFIC ALL-SPORTS HIGHLAND LAKE! 212012906 $224,900

– HIGHLAND – WATERFRONT HOME ON ALL-SPORTS, PRIVATE HIGHLAND LAKE! 212020231 $185,000

– TROY – QUALITY BUILT, SPRAWLING RANCH WITH OPEN FLOOR PLAN 212023460 $199,000

– MILFORD – SPACIOUS HOME, CLOSE TO THE VILLAGE OF MILFORD 212025808

$229,000

– HIGHLAND – STUNNING HOME ON 540 ACRE ALL-SPORTS WHITE LAKE! 212026900 $299,900

– HIGHLAND – ADORABLE AND CHARMING 3 BEDROOM CAPE COD. NEW KITCHEN WITH ALL APPLIANCES. 212028986 $109,900

– HIGHLAND – BENCHMARK HOMES PRESENTS 4 BEDROOM, 2.1 BATH COLONIAL ON 1 ACRE IN PINE BLUFFS 212029437 $275,000

– HOWELL – BEAUTIFUL RANCH WITH LAKE PRIVILEGES ON ALL-SPORTS CROOKED LAKE 212030060 $205,000

– HARTLAND – SPACIOUS AND SUPERBLY MAINTAINED LAKE PRIVILEGES ON DUNHAM LAKE 212030064 $210,000

– HIGHLAND – UPDATED HISTORIC FARMHOUSE JUST A BLOCK FROM DOWNTOWN 212032612 $105,000

– HIGHLAND – WELL PLANNED DESIGN, ATTENTION TO DETAIL. MAPLE & GRANITE KITCHEN 212032857 $304,900

– WHITE LAKE – HISTORIC HOME BUILT 1837 WITH ADDITIONS NICE ACREAGE, HUGE WORKSHOP 212035127 $119,900

– MILFORD – CUSTOM BUILT WITH HUGE FINISHED WALKOUT ON 1.79 WOODED ACRES WITH POLE BARN 212036298 $390,000

– HIGHLAND – FANTASTIC ACREAGE WITH PICTURESQUE POND, ROOM FOR HORSES & OUTBUILDINGS 212037729 $449,000

560 N. Milford Rd., Milford • 248.684.1065 ~ Serving Milford & Surrounding Areas

$238,000

©Real Estate One, Inc., 2012


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211131493 - $148,000

212036099 - $229,900

211101478 - $149,900

212035943 - $259,000

212035786 - $119,900

SPACIOUS, UPDATED HOME 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, lake privileges, finished basement

SWEET HOME + 1 ACRE LOT 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, master suite with walk-in, nature area, 2 level deck.

OLD WORLD CHARM TUDOR 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, coved ceilings, lake privileges

ALL-SPORTS LAKEFRONT 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2 fireplaces, 1,900 sq. ft., 1st floor laundry

ALMOST AN ACRE 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, hardwood floors, 2 bay windows

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212021785 - $154,900

212034537 - $119,900

212000049 - $124,900

212014288 - $160,000

212030979 - $719,500

LOVELY COLONIAL 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, first floor laundry, 3 season sunroom

WELCOME HOME-SPLIT RANCH 3 bedrooms, 1.1 baths, open floor plan, master suite, beautifully finished basement

GORGEOUS SETTING 2.2 ACRES 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, master 2 closets, barn/shed

BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED CONDO 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, hardwood floors, granite counter tops, spacious floor plan, finished basement

SPECTACULAR MIDDLE STRAITS WATERFRONT 4 bedrooms, 3.2 baths, kitchen newly remodeled, master suite, theatre room, many extras

RD FO TER A W

FEATURED HOME

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OF THE WEEK

211125980 - $189,900

212033689 - $159,900

ALL-SPORTS WILLIAMS LAKE 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, summer get away, possible walkout, nicely landscaped, brick pavers

COME ON OUT TO THE COUNTRY!! 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, woodstove, almost 2 acres, 3 car garage

D IEL MF LOO B ST WE

211112421 - $170,000

WELL MAINTAINED RANCH 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, kitchen and dining open to family room, deck, patio and large yard DL LLE WA

AKE

212033689 - $400,000 ITE WH

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NEW ENGLAND CHARM 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, 1.5 acres with pond, walkout finished basement CE ER MM CO

CE ER MM CO

LEY RK BE

211108336 - $59,900 CHARMING BUNGALOW/RANCH 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, updated kitchen and bath, fenced private yard L ITE WH

212035551 - $299,000

COMMERCE LAKEFRONT 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, almost 3/4 acre, finished walkout

212035487 - $59,000 R BO AR OH G E KE

E AK

212034531 - $307,660

212020077 - $276,000

CRANBERRY LAKE COLONIAL 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, gourmet kitchen, master suite fireplace, beautiful lot

BOATING/SWIMMING/LAKE SHERWOOD 3 bedroom, 3.1 bath, contemporary, vault ceilings, wood and ceramic, gazebo w/hot tub

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212035679 - $158,800

212025628 - $100,000

211048408 - $100,000

212022600 - $159,900

212032442 - $249,900

LARGE FENCED YARD 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, nat. fireplace, doorwall to deck, all appliances, lower lvl. poss. 4th bedroom

MANDON LAKEFRONT 2 bedrooms, 1 bath remodeled in 2009, large deck, shed

ADDITIONAL LOT 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, brick, vinyl, ranch, 2 car garage

ELEGANT CONDO 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, two story foyer, hardwood floors

SHOWS LIKE A GEM 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, dream kitchen, family room with fireplace

D IEL MF LOO B ST WE

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212033998 - $660,000

212030086 - $59,000

211099179 - $219,000

211128969 - $177,000

211124998 - $235,000

SPECTACULAR GREEN LAKE FRONTAGE 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, oversized bedrooms, 2 suites, heated Florida room, million dollar views

UPDATED RANCH 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, property consists of 3 lots, 2 car garage and separate workshop

TRANQUIL SETTING ON CROSS LAKE 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, Up North feeling, beautiful clean interior

CENTENNIAL FARMHOUSE 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, family/parlor with fireplace, over an acre

EXPANSIVE LAKEFRONT! 3 bedrooms, 1.1 baths, remodeled and updated, new furnace, Florida room, fireplace

Denotes a Real Estate One Virtual Tour

Lakes Area (248) 363-8300 • www.RealEstateOne.com

©Real Estate One, Inc., 2012


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

SUSI GOLLINGER

PAGE 53

BECKY KATZMAN McCARTHY

248-790-9915

Associate Broker - A.B.R.

(248) 310-9002

Lakes Area Specialist

susigollinger@hotmail.com

rmccarthy@RealEstateOne.com ING

ND

LEASE $2,000 – MILFORD 2,970 sq. ft. home on 2 acres plus. Freshly painted and cleaned. All appliances. Walk out basement. Need $3,000 sec. dep. and first month rent to move in. One dog o.k. No cats and no smoking in home. (S.G. 1365 OH)

PE

ALL-SPORTS LAKEFRONT WITH GORGEOUS VIEWS! Approx. 1,900 sq. ft. 4 br, 2.1 ba, newer roof, dock. $259,000. For all showings call Becky.

ALL-SPORTS LAKEFRONT! Approx. 1,700 sq. ft., of living area, 2 br. 2 full ba, spacious kitchen with island,living room with gorgeous views of the lake, 2 car detached garage, new well and hot water heater in 2011. $169,000. Call Becky for details.

ND EK D A WE TE IN 1 S I L D L SO

FOR ALL SHOWINGS CALL SUSI

CHERYL YEAGER

DEBI ISAAC

AUDREY STOREY

cherylyeager.com cherylyeager@yahoo.com

disaac21@comcast.net

audreystorey@yahoo.com

248-505-6911

248-310-8077 KE L A NT E T O I WH KEFR A L

LEASE - NOVI CONDO $1,050 - INCLUDES GAS & WATER 2 bedrooms, 1 bath - Beautiful upper unit, fresh paint, carpet 2011, updated fixtures and bath. Balcony from eating area. 1 car garage. Located near pool and tennis courts. Convenient location to freeways, dining and shopping. CY23578NR Denotes a Real Estate One Virtual Tour

LAKEFRONT ON WHITE LAKE New England style 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 story lakefront with over 2,700 sq. ft. on White Lake. One of the best spots on the lake with your own piece of paradise. Surrounded by professionally landscaped grounds and extensive pavers lakeside with outdoor kitchen and fire pit. Perfect place on the lake to watch the fireworks. Great open floor plan to entertain family and friends with panoramic view of lake. Master suite lakeside with balcony, doorwall, built ins, jetted tub. Heated ceramic floors and more. Code LA325DI $469,900

Lakes Area (248) 363-8300 • 8430 Richardson

248-363-8300 Ext. 233 248-496-1846

OPEN SUNDAY, APRIL 29TH, 1-3 PM

ALMOST 2 ACRES Nestled among the apple trees is this charming Cape Cod in Milford. Three bedrooms, 2 full baths, almost 3 car garage, spacious great room with doorwall. First floor bedroom and laundry area. Dining room featuring hardwood floors. Huron Valley Schools. $159,900. (AS 3162M) ©Real Estate One, Inc., 2012


PAGE 54

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Used/Wanted

89

Garage Sales

103

COMMERCE

THOSE COLLEGE STUDENTS Junk Removal

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, Saturday 9-5 1515 Robell corner Crumb and Robell. Large variety of items.

Rummage Sale & Bake Sale

Attics, Garages, etc. All your Removal needs 248-250-2164

Thursday, 4/26: 9-4, Friday, 4/ 27: 9-4, Saturday, 4/28: 9-12 bag day on Sat $3.00 a bag

Commerce United Methodist Church 1155 N. Commerce Road 248-363-3935

Absolutely Free

90

HUGE 3 FAMILY YARDSALE

Items must be FREE to respondents, ad free to you. Restricted to residential. The publishing group accepts no responsibility for actions between individuals.

Friday, April 27th, Saturday, April 28th Sunday, April 29th 9-5 2800 Brisbane Glengary & Benstein

Sorry, we do not accept ads for free dogs.

MILFORD

BLACK FEMALE cat, prefers males free to good home. 248207-8993 FREE upright piano and bench, needs to be tuned, you pick up. 248-563-8698 RESCUED CATS- Youngest is 9 months old. All are fixed, bathed, & dewormed. 248738-4901 or 248-214-9898

MOVING SALE: Noon-4p.m. Friday, & 8a.m.-2p.m. Saturday, 1491 Hidden Valley Drive. Take North Milford Road to Rowe Road. Furniture, toys, household items. ZANY MISCELLANY TMS Sale: April 26-28 9a.m.-5p.m. 3870 Foxthorn Court. Storage Wars meets Cash and Cari. Our first garage sale of the year. Something for everyone. Get details, map, and pictures at zanymisc.com

CARS - TRUCKS - VANS -CYCLES Pre-pay the first insertion (American Express, Mastercard, Visa, check or money order) and in the unlikely event it is still unsold, we will publish it FREE until you wave it goodbye, then just call and cancel the ad.

248-360-SELL (Private parties/non-commercial accounts only)

Garage Sales

103

MILFORD MOVING SALE: Noon-4p.m. Friday, & 8a.m.-2p.m. Saturday, 1491 Hidden Valley Drive. Take North Milford Road to Rowe Road. Furniture, toys, household items. WALLED LAKE ANTIQUES, CLOTHES, Furniture, something for everyone. 1679 Bolton. Thursday thru Saturday 9-6 WATERFORD INFANT/ TODDLER clothing boys/ girls, pack and play, toys, stroller, household items. 395 & 399 Cove View Drive 9-4, Thursday, Friday, if needed Saturday. RUMMAGE SALE Donations taken by May 2 May 3- 9a.m. to 7 p.m. May 4- 9a.m. to 4p.m May 5- Bag sale 9a.m.-noon Four Towns United Methodist Church 6451 Cooley Lake Road Waterford, MI WEST BLOOMFIELD THURSDAY THRU Saturday, 10am-5pm. 3945 Beach Terrace, 48323. Teen boy clothing, home accessories, 1989 18' Thompson boat, etc. WHITE L A K E MOVING HUGE, 9400 Thornyside, April 28th 9am-6pm, & 29th 9am-3pm. LET US HELP YOU SPREAD THE WORD for your Garage Sale. Call today 248.360.7255

Clothing/Apparel

119

WEDDING DRESS- Brand new- never been worn. Size 6, cream colored, strapless Aline, heart bodice, crystals on bodice, hem & train. Original price $1,000 asking $500 or OBO. Walled Lake. 248-6248857

Furniture/Rugs

125

WHITE ENTERTAINMENT Center, new, ready to assemble, 38 1/8 inch wide x 20 1/4 inch high x 14 7/8 inch deep. $20. 248-623-2661

Stuff/Infants

132

BABY bassinet, white with navy trim, $15. 248-7623625

Odds N Ends

138

7 ALUMINUM Windows with frame and screens. $35 each 248-887-5945 $20 PREPAID Phone card for only $10- I can give you a 1800 number to verify, expires June 13, 2013. 248-6232661. CHILDS BODY Glove swim trainer suit, 30-40lbs $24 248-360-8485 FOUR DRAWER Metal filing cabinet $20 517-294-4206 Walled Lake KOHLER KITCHEN 2 tub cast iron sink, white $24.99 248-425-1004 NIKE Shox size 7 women, $10 retail $105. 248-960-7285 STOVE TOP ESPRESSO Maker, European, tin. $10 248-534-7004 WESTINGHOUSE AUTOMATIC extra tall can opener, brand new in box. $7.50 248-623-2661

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

BOATS/ OUTDOOR Wanted Boats/ Jet Skis/ Parts

162

SEA-DOO JET SKIS WANTED DEAD OR DYING. 1995 on ups. $200$1400. Top $ for XP's & 947/951 or larger motors. Call Steve 231-943-4152 Boats/Motors/ Trailers

164

DAVE'S MOBILE MARINE •Pontoon Hauling •Inboard & Outboard Repair "We Come To You" •Buy & Sell Motors

(248)666-9248 Boat Hoists Docks

166

DOCK FOR Sale, Good condition, wood with aluminum edging. Three 10' by 4' sections with ladder and hardware. Make an offer 248-363-2181

CARS/TRUCKS MOTORCYCLES Wanted Parts/ Salvage

181

UNWANTED AUTOS LLC TOP $ Paid For Any: • Junk • Non Running • Wrecked Cars $275 & Up

(248)467-0396

Wanted Parts/ Salvage

181

CAMPBELL'S TOWING AUTOS, CARS & TRUCKS

$200 AND UP

248-698-1062 Motorcycles

183

MOTORCYCLEGUARANTEE See First Want Ad Page FULL REPAIR SERVICES Motorcycle parts/ Acces. Mention ad for up to 20% off! MX • ATV• P.W.C

Lakes MotorSports 4713 Dixie Highway, Waterford, MI 48329

248-674-0663 www.lakesmotorsports.com

Cars

187

FORD ESCAPE XLT 2002, 124k, original owner, $5,800 248-698-2219 JEEP COMPASS 2007 49k, loaded, must sell $12,900 248-505-8827 2009 JEEP WranglerX 4X4 46,000 miles, $15,900 (248)390-9242

SALES GUARANTEE Autos, Vans, Trucks See First Want Ad Page FORD MUSTANG LX 1993, auto, V8, convertible, runs great. Only $3,500 Call Jim 248-877-3309 HONDA ELEMENT EX 2005 4wd., bright red, 122K, 248881-0900 Private. MAZDA 626 LX 2001, 136K, gold, clean- must sell. 248884-7200

Buying a Home? Let us

Look Before You Leap!

Afford

able Home Inspections

Up to 170 components inspected in a typical three bedroom home. Computer-generated, comprehensive, easy-tounderstand report summary. High resolution, color pictures provide a visual reference of problem areas. Reports are emailed to you and your Real Estate Agent. After inspection questions are always answered, even after you move into your home.

248-881-3478 Licensed Insured

4075 Echo Drive West Bloomfield

4

Reasons To Use West Oakland Service Firms • Up-to-date listings allow for seasonal or changing conditions • They are part of the community • They offer a variety of services to meet your needs • They are ready & eager to serve


APRIL 25, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 55

LAKES AREA SERVICES (248) 360-7355

www.SpinalColumnOnline.com

Fax (248) 360-5308

IN PRINT and ON-LINE 24/7

Personal • Business • Maintenance • Improvements • Repair REPAIR/ IMPROVEMENT Appliance Repair

502

TONY'S APPLIANCE SERVICE Servicing all Major Appliances. •Hot water tank

(248)360-0213 (248)698-8819

Cement/ Concrete

Drywall 517

ARROW CONCRETE •Driveway Specials •Free Removal •Regular & Stamped •Home Owner Friendly •Residential - Commerical Fully Lic. & Ins. 20 Yr. Exp.

 248-758-4346

Carpet Installation

513

BOB'S CARPET Great prices on plush & berber carpet. Low prices on pad & installation. Living room & bedroom sized remnants $4 per yd. Restretching &repairs. 35 years experience.

Bob (248)681-5771 Cabinetry

515

Elegant Woodworking

MARCUCCI CONCRETE As Seen on ABC TV "Extreme Home Makeovers" Satisfying Customers for Over 30 Years •DRIVEWAY •PORCHES •FOUNDATIONS •BRICK •BLOCK •STAMPED/ COLORED Lic/Ins Visa/ MC Wixom

248-486-5900 AFFORDABLE CONCRETE SERVICES

•Hang & Finished •Small Repair •Texture Repair •Plaster Repair •Wet Sand

•Additions •Garages •Drywall •Painting •Plumbing •Electrical •Tile •Marble •Kitchens •Baths •Basements •Decks 33 Years ... Licensed

Ron (248)673-7665 528

MASTER ELECTRICIAN Insured & State Licensed, 25 years experience. Prompt, courteous service. FREE ESTIMATES. ALL TYPES OF WORK. Competitive Prices

(248)683-7985 Excavating

529

J.J.M BACKHOE SERVICE LLC

(248)363-3804

Call Bob

FLOOR COVERING

248-579-3979

•Linoleum •Ceramic Tile •Hardwood Floors •Laminate Wood 27 Years Exp. Free Est.

Doors 517

C&G CEMENT Quality Workmanship Residential-Commercial Over 30 years Experience STAMPED CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS FOOTINGS GARAGE FLOORS BLOCK WORK FREE ESTIMATES Michael (248)363-4783 MILFORD LOCATION

(248)684-5928

524

THE DOOR STOP Since 1980 Garage door springs and door openers repaired and/or replaced.

Call Anytime 248-624-4042 (cell) 248-640-6298 CERTIFIED OVERHEAD DOOR SERVICE •Garage Doors •Repaired/ Services •New Doors/ Openers •Installed at Factory Pricing •Emergency Service Available

248-624-3161

(248)241-6913 Handy Person

545

DU-IT-ALL HOME CARE IMPROVEMENTS Specials: •Ceramic Tile •Formica Tops & Kitchens •Exterior/Interior Painting Also, we do complete basements and all other interior work, including electric, plumbing, etc. Call today. Cell #

(248)891-7072 Licensed and Insured

Lawn Service •Spring clean up •Gutter cleaning •Landscape •Brick pavers •Mulch & weeding

TOTAL HOME SERVICE 35 Years Licensed PLUMBING • HEATING CARPENTRY • DRYWALL ELECTRICAL NEW SERVICE KITCHENS BATHS CERAMIC TILE

"The job your husband will do tomorrow."

Heating/Duct Work 546

EDWARD'S

A R T Outdoor Services, LLC

www.artoutdoorservices.com (248)625-5719

(248)624-6458 536

Plumbing 553

•Insured •Res. & Com.

(248)887-2366

Flooring

Lawn/Garden Services

248-684-4175 810-714-3058

Backhoe service & landscaping. 38 Years Experience. Small or Large Jobs. Fully insured. Free estimates.

Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks, Tear-outs, Replacements, Footings, Block work. Over 30 years experience.

Cement/ Concrete

545

D & S HOME REPAIRS REMODELING

•Mantels •Fireplace Surrounds •Furniture •Entertainment Center •Custom Cabinets •Crown Molding •Kitchen Cabinets •Custom Bars Harold Canfield elegant-woodworking.com

Handy Person

R & D DRYWALL & PAINTING

Electricians

ARROWCONCRETE.NET

526

THOMASON HEATING & COOLING • Furnaces • Boilers • Air Cleaners •Air Conditioners •Humidifiers Service & Replacements

FREE ESTIMATES ON INSTALLATION

248-363-1615 Home Inspection

548

Buying A Home? Let Us Look Before You Leap! AFFORDABLE HOME INSPECTIONS Licensed • Insured STERLING HOME SERVICES

248-881-3478

College Student Looking for Lawn care, mulch/ stone & odd jobs Shawn Larkins 248-931-0295 Painting/ Decorating

Premier Plumbing Licensed & Insured Complete Plumbing Service New Construction & Remodel Commercial & Residential

248-363-5864 Roofing

FARR'S PAINTING Exterior & Interior Wood Repairs • Caulking Staining • Wallpaper Removal Drywall repairs • Water repairs Free Power Washing w/paint. farrshomeimprovements.com

(248) 477-7764 (248) 345-3308

VS PAINTING SPRING SPECIAL Save 20% this season on exterior/ interior painting, drywall repair, & wallpaper removal on small or big jobs. 25 years experience. licensed and insured. Same day free estimates.

248-894-3239

571

 •Repairs •Re-Roofs •Chimney Repair •Metal Work •Flat Roofs •Complete Roof Packages. •Siding •Gutters

FREE Estimates 30 Years Experience

248-459-7894

585

•Remodeling •Quality Service •New Construction • Repairs •Grout Sealing • Licensed and Insured

John Miller (248)505-8865 jmtileandmarble.com

Trash/Debris Removal

Specializing in: •Appliances •Furniture •Debris Removal

Call anytime for estimates & great service

248-887-4892 587

Doug Dible 248-431-6243 ROOF REPAIRS Missing shingles replaced, Chimney flashing resealed, Leaks stopped, Vent stack flashing replaced, Complete roof inspection service, Guaranteed work. 30 yrs exp.

Call Doug Miller 248-360-0344

•Tree Trimming •Lot Clearing•Tree Removal •Experienced •Quality Work •Affordable •Free Estimates •Insured

(248)939-7420 (248)310-5031 jromotreeservice@yahoo.com

MAXON'S TREE SERVICE •Trimming •Tree Removal •Stump Grinding •Lot Clearing •Firewood & Woodchips "We now have wood fencing & deliver sand, gravel, top soil."

Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 577

I.D.C.

Home Service Siding, Trim & Soffitt Guaranteed Professional Installation. Lic./ Ins. References available.

Bob: 248-363-0589 idchomeservice.com

587

AERIAL TREE SERVICE Tree Trim Removal and Stumps •Free estimates •Insured 30 years experience

248-921-9097 Waterproofing

586

J ROMO TREE SERVICE

•Siding •Gutters & Leaf Guards •Soffits & Trimwork •Decks •Windows

Tree Service

J.M. TILE & MARBLE CUSTOM WORK

Tree Service

D&D ROOFING

Siding

Tile

Progressive Transportation

PRICE IS RIGHT ROOFING

562



567

599

Dry Basements, LLC We Repair: •Poured Walls/ Concrete Block •Waterproofing •Cracked or Bowed Walls •Foundation Repaired Replaced •Underpinning •Crawl Space and Encapsulation •Licensed & Insured •Ron Heck, Builder (248)420-0116

Wells

603

McPherson WELL SERVICE PUMPS •TANKS WELL REPAIR 2, 4, & 5 INCH

Emergency Service 7 days a week 248-

363-6464

aquawells.com All credit cards accepted

BOB WYCKOFF WELL SERVICE

(248)887-2190 AFFORDABLE STUMP GRINDING

"If you have questions, we have answers!"

Free Estimates

•PUMPS •TANKS • WELL REPAIR

Prompt Service Fenced Yard Accessible

Insured. Call Todd

248-425-0155

(248)310-0917

Emergency Service Visa & MasterCard


PAGE 56

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Yo u r Tr u s t e d D e a l e r s h i p A l t e r n a t i v e All Makes and Models ice rv Se ir pa Re to Au e Complet

e You c i v r e The S ices r P All certified t a t c e p Auto Technicians Ex e! s n e S ake M Fully Equipped Collision t a h T Shop with FREE Estimates!

2199 Haggerty Road @ Pontiac Trail Walled Lake • www.morrismotorsmi.com

248-624-4500

www.morrismotorsmi.com

SERVICE HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 7 a.m.-8 p.m. • Tues., Wed. & Fri. 7 a.m.-6 p.m.

When asked what makes your job rewarding Troy said “Working closely with our customers”. We offer our customers fast and friendly service and we listen to their problems and solve them. You won’t get charged for unnecessary repairs. Our technicians are the greatest! They are all certified and experienced in all aspects of mechanical and body work. Our technicians can actually repair your car, not just change parts and we give you the best price available. At Morris Motors we offer pick up and drop off service. For collision repair or mechanical repair most times we can offer free rental cars, just ask for details.

We care about our customers!

Special

7 AM9 AM MONDA Y FRIDAY -

OIL CHANGE

35

$

99

+tax & dep. fee with coupon

Includes Tire Rotation & Check Engine Light Must present coupon when order is written. Most GM vehicles. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or discount. Expires 5/9/12.

SC

Service Special ~ COUPON ~

OIL CHANGE

19

$

Fuel Injection Service HELP IMPROVE YOUR GAS MILEAGE!

PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCK

Our factory-trained technicians will perform the following:

M

Troy Willis is the service manager, and he likes working at Morris Motors on Haggerty Road in Commerce Township because of the way they do business. “I have never worked for a more honest and trustworthy company” stated Troy. Morris Motors has built their reputation on their commitment to great service year after year. We see many generations of the same family bringing their cars to us for service.

O I OTOR L

EMPLOYEES VIEW

Early Bird

95*

+tax & dep. fee with coupon

*Includes up to 5 quarts of oil and oil filter. Excludes synthetic oil and diesel engines. Most vehicles–see service advisor for exceptions. With this coupon. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 5/9/12. SC

•Pressurized cleaning of fuel injectors •Remove combustion chamber deposits •Clean air intake system S AVE •Three Part Fuel System $

10% OFF

99

$

Pot Hole Special

Front End Alignment Balance and Rotate Tires

INCLUDES: Check tire pressure Rotate tires FREE brake inspection Computer balance 4 wheels Set toe-in on applicable vehicles Caster or camber adjustments are extra

89

$

2,995**

$

8,997**

$

#P2051

95

Plus tax. Most GM cars and trucks. All coupons must be presented at time of write up. Offer cannot be applied with any other offer. Expires 5/9/12. SC

• • • • • •

#P1940A

2002 CHEVROLET ASTRO CONVERSION

30.00

Fuel filter Replacement

2001 CHEVROLET VENTURE

95 +tax

Must present coupon when order is written. Most GM vehicles. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or discount. Expires 5/9/12.

SC

2010 CHEVROLET IMPALA

2008 SCION XB #P2038

12,995

$

**

#P2016

13,999**

$

**For purchase with qualified credit approval. Prices are plus tax, title, license & doc fee. Call dealer for more details. Subject to prior sale. Expires 5/2/12.

SALES HOURS: Mon. & Thurs.: 8:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Tues., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. ~CHILD FRIENDLY CUSTOMER LOUNGE~

SCN4.25.12  

4/25/12 WATERFORD •UNION LAKE •WHITE LAKE •HIGHLAND•MILFORD•WIXOM WALLED LAKE •WOLVERINE LAKE •COMMERCE•ORCHARD LAKE •WEST BLOOMFIELD 248.69...

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