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WEST OAKLAND’S NEWSWEEKLY www.spinalcolumnonline.com

6/20/12

WATERFORD • UNION LAKE • WHITE LAKE • HIGHLAND • MILFORD • WIXOM WALLED LAKE • WOLVERINE LAKE • COMMERCE • ORCHARD LAKE • WEST BLOOMFIELD

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THROUGH 3 GENERATIONS Milford Cinema has been in the Henn family for four decades - pg. 7

MOVIE UNDER THE STARS Outdoor showing of ‘Secretariat’ to attract up to 1,000 viewers - pg. 3

LONG OUT AT CITY’S DDA Executive director post eliminated from next year’s ledgers - pg. 7

pg. 8 Live music will be part of Highland’s Sparks in the Park and other area events. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard) Proceeds benefit

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248-714-9780


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Sale of Spinal Column, other publications to Dale A. Duncan pending — page 30

‘Movies Under the Moonlight’ to show ‘Secretariat’ Friday By Leslie Shepard staff writer

West Bloomfield board OK's removal of mute swans, nests, eggs — page 16 Waterford's Log Cabin Days set for June 23-24 — page 17

That’s what HE said: "We'll see when I get to speak again." — State Rep. Lisa Brown (DWest Bloomfield, Commerce, Wolverine Lake) after Republican leadership in the state House of Representatives barred her from speaking on legislation on Thursday, June 14 following her remarks on a bill dealing with abortion.

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Summertime ushers in special family activities and lakes area residents won’t want to miss “Movies Under the Moonlight,” which is slated for Friday, June 22 in Waterford Township, where “Secretariat” will be showing on the big screen. The Waterford Chamber of Commerce in conjunction with the Waterford Coalition for Youth is hosting the family-friendly event at Pierce Middle School’s football field located at 5415 Hatchery Road. “We generally get between 800 and 1,000 people,” said Waterford Coalition for Youth Executive Director Heather Halls. “The event continues to grow a little each year.” For a small price, drive-in movie theater food favorites, including pizza, candy, pop, water, hot dogs, popcorn, “walking tacos,” baked goods, and nachos can be purchased at the concession stand. Gates open at 6 p.m. Costs are a $1 donation per child and a $2 donation

Wixom, Highland and Orchard Lake addressing Spice By Leslie Shepard staff writer

While communities were awaiting Gov. Rick Snyder’s signing of legislation banning the synthetic marijuana products known as “Spice” and “K2,” as well as other so-called designer drugs, a trio of lakes area communities were mulling the adoption of emergency ordinances and resolutions following, the lead of West Bloomfield, Waterford, and White Lake townships. Snyder was expected to sign bills banning these drugs yesterday, Tuesday, June 19 with the legislation taking effect Sunday, July 1. The Wixom City Council unanimously

Between 800 and 1,000 people are expected to attend “Movies Under the Moonlight” on Friday, June 22 to see a showing of “Secretariat” at Pierce Middle School’s football field located at 5415 Hatchery Road in Waterford Township. (Photo submitted by Heather Halls/Waterford Coalition for Youth)

per adult. There will be no readmittance. Smoking, alcohol, and pets are prohibited. The movie begins at dusk. Prior to the show, music and kids activities abound, including face painting by Waterford Kettering and Waterford Mott high school students; temporary airbrush tattoos by Rada Tattoos; rock

climbing; a bungee Xtreme jumper; and inflatables, pony rides, craft stations, and turtle races sponsored by Moby Dick’s. The U.S. National Guard will be on site conducting an underage drinking prevention awareness program. Century Bowl of Waterford will be donating portable bowling and Fit Zone

adopted an emergency ordinance on June 12 that bans the sale, use and possession of these drugs. City Manager Mike Dornan said that action was necessary due to an explosion of media coverage concerning what he called the “deleterious effects” of Spice and K2 on residents in west Oakland County communities. “While it is agreed that federal and/or state legislation would be preferable to the enactment of a patchwork of ordinances by communities, it is felt that Wixom cannot wait for those legislative bodies to act while the health, safety, and welfare of our residents is being threatened,” Dornan said. The state has wrangled with the issue due to the changing nature of the chemicals used in the manufacturing process and companies allegedly circumventing the law by slightly

altering ingredients in their synthetic marijuana products. Spice produces powerful, mindaltering effects and is considered by some to be more detrimental to the user than marijuana. The substances are not approved for human consumption and have been marketed and sold as herbal incense. The popularity of these drugs has grown among teens and young adults, in particular. They are available for purchase in gas stations, convenience and liquor stores and other businesses. These synthetic products contains dried, shredded plant material and chemical additives that are responsible for psychoactive effects that reportedly mimic THC, the active ingredient in marijuana. Other names the synthetic marijuana is known under include Blaze, Blueberry

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW WEST

OAKLAND’S

NEWSWEEKLY

51st YEAR OF PUBLICATION Waterford • White Lake • Highland • Milford Commerce • Wolverine • Walled Lake • Wixom West Bloomfield • Orchard Lake • Union Lake PUBLISHER / PRESIDENT: Susan Fancy BUSINESS MANAGER: Dennis Boggs EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT: Carol Barr EDITOR: ASSISTANT EDITOR: Tim Dmoch Kirk Pinho Staff Writers: Angela Niemi, Leslie Shepard, Michael Shelton Contributing Writers: Mike Scott, Mark Stowers Staff Photographer: Amy K. Lockard Photography Intern: Damon Tang ADVERTISING SALES: Account Representatives: Cindie Audia, Denise Engelberts, Linda Stickney, Laurie Wasker Sales Assistant/Proofing: Justina Vargas PHONE SALES MANAGER: Lori Snyder Account Representatives: Rhonda Libkuman, Cindy Stawick, Leslie Timko GRAPHICS: Denise Jungjohan, Marcia Reimer, Rob Robar, Andrea Watkins, IT MANAGER: Joel Stickney CIRCULATION: Dan Griffin ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE MANAGER: Carolyn Petherbridge Assistant: Mable McCullough PRESS RELEASES: Deadline 10 a.m. Thursday. Mail to P.O. Box 14, Union Lake, MI 48387-0014. Fax 248.360.1220 or bring to office. After-hours drop box. NEWS TIPS: Post at our website MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: 52 issues - $45 per year.

www.spinalcolumnonline.com OFFICES AT: 7196 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford, MI 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday thru Friday 248.360.SELL (7355) / 248.360.NEWS (6397) FAX 24/7: 248.360.1220 MAIL ADDRESS: P.O. Box 14, Union Lake, MI 48387 SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY OAKLAND LAKEFRONT OAKLAND HOMES MONTHLYADVERTISER WEST OAKLAND DIRECTORY Member of National Newspaper Association Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce Waterford Chamber of Commerce

The Spinal Column Newsweekly, all rights are reserved. No portion, whole or part, may be reproduced without prior permission. The names Spinal Column, Newsweekly, SportsWeekly, and West Oakland are protected property. The Spinal Column Newsweekly is co-owned by Steven and Susan Fancy, brother and sister; son and daughter of James Fancy, publisher from 1969-2011.

An Olympian in the making? Kettering's Wright competing in swimming Olympic Trials

M

adison Wright, 15, is one of the best swimmers in the state and is about test herself in one of the biggest competitions of her young career. Wright, who is nicknamed “Maddie,” will compete in the U.S. Olympic Trials in Omaha, Neb. in the 100-meter and 200-meter butterfly events next week. Preliminaries for the 100 butterfly are taking place on Monday, June 25 (6:30 p.m., NBC Sports Network) and the 200 butterfly preliminaries are being held on Thursday, June 28 (2:30 p.m., NBC Sports Network). The finals for each event will air in prime time on NBC at 8 p.m. those same days. This is just the latest step for this Waterford Kettering High School student-athlete who won two Michigan High School Athletic Association Division 1 state championships last November and has been swimming with the Kingfish Aquatics of Waterford swimming club since she was 10-years-old. As a result, she now holds numerous state records in addition to competing in national events such as the Speedo Jr. National Championships in California in 2010 and 2011 and in Grand Prix events against U.S. National Team members and Olympians. Last year, she was named to the U.S. Junior National Team and is currently ranked No. 27 nationally in the 200 butterfly. Wright hopes this year’s Olympic Trials will give her valuable experience as she has her sights set on gold at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She spoke with the Spinal Column Newsweekly just before departing for Omaha to talk about her goals for the Olympic Trials, how she stays successful yet grounded, and which Olympic swimmer she looks up to. You’re about to leave to compete at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Omaha, Neb. What goes through your mind knowing that you’re going to be competing on the same stage as some of the top swimmers in the country? What are your goals heading into the event and how would this qualify as a successful trip to you? MW: I’ve swam with Olympians before at Grand Prixs and they’re all really nice people. I’ve competed against them. But, it’s really just kind of a big honor to kind of be in the same pool and share the same deck with them, so I’m really excited. My goals are basically to just drop (my) time and possibly make it back for semi-finals, which would be amazing,

Q

and to make the USA National Youth Team. That’s if I (place) in the top 2 for (age) 18 and under, then I get to go to Hawaii to compete at the (2012 Junior Pan-Pacific Games) in August. A lot of kids enjoy swimming growing up, but then there are those that go the extra mile and accomplish what you have so far. Where does your drive and passion for swimming come from? What would you say was the breakout moment that really jump-started your swimming career? MW: I swam ever since I was little and it always just felt really natural to me. I just decided that I wanted to compete. I’m really competitive and I just decided

Q

NE MINUTE

INTERVIEW that I wanted to actually start racing people and I love it. (Growing up with two older brothers) definitely helps. (My breakout moment) was probably when I joined my club team, Kingfish Aquatics. I joined when I was about 10 and ever since I joined, my times have just been dropping and I’ve just been seeing a lot of success in my swimming. We understand you train seven days a week, three hours a day and do doubles during the summer and over holiday breaks. How were you able to balance your training, competitions and studies during the school year? Are there any instances where you feel overwhelmed by trying to balance so many things at once? MW: It’s quite a challenge because swimming is just so energy draining and

Q

it’s just very hard, but sometimes I do have to stay up until 1 a.m. studying or sometimes I’ll have to skip dry land, which is part of my workout, so I’ll have time to study for a test the day before. Yes, it’s difficult, but I manage. (Yes, I feel overwhelmed sometimes) and those are moments where you kind of need to take a break because with swimming, there are physical aspects and mental aspects. It’s very mentally draining so sometimes I’ll take a day off just to kind of gather myself together. You’ve also competed in Grand Prix events against Olympians and U.S. National Team members. When did you decide to make the jump to compete in national events and did you feel any hesitation at first? What did it mean to you to be named to the U.S. Junior National Team and to train in Colorado Springs? MW: I decided to do that because I really just wanted to take it to the next level. I want to travel and I want to swim in different countries and meet new people and coaches and I had no hesitation at all. I was all for it. The 200 butterfly is my best and favorite event ever. It just comes very naturally to me. It’s just something I’m good at. (When I went to California), I enjoyed meeting a ton of new swimmers who were like me. I made so many new friends from different states and I enjoyed competing with them and it was just a really good experience. (Being named to the Junior National Team) was amazing. Just to be on that team with so many amazing swimmers my age and older, it was really an honor to be considered an elite athlete. After you return home from the Olympic Trials, what are your plans for the summer and the remainder of the year? What are your goals for your future in swimming. Do they include winning an Olympic medal? MW: After I come back from trials, I’ll have a month before I go to nationals in Indiana, so I’ll keep training. I’ll probably do doubles for that and I’ll work really hard to better my times at that meet. After nationals in the summer, I’ll probably take a break. After my break, I will continue working out for the next Olympic trials. I’ll also return to Kingfish Aquatics. Yes, my future goal is to make the Olympic team and to win a gold medal in 2016. ❏

Q

Q

By Michael Shelton

Read more of this interview at www.spinalcolumnonline.com.


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

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PAGE 7

LAKES AREA NEWS

Forty years worth of memories at Milford Cinema By Michael Shelton staff writer

The Milford Cinema on East Summit Road in Milford Village has been operated by the Henn family for four decades, as its operations have been transferred from generation to generation. Tomorrow, Thursday, June 21 will mark the 40th anniversary of the Milford Cinema’s first movie showing, which occurred on the same date in 1972. David Henn, 31, is currently in charge of the theater’s operations after he took over from his father, Tom Henn, in January 2010. View VIDEO CLIPS relative to this story at

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

Before that, Tom Henn and his wife, Pam, began running the cinema in 1992 after they purchased it from Tom’s father, John, who originally had the idea for the cinema when a new shopping center was being constructed on Summit Road in 1969. “This was all one floor,” John said. “There were two 15-foot stores in this building. We knocked the glass windows out in front and put a bulldozer in here and landscaped and cut the thing down and went from there.” After a couple years of construction, the Milford Cinema showed its first movie, “The Groundstar Conspiracy” with adult tickets priced at $1.50, $1 for students, and 50 cents for children 12 and under. “I served the first popcorn to Harry Dodd of Highland, a friend of my dad’s,” Tom Henn said.

Long leaving DDA executive director post on June 30 By Leslie Shepard staff writer

After serving the city on and off for over a decade, Walled Lake Downtown Development Authority (DDA) Executive Director Charlene Long will be vacating her post effective Saturday, June 30. The Walled Lake City Council made

The Milford Cinema has reached its 40th anniversary, with three generations of the Henn family owning and operating the Milford landmark. Above from left to right inside the cinema are Tom Henn, original owner John Henn, and David Henn, Tom’s son and John’s grandson, who now operates the cinema. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

In its first year, the cinema was part of the United General Theaters franchise and used 16-millimeter film. But United General went “belly-up” a year later, John said. He was then faced with the challenge of becoming an independent operation, which included paying off $90,000 in debt left by United General, in addition to making the switch to 35-millimeter film. But the cinema started showing more first-run movies, including some of the very first summer blockbusters in the 1970s, including “Jaws” and “Star Wars.” Over the years, Milford Cinema has given residents a chance to see a new

blockbuster movie in a small theater tucked away from the major multiplexes — with reasonable prices to boot. Major films shown at the cinema have included “E.T.” in the 1980s and “Titanic” in the 1990s. This summer will be no exception, as the Milford Cinema will be showing Disney-Pixar’s “Brave” on Friday, June 22, “The Amazing Spider-Man” on Tuesday, July 3, and “The Dark Knight Rises” on July 20. Tickets are now priced at $5 for adults and $4 for children 10-years-old and under. A large popcorn is $4. Most of the movies that are screened there are family films that have ratings ranging from “G” to “PG-

line-item changes before approving a 2012-13 DDA budget that includes the elimination of Long’s full-time position. The panel then agreed to appropriate funds for a part-time executive director position, thus reducing the salary and expense line items from $63,600 to up to $50,000. “The executive director (position) was eliminated (and replaced with) a contractual part-time employee that will fulfill the needs of the position and (is) hired under the city manager’s direction,” said DDA Board Chairman and City Councilman Casey Ambrose.

According to City Councilman Bill Robertson, the city has yet to ask Long to stay on a part-time basis. “We’re looking for a change, but that’s just my vote,” Robertson said. “We’re thinking about making the city manager (the) executive director — not the hands-on daily person, but this is premature.” Long declined to comment. She began her tenure with the DDA in 2000 and, due to the shutdown of the DDA in 2006, she left her position with the DDA. She returned in 2008 when the DDA was reformed.

13,” with a few “R” rated exceptions over the years — such as “Saving Private Ryan” and “The Passion of the Christ.” The cinema books movies through Clark Theatre Services. “You have a personal relationship with people,” David Henn said. “You get to know hundreds of people by their first name and it sticks.” In fact, most of the Henn family, ranging from John’s wife of 64 years, Kitty, to their great-grandchildren have worked in the theater in some form, whether it was working concessions or taking tickets. Tom and his twin brother, Tim, in fact worked in the theater with their father when it first opened. After their father retired and moved to Florida, Dave and Phyllis Jenkins, Pam Henn’s parents, managed the cinema from 1984 to 1992. Then, Tom Henn picked up where his father left off. “It’s a great feeling that my dad started a movie theater 40 years ago probably with the hopes to get his kids through school and give us a job,” Tom Henn said. “We all work second jobs. I drive a school bus, Dad was a paper salesman, and Dave worked in restaurants.” David Henn said he is open to looking into other movie theater trends, such as 3-D showings, but that the challenge he is preparing for is the movie industry’s switch from film prints to digital technology. “Within six months to a year, everything is going to be digital or satellite,” David Henn said. “There will be no more prints of movies. It will be disk drive or satellite.” While said he knows the switch will take an investment, and he knows it will be worth it in order to carry on the cinema’s legacy and reputation that his father and grandfather built before him. For more information, visit milford-cinema.com. ❏ Long stands to receive two months severance upon her departure. Now the DDA is seeking a suitable part-time replacement. “Right now we’re looking for a person or persons to fill the requirements,” Ambrose said. “Charlene did a fabulous job. She is dedicated, loyal, and a trusted friend who was only here for the best interest of the city and the businesses located here.” ❏

FOR MORE LAKES AREA NEWS SEE PAGE 15


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

By Leslie Shepard staff writer

SPECIAL REPORT

B

reak out your sparklers, west Oakland County — or, for the daring types, the newly legalized types of pyrotechnics. The Fourth of July is soon upon us, and a variety of activities are lined up for lakes area residents to take part in, including the annual Sparks in the Park event in Highland Township, as well as Wolverine Lake’s expanded version of Tiki Night, among a slew of others. What follows is a run-down of all the festivities taking part in the lakes area over the next few weeks so residents can celebrate America’s Independence Day. However, it’s important to remember that when an event is listed as being private, the hosts mean it, so be sure to abide by their wishes. Parking alongside a roadway to view a private fireworks display is frowned upon, and could even result in police action such as a ticket. So be sure to be neighborly, and make careful note as you read this special report on which events are public and which are private — and have a safe and happy Fourth of July! COMMERCE TOWNSHIP Three lake associations in the township have pulled fireworks permits for the months of June and July. North Commerce Lake and Lake Sherwood will both be holding their private fireworks displays on Saturday, June 30, with a rain date of Monday, July 1. Meanwhile, Long Lake will be holding fireworks festivities on Wednesday, July 4, with a rain date of July 5. All of those fireworks shows are expected to start at dusk. Edgewood Country Club will hold its fireworks display on Tuesday, June 26, with a rain date of Wednesday, June 27. WHITE LAKE TOWNSHIP The sky will be lit with fireworks over Cedar Island Lake on Friday, June 29, courtesy of the Cedar Island Lake Association. White Lake will see fireworks on Saturday, June 30. Both shows are set to begin around dusk and are open to the public, with public boat access sites at both lakes. However, parking is very limited in the area. HIGHLAND TOWNSHIP Once again the night sky over Huron Valley Milford High School will be lit up as the Highland-White Lake Business Association (HWLBA) hosts Sparks in the Park on Saturday, June 30.

The 'oohs' and the 'ahhs'

Area gearing up for Fourth of July displays

Fireworks displays will be taking place throughout west Oakland County in the coming weeks as part of the area’s Fourth of July celebrations. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

As is the case with many public events, Sparks in the Park was a small community event centered around a traditional fireworks display when it first started 12 years ago. But it now has grown into a summer festival attracting approximately 10,000 people annually. However, it’s quite likely even more people annually enjoy the event’s fireworks from other areas along Milford Road and not at the Sparks in the Park site. Yet, enough people came to the site that the HWLBA had to move Sparks in the Park from its original location at Hickory Ridge Pines Park off of Hickory Ridge Road. With so many people attending, there became an overwhelming problem with traffic and parking. Moving the event to Milford High School became the solution. The move to the high school offered another opportunity to expand the event by adding the Great Campout, hosted by Huron Valley Recreation and Community Education. Now in its fifth year, it has become a popular attraction. According to Laura Kay, an HWLBA administrator, approximately 70 tents

were used at the camp site last year. Campsites are 15-feet-by-15-feet and can accommodate up to six people. Each camp site is limited to two tents, and an adult must be present at each camp site. The camping includes a free hot dog meal, free access to the high school’s pool facilities until 8:30 p.m., lawn games, VIP fireworks seating and parking, s’mores, and a breakfast the following morning sponsored by Rodnick Chiropractic. You can still register for the Great Campout online at www.huronvalleyrec.com. Forms will also be accepted by mail or fax. Registration ends Friday, June 22. The cost per camp site is $35. For more information about the Great Campout, call 248-676-8390. Sparks in the Park will also have many family-friendly activities again this year, including bounce houses, face painting and crafts, and food vendors. Also in its second year will be the Sparks Market Avenue, featuring vendors with locally crafted, hand-made products, and locally grown produce. In an effort to encourage economic growth in Michigan, Sparks Market

Avenue will feature vendors who produce their items in Michigan. For additional information on becoming a vendor, contact Kevin Lawrence at 246-755-1195 or at alaw4196@aol.com. Sparks in the Park will begin at 3 p.m. with the Great Campout. The Sparks Market Avenue will start at 4 p.m., while family activities will start at 5 p.m. Live music — featuring pop, rock, classic rock, bluegrass, and original tunes — will also be played from 5 to 10 p.m., followed by the fireworks. The line up of the live bands is as follows: • Miss Kayla Nettles; • Bulletproof Snow; • Mean Mary; • Infinity Hour Unplugged (Huron Valley’s Got Talent winner); • Perfect Fifth (Huron Valley’s Got Talent winner); • Mainstreet; and • Remedy Detroit Addy O’Brien will be singing the National Anthem, while the Novi Concert Band will provide patriotic music during the fireworks display. There will be free on-site parking at Milford High School, which will be acces-


JUNE 20-26, 2012

Face painting will be just one of the bevy of activities youngsters like the one above can take part in at the 2012 Sparks in the Park event being held at Huron Valley Milford High School on Saturday, June 30. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

two months. West Bloomfield’s first fireworks display will be a public fireworks display held over Union Lake on Tuesday, July 3, beginning at dusk. The rain date is July 14. A private display by the Pine Lake Country Club is also scheduled at dusk on July 3. The rain date is July 4. There will be a private display at the Benson Ford, Jr. property on Walnut Lake on July 4, scheduled for 15 minutes after dusk. The rain date for the display will be Thursday, July 5. The Green Lake Association will also hold its own private fireworks display on Saturday, July 7 at 10 p.m. with a rain date of Sunday, July 8. The Shady Beach Improvement Association’s private fireworks display on Upper Straits Lake is scheduled for July 7 at dusk, with a rain date of July 8. Finally, there will be a private fire-

works display by Temple Shir Shalom on Walnut Lake Road on Aug. 20 at dusk, with a rain date of Aug. 21. In addition, the public fireworks show over Sylvan Lake will be held on July 3, presented at the Oakland County Boat Club, located at 2330 Ferndale Avenue, with a live band from 6 to 10 p.m. and a DJ after the fireworks. The boat club will also have a sing-a-long of “God Bless America” at 9:55 p.m., as well as food and drinks all night. Gino’s Pizzeria & Restaurant at 1999 Cass Lake Road will also provide free shuttle service to the Oakland County Boat Club from 6 p.m. to midnight. WOLVERINE LAKE Unique to the lakes area, the village of Wolverine Lake will be hosting an 85-foot Grand Princess Riverboat on its namesake for a two-week stay that includes a Tiki Night Fireworks dinner and cruise on July 3 to cele-

PAGE 9

brate the 25th anniversary of the village’s holiday tradition. The boat sails in Friday, June 29 and will depart July 15. “This year it’s more of an experiment than anything to see what events work well and what doesn’t,” said Mike Stack, who co-chairs a committee dealing with the event along with village resident John Blankenship. The events open to the public are intended to benefit the village’s fireworks fund and local charities. “Next year, once our feet are semiplanted, we will figure out how to bring local organizations in and fund theirs on the boat,” Stack said. Activities and cruises are lined up for nearly every day of the festivities and vary in price. Enjoy a dinner cruise, a Pirate Adventure, a Teen Sun Dance or a leisurely riverboat ride. “From July 2 through July 8, every day something is scheduled,” Stack said. “There will be openings available for corporate sponsors.” Some of the highlights include a July 4 Wolverine Lake historical brunch cruise, a narrated tour hosted by the Wolverine Lake Historical Committee. The tour runs from noon to 2 p.m. A barbecue brunch will be provided by Uptown Grille. Costs are $25 per adult and $15 for children 12-years-old and younger. The July 5 Pirate Adventure is tailored to those 13-years-old and under. Kids will be enthralled by the pirates in costume and treasure hunt to take place on a beach location. Pizza and ice cream is included in the $15 ticket price. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Seniors are sure to enjoy the senior luncheon cruise on Friday, July 6 from noon to 2 p.m. Costs are $25 per person and seating is on a firstcome, first-serve basis. A cash bar is available. Also on July 6, teenagers between 14- and 18-years-old will have their own fun in the sun during the Teen Sun Dance and Pizza Party cruise from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Costs are $20 per person and a parental consent and signed waiver form is mandatory to attend. Other events include a Girls Night Out cruise, which is already sold out; a Mardi Gras dinner cruise; and afterglow or brunch cruises. For a complete listing of events, dates, times, and prices, visit www.wolverinelake.com. Food during weekend excursions and cruises will be provided by a trio of local restaurants, including Uptown Grille, A Matter of Taste, and The PAGE 10 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯

SPECIAL REPORT

sible by Watkins Road or by the service drive from Lone Tree Road. Parking will be first-come, first-serve until the lots are full. Donations are welcome. Meanwhile, a shuttle service will not be available this year. A site plan detailing where to park and watch the fireworks can be found at the HWLBA website at www.hwlba.com. MILFORD TOWNSHIP The Milford Historical Society will host its annual Fourth of July Parade on Wednesday, July 4 in downtown Milford beginning at 11 a.m. The parade will step off at Commerce and Main streets and move south to Atlantic/General Motors Road. Milford Historical Society President Russ Rheaume and Katherine Rheaume, the historical society’s recording secretary, will serve as the parade coordinators for the 10th consecutive year. Russ Rheaume said he expects 3,000 people in attendance for this year’s parade. “This will be bigger than ever,” he said. “We’ll have a lot of churches and politicians participating.” He added that he believes Oakland County Sheriff Mike Bouchard and former state Sen. Nancy Cassis will be in attendance. There will also be a performance by the Huron Valley middle schools’ combined summer band. Russ Rheaume added that there will be numerous parade entries from local businesses, as well as free ice cream compliments of Huron Valley State Bank. There will also be fire engines from several area fire departments, including the Milford Fire Department and possibly the White Lake and South Lyon departments, along with horses and other animals appearing in the parade. Milford-area Cub Scouts and Special Olympics participants will march along with honor guards from the American Legion and a team of German shepherds. Also participating will be the Kensington Trail Riders and representatives of the Carls Family YMCA. Candy will be thrown out to spectators during the parade. For more information about the annual parade, contact Russ or Katherine Rheaume at the Milford Historical Society by calling 248-684-7373. Camp Dearborn, which is owned and operated by the City of Dearborn, will not hold a fireworks display for the second consecutive year. The city of Dearborn pulled the plug on the display last year because it was too expensive. WEST BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP On May 14, the West Bloomfield Township Board of Trustees approved permits for six fireworks displays set to take place in the township over the next

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Fourth of July ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 9

Root. Each dinner will be served buffet style. A cash bar will be available. Reservations are necessary and tickets are limited. Order your tickets now online or stop by Village Hall at 425 Glengary Road. For more information, call 248624-1710. When ordering tickets online, select “Village of Wolverine Lake,” then select payment type. Be sure to enter the specific event name and start time where required. Tickets purchased online with a credit card will be available for pick-up at Village Hall two days after registration or at “Will Call” during the event boarding. However, tickets purchased at the Village Hall must be paid for with a check or cash only. These are rain or shine events; no refunds are available. Parking is available at Village Hall. WALLED LAKE The skies over Walled Lake will be awash with brilliance on Saturday, June 23 during the inaugural Freedom Festival, a fireworks gala open to the public. Bayside Bar and Grille General Manager Todd Clickner conceptualized and spearheaded the event, which has the theme of “Let Freedom Ring,” through a not-for-profit organization, the Walled Lake Civic Fund. “I originated the idea but wanted it as a city event, so we started the civic fund for community involvement,” Clickner said. The fireworks spectacular is expected to become an annual event and will be held the last Saturday in June beginning next year. “The Walled Lake Civic Fund was developed to raise funds to put on the fireworks, but Bayside is the biggest contributor and promotes it,” said Walled Lake Civics Fund President Ron Johnson. The fireworks alone cost around $16,000, according to Johnson. “There will be three barges: One smaller barge close to Bayside and a small and large 30-foot barge in the middle of the lake,” Johnson said. “It will be a full-blown show. We haven’t had fireworks since the early 1980s and never shot them off from the middle of the lake on barges.” The show will commence at dusk. A rain date of Sunday, June 24 is scheduled in case of inclement weather. Festivities at Bayside begin prior to the fireworks exhibit start around 4 p.m. and end around 2 a.m. Kids activities include face painting, jug-

This year’s Sparks in the Park event is expected to attract roughly 10,000 people to the area on Saturday, June 30. The event begins this year with the Great Campout at 3 p.m., the Sparks Market Avenue will begin at 4 p.m. and the family activities will start at 5 p.m. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

glers, and two inflatables. There will also be a riding bull and seven themed bars, along with 12 different DJs during the day set up on a concert stage. Live entertainment will begin at 9:30 p.m. at Bayside. The Atomics, a classic rock band, will play everything from the classics through Top 40 hits. Parking will be provided on the Walled Lake side of the lake in two church parking lots, as well as at Lynch & Sons Funeral Home and PNC Bank. The Walled Lake Police Department is proposing a temporary “no parking” order on 27 streets around the lake from 4 p.m. on June 23 to noon on June 24. WATERFORD TOWNSHIP A private fireworks show featuring two barges will be held at the south end of Lotus Lake starting at 10 p.m. on Saturday, June 30. A rain date of July 1 is slated in case of inclement weather. The Maceday-Lotus Lakes Association alternates the event between Maceday and Lotus lakes each year. While the fireworks exhibition is private, there is some public access provided at the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) boat launch ramp on Maceday Lake. As a part of the festivities, the association will host its annual Kids Bike Parade. Each bike is decorated as a means of personal expression. Prizes are awarded. The bike parade is followed by a boat parade.

In conjunction with the Fourth of July celebration, the association will be holding a Light up the Lakes contest where residents present lakeside displays of tiki torches and patriotic lighting. Each decorated display will be judged July 2 after 9:30 p.m. by a panel of impartial judges. Cash prizes will be awarded. Summerfest is an event Williams Lake Homeowners Association members make a top priority. The private fireworks event will be held over Williams Lake beginning at 10 p.m. July 21. The association rolls out festivities the weekend before with a fishing tournament and results are announced the following Sunday. A festival will commence the evening of July 20 with a boat rally. Then on July 21, the activities kick off with crafts and face painting between 10 a.m. and noon. A hot dog lunch will be available as a fund-raiser for $2 each. As a part of the festivities, a cardboard boat race will be held, in which participants build boats out of cardboard and duct tape and each boat follows an obstacle course. “You’d be surprised by the ingenuity people put into it,” said Williams Lake Homeowners Association President Joe Petrusha. The day after the fireworks, the Spray Masters Water Ski Team will perform on the lake. A raffle will also be held on Sunday to recoup fireworks

costs. A DJ will be on hand to emcee the raffles. Cash prizes, along with awards for the fishing tournament and boat rally, will be presented. Club Royale Marina will be sponsoring a private fireworks spectacular on Elizabeth Lake on Aug. 3 at dusk. In case of rain, an alternate date of Aug. 4 has been reserved. WIXOM Thanks to local business owners, an Independence Day extravaganza in Wixom is planned for Thursday, June 28 complete with a spectacular fireworks over Sibley Park. The city had rescinded its tradition of holding a fireworks display in 2010 due to economic challenges. The move to return the event was made public during Mayor Kevin Hinkley’s State of the City address when he said there was a groundswell of support to return the fireworks display to Wixom to underscore the importance of Independence Day. “It’s a fabulous opportunity — not just for the city, but the region,” Hinkley said. As a result, an ad hoc fireworks committee was formed to aggregate donations. A few businesses — such as Total Sports, which doled out $4,000, and Short’s Brewery, which anteed up $1,000 — stepped up to contribute. “The businesses and some residents have contributed, as well as the VFW, to bring back this venue,” Hinkley said. “It truly shows how the businesses have wrapped their arms around the community and furthers ‘buy local, buy Michigan” to promote the downtown.” The fireworks display will be held in conjunction with the city’s Farmer’s Market and Concert Series. “It showcases the downtown, along with our Concert Series and Farmer’s Market so we get people down here,” Hinkley said. The itinerary for June 28 is as follows: • Farmers Market, 3 to 8 p.m. • World War II Memorabilia Display, 6 to 8 p.m. • Booths (VFW, veterans, Boy Scouts, ROTC), 6 to 8 p.m. • Beer Tent sponsored by Shorts Brewery, 6 to 10 p.m. • Inflatables for kids, 6 to 9 p.m. • VFW Color Guard, 6:20 p.m. • Novi Concert Band, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. • Steve King and the Dittilies, 8 to 10:15 p.m. • Fireworks display, 10 p.m. ❏ Staff writers Angela Niemi and Michael Shelton contributed to this report.


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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LAKES AREA NEWS

Outdoor movie ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 3

for Women will be holding Zumba classes. A pair of raffles will be held: A 50/50 raffle and one, which is sponsored by John Bowman Chevrolet, to win a 2012 cherry red Chevrolet Camero. Proceeds benefit the Waterford Coalition for Youth. Those who will not be attending the event but want to purchase raffle tickets can contact the Waterford Coalition for Youth at 248-618-7424. Local sponsors also include the Waterford School District and Best Source Credit Union. Bryan’s Neighborhood Coney Island annually donates the hot dogs and chili for the event. ❏

Spice ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 3

Haze, Dank, Demon Passion Smoke, Genie, Hawaiian Hybrid, Magma, Ninja, Nitro, Ono Budz, Panama Red Ball, Puff, Sativah Herbal Smoke, Skunk, Ultra Chronic and Voodoo Spice. Some of the symptoms reported by users include delusions, elevated blood pressure, elevated heart rate, hallucinations, heart palpitations, increased agitation, nausea, pale skin, burned lungs, panic attacks, seizures, vomiting, overdoses, and even death. “After much thought and consideration, especially of the Oliver Smith overdose (on Spice) in Bloomfield Township over Memorial (Day) weekend, I decided we needed to implement an ordinance,” Dornan said. The ordinance calls for prohibiting “the possession and use of, and trafficking in, synthetic marijuana and other products or materials that are in a form that allows for human consumption by inhalation of smoke or vapors, ingestion, injection or application, and that contain chemical substances, compounds, or agents that cause or may cause an intoxicating, narcotic, stimulant, depressant, and/or hallucinogenic effect and imminent threat to the safety of persons that consume such products or materials and/or persons they come in contact with.” Violation of the ordinance is considered a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $500 and/or a jail sentence of no more than 90 days. In addition to Wixom’s action, the Orchard Lake City Council tabled adoption of an ordinance during its Monday, June 18 meeting, but community leaders expect the matter to

The Huron Valley School District community rang in the summer last week with the inaugural White Lake Family Carnival sponsored by Huron Valley Lakeland High School, Lakeland Leadership, and Huron Valley Recreation and Community Education. The four-day event from Thursday, June 14 to Sunday, June 17 was spearheaded by Lakeland Student Activities Director Scott Rolando and featured various rides and Midway game activities. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Damon Tang)

come up before the council in the next few weeks. “We tabled it to review what’s going on with state law and then check with our police chief and attorney to make sure the language doesn’t conflict state law,” said Orchard Lake Mayor Bruce McIntyre. “We want our ordinance to mirror state law.” According to Orchard Lake Director of City Services Gerry McCallum, an ordinance is expected to be drafted in roughly a month to enforce the ban at the local level. Finally, the Highland Township Board of Trustees passed a resolution Wednesday, June 13 declaring that the township’s governing body supports the efforts at the state level to make Spice and K2 illegal. “We’ve decided we are going to follow what the state legislation will say,” said township Supervisor Triscia Pilchowski. “We know it’s just a matter of time before the governor signs the legislation that the (state) House and Senate passed. That’s what I would like to see us go under is the state law.” Pilchowski said the message about these synthetic products has been positively received in Highland. “We’ve already gone to most busi-

nesses in Highland, and they are clamoring to get on board with preventing the sale of Spice,” she said. “The response of residents, parents, and business owners has been very encouraging to see. This is something that from the grassroots up, the community has been addressing this problem. It’s pretty impressive.” Earlier this month, Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard and county Executive L. Brooks Patterson announced the county would be providing decals to businesses that notify the county that they don’t or no longer will sell Spice or K2. To request a window decal, go to the county’s website at www.oakgov.com or call the Health Division nurse on call at 1-800-8485533. ❏

Commerce board OK’s changes in fence ordinance By Angela Niemi staff writer

The Commerce Township Board of Trustees unanimously adopted several amendments to the township’s fence

ordinance at a Tuesday, June 12 meeting. The amendments address nonobscuring fences in front yards and on waterfronts. They also define ornamental fences. According to the amendments, an ornamental fence is an “architecturally attractive fence that obscures no more than half of the landscape when viewed from an angle perpendicular to the fence.” These fences are typically of the rail or wrought iron type. Chain link and privacy fences are not considered ornamental. The amendment states that the ornamental fence should complement the primary structure. It also states that earthtones or colors matching the principal structure should be used. Currently, fences are permitted in a front yard as long as they aren’t within the required front setback or between the front building line of the principal building and the front lot line or road right of way line. They also have to be an integral part of the overall design of the principal structure. According to the new amendment,

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under the stars this summer. The township Parks and Recreation Committee will once again be holding Movies in the Park at Judith Hawley Park on two Saturdays this summer. The movie nights are scheduled to be held on Saturday, June 23 and Friday, July 27. “Every year, this event is gaining more and more momentum as more people know about it,” said Jason Iacoangeli with the township’s Planning Department. Showing on Saturday will be “The Iron Giant,” which is rated PG. The show on July 27 will be “Pee Wee’s Big Adventure.” The movies are projected on a 26foot screen under the stars. Gates to the park will open at 7 p.m., and admission will be free. The movie is set to start at dusk, around 9:15 or 9:30 p.m., Iacoangeli said. Movie-goers are encouraged to bring their own picnic dinner with them, lawn chairs, flashlights, and bug spray. Alcohol is prohibited. Activities will be available before the movie starts. White Lake has once again partnered with the Oakland County Recreation Assistance Program to provide bounce houses before the show. Children need to wear socks to participate.

❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 15

only ornamental fences will be permitted in the front yard, provided the ornamental fence is not within the required front setback. As for ornamental fences along a waterfront, those located in the side yard of the waterfront yard cannot encroach into the required waterfront setback. The amendment also states that fences cannot be located parallel to the water’s edge in any circumstance. It also cannot exceed 4 feet in height, and obscuring vegetation, hedges, walls, fences, or other forms of screening will not be permitted on a waterfront yard if it exceeds 4 feet in height. The new amendments go into effect on Wednesday, June 27. ❏

‘The Iron Giant’ to be shown under the stars Saturday By Angela Niemi staff writer

White Lake Township residents will have two opportunities to watch films

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Meanwhile, the White Lake Township Library will also be providing activities for the children. Judith Hawley Park is located behind White Lake Township Hall on Highland Road. ❏

Removal of mute swans OK’d by WB board

(Directly across from MHS)

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Trumpeter and vocalist Chris Clifton (above), a protege and long-time friend of the legendary Louis Armstrong, will be performing his tribute to Armstrong, “Memories of a Friend,” at the Steinway Piano Gallery Jazz Cafe in Commerce Township at 2700 E. Maple Road tomorrow, Thursday, June 21 beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets for the performance are $10 and Clifton will be accompanied by Paul Keller on bass guitar; Pete Siers on drums; Glenn Tucker on piano; Jim Wyse on clarinet; and Chris Smith on trombone. For tickets, call 248-560-9200 or 248-417-0033, or e-mail clufsr@yahoo.com or cloudon@steinwaydetroit.com. (Photo submitted by Tom Clufetos)

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The West Bloomfield Township Board of Trustees at its Monday, June 18 meeting unanimously approved a resolution to remove mute swans, their nests, and eggs from township lake-

front homes. This move comes after Michael Mankvitz, a board member of the Middle Straits Lake Association, wrote a letter to township Clerk Cathy Shaughnessy on behalf of the residents of Middle Straits Lake regarding issues with aggressive swans in the area. Mankvitz stated that incidents with swans have included attacks on small boats, watercraft, kayaks, waterskiers and wakeboarders that have resulted in injuries and erratic boating to avoid swans.

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LAKES AREA NEWS

Log Cabin Days in Waterford set for June 23-24 By Leslie Shepard staff writer

The Waterford Township Historical Society is hosting its 16th annual Log Cabin Days festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 23 and Sunday, June 24. The free event will be held at Fish Hatchery Park, located at 4490 Hatchery Road between Frembes and Dixie Highway. Michigan is the only state which has an annual statewide log cabin festival. There are currently 100 log cabins in Michigan participating. “The event started because the last Sunday in June is a state law cabin day,” said Waterford Township Historical Society President Sally Strait. The family-friendly tradition in Waterford features a tour of the 1919 Historical Hatchery House that serves as a museum and historical society headquarters, and a turn-of-the century village comprised of a log cabin, the Drayton Plains Depot, a train caboose, a hardware store, a playhouse, a print shop, the Jacober’s General Store, a barber shop, a bakery, a doctor and dentist office, a millinery, and the Nelson’s Filling Station. Like last year, Strait said she expects between 1,500 and 2,000 attendees at this year’s event. “We have a festival that families can come to free of charge — it’s a laid back day where they can tour our building and enjoy,” Strait said. Spectators can expect historical encampments such as the Sisters of the Union; the Muzzle Loaders; and the Society of Professional Surveyors. Those groups conduct

MIddle Straits swans ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 16

He noted that mute swans are not a native species to the state and that the swan population has increased from about six or eight swans three years ago to over 30 currently. Mankvitz said that the population growth has led to damage to the lake’s natural habitat and ecosystem. He added that ducks, herons and other waterfowl species are being chased away by the swans. Township Trustee Steve Kaplan

Between 1,500 and 2,000 people are expected to attend the 16th annual Log Cabin Days festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 23 and Sunday, June 24 at Fish Hatchery Park in Waterford Township. “We have a festival that families can come to free of charge — it’s a laid back day where they can tour our building and enjoy,” said Waterford Township Historical Society President Sally Strait. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

era re-enactments while wearing period costumes both Saturday and Sunday. The event includes exhibitors and attractions including spinners, quilters, rug weavers, wood workers, and alpacas. A half dozen crafters will be selling hand-made items similar to a juried arts and crafts show. This year, a pair of local historical authors will also be on site selling and signing their books. Robert Dustman, a former Detroit radio/TV broadcaster and one-time Waterford resident, penned “Defining Moments: A True Story of War, Family Conflict & Reconciliation,” a memoir of his father’s life during his tour in the

South Pacific during World War II. He will be on-site both Saturday and Sunday. Waterford resident Tom Sawyer, author of “Fire Sale” and “Sisigwad Papers,” will be on hand Sunday only. Also new to the event is a vintage sale where surplus items like books and antiques from the historic village will be sold. A white elephant sale, caricature portrait artist, and a hands-on historical tent are also planned. There will also be a kids area with free crafts, along with small-scale Michigan live steam engine train models. Entertainment abounds with live music from folk singer Bob Lowe; the

New Horizon Band, comprised of 70 members from the community; The Big Chief Chorus, a local barber shop quartet; and the Blackberry Creek Dancers. The historical society will provide hot dogs, chips, pop/water, and a fresh strawberry social for a charge. All proceeds and donations benefit the Waterford Township Historical Society. Parking and admission are free. A shuttle will transport attendees from Pierce Middle School to the site. There will be handicapped parking on the grounds of the Historical Village. For more information, call 248683-2697. ❏

said that the resolution applies to the entire township, but lake associations will have the option to opt out if they don’t want the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to come in to remove swans. In the meantime, the resolution will be sent to the DNR, which is then expected to come in to handle the situation at Middle Straits Lake at a time to be determined. The DNR in January created a Mute Swan Management and Control Program Policy with the short-term goal of reducing the statewide mute

swan population growth to zero on all lands, and the long-term goal of maintaining a spring population of less than 2,000 mute swans throughout Michigan by 2030. According to the DNR, mute swans were brought to the U.S. from Europe in the late 1800s and those swans that escaped from captivity have established populations in a number of states. In fact, the DNR states that the mute swan population in Michigan originated from one pair introduced in Charlevoix County in 1919. In 2010, the DNR counted the mute

swan population in the state at 15,500, up from about 5,700 in 2000. Mute swans are protected under state law and can only be removed under a DNR-issued permit. The way someone can tell a mute swan apart from Michigan’s native swans, the trumpeter and tundra swans, is that a mute swan has an orange bill and a black knob at the top of its bill. ❏

FOR MORE LAKES AREA NEWS SEE PAGE 18


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LAKES AREA NEWS

Frazer is interim village manager; MML to do search By Michael Shelton

New budget OK’d Village to retain current millage levy

staff writer

Leslie Shepard

The Milford Village Council has begun the search for a new village manager following the death of Arthur Shufflebarger. The council at its Monday, June 18 meeting approved to have the Michigan Municipal League (MML) utilize its executive search service and collect applications for the position. A sub-committee was also formed consisting of Village Council President Terri Rusas-George and Councilmen Michael Glagola and Kevin Ziegler. The committee will eventually select and interview the finalists for the position and make a recommendation to the council. In the meantime, Milford Township Clerk Deborah Frazer has been assigned as the village’s interim manager. “I’m up to the task. It’s nice that they rely on the staff and they know we work well as a team,” Frazer said. “Everything will stay the status quo. The departments will handle their business and if there is a major administrative issue, I will present it to the council.” Frazer added that the village is hoping to have the manager position filled within a 90-day period. Shufflebarger died during the morning hours of Monday, June 12 at his residence on Duke Street at the age of 60 as a result of natural causes after serving as the village manager since 1990. Shufflebarger’s funeral was held on Friday, June 15 at the Milford United Methodist Church and was attended by employees from the village and township. Former Village Council President Chris Smith gave the eulogy to honor his long-time friend. Shufflebarger is expected to be laid to rest in his hometown of Atchison, Kans., according to Frazer. He is survived by his wife, Kelsey, and his two daughters, Kayla and Ieasha. Memorial contributions in Shufflebarger’s name are encouraged to be sent to the Milford or Atchison United Methodist churches. ❏

staff writer

T

he Wolverine Lake Village Council unanimously adopted a budget for the 2012-13 fiscal year that nets a gain in the fund balance of over $110,000 and retains the overall millage rate at current levels. The fund balance as of Sunday, July 1, the start of the new fiscal year that ends on June 30, 2013, is projected at $1.6 million, while the fund balance is projected to be $1.78 million by the end of the budget year, according to Village Council President John Magee. “I’m very proud of this council and past councils who have put us on stable footing,” Magee said. “We have a healthy fund balance now.” However, the $110,280 being added to the fund balance may dwindle quickly due to some properties in tax foreclosure. “We are aware of a contingency that some property is in tax foreclosure and if it doesn’t sell at auction, the village could be on the hook for approximately $90,000 in taxes to Oakland County,” Magee said. Total General Fund operating revenues for the village are estimated at $2.25 million. The primary source of revenue is property taxes pegged at $1.27 million, a small increase from the current fiscal year. “This is important because we have had a steady decline in property tax, so this indicates an uptick in taxable value,” Magee said. Other primary sources of revenue include state-shared revenue, esti-

OC clerk’s mobile office to be at SOS in Highland 6/29 Highland Township will be the next stop for Oakland County Clerk/Register of Deeds Bill Bullard, Jr.’s mobile office as it will be available at the Michigan Secretary of State branch office in Highland on Friday, June 29 from 1 to 5 p.m. “We are excited about our partnership with Secretary of State Ruth Johnson and (the) One Stop Shop Mobile Office concept,” Bullard said. “We have been expanding our mobile

mated at $302,900, and refuse collection fees ($315,000). Total General Fund expenditures are approximately $2.25 million. The main expenditures are for the Wolverine Lake Police Department ($668,000); general services ($411,600); and waste and leaf collection ($315,000). One large capital outlay expense has been accounted for in the budget: a $150,000 expenditure for a new weed harvester. “We really kept a tight lid on capital expenditures over the last few years while waiting for our revenue situation to stabilize,” Magee said. The village stands to receive roughly $169,700 in major road revenue and $169,800 in local road revenues. The budget appropriates $219,650 for several local road projects during the new fiscal year, including paving along Lakeview and in the Spring Lakes Annex subdivision. The budget calls for maintaining a millage rate of 9.573 mills, the village tax rate since 1996. “We’re still below the Headlee (Amendment) maximum, which makes us fairly rare among local communities,” Magee said. A mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of a property’s taxable value, which is generally equal to half the property’s market value. The owner of a village property with taxable value of $100,000 is expected to pay $957 in village taxes during the budget year. ❏ offices into various community events lately, but this is a new level of convenience for Oakland County residents.” The mobile office offers convenience for those wishing to conduct business with the county Clerk/Register of Deeds Office and go to the Secretary of the State at the same time. The mobile office will allow people to access many services, including certified copies of birth, death, and marriage records; marriage license applications; notary public applications; military discharge forms; registration of assumed names and copartnerships; copies of property

records and deeds; Oakland County Circuit Court records; identity protection information; voter registration; and absentee ballot application forms. Normal copy fees apply. “This is a win-win for Oakland County residents because they’ll have an opportunity to take care of county business and conduct Secretary of State transactions at the same time,” said Secretary of State Ruth Johnson, Bullard’s predecessor. “Working together, we’re able to make government more accessible and convenient for everyone.” “Our job is to provide citizens the best possible service at the lowest possible cost, whether we are serving them in their community, or at our main office in the Oakland County Courthouse in Pontiac,” Bullard said. ❏

Water and sewer rates to increase in W. Bloomfield The West Bloomfield Township Board of Trustees approved the township’s water and sewer rates for the 2012-13 fiscal year at its Monday, June 18 meeting. Effective on Sunday, July 1, the water rate will increase from $38.54 per 1,000 cubic feet of water used to $38.64, an increase of 0.26 percent. The sewer rate will increase 7.49 percent from $26.82 per 1,000 cubic feet of water usage to $28.83. The sewer only flat-rate fee, which applies mostly to residents with private wells, will increase from $104.59 per quarter to $112.45 per quarter. Ed Haapala, director of the township’s Water and Sewer Department, stated in a letter to the township board that the overall 7.75 percent increase in wholesale water and sewer rates imposed by the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department and the county Water Resources Commissioner’s Office is due to water loss in the 2011 fiscal year, along with a requested change for a temporary modification in the amount of water and sewer infrastructure depreciation. The depreciation amounts are restricted funds in the Water and Sewer Enterprise Fund for capital improvement projects, as well as infrastructure projects and debt service expenditures. The depreciation amount is currently established at an annual amount of $2.55 million, according to Haapala, but that is to be reduced to $1.22 million for the upcoming budget. ❏


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

W.Bloomfield High’s ’12 summa cum laude grads

DANA SAMI ABUFARHA Plans: Attending UofM

ANKITA A. AJJAMPUR Plans: Attending UofM to study biology

ANDY PATRICK ALNAJJAR Plans: Attending UofMDearborn to study biochemistry

REBECCA FAY BERENBON Plans: Attending Oberlin College to study neuroscience

RHEA ESTELLE BERRY Plans: Attending University of Chicago to study chemistry

ESHA BISWAS Plans: Attending UofM to study biological sciences

CALVIN RAY BOYD II Plans: Attending UofM or Syracuse to study architecture

JUSTIN SCOTT BRONSTEIN Plans: Attending Case Western Reserve University to study aerospace engineering

BROOKE KIMBERLY BUFFMYER Plans: Attending CMU to study secondary education/science

CHRISTINA LOUISE CECI Plans: Attending UofMDearborn as advanced placement scholar

JOYCE WENSHION CHEN Plans: Attending UofM to study chemistry

RACHEL JEESUE CHOI Plans: Attending UofM Honors Program to study chemistry

JADE NICOLE COOK Plans: Attending UofM pre-dental program

MICHAEL GEORGE CURTIS Plans: Attending UofM to study human biology/business

HALA DUBAYBO Plans: Attending Wayne State pre-medical program

HANNAH JANET DYSTE Plans: Attending MSU

RYAN ALEXANDER EATON Plans: Attending UofM to study political science

ROSE ELIZABETH FILIPP Plans: Attending UofM

JENNIFER PAIGE FINKEL Plans: Attending Chapman University to study screenwriting and film production

NICOLE LAUREN FLEISCHMAN Plans: Attending UofM to study business

CLAIRE CASTILE FORHAN Plans: Attending UofM to study mathematics and education

JESSICA H. FRENCH Plans: Attending UofM to study art and design

ALEC MICHAEL FRITZ Plans: West Point Military Academy to study engineering and psychology

ANTHONY JAMES FRITZ Plans: West Point Military Academy to study engineering


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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PAGE 21

W.Bloomfield High’s ’12 summa cum laude grads

KELLY LEIGH GIULIANI Plans: Attending MSU to study psychology

MICHELLE RIKKI GOOEL Plans: Attending UofM

AUSTIN ZACHARY GREEN Plans: Attending UofM to study business and finance

BENJAMIN GRIESSMANN Plans: Attending UofM to study chemical engineering

MURTAZA HUSSAIN Plans: Attending Wayne State to study biochemistry

GABRIEL ELIZABETH KADIAN Plans: Attending New York University to study English

GABRIELLA JACQUELINE KARMO Plans: Attending OU to study pharmacy

UZAIR AHMED KHAN Plans: Attending UofM to study neuroscience

JOCELYN MARCELA KIRSCH Plans: Attending University of Wisconsin Stevens Point to study musical theater and business

LAUREN MARIE KLEMZ Plans: Attending UofM to study business

ARRIN MATHEW KONTOS Plans: Attending UofM to study pharmacy

ARISU (ALICE) KURIMURA Plans: Attending MSU to study nursing

MICHELLE LAN Plans: Attending UofM

DANIEL KEN-WAH LAU Plans: Attending MSU to study business/finance

JORDAN DANIEL LEWIS Plans: Attending University of Texas-Austin to study business

DANIEL PAUL LIN Plans: Attending UofM to study biomedical engineering

NICOLE S. LIU Plans: Attending UofM to study biology

AISHA MAHMOOD Plans: Attending University of Detroit Mercy

ANGELA ONWAH NG Plans: Attending Carnegie Mellon University

JESSICA LOUISE NICOSIA Plans: Attending George Washington University

JESSICA PAIGE NISKAR Plans: Attending MSU to study film

LILLIAN RACHEL MALACH Plans: Attending UofM's pre-medicine program

NIKHIL PRADEEP MANKUZHY HARRISON WINTON MATEIKA Plans: Attending UofM to Plans: Attending Wayne State study biology University's Irving D. Reid Honors College to study journalism/business


PAGE 22

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JUNE 20-26, 2012

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PAGE 23

W.Bloomfield High’s ’12 summa cum laude grads

ELIZABETH HOLLY PIONTKOWSKI Plans: Attending Wake Forest to study psychology

JACQUELINE ASHLEY PYLES Plans: Attending Boise State University to study engineering

ZARA EUPHEMIA PYLVAINEN Plans: Attending Carleton College

ALLIE RAVID Plans: Attending UofM to study biology

ALEXANDRA ALISON RISIUS Plans: Attending UofM to study biology

KAYLA BROOKE ROSEN Plans: Attending MSU (James Madison)

JOSEPH CRAIG ROSENTHAL Plans: Attending UofM to study engineering

MITCHELL SOLOMON SABLE Plans: Attending University of Detroit Mercy's predental program

ARYANA MARIA SHARRAK Plans: Attending Wayne State to study pre-medicine/ biochemistry and French

SHUBHUM SIDHAR Plans: Attending UofM to study environmental science and biology

MARTI ALEXA SILVER Plans: Attending American Jewish University and UofM to study psychology

ANDREW CONNOR SIMON Plans: Attending UofM's pre-medicine program

JULIA SHAYE SIMON Plans: Attending MSU's Lyman Briggs College

MACKENZIE ELAINE SMITH Plans: Attending UofM to study biomedical engineering

MEGHANA K. SUBRAMANIAN Plans: Attending Pennsylvania State University to study cognitive science/molecular biology

JASON SETH TISDALE Plans: Attending American University to study political science

AMANDA MICHELLE TOBIN Plans: Attending UofM to study biology

ELIANA MIRIAM UNGAR Plans: Attending UofM

EMILY NICOLE VRBENSKY ALEXANDER MICHAEL Plans: Attending Case WEISS Western Reserve Plans: Attending UofM to University to study study business engineering and music administration/marketing

CHELSEY NICOLE WEISS Plans: Attending UofM to study psychology

JERRIT YANG Plans: Attending UofM's pre-medical program

GRANT NOLAN YARBER Plans: Attending UofM to study business/music

LEAH LAETITIA ZERBIB Plans: Attending MSU's Lyman Briggs College to study math and sciences

ELI JEFFREY ZUCKER Plans: Attending UofM to study anthropology


PAGE 24

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EDUCATION

Western students in animation and drafting place 1st By Angela Niemi staff writer

This year marked the first year Walled Lake Western High School offered 2-D and 3-D animation classes; and considering two Western students took first- and second-place in ACME Animation’s National Competition in Level 1, the school’s new effort seems to be off to a pretty good start. There are three different competition levels, which are based on experience. “Students had to design animation based on the topic of tolerance,” said Jack Wellman, who taught the class in his first year. “Both students did school settings. Adam Focht’s did one about the first day of school called ‘First Day.’ It was about being different coming into a class. He did a great job. It was beautiful. His drawings were amazing. I loved the background art scenes. It was a good story.” Desmond Bouey took second-place in Level 1 for his animation entitled “Hallway Hero.” Bouey’s description of the video is as follows: “A boy on his way to school saves a young boy from a racist and harmful situation.” “He got so carried with it and was so detailed that some of it he had to leave in black and white,” Wellman said. “He did a great job, too. It’s very exciting to see both succeed nationally.” For a first-year class, Wellman said he was grateful for the opportunity to get training in Los Angeles the previous summer from teachers who work with Pixar and Dreamworks at the ACME Animation orientation, and he said he is incredibly lucky to have some “great kids come through the Art Department.” “Being my first year of teaching the class, I was a bit nervous going in but, I found that ACME’s curriculum was very helpful in getting my class up and running,” Wellman said. “I was also very blessed with extremely talented students who were motivated to succeed. I had never taught art, just drafting and engineering. I was very excited how well the students excelled with this. They had been wanting this class for a couple years and were just chomping at the bit to get started.” Wellman also had quite a few students competing in drafting recently at the Michigan Industrial and Technology Education Society State

‘The hills are alive’ ‘Sound of Music’ presented June 22-23 By Leslie Shepard staff writer

T

he Huron Valley Community Theater will be performing Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Tony Award-winning classic, “The Sound of Music,” this weekend at Huron Valley Lakeland High School’s Center for Performing Arts. Performances will be Friday, June 22 and Saturday June 23 at 7 p.m., and Sunday, June 24, at 2 p.m. The Sound of Music is a story of Maria, a young woman who is contemplating becoming a nun. Although she has good intentions, she proves too high-spirited for the religious life. She is sent to serve as a governess for the seven children of a widowed naval captain. The kids quickly become attached to Maria, who also gradually captures the heart of the captain. The captain and Maria eventually marry. Upon returning from their honeymoon, they discover that Austria has been invaded by the Nazis, who demand the captain’s immediate service in their navy. The family brainstorms a plan to escape over the mountains to Switzerland. “The stage version existed far before the film musical, so there will be some differences from the movie,” said Co-Producer Karen Nave. “All the songs and characters from the movies are still there and recognizable. It’s a great way for this generation to get to see the stage version.” Nave added that the production is unique given that a full orchestra will accompany the cast. “It’s unique, and a neat experience for the cast and also adds to the production value,” Nave said. The orchestra is comprised of college and high school students, as well as professional adult percussionists. “The students get a glimpse into how they can use their talents to move forward vs. just playing with peers in high school,” Nave said. Competition. Western’s drafting students came home with seven first-place awards,

About 50 cast members ranging from 6- to 60-years-old are participating in the production. “We have people in it from Waterford, Brighton, Howell, Commerce, Highland and, of course, Huron Valley, so it’s a good representation of the area and the community at large,” Nave said. The production is directed by Jason Pratt and produced by Nave and Jessie Pratt, Huron Valley Milford High School graduates who have been actively involved in theater. The cast is as follows: • Maria Rainer, played by Erinn Wrobel; • Georg Von Trapp, played by Bartholomew Reed; • Liesl Von Trapp, played by Meghan Griesbeck; • Friedrich Von Trapp, played by Clayton Maxwell; • Louisa Von Trapp, played by Kaitlyn Russell; • Kurt Von Trapp, played by Ian Lynar; • Brigitta Von Trapp, played by Julia Schwendenmann; • Marta Von Trapp, played by Tessa Biondo; • Gretl Von Trapp, played by Aspen Jacobson; • Mother Abbess, played by Candie Hardin; • Elsa Schraeder, played by Kenna Giddings; • Max Detweiller, played by Robert Boston; • Sister Margaretta, played by Nancy Boyd; • Sister Berthe, played by Kathy Olgeirsson; • Sister Sophia, played by Deb Biondo; • Rolf Gruber, played by James Richardson; • Frau Schmidt, played by Christine Hubbell; and • Franz, played by Ryan Goodman. Reserved seating tickets cost $11 per adult, $8 for seniors/students, and $6 for children 9-yearsold and under. Register online at hvcommunitytheater.org. ❏ eight second-place honors, and seven third-place finishes. Students who placed first included David Gornowicz,

Umang Lathia, Juan Pablo Lontscharitsch, Nate Michanowicz, Calvin Tandjung, Jacob Schiavi, and Abbot Wang. A total of 34 drawings placed in the top 10. “It was such a treat to see the students do so well after they worked so hard,” Wellman said. “We also had several freshmen and sophomores do well at the state meet, which was exciting.” The students competed in different categories, submitting rendered drawings of businesses, commercial buildings, restaurants, and set plans for homes and subdivisions. “Juan designed a beautiful high-rise hotel on the ocean, and he took firstplace in the state for that,” Wellman said. Meanwhile, Lathia was the division champion as the top mechanical drafting student for all ninth- and 10thgrade students in the state. ❏

New slate of AP courses to come to W. Bloomfield By Michael Shelton staff writer

The West Bloomfield Schools Board of Education at its Monday, May 21 meeting approved the adoption of three new courses for West Bloomfield High School beginning in the 2012-13 school year. The new courses that will be offered are Advanced Placement (AP) Western Civilization, AP Environmental Science and AP Music Theory. AP Western Civilization will give students a chance to focus on European history since 1450. The curriculum states that the goals of the class are to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation and an ability to express historical understanding in writing. The course will cover periods including the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Napoleonic Era, Industrial Revolution and World Wars I and II. AP Environmental Science will cover topics including ecosystems, climate and weather, population dynamics and matter and energy resources. According to the course proposal, classes would also be scheduled PAGE 27 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


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EDUCATION

West Bloomfield ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 25

to allow for sporadic off-site trips, similar to a medical mentorship, in order to conduct lab assignments. AP Music Theory will be geared toward students who are looking to advance their studies preparing for musical careers, as well as those who want to further their musical skills. Students will be graded on written theory and composition, eartraining and sight-singing and music literature. The literature used will cover Western Art music that will emphasize the music of the Common Practice Era (1600-1750). The students will learn about many styles of music and composers from each era. West Bloomfield High School is renowned for its award-winning band program, including its statechampionship winning marching band. ❏

All students in Waterford to see longer school day By Michael Shelton staff writer

The Waterford School District has implemented some changes for the 2012-13 school year schedule that will mean a slightly longer school day for all students. Beginning with the new school year, the schedules at Waterford Kettering and Mott high schools will be adjusted from the current sixperiod block schedule to a sevenperiod day, including a period for Academic Center work that will

count as a credited course where students can receive academic support, as well as test preparation, college or career advising, and structured work time. As a result, class times at the high schools will be 50 minutes. In order to provide the instruction in a seven-period day, the school day will be extended by 23 minutes. Middle school students will also see a 23-minute lengthening of their school day, and elementary students will see 13 minutes added to their school day. The district states this is being done to ensure equity and to maintain a gap between starting and ending times to accommodate transportation. All students in ninth- through 12th-grade will be required to take Academic Center as one of their seven classes, with an exception applying to students in grades 1012 who are scheduled to graduate on time, have a cumulative 3.0 grade point average and have no failing or incomplete grades in the previous semester. Those students can then take a seventh class in place of Academic Center. The district states that this will allow students to earn up to 28 credits in four years, with the number of credits required to graduate remaining at 24. In addition, the district states that it will be scheduling regular time for teacher collaboration and professional development in order to improve professional practices and enhance student learning. As a result, all students will see a one-hour early release on Thursdays and the district will not need to use the six half-days for professional development that are currently part of the yearly calendar. ❏

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Must present coupon. Cannot combine with any other offer. See store for details. Expires 7/15/12

www.demcnabb.com Used Auto Show Carpet available every day starting at just $0.33 (sq. ft.)

SC


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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248-669-6500

A & C Pet Hospital We Treat Your Pets like Family!

c c

Open 6 Days

BECK ROAD

25

Ask for details. Expires 7/3/12

c c IA NT PO

TO

With purchase of 12 or 6 heartworm tablets.

Dental Special

50% OFF on Spay or Neuter Packages

Includes I/V fluids, blood work, pain management and monitoring. Ask for details. Expires 7/3/12

Vaccinations $ $ 100 OFF Ea.

MAPLE ROAD

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Monday - Friday 9 - 6, Saturday 9 - 3

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A & C PET HOSPITAL GEISLER MIDDLE SCHOOL

46670 W. Pontiac Trail • Commerce Twp., MI 48390

Heartworm Test Special $ $

c

On advanced dental work. Includes blood work, I/V fluids, general anethesia, cleaning & polishing.

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MULTI-LAKES CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION

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Free Coffee / Food Available

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HALL RENTALS AVAILABLE For more information call 248-363-9109 3860 Newton Road • Commerce Township, MI 48382 www.multilakes.com

WEST OAKLAND’S

NEWSWEEKLY

IS NOW ON AND The Spinal Column Newsweekly is proud to announce our new Facebook page! There, you can receive breaking news directly from staff writers, discuss matters important to fellow lakes area residents and stay at the forefront of western Oakland County news. Simply search for “Spinal Column Newsweekly” on Facebook and add our page to participate.

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We’ve joined Twitter too! Stay connected to the Spinal Column Newsweekly, the premiere lakes area news source for over 50 years, at home or on the go. Follow @scnewsweekly to get breaking news from western Oakland County, as well as updates about stories you’ve read in the Spinal Column Newsweekly.

We’ve Gone

DIGITAL!

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50 YEARS AGO June 21, 1962 The recent death of Anthony Messina of White Lake Township left his wife, Vera, and their five children with few provisions. Out of concern for Mrs. Messina’s situation, friends and community people got together to see if they could do something to help. They decided upon holding a benefit dance, with the proceeds to go to Mrs. Messina for the care of the children. The dance will be held on Saturday, Aug. 11 ... at the Community Activities Building on Williams Lake Road in Waterford. The charge is $2 per couple, and donations will be accepted for refreshments. The Messinas have lived at their home at 9255 Camelot Road for five years. Mr. Messina worked for the M&M Cement Contractors. Their children range from 13 years to 2-monthsold and the three older ones attend Huron Valley Schools. 40 YEARS AGO June 21, 1972 The Milford Police Department is investigating the cause of a fire which last week destroyed a barn at 2705 Buno Road that housed the offices of Northwest Engineering, Inc., a heating and air conditioning company. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Caine operated the business and live in a house on the property. Mrs. Caine told the Spinal Column that three weeks ago the words “move out” were spray-painted across the barn, which has been the center of controversy in the area. Neighbors had objected to a business operating on the property, which is zoned residential, and protested to the township which issued a zoning violation. The Caines are scheduled to go to court over the violation today. Walter Wiedbrauk, a fire marshal from the Michigan State Police, has viewed the remains of the aluminumsided barn which was completely destroyed early Wednesday, June 14, and is aiding the Milford Police Department in its investigation. It was the second major fire on the property in less than six months. On Dec. 29, another barn, also over 100years-old, burned while the Caine family was on vacation.

June 23, 1982 A threat to close the 6,000-acre stateowned Highland Recreation Area, which straddles Highland and White Lake townships in west Oakland County, has spurred local criticism of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Highland has been listed among 21 parks which may be left open only two to three months or shut down entirely following Gov. William Milliken’s proposed $1.1 million reduction in the DNR Parks Division’s 1982-83 spending plan. DNR officials admit they aren’t sure how closure of a major park such as Highland would be carried out. But the facility remains on the target list because park entry fees fall far short of the cost of operation and maintenance, according to Parks Division Program Coordination Chief Henry zur Burg. 20 YEARS AGO June 17, 1992 Friends said Paul Smith, 42, of West Bloomfield died doing what he loved best — racing hydroplanes — after his boat broke apart Saturday, June 13, at an estimated speed of 125 mph on the Detroit River. Other drivers and fans wore Smith’s colors of red and white, flags flew at half-staff and a moment of silence was observed Sunday at the Thunderfest races after Smith was pronounced dead following his Saturday accident. Smith, driving a limited-class Grand Prix boat in a preliminary qualifying heat for the American Power Boat Association’s Gold Cup Race, suffered cardiac arrest and spinal cord injuries. He was still breathing 21 hours later, after being pulled from the cockpit wreckage on the river, but was pronounced dead Sunday.

Headlines of the Past

30 YEARS AGO – A special feature of the Spinal Column Newsweekly –


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LOCAL MATTERS business notes benefits ❐ The Huron Valley Council for the Arts (HVCA) is seeking help from local businesses in sponsoring a free upcoming celebration of the arts scheduled for July 21 at Byers Homestead in Commerce Township. The new Art on the River Festival will focus upon the celebration of the exceptional artistic talent in the area. Featured events include an arts and fine crafts market, artist demonstrations, a children’s crafts station and live music at the free, family-friendly event. “It’s designed to bring a feeling of community to Commerce Township at a cherished community location. Members of HVCA, in collaboration with Friends of Byers Homestead and Commerce Township Parks and Recreation, hope to build this festival into a tradition that families attend for years to come,” said Leah Ohmer, Huron Valley Council for the Arts executive director. Sponsorships by area businesses and artist participation are vital components to make Art on the River at the Byers Homestead a success. Several levels of sponsorship are available, from a $50 on-site advertiser to a $500 event sponsor. “Commerce-area businesses are challenged to join Shuman Motors, Rodnick Chiropractic, Commerce Village Dentists, New Quality Cleaners and Northern Bloomfield Properties in their welcomed support of this new event,” Ohmer added. For more information about Art on the River, call HVCA at 248-889-8660. ❐ The Samaritan Counseling Center of Southeastern Michigan will be holding its 11th annual Charity Golf Outing on Friday, June 22 at Moose Ridge Golf Course, 11801 Doane Road, South Lyon (near Huron Meadows Metropark). The four-person golf scramble registration begins at 11 a.m. with a shotgun start beginning at 1 p.m. Form your own four-

New owner at SCN Duncan to bring decades of expertise

T

he Spinal Column Newsweekly is getting a new owner. The family of Jim Fancy, the late owner of Oakland Communications, Inc., has signed a letter of intent to sell the assets of the 30,000 weekly newspaper and its associated publications to Dale A. Duncan, a Michigan native and former president and publisher of The Oakland Press. Susan Fancy, publisher of the Spinal Column Newsweekly and daughter of the former owner, said she and her brother, Steven, anticipate the sale will be completed early next month. “My father would be happy to know the newspaper will be operated by someone with extensive newspaper experience,” she said. “He loved the lakes region of Oakland County and cared deeply about the people here. It’s important to us, after 51 years of our family ownership, that all of our publications continue to thrive by providing news and information to their communities that people cannot find elsewhere.” Oakland Communications, Inc., based in Union Lake, has 24 employees. In addition to The Spinal Column Newsweekly, which circulates in western Oakland County, the company publishes four editions of The Monthly Advertiser, which reaches nearly 100,000 homes by mail; Oakland Lakefront, a seasonal magazine received by 17,000 upper-income people who live on the lakes; and Oakland Homes, a 6,000 free circulation real estate magazine. It also is the publisher of spinalcolumnonline.com and publishes a weekly Eedition of the newspaper. Duncan said he looks forward to working with the staff to grow the company and to serve readers and advertisers in Oakland County. “I remember The Spinal Column from my days as a reporter at The Oakland Press in the late 1970s,” he said. “I know it for its distinguished and aggressive coverage of local news and its emphasis on the environment. I think we can build on that history and grow its audience in the region.” Duncan, 57, was born in Detroit and raised in Macomb County. He is a graduate of Central Michigan University. He had a 22-year career as a reporter, editor and publisher with Capital Cities/ABC, one-time owner of The Oakland Press, and later served as president and publisher of The Indianapolis Star. He most recently was president of Maine Today Media in Portland, Maine. ❏ some or you will be placed in a great group. The $130 per golfer cost includes cart, practice tee and balls, lunch, golf, on-course beverages, dinner (steak on the grill) and awards. All monies raised from this outing are used to build Samaritan’s client assistance fund to aid in the cost of counseling. Non-golfers are

THANK YOU!!!

We would like to extend a heartfelt “Thank You!” to everyone who attended and volunteered their time at the “Matt Sprader for Supervisor Campaign Kick-Off Fundraiser”. The turnout far exceeded our expectations and the outpouring of support and generosity was truly overwhelming. We would like to encourage everyone to continue to attend the monthly Township Board meetings and to vote in the primary election on August 7th. Sincerely, Matt Sprader for Supervisor Campaign Committee Paid for by: Matt Sprader for Supervisor, 64 Grandview Circle, White Lake , MI 48386 (248) 640-2694 Error correction: The campaign kick-off ad in the May 30th issue of the Spinal Column should have read “Paid for by” instead of “Sponsored by”. Our apologies for the oversight.

welcome to attend dinner at a cost of $25. Call 248-474-4701 or visit www.samaritancounselingmichigan.com for additional information. The main office is located in Farmington Hills, with branch offices on the properties of Highland United Methodist Church, 650 W. Livingston Road in Highland, and First United Methodist Church, 777 W. Eight Mile Road in Northville.

weekly agenda ❐ FAMtastic Fitness of Novi is offering a FREE Family Fitness Adventure from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 30, at Kensington Metropark in Milford. The Adventure will begin with biking/Stroller Fitness along the paved trails that run along Kent Lake. As a reward for the children and a break for the adults, the next stop will be at a playground for some play time. After some play time, the Adventure will continue along the Wildwing Trail, which encircles Wildwing Lake, for a family

hike/walk with the strollers. Following the hike, families have the option to either visit the Farm Center, continue on to Martindale Beach for some fun at the beach/Splash ‘n’ Blast waterpark, or head home for the day. Admission to the waterpark is $4 for adults and $3 for kids and seniors. Children under 2years-old are free. This does not include the additional required motor vehicle park permit. For more information, visit www.FAMtasticFitness.com/family-fitness-adventures or call owner/ operator Maria Tilmos at 734-516-7101. ❐ Veterinary Care Specialists in Milford will be holding their Pets First

WEST OAKLAND COUNTY

SHOP LOCAL • THINK LOCAL • LIVE LOCAL

Support yourself and your community – shop locally! The choices that you make about where to shop are powerful statements to your community. By choosing locally owned & operated businesses, you support: Schools • Police and Fire • Libraries • Parks & Recreation • Roads Invest in our future – buy local, live local, and volunteer local too.

You have a choice! Spend it here. Keep it here. Pet Safety Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, June 23, at 205 Rowe Road. This event will feature valuable pet safety information, ResQ Microchip Identification Implant for only $25, canine good citizenship testing, as well as vendors, prizes and giveaways. For more information, contact Vikki or Heather at Veterinary Care Specialists at 248-684-0468.

chamber notes ❐ The Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce (HVCC) is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, visit www.huronvcc.com. • HVRN - Thursday Group, 8 a.m. Thursday, June 21, Comeback Inn,

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1451 S. Milford Road, Highland. • HVRN Tuesday Group, 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 26, Milford Fire Station, 325 W. Huron, Milford. • Euchre Tournament, 7:30 p.m., Friday, June 29, 59 West, Highland. Doors open at 7:30 p.m., tournament begins at 8:30 a.m. $25 per person. All proceeds benefit the Huron Valley Milford High School Cheer Program. RSVP/questions, contact Pam, 248462-5185 or gr8da@yahoo.com. ❐ The Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, call 248-624-2826 or visit www.lakesareachamber.com. • First Friday Coffee, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., July 6, Veterinary Care Specialists and VCS Pets First, 205 Rowe Road, Milford. Complimentary early morning networking opportunity. • Spotlight Lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, July 10, Cooley Lake Inn, 8635 Cooley Lake Road, Commerce. Informal networking. No registration required. Free soft drinks with your meal purchase. ❐ The Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce has announced that the following businesses have joined its membership ranks: • CMC Solutions, Brian Swanson, 248-960-1632, 50164 Pontiac Trail, Suite 5, Wixom. www.cmcpems.com • Cooley Lake Inn, Loretta Vidu, 248-363-9469, 8635 Cooley Lake Road, Commerce. • Express Employment Professionals, Fran Krause, 248-6826500, 49175 Pontiac Trail, Wixom. www.expresspros.com. • Huron Valley Council For The Arts, Leah Ohmer, 248-889-8660, 205 W. Livingston Road, Highland. www.huronvalleyarts.org. • Legacy Realty Group, Caryn Jensen, 248-681-8300, 2961 Orchard Place, Orchard Lake. www.legacy4u.com. • Motor City Party Bus, Tim Siepierski, 248-229-1709, 10325 Highland Road, White Lake. www.motorcitypartybus.com. • Nature Ripe Produce, Kevin McGuire, 248-859-5344, 706 N. Pontiac Trail, Walled Lake. www.natureripeproduce.com. • Oak Pointe Church, David Hughes, 248-912-0043, 50200 W. Ten Mile, Novi. www.oakpointe.org. • Sazbean Consulting, Loretta Vidu, 248-707-9666, 141 N. Milford Road, Suite 103, Highland. www.sazbean.com • UBS Financial Services, Kelly

The Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce would like to thank Barry Pearce of the Beacon Hill Golf Club & Banquet Center in Commerce Township for hosting a Spotlight Lunch event on Wednesday, June 13 for chamber members. The chamber reports the food was good, and the service was, too. Pictured above, from left to right, are Carol Wagner, Matt Burns, Barry Pearce and Cherel Cairns at Beacon Hill. The Spotlight Lunch events are networking opportunities for chamber members held at member restaurants. The host restaurant offers free soft drinks, coffee or tea with any meal purchase, often at a special low price. Members are invited to bring their friends and co-workers to enjoy lunch. For more information about the Spotlight Lunch events or the chamber in general, call 248-624-2826 or visit lakesareachamber.com. (Photo/Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce)

Petrocella, 248-645-3933, 325 N. Old Woodward, Suite 200, Birmingham. ❐ The Waterford Area Chamber of Commerce is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, call 248-666-8600 or visit www.waterfordchamber.org • Movies Under the Moonlight: “Secretariat,” movies and activities, family event, 6 to 11 p.m., Friday, June 22, Pierce Middle School, 5145 Hatchery Road, Waterford. 248-666-8600. ❐ The Greater West Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce is proud to announce the appointment of Ronald Bush as Interim Executive Director. Ron comes to the chamber with the professional expertise and working experience that gives the West Bloomfield Chamber the ability to engage, retain and grow our membership. It is our responsibility as the community resource to promote business in the greater West Bloomfield area and to inform our residents and visitors about the range of business services available throughout our community. Working harder and smarter to bring business and community together. We also want to acknowledge and thank Kay Bostwick, the assistant director, for her continued dedication and hard work.

The Huron Valley Council for the Arts (HVCA) seeks local businesses and artists for a free celebration of the arts on Saturday, July 21 at the Byers Homestead in Commerce Township. The new Art on the River Festival will focus on the exceptional artistic talent in the area. Featured events include an art and fine craft market, artist demonstrations, a children’s craft station and live music. Sponsorships by area businesses and artist participation are vital components in making the event a success. Several levels of business sponsorship are available, from a $50 on-site advertiser to a $500 event sponsor. Interested artists must submit photos of their work along with a completed application form, which can be found on the HVCA’s website at huronvalleyarts.org. For more information about Art on the River, call the HVCA at 248-889-8660. (Photo submitted by Dianne Deinek)


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PUBLIC SAFETY Fire at former missile site probed in Commerce The Commerce Township Fire Department responded to a reported fire at the abandoned Nike missile site on Wise Road Wednesday, June 13 around 2:11 p.m. According to Fire Chief Joe Schornack, it’s still unknown how the fire started, although arson is being considered as a possibility. The fire that burned at an abandoned control and barracks structure remains under the investigation by the Commerce Township Fire Department and an Oakland County Sheriff’s Department fire investigator. Schornack said there are currently no suspects. ❏

Man used knife in theft of $250 in Commerce Oakland County Sheriff’s Department Commerce Township substation deputies were dispatched to Cleaner Image located in the 8000 block of Richardson Road at around 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 13 on a report of an armed robbery. According to the complainant, a white male wearing a black hooded sweatshirt with green writing on the back and dark pants, and armed with a knife demanded money. He took off with approximately $250 in cash. The suspect was not seen entering any vehicle but fled west in the retail plaza. A K-9 unit was called in and a perimeter was established. The K-9 was able to locate a steak knife that was used in the robbery, but was unable to continue the suspect track from that point. ❏

Camper detained by immigration officials A man staying at Camp Dearborn who was arrested by Milford police for possession of marijuana last weekend was later held by U.S. immigration officials on suspicion he may have been in the country illegally. The incident occurred on Sunday, June 17 just after 1 a.m. when an officer making a traffic stop noticed two suspicious men standing outside a gray Dodge Charger with its trunk open near the Speedway parking lot on General Motors Road. The officer eventually approached the vehicle and reportedly could smell marijuana and found a leafy green substance on the vehicle’s center console. The driver said that he did not

Rape investigated Girl, 17, reports March CSC incident By Leslie Shepard staff writer

W

alled Lake police are investigating a criminal sexual assault incident that allegedly occurred in late March in the 830 block of North Pontiac Trail. Police spoke with the 17-year-old female victim who stated she and her boyfriend began engaging in consentual sex, but during the act she asked him to stop because she was in pain. According to police reports, the 21-year-old male suspect refused to stop. The victim began pushing hard on his stomach to get him away from her, but he allegedly began hurling profanities at her and then insisted she perform other sexual acts. She complied since she felt forced, even though she “felt sick to her stomach.” After the incident, she dressed and was picked up by her mother. The victim told her mother what had occurred, but the woman didn’t want the crime reported since, according to the victim, her mother said it would ruin her life and she didn’t believe the police could do much about it. The victim reported the incident after she spoke with a therapist who advised her to do so. The teen severed ties with the boyfriend following the attack. ❏ know about the marijuana and that he was just driving the vehicle’s owner to the gas station. A search of the driver turned up a folded brown paper with broken white pills, which he said belonged to the vehicle’s owner, who was in the station. The driver said that he saw the pills in the cupholder and took them and he was arrested for possession of the pills and marijuana. The officers caught up with the car’s owner at the Speedway and he said he did not know what was in his car. A search of the vehicle turned up a leafy green substance in the trunk and the car’s owner was arrested for possession of marijuana. The driver was interviewed by police and said that he came to Camp Dearborn with some girls and met the vehicle’s owner, who had rented out a cabin at the camp. One of the girls became sick and the owner was drunk, so the driver was asked to drive them to Speedway to meet the girl’s parents. The driver added that he took the pills in the cupholder in order to impress another girl. He added that he and the vehicle owner were standing near the car’s trunk so the owner could show him where more marijuana was. The driver refused to complete a written statement and said that everything in the car belonged to the vehicle owner. The owner of the car admitted to smoking marijuana earlier, but said it

belonged to the driver, as well as the pills and everything else in the vehicle. When asked about the trunk, the owner said that the driver asked him to open it so he could put something in it, but the owner didn’t know what it was. The driver was released from custody while a detainer was dispatched by U.S. immigration officials for the vehicle’s owner. The marijuana recovered weighed 2.5 grams while the pills were Alprazolam 2 mg pills. Officers later went to the cabin at Camp Dearborn, where two women and two men were sleeping inside. Both women reportedly were named in warrants from different jurisdictions, which were requested to advise and release. ❏

person(s) attempted to steal his 2000 Chrysler Concorde from the parking lot. Police observed severe damage to the car’s steering column and ignition. The attempt was unsuccessful because the car required a computer chip in the key to operate the vehicle. There are no suspects in the cases at this time. ❏

Drunk man grabbed Milford officer’s testicles Milford police arrested a man who reportedly tried to fight off officers after he and two women allegedly were found in a truck in an empty parking lot with marijuana. The incident occurred on Saturday, June 16 at 2:15 a.m. when an officer on patrol found a GMC Yukon truck in the Mill Valley Vacuum parking lot on Main Street. The female driver of the vehicle said that they met the male passenger in the truck at the Red Dog Saloon and that he asked her and her girlfriend to smoke marijuana, which the officer reportedly could smell. The male and the female passenger allegedly became agitated and ignored the officer’s commands, according to a police report. The officer then tried to handcuff the male, but he tried to pull his arm away and yelled profanities at the officer. Backup officers arrived and the man allegedly grabbed at the officer’s testicles at one point. Officers reportedly found a prescription bottle in the truck with a marijuana roach. The male suspect was taken to the police station and lodged while still yelling profanities at officers. He reportedly had a blood-alcohol content of 0.136 percent after a Breathalyzer test was administered. ❏

No suspects in pair of stolen vehicle cases

Landscaping truck and trailer missing in Milford

A pair of stolen vehicle complaints were lodged with Wixom police on Sunday, June 10. A victim who resides in the 30750 block of Beechwood in the Village Apartments told police he discovered his gold 1998 Dodge Intrepid missing from the north parking lot. The victim had all sets of the vehicle’s keys in his possession and there were no liens on the vehicle. In addition, a stolen vehicle attempt occurred down the road at the Stoneridge Apartment complex. A victim who lives in the 30980 block of Stoneridge reported some unknown

Milford police are asking for assistance in locating a missing landscaping truck and trailer. The owner of Golden Landscaping reported the truck missing from his father-in-law’s property on Tuesday, June 12 at 9:15 a.m. The company’s employees said they did not have the truck and had not seen it since the previous day. The keys for the truck are also missing. The truck is a 2006 GMC Sierra and both the truck and trailer have a white color with Golden Landscaping in green lettering. ❏


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UPDATE

Headed to Snyder Bill passed to ensure federal road $$$ By Leslie Shepard staff writer

T

he Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) is poised to receive about $100 million to meet the matching funds requirement in order to receive federal transportation funding now that legislation has passed the state House and Senate. Senate Bill (SB) 351, passed by the state Senate on Tuesday, June 12, would earmark 18 percent from the first 4 percent of the 6 percent state sales tax on vehicle fuel sales for matching funds required to receive annual federal transportation allocations. The remaining 2 percent of the existing sales tax collected upon the sale of vehicle fuel is allocated to schools under Proposal A. Essentially the bill reconfigures the existing distribution structure for sales tax revenue. “Currently the 6 percent you pay on fuel (sales) goes 100 percent to the (state’s) general fund and now it will take some of the monies and put (them) in the state trunkline (fund), so by no means is it a tax increase — it’s not additional money from the locals,” said MDOT Spokesperson Rob Morosi. The bill was drafted to help Michigan obtain enough dollars to qualify for annual federal funding allocations. “Essentially the bill was introduced because the governor had made an announcement that he would support legislation for additional transportation revenue next year,” Morosi said. “SB 351 will be done on a limited basis and is not supposed to go into effect until Oct. 1, 2012, with a sunset clause of Sept. 30, 2013.”

Dems narrowing quest for missives in PA 280 battle Democrats in Oakland County have withdrawn a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request seeking documents about the effort leading up to a new state law that took control of the redistricting process for the county

Prior to final approval, the legislation was revised to cap the new earmark at $100 million annually for the state trunkline fund. Anything in excess would be appropriated to the state’s counties and cities, meaning county road commissions would get 66 percent and cites and villages would net 34 percent (for highway, road and street projects along with related purposes), but more than likely only MDOT will reap the benefits unless the $100 million threshold is exceeded. “We’re not going to get anything out of this,” said Road Commission for Oakland County Spokesperson Craig Bryson. “The bill states that it shall not exceed $100 million and the first share goes to the state and after that, other agencies, but the state needs more than $100 million to match federal funds,” Bryson said. Morosi agreed that potential exists. “It’s not intended as a profitable windfall for MDOT but to provide additional match dollars for the state to leverage all federal monies we bring in for transportation projects,” Morosi said. Transportation officials are still waiting for the federal government to pass a new federal surface transportation bill. “Until that’s passed we don’t know what is needed to match funds,” Morosi said. Only Senate Republicans voted in favor of the legislation, including state Sens. Mike Kowall (R-White Lake, Commerce, Highland, Milford, Walled Lake, Wixom, Wolverine Lake, Orchard Lake, West Bloomfield) and David Robertson (R-Waterford). ❏ Board of Commissioners away from them. Although the request has been withdrawn, that doesn’t mean that county Democrats aren’t still going to look for evidence of backroom politicking dealing with the passage of Public Act (280) of 2011, the law passed at the end of last year giving the Oakland County Board of Commissioners, which is controlled by a Republican PAGE 35 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯

Area road construction COMMERCE ROAD (Commerce Township) • Closure: Commerce Road between Carroll Lake and Union Lake roads, from Monday, June 25 until Monday, July 2. • Completion date: Sept. 1. • Notes: The project involves reconstruction of the roadway, as well as traffic signal upgrades and drainage improvements. Motorists should expect delays. • Cost: $2.6 million. COOLEY LAKE ROAD (Milford, Highland, White Lake, and Commerce townships) • Closure: Cooley Lake Road, east of Duck Lake to Mystic Valley. • Notes: A $4.4 million gravel road paving project will be underway on Cooley Lake Road, east of Duck Lake to Mystic Valley, in Milford, Highland, White Lake, and Commerce townships. • Detour: Duck Lake Road to Commerce Road to Carey Road, and vice versa. • Completion date: November. BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION PROJECTS: I-96 EAST OF MILFORD ROAD, WEST OF KENT LAKE ROAD (Milford area) • Completion date: Fall. • Notes: A series of bridge reconstruction projects are being facilitated in the area and carried out in phases. Currently crews are constructing the inside of the Milford Road bridge. Traffic has recently been shifted onto the new portion of the Milford bridge. One lane in each direction of Milford Road will be open during the project. Crews also began demolition of the Kent Lake Road bridge (I-96 over Kent Lake Road). The second phase is expected before the Wednesday, July 4 holiday when motorists will be traveling on pavement. Both bridges are being reconstructed in phases so three lanes are maintained on I-96 at all times. • Cost: $15.5 million.


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UPDATE

FOIA withdrawal ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 34

majority, the power to redrawn county board district lines after Democrats held the reins in the process as a result of the 2010 elections. “We’re just basically re-evaluating things,” said Oakland County Democratic Party Chairman Frank Houston. “We’ll resubmit it right after July 4.” The FOIA request was asking for documents and electronic records from Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson, county Clerk/Register of Deeds Bill Bullard, Jr., Board of Commissioners Chairman Mike Gingell, and the county commission containing the words “redistrict,” “redistricting,” “apportionment,” “map,” “deviation,” “compactness,” “Voting Rights Act,” “VRA,” or both of the words “majority” and “minority” from between March 1, 2011 and Monday, April 23. A previous FOIA request yielded hundreds of pages of e-mails between Republican state lawmakers, appointed and elected Oakland County officials, and lobbyists that Democrats say are proof that PA 280’s passage had nothing to do with saving the county

$250,000 annually in county commissioner salary and benefit costs as county officials had contended, since PA 280 requires the shrinking of the county board from 25 to no more than 21 commissioners. Democrats counter that PA 280 was a purely political maneuver to regain control of the redistricting process. ❏

Wastewater plants recognized for their compliance By Angela Niemi staff writer

The Walled Lake-Novi Wastewater and Commerce Township Wastewater Treatment plants were both awarded with the Platinum Peak Performance Award by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) again this year. The NACWA was established in 1970 by a group representing 22 large municipal sewerage agencies to secure federal funding for municipal wastewater treatment and to discuss improving the quality of the nation’s waters. Now, the NACWA is a national organiza-

lake levels LAKE LEVELS Following are the lake level readings for lakes and rivers across the western Oakland lakes area, as compiled by Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner John P. McCulloch’s office. Legal levels are denoted by elevation in feet from sea level; current levels are denoted as plus or minus the legal in hundredths of feet. River depths are measures from the river bottom, at point of measurement. WATERWAYS Cass Cedar Island Commerce Dawson Mill Pond Duck Fox Huron River Long Loon* Maceday-Lotus Middle & Lower Straits Mohawk Oakland-Woodhull Orchard Oxbow Pontiac Shawood-Walled Lake Schoolhouse Scott Sylvan-Otter Union Upper Straits Watkins White Williams

LEGAL LEVEL 929.22 934.00 906.80 928.60 1016.63 930.00 1.08 933.00 949.30 966.70 930.70 949.30 957.50 930.50 942.75 962.83 932.80 949.30 951.00 928.60 927.07 930.80 950.00 1019.10 965.42

5/25/12 +.10 +.30 +.42 +.09 +.09 +.10 +.14 +.17 +.13 +.10 –.10 +.33 +.10 +.01 +.35 +.70 +.30 +.28 –1.40 +.10 +.13 +.28 –.05 Legal –.03

6/1/12 Legal +.41 +.22 +.09 +.08 +.09 +.04 +.17 +.22 +.01 –.08 +.34 +.13 –.12 +.27 +.59 +.20 +.30 –1.33 +.12 +.11 +.17 –.08 –.03 –.12

*Reading for Loon Lake, in Waterford Township, also applies to Mohawk–Worme Schoolhouse, Silver and Upper Silver Lakes.

6/8/12 +.16 +.40 +.23 +.11 +.10 +.09 +.04 +.22 +.25 +.02 +.06 +.30 +.18 –.14 +.26 +.49 +.10 +.28 –1.42 +.13 +.10 +.08 –.06 Legal –.12

tion involved in water quality protection and represents the collective interests of America’s clean water utilities. The Platinum Peak Performance Award recognizes 100 percent compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit limits over a consecutive five-year period. “This is truly a great honor and reflects the hard work and dedication of our employees at the two facilities which have earned this highly prestigious recognition,” said Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner John P. McCulloch, whose office operates and maintains the wastewater treatment plants. “The Walled Lake-Novi plant has received the award six times and the Commerce Township facility seven times, which is a testament to their efforts to keep Oakland County waterways pollution-free.” In a letter notifying and congratulating McCulloch and his team, Kelly Brocato of the NACWA stated: “Your commitment to excellence in environmental protection is outstanding.” Both facilities will be featured in a video presentation during the July 16 Awards Ceremony at the NACWA’s summer conference held in Philadelphia, for having won the award multiple times. “Our top priorities as Oakland County’s environmental stewards are ensuring that our waterways are clean and free of pollution and that natural wildlife habitats and wetlands are preserved,” McCulloch said. “The 220 men and women who work for the Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner’s Office are true professionals who are dedicated to maintaining the highest standards possible.” ❏

Brown muzzled over abortion bill floor speech By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

What started off last week as a simple floor speech in the state House of Representatives on a controversial issue has attracted national and international media attention, after state Rep. Lisa Brown was rebuked by her Republican counterparts for remarks she made during an impassioned statement against abortion legislation. Brown (D-West Bloomfield, Commerce, Wolverine Lake) chided a

bill proffered by the House GOP, ending her retort with the following quip: “I’m flattered that you’re all so interested in my vagina, but ‘no’ means ‘no.’” Democratic leadership informed Brown on Thursday, June 14, the day following her remarks on the House floor, that she and state Rep. Barb Byrum (D-Onodaga) — who had offered up an amendment to the abortion legislation to require that legitimate medical reasoning would be needed to perform a vasectomy — would not be recognized by the Republican Speaker of the House to speak on the House floor about any legislation that day. Earlier this week, Brown said she still had yet to hear “from anyone in Republican leadership” about being prohibited from speaking on the House floor on Thursday. The office of Speaker of the House Jase Bolger (R-Marshall) took to Twitter, saying “2 Reps. aren’t being recognized to speak today because of their actions. (It) has nothing to (do) w/gender, religion or topic.” National and international media attention has been ginned up over the issue, even prompting a performance of “The Vagina Monologues” on the steps of the state Capitol building on Monday, June 18. Brown said the support she has received from constituents and outside her district as “overwhelming.” There has also been an uptick in campaign donations, according to Brown. “I didn’t plan this,” she said. “I never could have dreamt this. I’m just trying to do the job that I was elected to do ... We’ll see when I get to speak again.” House Bill 5711 would require that “a physician who performs an abortion shall arrange for the final disposition of the fetal remains resulting from the abortion” unless the mother of the aborted fetus provides written consent for research on the fetal remains. In addition, the bill requires that abortion providers determine that a woman seeking the procedure have not been coerced into doing so. It also requires that abortion providers who perform six or more abortions per month maintain professional liability coverage of at least $1 million “for the purpose of compensating a woman suffering from abortion complications caused by the gross negligence or malpractice of the physician.” Senate lawmakers don’t expect to take up HB 5711 until September. ❏


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

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From Janice T. Brines, White Lake: Sitting at my grandson’s elementary school bus stop, (I) got an ear full. Two children between first- and fifth-grade were discussing how to kill a human. One of them was talking while the other one was poking him (or her) trying to tell him, “No, no, this is how.” Were they talking about a game, a book, or the real thing? Parents: What are your children doing and do you approve of it? Reading books, watching movies, playing games about killing humans. I was appalled. When does this story-telling possibly become a reality to small minds still being formed morally? As a grandparent, I felt such sadness that those children could have been my grand-children. To say it’s just a book, or just a

movie, or just a game — for some it may become more reality to them if there is no balance. These are children who were given to us to protect, to help them grow to be the best they can be morally, emotionally, mentally and physically. God game them to us; it is our responsibility to be responsible for everything that they come in contact with. As a parent and a grand-parent, I pray for my children and grand-children. As an adult, I need to be responsible for what I do or don’t do. Heads up, parents. These children are yours to form morally for a short period of time. It is our God-given responsibility to take a stand for our children. I don’t remember in my childhood hearing children discussing how to kill a human — did you? ❏

Mail Bag provides a forum to express your thoughts. Please limit to 275 words or less. Please type and double space. We reserve the right to edit or not publish any letter. Deadline - Friday at 12 noon. Include name, address and phone number for verification, only your name and community will be published. Letters without names will not be considered. Mail to Spinal Column Newsweekly, P.O. Box 14, Union Lake, MI 48387; fax 24/7 to Editor 248-360-1220 or email to news@thescngroup.com.

1403 N. Pontiac Trail Walled Lake, MI 48390 248-624-4600 www.walledlakecoc.com Minister Roger Woods Sunday Bible School 10 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. Small Groups 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7 p.m.

AROUND THE LAKES AREA

A special feature of the Spinal Column Newsweekly

WE’RE ASKING… What is your favorite summer barbecue or picnic food? "Hot dogs with onions."

— Rachel Riehl, White Lake Twp.

"Ribs with barbecue sauce."

— Jessie Lemarb, White Lake Twp.

"Hamburgers with cheese and tomato."

—Amber Hardenburgh, White Lake Twp.

"Hot dogs with ketchup."

— Madison Snell, White Lake Twp.


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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PAGE 37

IN OUR OPINION

More funds for roads, bridges It’s time for lawmakers to consider changes in state fuel taxes M ichigan lawmakers have granted final approval to a bill that will probably be a bit confusing to most people, given that it involves the state sales tax collected whenever vehicle fuel is purchased and the continued lament from transportation officials about the need for more revenue to maintain or expand existing roads and construct new roadways. This much is clear: The state Legislature has yet to take action to address the growing gap between road maintenance and construction needs and the funding available for road work. It’s our hope that lawmakers — whether it’s those who are serving in the current Legislature or those who will be elected later this year to take office in January — give some real attention to the state’s road funding dilemma. The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) will take in about $100 million during the next fiscal year to meet the matching funds requirement to receive federal transportation funding following recent final approval of legislation in Lansing. Senate Bill (SB) 351 earmarks 18 percent from the first 4 percent of the state’s 6 percent sales tax on vehicle fuel purchases for matching funds required to receive annual federal transportation allocations. The remaining 2 percent of the existing sales tax collected upon the sale of vehicle fuel is allocated to schools under provisions of voter-approved Proposal A. Essentially the bill reconfigures the existing distribution structure for revenue from the existing sales tax collected upon the purchase of vehicle fuel. According to MDOT Spokesperson Rob Morosi, all of the current sales tax revenue collected on vehicle fuel purchases — except the final 2 percent dedicated to schools — is deposited into the state’s General Fund. He said under SB 351, a small portion will now

be diverted into the state’s trunkline fund. The bill’s earmark for the trunkline fund will take effect on Oct. 1 — the first day of the state’s 2012-13 fiscal year — and then expire on Sept. 30, 2013. Prior to final approval, the bill was revised to cap the new earmark at $100 million. Anything collected in excess will be appropriated to the state’s counties and municipalities as revenue sharing and to the state’s county road agencies: Road commissions would get 66 percent and municipalities would net 34 percent for highway, road and street, and bridge projects, and other transportation initiatives. Municipalities and county road agencies already receive a portion of the sales tax collected upon fuel sales; however, their share of the total will now be smaller for at least the next year. Approval of SB 351 doesn’t not represent a tax increase of any kind. The bill merely changes how revenue from the long-standing sales tax is distributed; so, there’s no windfall for MDOT, and certainly none for the county road agencies, which will now share a smaller piece of the revenue pie. The real benefit of the bill is that the state will have a one-year dedication of sales tax revenue to help meet the annual matching funds requirement to receive federal transportation funds. Coming up with the matching funds has become increasingly difficult in recent years, which has jeopardized the state’s ability to rake in “free” federal money for roads, bridges, and transit projects. State transportation officials are still waiting for Congress to pass a new federal surface transportation bill. Until Washington takes action, the state won’t know what is needed in matching funds. At least SB 351 will help get the state to whatev-

er matching fund level is necessary so that it doesn’t forfeit available federal funding. At the point the state is unable to meet the minimum matching funds requirement, Michigan’s share of federal road funds will go to other states. So, while the final approval of SB 351 is good news for the effort to cobble together matching funds to satisfy federal requirements, it does nothing to help the state’s county road agencies or MDOT secure new revenue. Keep in mind that the state’s long-range transportation budget shortfall reportedly is around the $3 billion mark. Michigan’s fuel taxes haven’t been hiked in close to two decades. With the state’s economy improving — albeit slowly — and its budget now stabilized after years of turmoil, it’s time to consider changes. After all, labor and material costs for road and bridge projects certainly have risen since fuel taxes were raised in the mid-1990s. It only make sense to give sincere consideration toward at least a small bump up in the fuel taxes, or even equalizing the gasoline and diesel taxes — remember, the state’s gas tax is 19 cents per gallon, while the diesel tax is 15 cents per gallon. It’s foolish to believe lawmakers will take action to hike fuel taxes prior to this year’s elections; but, there’s always the lameduck legislative session following the November general election, after current lawmakers have won or lost in November. Then there’s the folks who will be elected in November to start a new legislative session after the new year. They won’t have to face the prospect of re-election until 2014. As such, we’re hoping those lawmakers will finally deal with the need to revise fuel taxes in order to close the gap between funding and needs. ❏

Brown’s censorship was wrong We’re betting that just one week ago Lisa Brown didn’t think she’d be thrust into the national spotlight for speaking her mind, or performing “The Vagina Monologues” on the steps of the state Capitol. The Democrat representing West Bloomfield Township, Commerce Township and Wolverine Lake in the state House was outrageously stifled for something she often does — making remarks on the floor of the state’s lower chamber. Republican leadership in the Michigan House of Representatives should be ashamed for muzzling Brown, as well as her colleague state Rep. Barb Byrum (D-Onondaga). Brown’s remarks last week over a controversial bill concluded with the following quip: “I’m flattered that you’re all so interested in my vagina, but ‘no’ means ‘no.’” Some have speculated GOP leadership refused to recognize her on the House floor the next day because she said the word “vagina.” Others have said

it was because the phrase “‘no’ means ‘no’” is associated with rape. Regardless, Brown should not have been silenced. Neither should have Byrum, who offered up an amendment to House Bill 5711 that would have required legitimate medical reasoning in order to perform a vasectomy. The office of Speaker of the House Jase Bolger (RMarshall) took to Twitter, saying “2 Reps. aren’t being recognized to speak today because of their actions. (It) has nothing to (do) w/gender, religion or topic.” Bolger himself reportedly didn’t make the decision to put Brown and Byrum in the Bad Lawmakers’ Corner; that reportedly was done by state Rep. Jim Stamas (R-Midland), the Majority Floor Leader. Of all places, the Michigan Legislature should be a place where free speech — you know, the concept laid out in the First Amendment? — is lionized, put on a pedestal and never trampled upon. Instead, that’s

what happened at the behest of Republicans made uncomfortable by Brown’s remarks. We aren’t surprised that GOP leadership didn’t like her remarks or that they came in opposition to legislation outlining new requirements for abortion providers. However, we’re stunned that Republican House leadership would prohibit Brown and Byrum from speaking about anything the following day. Honest and open debate, regardless of the issue at hand, should not be stymied because someone says something the majority party doesn’t like, whether Republicans or Democrats are in charge. The GOP leadership that muzzled Brown and Byrum last week was wrong, plain and simple, and ushered in an embarrassing low for both the Michigan Legislature and the state itself, considering the national and international media coverage. Pure Michigan, indeed. ❏


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COMMUNITY CALENDAR ■ Walled Lake Concert Series: Groove Therapy, 7 p.m. Thursday, June 21, Riley Park, Walled Lake. Free admission. ■ Huron Valley Council for the Arts: Friday Night Live: Milford’s singer/songwriter Gary Weisenburg’s Sing-a-long, 7 p.m. Friday, June 22, downtown Milford’s Center Street Park gazebo. Free admission. 248-889-8660 or visit www.huronvalleyarts.org. ■ Waterford Youth Assistance and Waterford Chamber of Commerce: Movies Under the Moonlight - “Secretariat,” movies and activities, family event, 6 to 11 p.m., Friday, June 22, Pierce Middle School, 5145 Hatchery Road, Waterford. 248-666-8600. ■ St. Matthew Lutheran Church: Bazaar fund-raiser for Nehemiah Project, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, June 23, 2040 S. Commerce Road, Walled Lake. 248-624-7676 or www.st-matthew.org. ■ White Lake Township Parks and Recreation:Movies in Hawley Park: “The Iron Giant,” Saturday, June 23, 7525 Highland Road, White Lake. 248-698-4942. ■ White Lake Historical Society: Community Flea Market, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, June 23, Kelley-Fisk Farm, 9180 Highland Road, White Lake. Vendor space still available from $5 to $10. 248-887-3244. ■ Mobile Knit Shop: Knit-Togethers, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Jewish Community Center, 6600 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield. Sessions after Saturday, June 30 are $5 each. 248-421-2566. ■ Huron Valley Council for the Arts and Friends of Byers Farm: Art on the River Festival, Fine Art & Craft Market, July 21. Call for artists, submission deadline is Sunday, July 1. 248-889-8660, huronvalleyarts.org or HVCA@comcast.net. ■ HotWorks.org: Chadwick Group Youth Art Competition call for young artists, kindergarten through eighth-grade or ages 5 to 12, July 27 to 29, West Bloomfield Plaza, 668 Orchard Lake Road, West Bloomfield. Deadline July 1. For application, visit HotWorks.org or 248-684-2613. ■ Waterford Seventh Day Adventist Church: Looking for vendors for Parking Lot Rummage Sale, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., July 8, 5725 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. Spaces are $10 each. 248-681-3334. ■ Huron Valley Council for the Arts: Van Go Tours - Tour the Titanic the Artifact Exhibition, the 100 Year Journey at the Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, 9:30 a.m. July 19, 205 W. Livingston Road, Highland. Reservations must be received by July 12. 248-889-8660, www.huronvalleyarts.org or HVCA@comcast.net ■ St. Mary’s Catholic Church and Huron

Valley Schools: Distributing backpacks with school supplies for Huron Valley families experiencing financial difficulties. The backpacks will be available for pick up from 9 to 11 a.m. on Aug. 29, St. Mary’s Church, corner of Commerce and Burns roads in Milford. Valid ID with an address and proof (bus route post card, report card or current schedule) that each child will be attending school in the Huron Valley School District is needed. For more information, e-mail pawlowskid@huronvalley.k12.mi.us ■ Wixom Farmers Market: Open 3 to 7 p.m. every Thursday through Oct. 4, Sibley Park off Pontiac Trail, across from City Hall. wixomparksandrec.com. ■ White Lake Farmers Market: Open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday now through Oct. 6, Huron Valley Lakeland High School, 1500 Bogie Lake Road, White Lake. whitelakefarmersmarket.weebly.com or 248-755-1195. ■ Milford Farmers’ Market: Open 3 to 8 p.m. every Thursday through Oct. 18, E. Liberty Street between S. Main and Union streets in Milford. milfordfarmersmarket.org. ■ Walled Lake Farmers Market: Open 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays now through Oct. 31, Walled Lake City Event Field on E. West Maple Road between Decker Road and Pontiac Trail, Walled Lake. 248-624-4847. ■ Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit’s Shalom Street Museum, new exhibit, “Be Kind to Our World: Shomrei Adamah,” with butterfly garden, a display about wind energy and an actual hydroponic garden, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays, now through end of November, 6600 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield. 248-661-1000. ■ Oakland County Market: Open 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, May through Christmas, 2350 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. oakgov.com/cmarket. ■ Milford Police Department: Now taking back unwanted prescription drugs on a continuous basis at 1100 Atlantic Street in Milford. These unwanted prescription drugs may be placed into the secure drop box located in the Police Department lobby. All drugs turned in will ultimately be sent to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration for destruction. The service is free and anonymous with no questions asked. For more information, visit www.milfordpolice.com or call 248-676-2089.

Tuesdays, Waterford Oaks Activity Center, 2800 Watkins Lake Road, Waterford. 248698-9133 or 248-563-2109. ■ (Breakfast) Optimist Club of Waterford: Meeting, 7:15 a.m. Thursdays, Big Boy Restaurant, M-59 and Airport Road, Waterford. 248-673-3493. ■ Catholic Social Services of Oakland County: Senior companion volunteers needed to support adults with developmental disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, chronic mental illness, as well as the physically frail and homebound. 248-559-1147, ext. 3434. ■ Dads of Foreign Service: Bingo, 5:30 p.m. Sundays, VFW Post No. 4156, 321 Union Lake Road, White Lake. www.vfw4156.org or 248698-8302. ■ Grace Hospice: Volunteers with reliable transportation needed to visit terminally-ill patients and family members in our communities. Free training and classes are now forming. 1-888-937-4390. ■ Mothers & More: Book club meeting, 7 p.m., first Monday of the month, Caribou Coffee, Union Lake Road, Commerce. 248360-7702. ■ Multi-Lakes Conservation Association: Allyou-can-eat fish fry, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Fridays, 3860 Newton Road, Commerce. 248-3639109. ■ Rotary of West Bloomfield: Meeting, 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Henry Ford Medical Center, second floor, southwest corner of Farmington and Maple roads. 248-520-0095. ■ Waterford Rotary Club: Meeting, noon, Tuesdays, The Shark Club on M-59, Waterford. 248-625-4897.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Anonymous, 7 p.m. Thursdays, Wesley Room, Commerce United Methodist Church, 1155 N. Commerce Road, Commerce. 248-358-8508 or kleptomaniacsanonymous.org. ❐ Divorce Care: Support group meeting for adults and children, 6:30 p.m. Sundays, Brightmoor Christian Church, 40800 W. 13 Mile, Novi. 248-755-9533. ❐ Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous: Meeting, 6 p.m. Fridays, Crossroads Presbyterian Church, 1445 Welch Road, Commerce. 248-807-8667 or foodaddicts.org. ❐ MOMS Club of Waterford South: Support group for mothers at home, weekly activities, monthly meetings, third Friday of the month, Waterford area. momswaterfordsouth.webs.com. ❐ Over-Eaters Anonymous: Recovery from compulsive eating, 12-step program, meeting, 6 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 5301 Hatchery Road, Waterford. ❐ Postpartum Depression Support Group: Meeting, 6:45 p.m. Thursdays, DMC Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital, Commerce. 248-9375220. ❐ TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly): 5:30 p.m. weigh-in, 6 p.m. meeting, Tuesdays, DMC Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital Conference Room 1-C, 1 William Carls Drive, Commerce. 248-363-6369 or e-mail jr.h@att.net.

SENIOR ACTIVITIES ❐ Dublin Senior Center: Drums Alive! 10:30 a.m. and Zumba Gold, 2 p.m. Tuesdays, 685 Union Lake Road, White Lake. Registration. 248-698-2394.

❐ Age with Grace: Caregiver support group meeting, 6 p.m. the first Monday of every month at 2230 E. Highland Road, Highland. Space limited, so please call to reserve your place. 248-529-6431.

❐ Highland Adult Activity Center: Strengthening Class in the gym, Thursdays; Movie: “War Horse,” noon, Friday, June 20, 209 N. John Street, Highland. 248-8871707.

❐ AA Meetings: 8 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays, Four Towns United Methodist Church, 6451 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford. 248-682-0211.

❐ Richardson Community Senior Center: Soup, Sandwich & Movie Day, noon to 3 p.m. Thursdays, 1485 E. Oakley Park, Commerce. 248-926-0063.

❐ Celebrate Recovery: Alcohol, drugs, gambling, sexual addiction, for life’s hurts, habits or hang-ups, meetings, 7 p.m. Thursdays, Woodside Bible Church, 9000 Highland Road, White Lake. 248-698-1300.

❐ R.S.V.P: Retired and Senior Volunteer Program needs volunteers, age 55 and up to work at hospitals, cultural institutions, food pantries, schools and more. For more information, contact Carol Heckman at 248559-1147, ext. 3435.

■ Friends of Byers: Byers’ Antique Barn now open noon to 5 p.m. Sundays. Volunteers are needed at 213 Commerce Road, Commerce. For more information, visit byershomestead.org or call 248-363-2592.

❐ Celebrate Recovery: Alcohol, drugs, gambling, sexual addiction, for life’s hurts, habits or hang-ups, meetings, 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Life Point Christian Church, 501 Scott Lake Road, Waterford. 248-682-1747.

■ Big Chief Chorus: Rehearsals, 7:30 p.m.

❐ C.A.S.A.: Kleptomaniacs and Shoplifters

❐ Sylvan Lake Lutheran Church: Senior Stretch and Tone, 11 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30 a.m. Fridays, 2399 Figa Avenue, West Bloomfield. 248-682-0770. ❐ Waterford Senior Center: Bundo and din-


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR ner, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, June 28, 3621 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. 248-683-9450. ❐ West Bloomfield Parks and Recreation Senior Programs: Line dancing, 11 a.m. Fridays at the Corners, 4640 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield. Registration. 248451-1900. ❐ Wixom Senior Center: “Come As You Are Chorus,” Wednesdays, 49015 Pontiac Trail, Wixom. 248-624-0870.

PARKS ❐ Indian Springs Environmental Discovery Center: “No Child Left Inside: Frog Catchin’ Fun,” 1 p.m. Saturday, June 23; “Bug Bites and Rashes,” 1 p.m. Saturday, June 30, Indian Springs Metropark, White Lake. 248-6256640. ❐ Kensington Farm Center: Horse-drawn hayrides, noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, Kensington Metropark, Milford. 248684-8632 or 1-800-477-3178.

❐ West Bloomfield Township Public Library: Royal Party, games, dancing, songs, ages 3 and up, 2 p.m. Thursday, June 21, 4600 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield. Free admission. 248-682-2120 or www.wblib.org.

❐ Wixom Public Library: Movie and Pizza Night, “Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol,” adult program, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, 49015 Pontiac Trail, Wixom. Registration, 248-624-2512.

RELIGIOUS

❐ White Lake Township Library: “Creatures of the Night,” live animals, children’s program, 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 23; “Eating Regional & Seasonal” with Chef James Rigato from The Root Restaurant, adult program, 6:30p.m. Wednesday, June 27, 7527 E. Highland Road, White Lake. Registration. 248-698-4942.

BLACK

CYPRESS

❐ Union Lake Baptist Church: Free Vacation Bible School, “Lifeway’s Amazing Wonders Aviation,” ages 3 to grade 6, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday, June 25 to Friday, June 29, 8390 Commerce Road, Commerce. Free admission and reservations. 248-363-9600.

BARN RED

❐ Springfield Oaks County Park: Oakland County Fair, carnival rides, free circus, Oakland County Idol contest, exhibits, foods, and more, Friday, July 6 through Sunday, July 15, Springfield Oaks County Park, Davisburg. 248634-8830, www.oakfair.org, or www.DestinationOakland.com.

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❐ Walled Lake City Library: Download Destination, adult program, Thursday, June 21, 1499 E. West Maple, Walled Lake. Registration. 248-624-3772. ❐ Waterford Township Public Library: “Follow That Dream!” professional performer/storyteller Jean Bolley, ages 5 and up, 10 a.m. Thursday, June 21, 5168 Civic Center Drive, Waterford. Registration. 248-6744831.

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❐ Commerce Township Community Library: Stuffed Animal Sleepover, 7 p.m. Thursday, June 21, 2860 N. Pontiac Trail, Commerce. Registration, 248-669-8108 or commercelibrary.info. ❐ Highland Township Public Library: Nocturnal Animal Craft, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, June 21, 444 Beach Farm Circle, Highland. Registration. 248-887-2218.

GOLD

NEED MULCH?

ALL

While Supplies Last

❐ Kensington Metropark: “An American Salute” with Michigan Philharmonic, 8 p.m. Friday, June 22; “No Child Left Inside: Summer Nature Detectives,” ages 6 and up, 2 p.m. Sunday, June 24; “No Child Left Inside: Pond Dipping,” 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 30, Kensington Metropark, Milford. Registration. 810-227-8916 or 810- 227-8910.

HARDWOOD

UNION LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH 8390 COMMERCE RD. • COMMERCE, MI 48382 248-363-9600

Pre-Register at www.unionlakebaptist.org

JUNE 25 -29

9:00 am to 12:30 pm • Open to ages 3 - 6th Grade

Our Lord is Great, vast in power; His understanding is infinite.

- Psalm 147:5 (HCSB)

Obituaries

ALLEN, RICHARD EDWARD; a resident of Commerce Twp. passed away peacefully June 3, 2012. He was 76 years old. BICKFORD, KEVIN ROBERT; of Waterford, died tragically on June 6, 2012 at the age of 45. BROWN, KATHLEEN MARIE; of Waterford June 7, 2012 at 90 years of age. FALLONE, ANTONIA; a resident of Milford, died peacefully on June 10, 2012. She was 92 years old. GABE, LOUIS; a resident of Novi, Michigan, died on June 5th, 2012 at the age of 92. GOHS, SHIRLEY A.; a long time resident of Lake Sherwood in Commerce Twp., died on June 7, 2012, at the age of 86. MCDONNELL, MILTON “TOM” T.; of Waterford, died June 8, 2012 at 69 years of age. Beloved husband of Martha for 34 years. NELSEY, MAXINE AGNES; of Waterford; went to be with the Lord June 7, 2012 at age 86. Beloved wife of Glenn for 62 years. RAFFIN, JAMES JOSEPH; of Commerce Township was born July 18, 1934 and died June 4, 2012 at age 77. ROSENKRANDS, JOHANNES W. “JOHN”; of Waterford, died June 4, 2012 at 90 years of age. SCHIMMEL, WILLIAM P.; age 76 and a long time resident of Milford, died on June 5, 2012 after a long battle with cancer. SHELTON, MICHAEL R.; of Waterford, died June 9, 2012 at 62 years of age. SIMMONS, MAUDINE JUNE; age 81 and a resident of Highland Haven in Highland Twp., died at her home on June 6, 2012. WEISMAN, HARRY; a resident of Walled Lake, Michigan, died on June 7th, 2012 at the age of 79. To place an obituary in the Spinal Column Newsweekly please call the Classified Department at 248-360-7355 or email: lorisnyder@thescngroup.com

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

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RITA HOLLOWAY-IRWIN For

WATERFORD TWP. CLERK Dear Voter, Waterford’s long time Clerk Betty Fortino passed away last year. These will be some big shoes to fill and I, Rita Holloway Irwin am the only person in this election who is a Certified Municipal Clerk with 28 years municipal experience. Please check out my qualifications.

Certified Municipal Clerk 12 yrs. Municipal Clerk Experience 11 yrs. Deputy Clerk / Treasurer 5 yrs. Building Dept. / Office Clerk Waterford Kettering Graduate 1974

VOTE AUG. 7th Primary Nov. 6th General Election

Visit me at: www.ritairwin4clerk.com Rita Holloway-Irwin on Facebook Email: rita@ritairwin4clerk.com

Paid for by the Committee to elect Rita Irwin, Waterford Township Clerk, 433 Beverly Island Dr., Waterford, MI 48328


SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Huron Valley Lakeland’s Madison Burgess attempts to lay down a bunt in the Eagles’ Division 1 state quarter-final game against Sterling Heights Stevenson on Tuesday, June 12. Burgess hit a perfect 4-for-4 and scored two runs as Lakeland defeated the Titans, 5-4, to advance to the state semi-finals, where it would fall to defending Division 1 champion Mattawan. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

Eagles’ comeback thwarted Lakeland ‘gave everything,’ but couldn’t top Mattawan, 5-4 By Michael Shelton staff Writer

Huron Valley Lakeland fought hard all season to reach the state’s final four, where they ran into a team that was just a little better: The defending state champions. The Eagles fell to Mattawan, 5-4, in a Michigan High School Athletic Association (MHSAA) Division 1 state semi-final at Bailey Park in Battle

Creek on Friday, June 15, ending what was a tremendous season for the Lakeland softball program. “This was one of my all-time favorite teams,” said Lakeland Head Coach Joe Alsup. “They gave everything on the field, they worked together as a group, and sacrificed a lot for each other.” Lakeland (36-7) came into the game looking to advance to its sixth state final and first since 2010 for a shot at its first

state championship. But Mattawan hoisted the state final trophy last year and showed its champi-

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onship mettle early as Abby Stoner hit a 2-run home run to right center field in the bottom of the first inning against

Eagles’ ace Selena Hicks for a 2-0 lead. The Wildcats (33-11) struck again in the bottom of the third inning with three runs off an RBI single by Stacey Thompson and a 2-run double by Emily McCarty to take a commanding 5-0 lead. The Eagles would finally get on the board in the top of the fourth inning with three runs off an RBI fielder’s PAGE 42 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

SOFTBALL

Lakeland Eagles ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 41

choice by Morgan Craft and an RBI single by Meghan Jacobs, scoring Adriana Ball and Hannah Szajner to cut the deficit to three runs. The next two innings would be scoreless before Lakeland came up to bat in the top of the seventh inning with its season on the line. Mary Armstrong came in to pinch hit and led off with a single before advancing to second on a groundout by Madison Burgess and then to third on a single by Karissa Gawronski. After Gawronski stole second base, Kelly Merkle then delivered with a 2-run single to score Armstrong and Gawronski to pull Lakeland within one run, as Merkle also advanced to second base on the throw home, putting the game-tying run in scoring position with one out. But Sierra Burke then popped out for the Eagles’ second out and Hicks came back in to pinch-hit for Annika Wiesinger, who relieved her in the bottom of the sixth inning. However, Hicks would strike out to end the game and the season for Lakeland, which fell just short of a magical comeback. “When we were down 5-0, our kids could have folded, but we had several opportunities because the kids kept pushing. I’m blessed to have such great kids,” Alsup said. “There are 170 teams in the state, so to get to the final four is a big accomplishment.” Mattawan would go on to fall to Hudsonville, 2-1, in 10 innings on Saturday, June 16 in the MHSAA Division 1 state final. Hudsonville has now won three state championships in the past four years. Hicks pitched just over five innings in the loss to the Wildcats, giving up five earned runs on nine hits and four walks while striking out two batters. Craft and Szajner also each hit 2-for-3 as Lakeland left seven runners stranded on base compared to Mattawan’s 10. On Tuesday, June 12, Lakeland advanced to the state semi-finals with a 5-4 victory over Sterling Heights Stevenson in an MHSAA Division 1 state quarter-final at Madison Heights Bishop Foley. The Eagles had a 2-1 lead before Stevenson tied the game at 2-2 in the top of the sixth. The Titans then scored two runs in the top of the seventh to take a 4-2 lead and Lakeland headed to the bottom of the seventh with a trip to Battle Creek on the line. After Gawronski bunted home Armstrong to cut the deficit to one and

Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes/Clarkston Everest Collegiate celebrate Anna Robb’s goal against Madison Heights Bishop Foley on Wednesday, June 13 in a Michigan High School Athletic Association Division 4 state semi-final. The Lakers would eliminate the defending state champion Ventures and advance to the Division 4 state final, where they would be shutout by Grandville Calvin Christian. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

Grandville blanks Our Lady Lakers fall in state title game 6-0, end season at 18-1-2

By Michael Shelton staff writer

as Grandville outshot Our Lady 26-7. Megan Luttinen made 10 saves in net for Our Lady while Lydia Verstrate made two saves for Grandville and Allison Kaiser made one save. Back on Wednesday, June 13, Our Lady defeated the defending Division 4 state champion Madison Heights Bishop Foley, 3-2, in an MHSAA Division 4 state semi-final at Pontiac Notre Dame Prep.

Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes/Clarkston Everest Collegiate suffered its very first loss of the 2012 season this past week, which happened to come in the state final. The Lakers were shut out by Grandville Calvin Christian, 6-0, in the Michigan High School Athletic Association (MHSAA) Division 4 state final on Saturday, June 16 at Michigan State University. Our Lady (18-1-2) had dreams of winning its second state title in three seasons, but trailed 3-0 at halftime on two goals by Katie Klunder and a goal by Jenny Holsem. Grandville (25-2-1) didn’t let up in the second half, as Holsem scored two goals to complete her hat trick before Klunder scored her third goal

After Lauren Cross scored for Bishop Foley in the first half, Brianna Topolewski scored off an assist from Lindsay Straw to tie the match at 11. Rachelle Topolewski then scored off

move Burgess to second base, Burgess advanced to third on an error by Stevenson’s catcher. Another error by Stevenson’s catcher allowed Burgess to score the game-

tying run and put Gawronski in scoring position. Then on an intentional walk attempt with Merkle at the plate, a pitch got past Stevenson’s catcher, allowing Gawronski to score the game-

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a rebound to give the Lakers a 2-1 lead with just over six minutes left in the first half, sending Our Lady into the halftime break with momentum. Anna Robb then scored in the second half off a rebound from a Brianna Topolewski shot to give the Lakers a two-goal advantage. Megan VanFleteran scored for Bishop Foley to pull the Ventures within one, but that’s as close as Bishop Foley would get as the Lakers celebrated a trip to East Lansing and the state final. Our Lady may have fallen last Saturday, but it graduates only one senior this year, Ally Albright, and it will be reloaded to come back with a vengeance next season with Ava Doetsch, Jessica Parry and a host of underclassmen with varsity experience now under their belts. winning run. While the Titans may have led by two runs at one point, they finished with only three hits compared to Lakeland’s PAGE 43 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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PAGE 43

SOFTBALL

Lakeland Eagles ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 42

11; and committed six errors compared to two by the Eagles. Burgess hit a perfect 4-for-4 with two runs scored for the Eagles while Gawronski had 2 RBIs. Hicks pitched a complete game, allowing 4 earned runs on 3 hits and 7 walks while striking out six batters. The Eagles have established themselves as a dominant force in lakes area softball, having won their seventh regional title in eight seasons this year, in addition to their fourth straight Kensington Lakes Activities Association (KLAA) North Division title, their second KLAA championship and their fourth straight Fred Pieper Tournament championship. Yet the one thing that continues to elude the Eagles is the state championship. “I never worry about getting over the hump. These kids win big games all the time,” Alsup said. “We had to come back against Stevenson, Fenton, Waterford Kettering and Plymouth. So I’m not disappointed.” Lakeland will graduate five seniors: Craft, Burke, McNabb, Armstrong and Jacobs, whom Alsup called “real tough kids who came to win.” But the Eagles will be retooled and reloaded next spring with Hicks and many other starters and underclassmen returning. “We have a ton of really good kids coming back. It’s going to take an amazing effort to get back where we just were,” Alsup said.

SPORT NOTE Kensington Metropark will host the 2012 Kensington Men’s Individual Championship qualifying rounds on its golf course on Aug. 4 and Aug. 5. Participants pay a non-refundable entry fee of $6, and open players prepay greens fees of $26 for the qualifying rounds, which will be flighted by U.S. Golf Association handicap. Golfers can qualify on either day for the Men’s Individual Championship, being held on Aug. 26 at Kensington Metropark. Entry applications and fees must be received at the starter’s desk by 5 p.m. on Aug. 2. Kensington will also host its Kensington Parent/Child Tournament on Aug. 18. Teams will be flighted by the child’s age, and the fee is $74 per team, including greens fee, cart, and prizes. Entry applications and fees must be received at the starter’s desk by 5 p.m. on Aug. 16. For more information, contact Kensington Metropark Golf Course at 248-685-9332 or 1-800-23-GOLF-4.

Huron Valley Lakeland ace Selena Hicks pitched a complete game, allowing four earned runs on three hits and seven walks while striking out six batters in the Eagles’ state quarter-final win over Sterling Heights Stevenson on Tuesday, June 12. However, Hicks surrendered five runs to Mattawan as Lakeland fell by a run in the Division 1 state semi-finals in Battle Creek on Saturday, June 16 as she finished with a record of 16-2 on the season. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

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BEACH RESTORATION TT&C Beaches www.ttcbeaches.com BOAT COVERS Bev’s Canvas Covers www.bevscanvascovers.com BOAT REPAIRS/FURNITURE American Soft Trim www.americansofttrim.com BOATS/NEW & USED Lake Ponemah Marina www.lakeponemahmarina.com BOATING SUPPLIES Boating Supply Center www.boatsupplies.com

DOCKS & LIFTS American Marine www.americanmarinesc.com LAKE MANAGEMENT SERVICES Aqua Weed Control www.aquaweed.com REAL ESTATE Cyndi Robinson - Real Estate One www.cyndirobinson.com Tom Buchanan - Real Estate One www.lakesareahomesearch.com TRAILERS American Trailer Mart www.americantrailermart.com VISITING NURSES & THERAPISTS Affinity Home Care Agency, Inc. www.affinityhomecareagency.com


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The West Bloomfield Township Wetland Review Board will hold a public hearing at the Township Board Room, 4550 Walnut Lake Road on Wednesday June 27, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. to consider the following Wetland/Floodplain Permit Applications:

COMMUNITY LEGAL NOTICES

CASE #PWT12-1828 KETTY Parcel: Lots 46 to 48, Zox Lakeside Park Subdivision Sidwell #18-03-126-049 Location: 1627 Gerundecut Request: An after-the-fact request to remove predominately invasive plants (phragmities) and a few native plants and a before-the-fact request to restore the disrupted area within wetland, 100 year floodplain and the 25 foot environmental features setback to Cass Lake. Applicant: John Ketty CASE #PWT12-1837 BLOOMFIELD SQUARE BEACH ASSOCIATION Parcel: Bloomfield Square Beach Association Sidwell #18-24-401-010 Location: Inkster Road, west of Quarton Request: An after-the-fact request to place 8 cubic yards of beach sand to a community beach within the 25 foot environmental features setback to Walnut Lake. Applicant: Chris Meathe - Bloomfield Square Beach Association CASE #PWT11-1792 BENJAMIN Parcel: Lot 27, Lakeridge of Wabeek #18-13-277-014 Location: 4016 Fox Lake Drive Request: A request to remove brush and install a wood chip path leading to the water’s edge within the 25 foot environmental features setback to Fox Lake Applicant: Karen Benjamin CASE #PWT11-1718 HAROLD Parcel: Lot 709, Herndon’s Walnut Lake Estates Sidwell #18-25-201-084 Location: 2346 Walnut Lake Road Request: A request to amend the existing permit for the placement of 10 cubic yards of additional sand to the approved upland beach area. Applicant: David Harold Detailed plans are available for inspection at the West Bloomfield Township Environmental Department, 4550 Walnut Lake Road, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. A staff report, as prepared for the Wetland Review Board, will be available for review the Friday prior to the meeting. If you have any questions on this matter, contact the Environmental Department at (248) 451-4818. Marshall Labadie, Development Services Director S.C. 6-20-12 The Township will provide necessary, reasonable auxiliary aids and services to individuals with disabilities at a public meeting upon two weeks notice in writing or by calling the Township Clerk or Environmental Director at (248) 451-4800.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF WEST BLOOMFIELD PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING

CITY OF WIXOM PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Wixom Zoning Board of Appeals will conduct the following public hearings at their next regular meeting scheduled for Monday, July 9, 2012 for the following topics: ZBA CASE #015-12: STEVE/MANDY PALLOZZI, 1223 ANDOVER CT., WIXOM, MI 48393: The applicant is seeking a variance for lot coverage over 30% on a non-conforming lot. The Wixom Municipal Code, Section 18.03.050 Table 3.05 requires approval from the Zoning Board of Appeals. The property is located at 1223 Andover Ct. and zoned R-4, Single Family. The tax number is 17-29-452-004. The Zoning Board of Appeals meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will be held in Wixom Council Chambers, 49045 Pontiac Trail. Persons having any questions regarding these matters are urged to attend this meeting or contact the Building Department at (248) 624-0880.

The West Bloomfield Township Planning Commission will hold a public hearing at the West Bloomfield Town Hall, 4550 Walnut Lake Road, on Tuesday, July 10, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following request: SKETCH PLAN AND SPECIAL LAND USE AMENDMENT APPROVAL: Metro Church (SP-12-09) Request: Site plan, special land use, and associated stormwater management plan approval to construct a 652 sq. ft. building addition to an existing 9.316 sq. ft. place of worship Location: #18-36-101-006, 6655 Middlebelt Road, East side of Middlebelt, south of Maple (12.7 acres) Applicant: John Tagle, John Tagle Associates Zoning: R-15 Single Family Residential

SC: 6/20/12

CITY OF WIXOM

NOTICE OF EMERGENCY ORDINANCE ENACTMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at its regular meeting duly called and held on Tuesday, June 12, 2012, the Wixom City Council enacted an Emergency Ordinance to prohibit the possession and use of, and trafficking in, synthetic marijuana and other products or materials that are in a form that allows for human consumption by inhalation of smoke or vapors, ingestion, injection or application, and that contain chemical substances, compounds, or agents that cause or may cause an intoxicating, narcotic, stimulant, depressant, and/or hallucinogenic effect and an imminent threat to the safety of persons that consume such products or materials and/or persons they come in contact with. Copies of this Emergency Ordinance are available at the City Clerk’s Office during normal business hours (7:15 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday). Catherine Buck City Clerk S.C. 6-20-12

Catherine Buck, City Clerk City of Wixom (248) 624-4557

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CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF COMMERCE 2009 TOWNSHIP DRIVE COMMERCE TOWNSHIP, MI 48390

INTRODUCTION NOTICE: • An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 2.006 to be known as the Charter Township of Commerce Fee Ordinance No. 2.007.

ADOPTION NOTICE: • An amendment to the Zoning Ordinance for the Charter Township of Commerce (Ordinance 3.004) has been adopted by the Township Board of the Charter Township of Commerce. The amendment adds the definition of “Ornamental Fences” and regulates ornamental fences in residential districts. • The Zoning Ordinance Amendment will be effective June 27, 2012. A copy of the Ordinance amendment may be inspected or purchased at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan between the hours of: Monday - Thursday 7:15 A.M. - 5:30 P.M. CLOSED FRIDAYS

The proposed site plan is available for public review at the Community Development, West Bloomfield Town Hall, 4550 Walnut Lake Road, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Any comments regarding this request may be made in writing to the planning commission or by appearing at the scheduled public hearing. If you have any questions, please call (248) 451-4828. Thomas M. Walsh, Community Development Director The Township of West Bloomfield will provide necessary, reasonable auxiliary aids and services (such as signers for the hearing impaired and audio tapes of printed materials being considered at the meeting) to individuals with disabilities at a public hearing/meeting upon two weeks notice in writing or by calling the Township Clerk at (248) 451-4800. S.C. 6-20-12

The above Ordinance shall be posted (in its entirety) at the following locations; (1) Office of the Township Clerk 2009 Township Drive (2) Main Township Library 2869 North Pontiac Trail (3) Township’s website www.commercetwp.com Daniel Munro Clerk, Charter Township of Commerce S.C. 6-20-12


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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WEST OAKLAND SUPER WANT ADS

SUPER RATES! SUPER REACH! PHONE 248.360.7355 • Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5 FAX 24/7• 248.360.5308

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01-08

REAL ESTATE 12-22

MOBILE HOMES 42-43

RENTALS 45-57

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HIGHLIGHT YOUR AD For further emphasis add an icon or shade your ad for only $5.

MERCHANDISE 89-138

• Absolutely Free (#90): An item must be offered FREE to appear in this category. The want ad is FREE to you. One item per ad, one ad per family on any given week. Column is for non-commercial ads only. • Items under $25: Advertise an item for $25 or less and a 10-word want ad is FREE. Special rates for items over $25. • Used Vehicle: Five weeks FREE for private party vehicles. Charge your first week and we schedule it for 5 more weeks. Call to cancel when sold. • Found: Found a lost item? We will run an ad for FREE (#3/Found) to help you find the owner. • Reunions (#4): Published FREE for 4 weeks.

LEISURE TIME 142-159

RECREATION

BOATS 162-179

CARS, TRUCKS CYCLES

PAGE 45

NOTICES

Houses For Sale Hartland

Reunions

4

LAKELAND HIGH School Class of 1992, 20 year reunion June 30, 2012, 6pm at Bakers in Milford. For more information, please call Dana 248763-6011

Legal Notices

5

PUBLIC NOTICE On April 9th, 2012, Oakland Vision Services in Walled Lake noticed their system had been compromised by a ransom ware infection. The infection encrypted files and deleted information. The FBI was notified and involved; they feel that no information has been accessed or utilized. However, we would like our patients to be aware of the situation. We have increased our protection so this matter will not happen in the future. If you would like to find out more information or to see if you were affected, please call:

Toll free 1-855-624-1707 Published May 16th thru July 4th, 2012.

Highland QUALITY & ELEGANCE! Desirable Dunham Lake access w/this pristine 1.5 story home situated on 1 acre setting. Well planned with 3076 sq. ft. Gorgeous kitchen w/butler’s pantry, granite counters & terrazzo floor. Spacious great room w/2 story see through stone masonry fireplace. 1st floor master suite. 1338 sq. ft. in finished w/o LL includes family room w/fireplace & addl. 2 car garage/ workshop. Extensive landscaping. $499,000.

England Real Estate (248)887-9736

RICK REID 248-981-8582 2900 Union Lake, Rd. Suite 210 Commerce Twp., MI 48382

PERSONAL

SERVICES

LD FIE OM O L B ST WE

REPAIR IMPROVEMENT

SERVICES

MIDDLE STRAITS LAKE IMPROVED PRICE - $164,900 Charming newly remodeled 3 bedroom ranch with open floor plan, close to association clubhouse and beach. Lakeside Florida room surrounded by the best panoramic views of Middle Straits Lake. Bloomer Park and Bay Pointe Golf are nearby. Call Rick or email rick_reid@att.net.

RENTALS

18

SOUTH LYON House 4 Sale By Owner.

Commercial/ Industrial

Country setting 3/4 acre. 3 bdr., 1.5 baths, attached 2 1/ 2 car garage, small enclosed porch, outside deck. South Lyon schools. $155,000 OBO Call for appt.

248-560-5616 or 248-669-4872

47

WATERFORD Industrial space or lease with offices Loading dock, 3 phase. 14 X 14 overhead door. 1,800 sq. ft $850/mo. 7,000 sq.ft. $4,000/mo. Immediate occupancy

248-496-7652 or 248-496-7648

MOBILE HOMES Mobile Homes for Sale

42

Fawn Lake Pontiac Trail at Maple Pre-Owned Homes: $6,000 - $25,000 Rent: $385 - $400 PLUS MOVE-IN DISCOUNTS On Select Homes

248360-SELL

(248) 624-0709

(248-360-7355)

Twelve phone lines open 8:30-5:00 Monday through Friday

MONDAY AT 5

D CE DU RE E IC PR

Whispering Meadows ~ Custom built sprawling brick ranch in Whispering Meadows with over 2,300 sq. ft. on .77 acre. 3 beds, 2.1 baths, large open great room with 2-way gas fireplace, kitchen with breakfast nook and built-in appliances. Master bedroom with doorwall to 30’ x 17’ deck, walk-in closet, master bath with corner tub and separate shower. Finished walkout with rec/gaming area, family room and plumbed for bath and a 3 car attached garage, central vac, whole house generator, 1st floor laundry, Andersen windows. $249,900.

THELMA CARY-ROSSBACH CELL:

(248) 408-0957

800 N. Milford #100 - Milford, MI 48381

Award Winning Agent

248.672.4800 6611 Commerce Road West Bloomfield, MI

DEADLINES • Word Ads • One-Column Ads

OPEN HOUSE 6/24 - 1-4 PM

Jim Mandeville

advertisement you get a FREE Garage Sale Kit with street signs, balloons, price stickers and tips on having a successful garage sale.

FRIDAY AT 5

Elegant 2 story home on 2 partially wooded acres. 2686 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, kitchen with granite counter and unique granite floor. Gas fireplace in family room, living room, formal dining, 1st floor laundry, full basement with daylight windows. 3 car garage. $274,000.

Michigan/ Other Areas

181-196

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE Advertising published is subject to rate card or contract conditions, copies of which are available from the publishing group. Ads are subject to approval before publication, only publication constitutes acceptance. We reserve the right to edit, reject, cancel or reclassify any ad. If an error by the newspaper should occur, the newspaper’s responsibility for that portion of the advertisement in error is limited to cancellation of the charge or publication in the following issue. The publishing group shall not be liable for any loss or expense that results from publication or omission of an advertisement.

JimMandeville.com Serving the “Lakes Area” Since 1989 CONTEMPORARY LAKEFRONT

GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY

All-sports lakefront in excellent condition. Full walkout lower level. Five bedrooms, 3 car garage and over 5,000 sq. ft. $699,000

2,500 sq. ft. colonial. 4 bedrooms with partial finished basement. Brand new granite kitchen counters. Open Sunday. $248,000

Call for Free Market Analysis


PAGE 46 Houses/ Condos

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Looking to rent a house or condo?

Call Arlene Keller Williams Realty mihome4u.com 248-912-4628 WATERFORD Duplex 3 bedrooms, unfurnished, all appliances. $750 a month plus security.

248-343-1666 COMMERCE Contemporary. newly remodeled 3 bdm, 1200 sq.ft. ranch, cathedral ceilings, skylights, granite kitchen, 2 master marble baths, 3 car garage, small pets. $1,295/mo.

olivermich@mac.com

248-755-5073

Houses/ Condos

Apartments 55

HIGHLAND Nice 3 bedroom ranch w/2 baths, fireplace, finished basement, 2 car garage. Built in 1996. $1,600.00. monthly plus 1/2 months security.

(248)887-9736 Apartments

56

WALLED LAKE 2 bedrooms, ver tical blinds, basement storage, great location. Close to everything. $650/month includes all utilities, occupancy July 1st.

248-425-4853 56

Pontiac Lake 1 bdrm for $459 (newly renovated).

Includes all utilities except electric. Security Deposit. For more information & availability call

248-626-7857

Renovated Studio Lake Front White Lake $75 week or $300 month applecrisp12271@aol.com

WALLED LAKE AREA One bedroom apar tmentwalk in closets, high speed internet available, heat & water paid, Walled Lake Schools, no dogs. Leasing now.

Move in special!

248-982-3281

Recording Secretary Milford Township is seeking a qualified candidate for recording secretary to the Milford Township Planning Commission. Duties include attending Planning Commission meetings held on the last Thursday of each month except November and December, taking notes and preparing the meeting minutes. Wage is $75.00 per meeting, plus $6.50 per page. For consideration submit a letter of interest and experience by July 2, 2012 to the Charter Township of Milford, Clerk’s Office, 1100 Atlantic Street, Milford, Michigan 48381. S.C. 6-20 & 6-27-12

Rooms/Share Quarters

65

TAXI & AIRPORT DRIVERS WANTED Full or Part time Day or Night

248-666-2110 57

FURNISHED SLEEPING room for rent. Waterford area, $100 /week. 810-355-8097

HELP WANTED General/ Help Wanted

General/ Help Wanted

DEDICATED RUN $62,000 per Year! HOME WEEKENDS Medical, Dental, Vision, Life, 401K Class A CDL + 1 yr OTR Exp Landair Transport

Call Today! 1-866-640-5996 www.landair.com

65

BAKER Wanted for early morning hours, five days a week. Apply in person

Great Harvest Bread Company 3376 E West Maple Commerce MI 48390

OFFICE CLEANING EVENING HOURS MONDAY- FRIDAY NOVI AREA CORPORATE CLEANING GROUP

248-313-9880

Part-time (30 hrs/wk) Clerical Position in Commerce. Position’s responsibilities include order entry, billing, coordinating freight, production reporting and inventory control. Must be detail oriented with good math skills, able to work in fast paced environment and computer literate. Excel skills preferred. Send resume with wage requirements to jobopportunityA@yahoo.com. All qualified candidates required to take a drug test.

Part time openings at Canterbury on-the-Lake: Receptionist: 30 hours/month, ave. 8 hrs/week, some weekday coverage, mostly

weekends 11a-4p. Must be able to use Word/Outlook, office equipment and have good customer service skills. Covers holidays.

Activities Staff: 10-12 hrs/week, one weekend day per week. Must have experience leading activities with the elderly, be able to work independently and multi-task. Apply on line at www.canterburyonthelake.com or submit resume via email to karens@cotl.net 5601 Hatchery Rd., Waterford, MI 48329

EOE

General/ Help Wanted

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY 65

Experienced Installers and Service Technicians Excellent woking Conditions and wages. Family Heating, Cooling & Electrical, Inc.

248-886-8626 The Independence Village of White Lake Is now hiring for P/T housekeepers for afternoon and morning shifts Apply in person at: 935 Union Lake Road or fax resume: 248-360-7626 Attn: Stefanie EOE

Stylist Wanted Very busy Fantastic Sam's salon in Commerce. $9 per hour guaranteed, plus tips. Over 400 walk-in guest per week. Full or part time.

248-890-7077 or apply in person 2516 Union Lake Road

WAIT STAFF Now hiring full/ part time, positions. Family restaurant seeking enthusiastic, experienced individuals who are customer service focused, reliable and attentive. Must have minimum 4 years experience in restaurant industry. Only serious applicant please. Contact (248)672-1019

9a.m. - 7p.m.

General/ Help Wanted

65

Medical/ Dental

HOME HEALTH CARE

HARDSCAPE LANDSCAPERS $11.50-$15/ HOUR Must have at least 2-5 years experience & knowledge in all phases of landscaping, boulder walls, pisa walls, sprinkler systems, harley raking, hydroseeding, pavers, dump trucks, bob cat operators & loaders. Must have a valid driver's license or chauffeurs -- CDL preferred. Must provide previous references & have reliable transportation. Serious workers only! Contact

Larry Lofthouse 248-889-1491 or 248-318-8566. HAIR STYLISTS Great Clips salon now open on M-59 & Fisk Road in White Lake needs both part time & full time hair stylists. No clientele needed, hourly wage plus commission. Fun team environment. Ask for Bridgette 248-330-6402

CHILD CARE CENTER Seeking Child Care Provider. Early childhood or child related field degree preferred. 35-40 hours a week. Must be able to work until 6 p.m. Commerce Twp area. Call 10a.m.-3p.m.

248-669-6880

NOW HIRING: Companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info:

1-985-646-1700 DEPT. MI-2319

67

Used/Wanted

Experienced home health aid needed par t time through the fall. CNA preferred. Client is in the Union Lake area

248-425-2214 Office/ Clerical

69

TEACHERS AIDE / OFFICE WORK Need classroom experience. Part or Full time. W. L. / Commerce. Fax resume to: 248-737-9517 or E-mail: administrator@ MiMontessori.com Sales Positions

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

71

SALES DESK Wholesale Building Materials Distributor in Walled Lake looking for entry level person for Sales Desk. Building Materials & computer experience helpful. Full-time with benefits. Send resume to:

Jim Frensley email: jfrensley@ hansenmarketing.com or fax: 855-259-9069. LET US LET YOU FIND that perfect employee to fill that spot on your staff. Give us a call at 248-360-7355 or fax to 248360-5308 or 219-360-5309.

89

SCRAP METAL Aluminum .30-.60¢/lb. Copper $2.00-$2.60/lb. Brass .80¢- 1.50/lb. Auto Rads. .80¢-1.10/lb. 1011 Decker, Walled Lk

Mann Metals Corp. (248)960-1200 Absolutely Free

90

Items must be FREE to respondents, ad free to you. Restricted to residential. The publishing group accepts no responsibility for actions between individuals. Sorry, we do not accept ads for free dogs. 8ftX8ft CalSpa hot tub. Winterized, you pick up. 248-4591137 BALDWIN ORGA-SONIC oak organ. Good condition, you pick up. 248-681-8307 FIVE LARGE Pieces from cut up tree, seasoned.You pick up. Commerce area. 248- 3434239 FREE FUEL Oil - 25 gallons. You pick up. 248-669-2922 HOT TUB. Working condition, Needs some work.You pick up. 248-904-9435


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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$139,900

$399,900 BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED HOME ON ALL-SPORTS DUCK LAKE! •2,962 sq ft, 3 bed, 2 ba, vaulted dining, library •Fp, vaulted family rm, 1st flr laundry, bsmt #212060746 EXT. #246•KEY #258416

SHARP RANCH - LARGE BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED LOT •1,408 sq ft, 3 bed, 2 ba, oversized 2 car gar •1st flr laundry, lg shed, patio, Walled Lk schools #212011148 EXT. #285 •KEY #fm256j

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2900 Union Lake, Suite 210, Commerce, MI 48382

Zillow - Preferred Agent

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Janet Direct: Steve Direct: 248-755-7600 248-755-7500

$89,900 BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON ALL-SPORTS WOLVERINE LAKE! •.39 acre - 76 ft. sandy shoreline •Adjacent lot available, sewer at street #212060387 EXT. #291•KEY #261788 P. TW CE ER M M CO

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$169,900 METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED WHETHERSTONE CONDO •1,733 sq ft, 3 bed, 3 ba, vaulted great rm-fp •1st flr mstr-luxury bath, bsmt, deck, 2 car #212058485 EXT. #248•KEY #248371

$199,900 BEACON HILL GOLF COMMUNITY END UNIT CONDO •2,005 sq. ft., 3 bed, 2.5 ba, 2 mstr. suites, fp •1st flr laundry, walkout bsmt, 2 car garage #212055971 EXT. #258•KEY #256951

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$378,800

ALL-SPORTS UNION LAKEFRONT HURON HILL SUB - WAY BACK IN SUB SPECIAL TREED PRIVATE LOT •2 story w/2,594 sq. ft., 4 lg. bed, 2.5 baths •2-3 bedroom brick ranch, fin w/o, brick fp •Fp, ff laundry, 3+ car, part fin daylight bsmt •2 car attached gar, elevated deck, patio #212037708 EXT. #224•KEY #248384 #212034479 EXT. #215•KEY #276273

GE

$385,000 10+ ACRE HORSE/HERB FARM WITH CIRCA 1880 FARMHOUSE •2,200 sq ft 2 sty, 4 bed, 2 ba, full basement •14 stall barn, 10 fenced pastures, coop, 8 car #212034718 EXT. #201•KEY #248379

$219,900 GORGEOUS GERUNDEGUT BAY ALL-SPORTS CASS LAKE •Remodeled ranch, stone fp, dining rm •Corian counter kitch, tile, crown molding #212060211 EXT. #280•KEY #248373

$344,900

$289,900

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66 FT. OF ALL-SPORTS WOLVERINE LAKEFRONT SPECIAL •1,900+ sq ft, 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2 sty. great rm •Fin. walkout, fp, tiered decking, 2+ car #212037690 EXT. #206•KEY #248398

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SPACIOUS 2 STORY CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN •2,225 sq ft, fin basement, 4 bed, 3.5 ba •Fireplace, cath mstr w/bath, deck, 2 car #212046349 EXT. #208 •KEY #276271

GE

$259,900 127 FT. OF BULLARD WATERFRONT GORGEOUS TREED .43 ACRE LOT •2,116 sq. ft., walkout, 4 bed, 3.5 ba, wet bar •Part fin. w/o, circle drive, elevated deck #212051318 EXT. #234•KEY #248366

TWO DECKS OVERLOOKING A BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED YARD! •1.836 sq ft + finished walkout, 3 bed, 2.5 ba •Great rm-fp, dining rm, library, fam/rec rm #212061283 EXT. #275•KEY #257017

$209,900

AFFORDABLE ALL-SPORTS METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED CLARK/CARROLL LAKEFRONT RANCH AND YARD •3 bed, 2 ba, full bsmt, cathedral great rm, fp •3-4 bed, 2 ba, brick ranch, finished walkout •Wood laminate flrs, mstr bath, appliances, 2 car •2 fp, mstr w/ba, 4 season sunporch, patio #212054875 EXT. #230•KEY #248392 #212027022 EXT. #243•KEY #264094 . WP DT AN L T R HA

SPACIOUS TRI-LEVEL BEAUTIFUL 1.38 ACRE LOT •1,804 sq ft, 3 bed, 2 ba, Florida rm, living rm •Family rm - fp, kitchen appl., shed, 2 car #212056167 EXT. #262•KEY #247493

$199,900

$189,900

$224,900

$189,900

Lakes Area’s #1 Team!

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janet@TheStocktonTeam.com

steve@TheStocktonTeam.com

800-396-5204 + Ext. # for recorded message Text Key # to 90210 for text message Call today for a private consultation.

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$79,900

$495,000

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED RARE BUILDING OPPORTUNITY CONDOMINIUM TOWNHOUSE ALL-SPORTS UNION LAKEFRONT •2 bed, 1.5 ba + fin basement, granite kitchen •75’ sandy shoreline, 200’ deep lot, seawall •Possible walkout site, existing 2 br, 2 ba home •Ceramic, hdwd, LC terms, clubhouse, pool, patio #212017000 EXT. #205 •KEY #248367 #212009441 EXT. #259 •KEY #262565 LD FIE OM LO B ST WE

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$34,900

$359,900

GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO BUILD ALL-SPORTS UNION LAKEFRONT YOUR DREAM HOME BUILDING LOT •Lot includes 3 parcels (90’x101’), W.B. schools •210’ deep, 45’ sandy shoreline, walkout site •Sub beach & boating on Upper Straits Lake •Utilities, city wtr & sewer, Walled Lk schools #212040546 EXT. #221 •KEY #248395 #212055074 EXT. #264•KEY #278040

With property inventory down, mortgage rates remain low and home pricing on the rise...

There’s No Better Time To Sell! We are full time professional Realtors... •Meeting Client’s Needs Since 1977 •Dedicated Listing & Buyer’s Agents •160+ Negotiated/Closed “Short Sales”

Our performance speaks for itself!

www.TheStocktonTeam.com


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212055875 - $139,000

211131493 - $137,000

212040150 - $274,900

212036982 - $164,900

212057094 - $230,000

SHARP HOME 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, newer roof and updates. Separate building/in-law quarters.

SPACIOUS, UPDATED HOME 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, lake privileges, finished basement

CONTEMPORARY HOME CARIBOU CREEK 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, open floor plan, master suite, walkout basement, large yard

END UNIT CONDO 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, island kitchen, gas fireplace

PRESTIGIOUS MEDTOWN SQUARE UNIT 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, open floor plan, new carpet, 2 car tandem garage, storage unit.

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211101478 - $149,900

212058773 - $239,900

212051648 - $224,900

212000049 - $124,900

211120853 - $152,900

OLD WORLD CHARM TUDOR 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, coved ceilings, lake privileges

BEAUTIFUL COLONIAL IN CUL-DE-SAC 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, large kitchen, vaulted ceilings, master suite, 1st floor laundry

IMPRESSIVE CONTEMPORARY HOME 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 1st floor master suite, natural fireplace

GORGEOUS SETTING - 2.2 ACRES 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, master with 2 closets, barn/shed

GOLF FRONTAGE Corner unit condo - 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, finished basement, fireplace

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212048663 - $259,900

212049543 - $699,000

BEAUTIFUL BRICK RANCH 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, master large walkin, jetted tub, brick patio, garage heating unit

SPECTACULAR MIDDLE STRAITS WATERFRONT 4 bedrooms, 3.2 baths, kitchen newly remodeled, master suite, theater room, many extras

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GREAT RANCH HOME 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, recent updates and new windows. Move in ready. 212058293 - $78,000

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212028681 - $149,900

212050394 - $289,000

COME ON OUT TO THE COUNTRY! Three bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, woodstove, almost 2 acres, 3 car garage

NEW ENGLAND CHARM 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, 1.5 acres with pond, walkout finished basement

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212039715 - $139,900

212056484 - $112,000

212045708 - $229,000

212050308 - $300,000

212049385 - $398,000

CURB APPEAL PLUS! 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, fenced, wooded yard

POTTERY BARN MOVE-IN READY 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, shabby chic kitchen, all appliances, huge 3 car garage, fenced yard

PRIVATE SETTING ON 3.34 ACRES 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, kitchen with island, all appliances, partially finished walkout

CRANBERRY LAKE COLONIAL Four bedrooms, 2.1 baths, gourmet kitchen, master suite fireplace, beautiful lot

ALL-SPORTS CEDAR ISLAND RANCH 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, open floor plan, 3 season sun room

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212031285 - $259,000

212056840 - $155,000

211110139 - $9,900

212046820 - $635,000

211128969 - $158,000

LAKEFRONT GEM 83’ ON WOODALL LAKE 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, huge master with bath & doorwall to deck. Walkout w/2nd kitchen.

FOUR BEDROOM CONDO 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 1st floor laundry, cozy fireplace, 2 car attached garage

LAST LOT AVAILABLE Fentonwood Estates build your dream home. Wooded setting.

SPECTACULAR GREEN LAKE FRONTAGE 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, oversized bedrooms, 2 suites, heated Florida rm, million dollar views

CENTENNIAL FARMHOUSE 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, family/parlor with fireplace, over an acre

Denotes a Real Estate One Virtual Tour

Lakes Area (248) 363-8300 • www.RealEstateOne.com

©Real Estate One, Inc., 2012


JUNE 20-26, 2012

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– 696 SOUTHFIELD RD., BIRMINGHAM – STUNNING 4 BEDROOM COLONIAL, WALK TO DOWNTOWN. NESTED ON EXTRA DEEP LOT. 212043782 $375,000

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– 763 PROMOTORY DR., MILFORD – END UNIT RANCH CONDO ON QUIET STREET, OPEN FLOOR PLAN $190,000 W NE EAS E L

– HARTLAND – BEAUTIFUL HOME, BATHS REMODELED IN 2012. STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES INCLUDED. 212051684 $159,900

– COMMERCE TOWNSHIP – MUST SEE BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM BUILT HOME ON 6.3 ACRES. 212050989 $414,500

ICE PR

– HIGHLAND – LARGE RANCH WITH DOCKING PRIVILEGES ON ALL-SPORTS WHITE LAKE. 212050464 $169,900

– HIGHLAND – LEASE WITH PRIVILEGES ON DUNHAM LAKE! 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, LOTS OF STORAGE! 212048317 $1,500

– HIGHLAND – TOTALLY UPDATED CAPE COD ON 12 WOODED ACRES. POLE BARN. 212057271 $239,000

– HIGHLAND – MANY STUNNING UPGRADES AT A GREAT PRICE! BEAUTIFUL BRAZILIAN CHERRY FLOORING. 212043226 $139,900

– MILFORD – BEAUTIFUL FENCED 10 ACRES WITH STOCKED POND. MUST SEE - COUNTRY LIVING IN THE CITY! 212039423 $224,900

– HIGHLAND – FANTASTIC ACREAGE WITH PICTURESQUE POND, ROOM FOR HORSES AND OUTBUILDINGS. 212037729 $429,000

– HIGHLAND – WELL PLANNED DESIGN, ATTENTION TO DETAIL. MAPLE & GRANITE KITCHEN. 212032857 $289,900

– HARTLAND – SPACIOUS AND SUPERBLY MAINTAINED. LAKE PRIVILEGES ON DUNHAM LAKE. 212030064 $200,000

– HIGHLAND – PREMIUM, DOWNEY LAKE FRONT SITE

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– HOWELL – BEAUTIFUL RANCH WITH LAKE PRIVILEGES ON ALL-SPORTS CROOKED LAKE. 212030060 $205,000

– HIGHLAND – BENCHMARK HOMES PRESENTS 4 BEDROOM, 2.1 BATH COLONIAL ON 1+/- ACRE. 212029431 $274,000

– MILFORD – SPACIOUS HOME, CLOSE TO THE VILLAGE OF MILFORD. 212025808 $209,000

212022371

– COMMERCE – OVER 5,000 SQ. FT. OF LUXURY WATERFRONT LIVING ON ALL-SPORTS LAKE SHERWOOD! 212019292 $6O5,000

– HIGHLAND – A HIDDEN JEWEL ON LOW TRAFFIC ALL-SPORTS HIGHLAND LAKE! 212012906 $209,900

– HIGHLAND – ALL UPDATED SUPER COTTAGE WITH 125 FT. FRONTAGE ON DUCK LAKE CANAL! 212007826 $120,000

– HIGHLAND – BEAUTIFUL BRICK 4 BEDROOMS, 5.1 BATHS LAKEFRONT HOME! 211115821 $549,321

560 N. Milford Rd., Milford • 248.684.1065 ~ Serving Milford & Surrounding Areas

$324,900

©Real Estate One, Inc., 2012


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Absolutely Free

90

FREE 100 retainer wall cement blocks good for landscaping 248-363-1575 CATS FIXED, rescues, and 2 male 9 week old kittens, must stay together. Need loving homes. 248-738-4901 or 248-214-9898

Moving Sales

102

JUNE 23rd & 24th 10am4pm 3301 Erie Drive, Orchard Lake, 48324 Something for everyone.

Garage Sales

103

COMMERCE BIG MOVING Sale. June 21, 22, 23. Union Lake, 9am4pm. 7988 Farrant 48382. TWO FAMILY Sale, 8a.m.3p.m. Thursday, Friday, Stoneridge Court at Coralwood, Commerce at Duck Lake.

ANNUAL SUB SALE June 21st - 23rd 20 + Streets Off Commerce Rd. between Edgewood & S. Commerce. Avoid the construction and come in on Newton, off Oakley Park Rd.

VINTAGE ESTATE SALE 3515 Ravinewood Ct., Lake Sherwood Subdivision, Commerce Twp., June 22, 23, 24; 9am-7pm. Antique furniture (very large collection of pottery, ceramics, teapots (McCoy, USA, etc.) Kitchen collectibles and household items, Fire King dishes, costume jewelry, Bose 901 (4 speaker system with stands), 80's complete Marantz system with stand, large conference table, motorcycle gear, class C hitch with sway bars, many other items. Something for everyone. All must go. Very Reasonable prices. Dealers welcome, NO pre-sales. Cash Only.

Garage Sales

103

Garage Sales

103

Appliances

COMMERCE

WEST BLOOMFIELD

MYSTIC FOREST SUB SALE

GARAGE SALE- June 21, 22, 23, 9a.m.-5p.m. 5429 Greenbriar Drive, West Bloomfield. 48323. Collectables, designer items, household items.

Sleeth & Benstein Friday, June 22 & Saturday, June 23. 9am-4pm HIGHLAND HUGE FAMILY Sale: June 22-23, 9a.m.-4p.m. 3768 Capitol Way off Harvey Lake. BB/ FB/ Hockey cards, jewelry, golf clubs, glassware, household goods. 4313 MALLARD'S Landing off Clyde Road. June 21, 22, 23. 9am-5pm. Jewelry, antique dresser, dolls, TV wall unit, Avon, armoire, 16ft. aluminum canoe, etc. MILFORD

MULTI - FAMILY GARAGE SALE Furniture, household items, clothes, linens.

June 21st and 22nd 8am to 5pm 1506 Hidden Valley Dr. (2 miles north of Milford, on Milford Rd., west on Rowe Rd.) WALLED LAKE

WALLED LAKE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Rummage Sale 313 Northport Behind Lynch Funeral home, Treasures Plus Thursday & Friday 9am-5pm Saturday 9am-12pm (Half off day) WATERFORD 3645 LINCOLNSHIRE 48328, June 22-23, Bikes, books, furniture, & more. WEST BLOOMFIELD ESTATE/ MOVING Sale: Selling everything! June 2124,10a.m.-dusk, 7538 Greenway Lane off Commerce & Keith, Birchwood Park Subdivison.

FAX

YOUR CLASSIFIED AD

You can fax your ad 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to the Spinal Column Newsweekly

360-5308 360-5309

GE PROFILE dishwasher, built-in type, works well, black. $25 248-360-2911 USED AIR Conditioner for whole small house, $24.99 248-652-1657

Furniture/Rugs

WHITE LAKE BABY ITEMS, Gently used. sports equipment clothing TV furniture home goods. all must go Thursday, Friday 10am. 9857 Elizabeth Lake Road . JUNE 22ND & 23rd, Ormond Rd & M-59. Follow signs. GARAGE SALES 10260 Lakeside Drive. M-59/ Teggerdine. June 21st, 22nd, 23rd 9-4. Antiques and cool stuff

AUTUMN GLEN SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE

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125

FOUR OAK Dining room chairs, good condition, $24.00. 248-698-9469 PRINT PATTERN sofa, love seat, chair with lamps and end tables. Best offer. (248)6663752 OLD MAPLE Chest with drawers. Fair condition. $8.00. 248-420-4320 VINTAGE RECORD Cabinet, $25. 248-666-9444

Household Items

129

WOODEN PLANT stand w/ graduated shelving. 28" long x 28 1/2" high. $10 248-6232661

June 21st, 22nd, 23rd

Thurs., Fri., Sat. 9a.m.-5p.m. Williams Lake Road across from Hess Hathaway Park 30 YEARS ACCUMULATION. Something for everyone. Oxbow/ Cedar Island, Enter Golden Dr., 945 Merit. June 21- 23, 9am-4pm.

CRANBERRY LAKE COMMUNITY WIDE YARD SALE

9a.m.-5p.m. Thurs., Fri., &Sat. June 21, 22, & 23 Cranberry Lake is located at 9620 Highland Road. WIXOM

Odds N Ends

138

$20 PREPAID Phone card for only $10- I can give you a 1800 number to verify, expires June 13, 2013. 248-6232661. 4.3 Tom Tom GPS XL335 TM, touch screen/ voice street names, 3-D view/ advanced lane guidance, lifetime traffic & maps, all cables, fold & go easy port mount & manuels. $50. 248-872-1096 WESTINGHOUSE AUTOMATIC extra tall can opener, brand new in box. $5. 248-623-2661

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Sports/Recreational146 DUNLOP GOLF driving iron, graphite. $15. 248-553-4967

BOATS/ OUTDOOR Boats/Motors/ Trailers

164

DAVE'S MOBILE MARINE •Pontoon Hauling •Inboard & Outboard Repair "We Come To You" •Buy & Sell Motors

(248)666-9248 Campers

176

1995 TERRY camper. 24ft., great condition. Includes tow package. $4,500. 248-4998855 TRAILER HITCH- Heavy duty 2inch ball mount. $25 248698-4168

CARS/TRUCKS MOTORCYCLES Wanted Parts/ Salvage

183

181

UNWANTED AUTOS LLC TOP $ Paid For Any: • Junk • Non Running • Wrecked Cars $275 & Up

(248)467-0396

LEISURE TIME

CAMPBELL'S TOWING

Building Materials 105

Sports/Recreational146

AUTOS, CARS & TRUCKS

SANDED GROUT, tile nippers, miscellaneous tiles all for $10 248-766-4323

WANT TO BUY. Lightweight Kayak. 8-10 ft. Good condition. 248-318-4997

$200 AND UP

248-698-1062

Cars

187

2005 Harley Davidson 883L 1400+ miles. $5K 248-2315107

FORD, E150 XLT, 2000. V8, kbb; excellent. One owner. 8 passenger, loaded. $5,600. 586-303-6500

MOTORCYCLEGUARANTEE See First Want Ad Page

SALES GUARANTEE

FULL REPAIR SERVICES Motorcycle parts/ Access. Mention ad for up to 20% off! MX • ATV• P.W.C

Lakes MotorSports 4713 Dixie Highway, Waterford, MI 48329

248-674-0663 www.lakesmotorsports.com

Trucks/Trailers

185

FORD 150 PICK UP 1993, runs great, $900 OBO. 248960-3829 2002 WELLS CARGO Trailer, 5ftx10ft, $1,100. 248-3909943.

Cars

187 HADLEY'S TOWING

24825 Hathaway St. Farmington Hills, Mi 48335

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, Saturday, 8:30am-4:30pm. 1182 S. Creek Drive. Antique furniture, clothes, small appliances, tools.

HIGHLAND’S NEWEST AUTO DEALER

Motorcycles

AUCTION JULY 9th, 2012 11am 1. 1999 Plymouth Voyager 1P4GP44G2XB545815 2. 1997 Mitsubishi Eclipse 4A3AK440VE193893 3. 1996 Plymouth Breeze 1P3EJ46C9TN310151 4. 2002 Isuzu Rodeo 4S2CK58W024322991 5. 1998 Mercedes ML 320 4JGAB54E3WA043831 6. 1996 Nissan Maxima JN1CA21D0TT722498 7. 2003 Pontiac Bonneville 1G2HX52K434114952 8. 1996 BMW 740 IL WBAGJ8328TDL39736 9. 1999 Dodge Stratus 1G3EJ56H1XN654648

Autos, Vans, Trucks See First Want Ad Page

HAL'S AUTO CLINIC 24795 Hathaway Farmington Hills, Mi 48335 248-477-5951

AUCTION JUNE 29th @ 12pm 2002 Chevrolet Cavalier 1G1JH52F327375220 100,083 miles LINCOLN MARK Vll 1986, Excellent running condition, interior- like new, 138k, $2,600 OBO. 248-363-1378

Classic/ Antique Cars

188

WANTED

248-252-9194

SERVICE DIRECTORY REPAIR/ IMPROVEMENT 502

TONY'S APPLIANCE SERVICE Servicing all Major Appliances. •Hot water tank

(248)360-0213 (248)698-8819 Asphalt/Pavement 503

KEITH'S SEALCOATING • NO SPRAY • ASPHALT REPAIR & GRAVEL FILL

Guaranteed Credit Approval

SINCE 1983

(248)-623-7282

2009 DODGE CHALLENGER SPORT SE, 1 owner, auto., loaded, 3.5 L 6 cylinder, MP3/CD, $22,000

WE BUY CARS! Paying more for your trade

3365 W. Highland Rd. (M-59) at Hickory Ridge Rd.

248-714-6125

woodwardauto.com

Carpet Installation

513

CARPET REPAIR •Restretching Seams & Patches

248-563-4731 Cabinetry

515

Elegant Woodworking •Mantels •Fireplace Surrounds •Furniture •Entertainment Center •Custom Cabinets •Crown Molding •Kitchen Cabinets •Custom Bars Harold Canfield

(248)363-3804 elegant-woodworking.com

1967- 69 Camaro or any muscle car, any make, any model, any condition. Also 1972 or older Corvettes,

Appliance Repair

Carpet Installation

513

BOB'S CARPET Great prices on plush & berber carpet. Low prices on pad & installation. Living room & bedroom sized remnants $4 per yd. Restretching &repairs. 35 years experience.

Bob (248)681-5771

Cement/Concrete

517

C & G CEMENT

Quality Workmanship Residential-Commercial Over 30 years Experience STAMPED CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS FOOTINGS GARAGE FLOORS BLOCK WORK FREE ESTIMATES Michael (248)363-4783 MILFORD LOCATION

(248)684-5928 ARROW CONCRETE •Driveway Replacements Free Tear outs •Regular & Stamped •Home Owner Friendly •Residential - Commerical Fully Lic. & Ins. 20 Yr. Exp.



ARROWCONCRETE.NET

248-758-4346

MARCUCCI CONCRETE As Seen on ABC TV "Extreme Home Makeovers" Satisfying Customers for Over 30 Years •DRIVEWAY •PORCHES •FOUNDATIONS •BRICK •BLOCK •STAMPED/ COLORED Lic/Ins Visa/ MC Wixom

248-486-5900 AFFORDABLE CONCRETE SERVICES Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks, Tear-outs, Replacements, Footings, Block work. Over 30 years experience.

Call Bob

248-579-3979


JUNE 20-26, 2012

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 51

LAKES AREA SERVICES (248) 360-7355

www.SpinalColumnOnline.com

Fax (248) 360-5308

IN PRINT and ON-LINE 24/7

Personal • Business • Maintenance • Improvements • Repair Decks/Patios

523

Deck Maintenance Power washing

Excavating

529

J.J.M BACKHOE SERVICE LLC

Call Tredway Painting

Backhoe service & landscaping. 38 Years Experience. Small or Large Jobs. Fully insured. Free estimates.

248-787-1174

(248)624-6458

Stain & Sealing Interior/Exterior Painting

Doors

524

Flooring

536

THE DOOR STOP

EDWARD'S

Since 1980

FLOOR COVERING

Garage door springs and door openers repaired and/or replaced.

Call Anytime 248-624-4042 (cell) 248-640-6298

CERTIFIED OVERHEAD DOOR SERVICE

248-624-3161 526

R&D DRYWALL & PAINTING

545

D&S HOME REPAIRS REMODELING •Additions •Garages •Drywall •Painting •Plumbing •Electrical •Tile •Marble •Kitchens •Baths •Basements •Decks 33 Years ... Licensed

248-684-4175 810-714-3058

•Hang & Finished •Small Repair •Texture Repair •Plaster Repair •Wet Sand

Ron (248)673-7665 Electricians

(248)241-6913 Handy Person

•Garage Doors •Repaired/ Services •New Doors/ Openers •Installed at Factory Pricing •Emergency Service Available

Drywall

•Linoleum •Ceramic Tile •Hardwood Floors •Laminate Wood 27 Years Exp. Free Est.

528

MASTER ELECTRICIAN Insured & State Licensed, 25 years experience. Prompt, courteous service. FREE ESTIMATES. ALL TYPES OF WORK. Competitive Prices

(248)683-7985

TOTAL HOME SERVICE 35 Years Licensed PLUMBING • HEATING CARPENTRY • DRYWALL ELECTRICAL NEW SERVICE KITCHENS BATHS CERAMIC TILE

"The job your husband will do tomorrow." (248)887-2366

Handy Person

545

DU-IT-ALL HOME CARE IMPROVEMENTS Specials: •Ceramic Tile •Formica Tops & Kitchens •Exterior/Interior Painting Also, we do complete basements and all other interior work, including electric, plumbing, etc. Call today. Cell #

(248)891-7072 Licensed and Insured

Heating/Duct Work 546

THOMASON HEATING & COOLING • Furnaces • Boilers • Air Cleaners •Air Conditioners •Humidifiers Service & Replacements

FREE ESTIMATES ON INSTALLATION

248-363-1615 Home Improvement

547



TALLON ROOFING & SIDING Est. 1971 "Quality is Top Priority" Licensed/ Insured

•Roofing •Siding •Repairs •Gutters •Gutter Protection

248-684-1555

Interior Decorating 550

Interior Decor Tired of looking at that same old room? Let me give it a make over.

248-755-5791 Tracy Lawn/Garden Services

553

A R T

Outdoor Services, LLC Lawn Service •Spring clean up •Gutter cleaning •Landscape •Brick pavers •Mulch & weeding •Insured •Res. & Com. www.artoutdoorservices.com (248)625-5719

ESTATE PROPERTY Manager/ Pruning Specialist Highly Qualified & Available Will oversee all services pertaining to the proper ties, maintenance & upkeep. Call

David of Crucial Details 248-884-8464

College Student Looking for Lawn care, mulch/ stone & odd jobs Shawn Larkins 248-931-0295 Painting/ Decorating

Painting/ Decorating

Roofing 562

VS PAINTING SUMMER SPECIAL Save 20% this season on exterior/ interior painting, drywall repair, & wallpaper removal on small or big jobs. 25 years experience. licensed and insured. Same day free estimates.

D&D ROOFING •Siding •Gutters & Leaf Guards •Soffits & Trimwork •Decks •Windows

Doug Dible 248-431-6243

248-894-3239 SUMMER SPECIALS

Lakes Painting All types of Painting Drywall Repairs • Wallpaper Removal & Installation . References • Lakes Area Owner Operated Since 1980

ROOF REPAIRS Missing shingles replaced, Chimney flashing resealed, Leaks stopped, Vent stack flashing replaced, Complete roof inspection service, Guaranteed work. 30 yrs exp.

Call Doug Miller 248-360-0344

248-762-1534 Plumbing

Licensed & Insured Complete Plumbing Service New Construction & Remodel Commercial & Residential

248-363-5864 Power Washing

NEED A NEW ROOF?

567

Premier Plumbing

•Best Prices •Best Work •Best Warrenty Licensed, Bonded, Insured & Certified

248-933-7200 Siding

569

FARR'S POWER WASHING •Deck Cleaning / Staining & Sealing •Brick Cleaning •Rust & Mold Removal •Housewashing. •Painting •Deck Repairs.

 FARR'S PAINTING Exterior & Interior Wood Repairs • Caulking Staining • Wallpaper Removal Drywall repairs • Water repairs Free Power Washing w/paint. farrshomeimprovements.com

(248) 477-7764 (248) 345-3308

(248) 477-7764 (248) 345-3308 Roofing

577

I.D.C.

Home Service Siding, Trim & Soffitt Guaranteed Professional Installation. Lic./ Ins. References available.

Bob: 248-363-0589

farrshomeimprovements.com

562

571

idchomeservice.com 571

 PRICE IS RIGHT ROOFING •Repairs •Re-Roofs •Chimney Repair •Metal Work •Flat Roofs •Complete Roof Packages. •Siding •Gutters

Tile

585 J.M. TILE & MARBLE CUSTOM WORK

•Remodeling •Quality Service •New Construction • Repairs •Grout Sealing • Licensed and Insured

30 Years Experience

John Miller (248)505-8865

248-459-7894

jmtileandmarble.com

FREE Estimates

Trash/Debris Removal

Tree Service 586

Progressive Transportation Specializing in: •Appliances •Furniture •Debris Removal

Call anytime for estimates & great service

248-887-4892 Tree Service

587



J ROMO TREE SERVICE •Tree Trimming •Lot Clearing •Tree Removal •Experienced •Quality Work •Affordable •Free Estimates •Insured

(248)939-7420 (248)310-5031 jromotreeservice@yahoo.com

MAXON'S TREE SERVICE •Trimming •Tree Removal •Stump Grinding •Lot Clearing •Firewood & Woodchips "We now have wood fencing & deliver sand, gravel, top soil."

Licensed & Insured Free Estimates

(248)887-2190 KODIAK AERIAL TREE SERVICE Tree Trim Removal and Stumps •Free estimates •Insured 30 years experience

248-921-9097

587

Quality, Affordable Tree Work JAYS QUALITY LAWN SERVICE

Insured 248-431-1494 Waterproofing

599

Dry Basements, LLC We Repair: •Poured Walls/ Concrete Block •Waterproofing •Cracked or Bowed Walls •Foundation Repaired Replaced •Underpinning •Crawl Space and Encapsulation •Licensed & Insured •Ron Heck, Builder (248)420-0116

Wells

603

McPherson WELL SERVICE PUMPS •TANKS WELL REPAIR 2, 4, & 5 INCH

Emergency Service 7 days a week 248-

363-6464

aquawells.com All credit cards accepted

BOB WYCKOFF WELL SERVICE "If you have questions, we have answers!" •PUMPS •TANKS • WELL REPAIR

(248)310-0917

Emergency Service Visa & MasterCard


PAGE 52

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Yo u r Tr u s t e d D e a l e r s h i p A l t e r n a t i v e

Cooley Lk. Rd. Union Lake Rd.

Commerce Rd.

.

Ric hard son Rd Oakley Park Trail tiac Pon

WALMART

Haggerty Rd.

Where You Need Us!

Maple Rd.

M-5

Benstein Rd.

RIGHT HERE 2199 Haggerty Rd. at Pontiac Trail, Walled Lake

14 Mile Rd.

www.morrismotorsmi.com

248-624-4500

The Service You Expect at Prices That Make Sense!

Complete Auto Repair Service All Makes and Models

SUMMER A/C TUNE-UP SPECIAL INCLUDES: • Check A/C Performance • Check Belt • Clean Condensor • Check Condition of Engine Coolant • Freon Extra

49

$

Must present coupon when order is written. Most GM vehicles. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or discount. Expires 7/3/12.

CHECK ENGINE LIGHT SPECIAL OR ANY WARNING LIGHT (ABS/AIRBAG)

FRONT BRAKE PADS INSTALLED

95 +tax

SC

Install ACDelco DuraStop CERAMIC brake pads Normally $175.00

99

$ ONLY

95* WOW!

We will perform a complete computer scan and external diagnosis. If your vehicle displays a “Check Engine” or “Service Soon” bring this coupon in for diagnosis.

ACT NOW BEFORE OFFER EXPIRES

*Turning or replacing rotors, all other services, and tax extra. Excludes Corvette, Saturn, Saab, HUMMER and other select vehicles. Not valid with other offers. See dealer for eligible vehicles, details. Offer ends 7/3/12

SC

LIMITED TIME ONLY

FREE

Must present coupon when order is written. Cannot be combined with any other offers. GM vehicles only. Plus tax and shop supplies. Expires 7/3/12.

SC

Fully Equipped Collision Shop with FREE Estimates!

25 OFF 15 OFF

Any Service over $175.00 Any Service over $90.00 Any Make or Model One coupon per customer. Coupons may not be combined with any other offer. Expires 7/3/12. Excludes oil changes, brake promotion, tires and SRTA’s. Valid only in our service department. Must present coupon when order is written.

SC

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL

SERVICE SPECIAL COUPON

19

OIL $ CHANGE

95

OIL CHANGE & TIRE ROTATION

+tax and disposal fee with coupon

*Includes up to 5 quarts of oil and oil filter. Excludes synthetic oil and diesel engines. Most vehicles - see service advisor for exceptions. With this coupon. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 7/3/12

All certified Auto Technicians

7 A.M.-9 A.M. MONDAY-FRIDAY

MO O TOR IL

WILD CARD SPECIAL $ $

includes Check Engine Light Synthetic Oil Extra SC

35

$

Must present coupon when order is written. Most GM vehicles. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or discount. Expires 7/3/12.

#P1940A

2,777**

$

2008 FORD ESCAPE #P1937

14,995**

$

Find us on Facebook

2007 MAZDA CX7

2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

#P1951

#P1956B

13,995**

$

9,997**

$

SC

Automotive Parts

SERVICE HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 7 a.m.-8 p.m. • Tues., Wed. & Fri. 7 a.m.-6 p.m.

FIRST DAY OF SUMMER BLOWOUT!

2001 CHEVROLET VENTURE

99

6/20 THRU 6/27/12

2002 CHEVROLET ASTRO CONVERSION #P2051

8,797**

$

Morris Complete Inventory At: www.morrismotorsmi.com Motors Michigan For Peace of Mind: most of our vehicles have warranty or service contracts available.

**For purchase with qualified credit approval. Prices are plus tax, title, license & doc fee. Call dealer for more details. Subject to prior sale. Expires 6/27/12.

SALES HOURS: Mon. & Thurs.: 8:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Tues., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.

~CHILD FRIENDLY CUSTOMER LOUNGE~

SCN-6.20.12  

WATERFORD •UNION LAKE •WHITE LAKE •HIGHLAND•MILFORD•WIXOM WALLED LAKE •WOLVERINE LAKE •COMMERCE•ORCHARD LAKE •WEST BLOOMFIELD Buffet Brunch...