SCI Final Report 2021

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On line Edition 1


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Acknowledgments This edition of Science Club International 2021 was supported by a Public Engagement Grant funded by the American Society for Cell Biology through the Science Sandbox, an initiative of the Simons Foundation

Special thanks to Thea Clarke - ASCB Deborah Wasserman - (COSI Center for Research and Evaluation) Mónica Feliú-Mójer - Ciencia Puerto Rico, iBiology Wallace Marshall - University of California San Francisco 3


Index

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Index 1.What is Science Clubs International? 2. SCI Online Edition 2.1 Clubes and instructors 2.2 Activities 2.3 The SCI Challenges 3.Testimonials 3.1 Students 3.2 Instructors 4. Statistics and evaluation 4. Statistics and evaluation 5.Financial Report 6.Our team

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¿What is Science Clubs International?

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¿What is Science Clubs International? Science Clubs International (SCI) is a network of passionate science educators and a non-profit organization founded in 2016. Our mission to spark a social transformation by expanding access to high-quality STEM education and collaborative, international networks, and educational experiences in an international environment. Science Clubs International is also a growing network of sister organizations and a US-based organization that works to support and accelerate the network’s progress. Through this global network, we can share ideas and innovations across countries and learn from each other. Our common flagship program is called Clubes de Ciencia, a series of hands-on, week-long workshops designed for high school and college students. Each club is taught by a team of instructors, young scientists from top institutions in the world. The “Clubes de Ciencia” Program started in Mexico in 2014 and quickly expanded to several countries in Ibero-America. The “Clubes” are complemented by multiple initiatives that foster collaborations and bring closer specialists in multiple STEM fields with youth. We strive to spark and support the students’ interest in STEM as a long term career and as a tool for social impact.

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SCI Online Edition 2021

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Sex

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Language

School Type


Clubs and Instructors

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SCI2021-01 - Talking cells, dripping fluids, and promising therapies. Claudia Carrera - National University of Singapore Brendan Deveney - Harvard University The cells are the key components of tissues responsible for repair or regeneration. In Vitro methods allow for the evaluation of the cellular function and potential treatments. Additionally, through 3D printing we can design and develop computer models to be applied in diseases such as fractures, luxations and joint replacements. The objective of the present science club is to evaluate different tissues (ligaments, tendons, bone) under In Vitro conditions. Moreover, 3D printing will be used to develop different bone models for different species including dogs, cats, wild animals, and humans.

SCI2021-02 - Regenerative therapeutics: Cell culture and 3D-printing Haydee Pacheco - Rutgers University Sebastian Cardona - University of Missouri The cells are the key components of tissues responsible for repair or regeneration. In Vitro methods allow for the evaluation of the cellular function and potential treatments. Additionally, through 3D printing we can design and develop computer models to be applied in diseases such as fractures, luxations and joint replacements. The objective of the present science club is to evaluate different tissues (ligaments, tendons, bone) under In Vitro conditions. Moreover, 3D printing will be used to develop different bone models for 11

different species including dogs, cats, wild animals, and humans.


SCI2021-03 - Artificial Intelligence: uses, wonders, and Jorge Posada- Secretaría de Educación y Cultura del Tolima, Col Hugo Posada - University of Connecticut The aim of the club is to bring participants closer to artificial intelligence (AI), its current uses, potentialities, and risks, in a practical and simple manner. Some basic mathematical details will be presented to highlight the importance of mathematical preparation for AI. Based on the understanding of human intelligence, we will demonstrate how machines “learn” and make decisions. The “deep learning” (an advanced AI technique) will be presented in a practical way. We will use the learned techniques to build a simple AI system using data available to participants, so that they can explore and share it with their families and friends.

SCI2021-06 - Brain gym role on algorithms essentials for daily life Ana Carolina da Hora - PUC Rio, Bra Sylvia Ortega Martinez, PhD This club will teach students about our brain , specifically on the process called Neurogenesis (our ´brain gym´). In other words, the new neuron generation in the adult brain. This process is a key target in mental health disorders such as anxiety, but also contributes in the cognitive and emotional functions of the brain.

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On the other hand, this brain ability allowing humans to have creativity as well as logic abilities, is intimately related with the human ability to create algorithms and work with technology. Algorithms are tools used by humans in a set of steps to perform a task or solve problems that our human brain is not so quick to solve. In the biological sciences, new algorithms are continually being designed to help, for example, find solutions to diseases. In this regard, this club will teach students about algorithms and their use in Neuroscience. Technology should lead the student to be a creative thinker, developing through collective work that involves experimenting with new ways of relating to the world.


SCI2021-05 - Dancing with enzymes: designing the drugs of the future Carlos Diaz Tufino - Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mex Brendan Deveney - Harvard University The cells are the key components of tissues responsible for repair or regeneration. In Vitro methods allow for the evaluation of the cellular function and potential treatments. Additionally, through 3D printing we can design and develop computer models to be applied in diseases such as fractures, luxations and joint replacements. The objective of the present science club is to evaluate different tissues (ligaments, tendons, bone) under In Vitro conditions. Moreover, 3D printing will be used to develop different bone models for different species including dogs, cats, wild animals, and humans.

SCI2021-04 - Building a synthetic cell: from Bacteria to stem cells Natalia Montellanos - Universidad Católica Boliviana, Bolivia Andres Florez - Harvard University Miguel Torres- University of Toronto

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In this club, we will learn how enzymes are related to drug design, development, and its efficacy and safety for disease treatment. Throughout interactive lectures on the structure and function of enzymes, we will understand how drug action is a unique phenomenon, relying on both biology and chemistry. With hands-on activities (molecular visualization of enzymes, common drugs’ docking, and molecular dynamics simulation), we will visualize how the molecular movement is essential for the binding efficiency of drugs in their biological targets. Are you ready to become the drug designer of the future?


SCI2021-07 - Navigating our Planet’s waters from aquifers to coral reefs Ana María González - Pennsylvania State University Michel Pedrazas - University of Texas Our planet is covered in water. It is found on the surface as oceans, lakes and rivers and also beneath the surface in aquifers and soil moisture. Water is everywhere and it is essential not only for humans but to maintain ecosystems all over our planet! Is all water the same? Where does our home water come from? How can we sustainably manage water? Is groundwater always clean? What about sea water? What can water tell us about the climate? And, what are other ways water is important to our planet? Come join us!

SCI2021-08 - Hacking the human genome Soad Bohorquez - CRISPR Therapeutics Yara Rodriguez - Northwestern University The instructions of life are contained within genes. A gene is a code that contains information to make proteins. Proteins sustain life; they make up all living organisms. What if we could modify this code to correct genes that cause disease? or paste genes from one organism to another to produce a desired product? CRISPR is a powerful tool for editing genomes, It allows scientists to alter DNA sequences and modify gene functions. The applications of this technology range from agriculture to medicine and production of biofuels. Join us to learn everything about this amazing technology! 14


3.2 Activities The first online edition of SCI was a 4-day long event on February 27-28 and March 6-7. It’s an intensive event with eight online workshops (clubes) for high school and college students in ibero-America and the USA. All students and instructors were selected from a pool of applicants of former participants in Clubes de Ciencia. Our first international edition had a couple of twists. First, it’s all online, due to COVID, second, our students and instructors are scattered in eight countries, in multiple time zones and we have Spanish, Portuguese, and English speaking participants. We organized pre- and post- clubes activities to encourage all participants to get to know each other. Finally, we had a student fair where participants, in teams, will have the opportunity to showcase what they learned during their club. The SCI Academic committee developed several activities to engage students and their instructors. All the events were carried out by zoom

“Meet the SCI Instructors Panel” A 1-hour-long event on Saturday, February 13th at 3 PM EST. In this event we invited students and instructors, so that the students can get to know not only the instructors from their Club but also the instructors from other Clubes. The students were able to ask questions to the instructors about their academic work and their experiences in their different fields.

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“SCI opening ceremony” A 1.5-hour-long event on Friday, February 26th at 12 PM EST. The opening words were spoken in English, Spanish and Portuguese and highlighted the importance of diversity in Science, expanding access to science, and resilience against the challenges presented by the COVID pandemic. Then the event focused on presenting the statistics about students, and introducing each club. As a part of this event, the instructors met their students in breakout-room for 30 minutes. The questions discussed were: What strikes you the most about science? What has been your experience in previous science clubs? What did you learn? In which country have you previously participated? What is your involvement in science (research or other projects)?

Figure: Presentation of Club 5 by instructor Jesús Valdivienzo

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Figure: Presentation of Club 7 by instructor Micaela Pedrazas

Figure: Instructor Hugo Posada, Jorge Posada and students, Club 3.

Figure: Instructor Hugo Posada, Jorge Posada and students, Club 3.

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Figure: Instructors Sylvia Ortega Martinez, Nina Carolina Da Hora and students, Club 6.


Webinar/discussion in English “Art in scientific research and education”

1-hour-long event at 12 PM EST on Wednesday, March 3th. Presented by Dr. Janet Iwasa, Dr. Annabel Romero, and Suyu Chen. The aim of this webinar was to show how art and science can synergize one another to explain concepts in STEAM using art, colors, illustrations, animations, videos, etc. Webinar/discussion in Portuguese “Between science and society” 1-hour-long event at 12PM EST on Friday, March 5th. Presented by Dr. Mellanie Fontes-Dutra and Guilherme de Rosso Manços. The aim of this webinar was to show how science can build societies and create a better future.

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Webinar/discussion in Spanish “Encouraging the participation of girls and women in science: Latin-American Scientific Networks and their role” 1-hour-long event at 12 PM EST on Saturday, March 13th. Presented by Dr. Maria Claudia Segovia Salcedo, Dr. Vania Figueroa Ipinza, and Dr. Angela Stella Camacho Beltrán. The aim of this webinar was to show. The aim of this webinar was to show the participation of Pioneer women that creates and developed Scientific networks and they will comment on the achievements and future challenges in motivating girls and women in science.

“SCI closing ceremony” 2-hour-long event at 12 PM EST on Saturday, March 14th.

“SCI Symposium” 2-hour-long event at 12 PM EST on Saturday, March 20th. The webinars and symposium will be available in our youtube channel

The SCI Challenges We used a challenge-based gamification approach to encourage student engagement and overall participation. The program leveraged established online tools like zoom, slack, and social media platforms to allow for continuous communication among instructors, students and volunteers. Below is the list of challenges presented to the students Challenge 1 Take a picture of your club during a break-out session. Complete the pre-event survey. Post one slack message in your club channel in a non-native language sharing a song from your country. Post something about the SCI experience on social media. 19


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Challenge 2 Create a list with the most interesting new words (could be a chemical, a process, a natural phenomenon) you are learning this weekend

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Challenge 3 Join one of the SCI webinars and share your thoughts in your club’s slack channel! One comment per student per webinar (we will also look at the attendance list to make sure you were there! . The Club with the most slack comments will get the most points! Webinars: Art in scientific research and education Entre a ciência e a sociedade La mujer en la ciencia Challenge 4 Create a meme (or multiple ones) using what you have learned during your club and post it (them) in the #general channel. The Club with the most memes will get the most points!

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Challenge 5 Send us a video of max 15 s answering: What do you think about the first edition of Science Clubs International? Final project The students made videos about what they have learnt in the clubes. A sample of these videos are available in our YouTube channel. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLxPoLsw41PTfRkmSBJRlD2TyARnMVUiG

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Testimonials

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students

Ana Beatriz Barrero García “Science Clubs International es una experiencia maravillosa donde conoces a científicos y personas increíbles y aprendes muchísimo sobre ciencia a parte compartes todos los conocimientos que tu tengas con los demás.” “Science Clubs International is a wonderful experience where you meet incredible scientists and people and you learn a lot about science apart from sharing all the knowledge that you have with others.”

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Angel Caviedes

Estefany Valverde Salinas

“Fue una experiencia enriquecedora a nivel académico y personal, porque me permitió establecer comunicaciones con otros compañeros con los mismo intereses y también me pareció muy importante el debate que se pudo establecer junto con docentes expertos en la materia.”

“La primera edición de SCI me pareció magnífica y enriquecedora, el Club número 2 me ayudó bastante en mi desarrollo profesional. Las herramientas brindadas lograron expandir mis horizontes y me motivó a tomar un rumbo hacia mi desarrollo científico y tecnológico.”

“It was an enriching experience at an academic and personal level, because it allowed me to establish communications with other colleagues with the same interests and I also found the debate that could be established together with expert teachers in the field very important.”

“The first edition of SCI seemed magnificent and enriching to me, Club number 2 helped me a lot in my professional development. The tools provided managed to expand my horizons and motivated me to take a course towards my scientific and technological development.”


Jeison Gora

Kevin Becerra Arce

Mauro David Malca Rodas

“Hola, mi nombre es Jeison y soy del Club número 1 y mi experiencia en clubes de ciencia fue excelente. Ya que amplio mis conocimientos me dio una idea más clara sobre investigación, pero sobre todo me motivo a seguir adelante con mi carrera.”

“Mi nombre es Kevin Becerra Arce, tengo 19 años. Ingrese a Science Clubs International con una gran satisfacción de haber estado en el Club número 3, me llevo una experiencia increíble con profesores y con estudiantes de diferentes países. Me agrada el tema de networking, inteligencia artificial aplicada a un negocio e hice muchos amigos y desearía volver a repetir esta experiencia muy hermosa.”

“Hola chicos, soy Mauro Malca estudiante del club de inteligencia artificial y esta primera edición de Science Clubs International me pareció genial por 3 razones: fue colaborativa, multicultural y sobretodo muy motivadora. Espero que esta experiencia tan enriquecedora se vuelva a repetir. ¡Muchas gracias! Chao.”

“Hi, my name is Jeison and I’m from Club # 1 and my science club experience was excellent. Since I broadened my knowledge, it gave me a clearer idea about research, but above all it motivated me to continue with my career.”

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“My name is Kevin Becerra Arce, I am 19 years old. I entered Science Clubs International with great satisfaction to have been in Club number 3, I had an incredible experience with teachers and students from different countries. I like the topic of networking, artificial intelligence applied to a business and I made many friends and I would like to repeat this very beautiful experience.”

“Hi guys, I’m Mauro Malca, a student of the artificial intelligence club and I found this first edition of Science Clubs International great for 3 reasons: it was collaborative, multicultural and above all very motivating. I hope that this enriching experience will be repeated. Thanks a lot! Bye.” International with great satisfaction to have been in Club number 3, I had an incredible experience with teachers and students from different countries. I like the topic of networking, artificial intelligence applied to a business and I made many friends and I would like to repeat this very beautiful experience.”


Natália Araújo do Carmona

Valentina Mendoza

“La primera edición de Science Clubs International fue una oportunidad excelente de conocer gente de diferentes países y trayectorias. Me gustó muchísimo compartir mi pasión por la ciencia y aprender junto con otros estudiantes de una forma activa y colaborativa”

“Clubes de Ciencia siempre logra superar mis expectativas y en esta edición internacional conocí a personas increíbles de las que aprendí muchísimo y que me inspiran a continuar por mi pasión por la ciencia por construir un mejor futuro.”

“The first edition of Science Clubs International was an amazing opportunity to meet people from all different countries and backgrounds. I liked sharing my love for science and learning together with other students in an active and collaborative way.”

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“Clubes de Ciencia always manages to exceed my expectations and in this international edition I met incredible people from whom I learned a lot and who inspire me to continue because of my passion for science to build a better future.”


iNSTRUCTORS

iNSTRUCTORS Jorge Posada “Esta primera versión de Clubes de Ciencia Internacional fueron una valiosa oportunidad para aprender, explorar, conocer y en específico en nuestro club para motivar a los estudiantes en el uso y aprendizaje de técnicas de inteligencia artificial y machine learning en sus procesos de investigación.” “This first version of International Science Clubs was a valuable opportunity to learn, explore, know and specifically in our club to motivate students in the use and learning of artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques in their research processes.”

Hugo Posada “Clubes de Ciencia Internacionales 2021 fue una experiencia espectacular los estudiantes fueron maravillosos aprendimos, disfrutamos. Les deseo a todos lo mejor, muchas gracias por permitirme participar en Clubes de Ciencia 2021.” “International Science Clubs 2021 was a spectacular experience the students were wonderful we learned, we enjoyed. I wish you all the best, thank you so much for allowing me to participate in Science Clubs 2021.” 28


Statistics and Evaluation

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Statistics and Evaluation In 2020, Science Clubs International (SCI) designed an international educational online model with previous students and instructors with support of a public engagement grant by the American Society for Cell Biology. It was the first time we carried an entire program in three languages (Spanish, Portuguese and English) and with participants scattered in multiple time zones. We received over 600 applications and selected 184 students from Peru, Mexico, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Spain and the USA to participate in the first edition of a SCI joint program. Our evaluation team designed pre- and post-clubes surveys to measure the program’s impact on the students’ critical thinking, motivation to pursue a STEM career, STEM identity, among other things. This process was done in collaboration with Prof. Deborah Wasserman (COSI Center for Research and Evaluation), who immensely contributed to the design of our evaluation surveys. Ultimately, our long term goal is to evaluate the contribution of the program to the students’ academic careers and professional choices. For that, we first mapped the program objectives to survey outcomes (Table 1).

As students had previously participated in country-specific Clubes de Ciencia, we were able to assess the long term impact of the workshops through retrospective questions related to their previous participation (e.g. “Since your first clubes participation…” and “Before your first clubes experience…”), as well as the contribution of their Clubes experience (e.g. “How much do you consider that your Clubes experience contributed to …”) in our pre-clubes survey. At this step, 173 students (94%) answered the form that contained about 60 questions and was supposed to take around 40 minutes to be fully answered.

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One of the program’s main objectives is to introduce innovative ideas and scientific knowledge to youth. Targeting that, we asked the participants about some abilities related to 21st century skills, such as collaboration, communication, digital literacy, critical thinking, and problem solving (Table 1). The majority of students considered that their abilities at the moment of the survey had improved since their first participation in Clubes de Ciencia in their respective country. Most importantly, most students considered that their participation in Clubes de Ciencia had contributed considerably to this improvement (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Assessing Students’ 21st Century Skills [pre-clubes survey] Before and now: 1=”very poor”, 2=”poor”,3=”average”, 4=”good”,5=”very good” Contribution: 1=”not at all”, 2=”a bit”, 3=”moderate amount”, 4=”a lot”, 5=”a huge amount” Legend > Grey: before participating in Clubes / Black: now / Blue: contribution of Clubes To assess our goal of creating scientific networks between early-career scientists and students (Table 1), we evaluated our students’ knowledge related to career development prior to their first experience at Clubes de Ciencia and at the moment of the pre-clubes survey. We asked students to evaluate their knowledge about the steps to get a STEM career and how often they discuss STEM topics with friends, as well as how often they seek career advice or talk to scientists. While prior to their first Clubes experience, most students had classified these aspects as “average” or below average, at the moment of the survey the majority of participants classified themselves as “good”, and considered that Clubes de Ciencia had contributed “a lot” to this improvement (Figure 2). 31


Figure 2. Assessing Students’ Knowledge about Career Development [pre-survey] Before and now: 1=”very poor”, 2=”poor”,3=”average”, 4=”good”, 5=”very good” Contribution: 1=”not at all”, 2=”a bit”, 3=”moderate amount”, 4=”a lot”, 5=”a huge amount” Legend > Grey: before participating in Clubes / Black: now / Blue: contribution of Clubes Finally, to understand our impact related to our third goal, we targeted participants’ motivation and engagement in scientific activities by assessing their interest for STEM, whether they identify as a STEM person, and their interest for pursuing a STEM-related career (Table 1). As observed before, at the moment of the survey students considered themselves more motivated and engaged as they were prior to the first participation in Clubes de Ciencia, and once more they thought that the program had contributed considerably to their higher scores (Figure 3).

Figure 3. Assessing Students’ STEM interest, STEM identity and STEM career interest [pre-survey]

Before and now: 1=”very poor”, 2=”poor”,3=”average”, 4=”good”,5=”very good” Contribution: 1=”not at all”, 2=”a bit”, 3=”moderate amount”, 4=”a lot”, 5=”a huge amount” Legend > Grey: before participating in Clubes / Black: now / Blue: contribution of Clubes

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The pre-survey was important to set a baseline for the post-clubes evaluation, but also allowed us to measure the long-term impact of students’ participation in Clubes de Ciencia in their original country. Although the analysis shown here are not stratified by country yet, it will be very interesting to further analyze this data and compare particularities and idiosyncrasies of the program carried in different places.


After the completion of the program, students were asked to fill the post-clubes survey to evaluate the immediate impact of the SCI Online Program. The length and duration of the form were similar to the preclubes survey and 151 students (82%) successfully submitted the form on our platform. As a reference to guide their self-evaluation, students were asked retrospective questions to reset the baseline for a specific aspect related to how they self-evaluated prior to SCI Online Edition (e.g. “Try to remember what your response was two weeks ago…”). Moreover, for some of the questions, we included an evaluation of the program’s contribution (e.g. “How much do you consider that your SCI experience contributed to…”). Following a similar strategy to the pre-survey, we assessed the different program objectives through specific survey outcomes (Table 1). In order to estimate the impact SCI Online Edition had on introducing innovative ideas and scientific knowledge, students were asked to score how much they agreed that SCI Online Edition had contributed or exposed them to the following aspects (Figure 4). As observed, most students strongly agreed that participation in the event contributed to their knowledge and exposure to new topics.

Figure 4. Assessing Students’ 21st Century Skills [post-survey] 1=”strongly disagree;” 2=“disagree;” 3=“undecided;” 4=“agree,” 5=”strongly agree” When assessing the impact of creating scientific networks between early-career scientists and students during SCI Online Edition, participants scored their skills in between “good” and “very good” after the completion of the program in comparison to scores that ranged in between “average” and “good” to how they remembered they had scored in the beginning of the event. More importantly, most students considered that SCI had contributed a lot to this improvement (Figure 5).

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Figure 5. Assessing Students’ 21st Century Skills and Knowledge about Career Development [post-survey] 1=”very poor”, 2=”poor”,3=”average”,4=”good”,5=”very good” 1=”not at all”, 2=”a bit”, 3=”moderate amount”, 4=”a lot”, 5=”a huge amount” Legend > Grey: before SCI Event started / Black: now / Yellow: contribution of SCI Online Event We, then, targeted participants’ motivation and engagement in scientific activities by assessing their interest for STEM, whether they identify as a STEM person, and their interest for pursuing a STEM-related career (Table 1). In comparison to how they felt at the beginning of the program, students had demonstrated higher interest in several aspects after completion of SCI Online Edition, and they considered that the program had contributed a lot to this higher score (Figure 6).

Figure 6. Assessing Students’ Knowledge about Career Development, STEM interest, STEM identity and STEM career interest [post-survey] 1=”not at all interested”, 2=”slightly interested”, 3=”moderately interested”, 4=” interested”, 5=”extremely interested” 1=”not at all”, 2=”a bit”, 3=”moderate amount”, 4=”a lot”, 5=”a huge amount” Legend > Grey: before SCI Event started / Black: now / Yellow: contribution of SCI Online Event Finally, as part of the post-clubes survey, we collected feedback related to the online tools we used to carry the program (Zoom for video conferences and synchronous communication and Slack for messaging and asynchronous/synchronous communication). As most students were not used to Slack in particular, we developed a small tutorial of how to use the platform and provided it to the participants in order to facilitate and encourage communication within the group. As observed, students considered the overall Zoom and Slack experience in between “good” and “very good”.

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Figure 7. Assessing platforms utilized during the program [post-survey] 1=”very poor”, 2=”poor”,3=”average”, , 4=”good”,5=”very good” The results presented in this report are a sample of a longer and broader assessment that is still ongoing. Nevertheless, in summary the data already point to a successful perception from the students of the first SCI Online Edition. It is noteworthy that the dataset will allow for more complex analyses. It will be interesting to further stratify the results by country, sex, and age to better understand and tackle the differences among each group. Moreover, a careful comparison with proper statistical analysis of results from pre- and postclubes surveys will be necessary to describe the level of the program’s impact. Finally, our goal is to deliver a follow up survey 6 months after the completion of the program to measure the long term impact of the first SCI Online Edition. Altogether, the final analysis of these data will not only provide a more complete overview of the immediate and long-term impact of the program, but also allow us to better understand and improve the program moving forward. Finally, as one of SCI goals, we are working on using the forms designed for this program to standardize the evaluations among all the countries. We believe this will be important to: 1) understand how to better support each country’s needs and learn from individual successes , 2) help the dissemination of the program in new countries, 3) work on ways of jointly fundraising to guarantee continuous financial support to all the teams. Acknowledgements: We would like to thank Deborah Wasserman (COSI Center for Research and Evaluation) for the support and insightful discussions, as well as guidance and feedback during the design of the surveys. We also thank all the Evaluation team members, who carefully designed the surveys, implemented the forms, collected and analyzed all the data (Carla Marquez, Pablo Cardozo, Susana Pando, Pedro Pousa, Bruna Paulsen) with the support of Laura Peña, Rogelio Hernández-López and Sofia Espinosa.

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Financial Report

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The 2021 Edition of Science Clubs International was supported by a Public Engagement Grant funded by the American Society of Cell Biology through the Science Box, an initiative of the Simons Foundation.

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Our team SCI Core Team Rogelio Hernández-López - University of California San Francisco, USA Bruna Paulsen - Harvard University, USA Sofía Espinoza - Yale University, USA Laura Peña - Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico Karen G. Barajas - The University of Hong Kong, China Country representatives and Team Members Carla Márquez-Luna - Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA - Mexico Gerald Salazar Quiroz - Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería - Peru Carmen Fernández - Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas - Spain Elisa Chaparro - Co-fundadora Science LAB - Colombia Luiz Eduardo del-Bem - The Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil Bianca Cervantes - Arizona State University, USA Oscar Hernandez Murillo- Harvard University, USA - Ecuador Omar Gandarilla- Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA - Bolivia Alberto Lazzaroni - Fluminense Federal University, Brazil Pablo Cardozo - The Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil Froylan Hernandez - The Nature Conservancy Instructors Claudia Carrera Bravo - National University of Singapore, Singapore Brendan Deveney - Harvard University, USA Haydee Pacheco - Rutgers University, USA Sebastian Cardona Ramírez - University of Missouri, USA Jorge Posada - Secretaría de Educación y Cultura del Tolima, Colombia Hugo Posada-Quintero - University of Connecticut, USA Natalia Montellano Durán - Universidad Católica Boliviana, Bolivia Miguel Salvador Torres-Pérez - University of Toronto, Canada Andrés Flores - Harvard University, USA Gabriel Fuente - The Scripps Research Institute, USA Jesús Valdiviezo - Duke University, USA Carlos Diaz Tufino - Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico Ana Carolina Da hora- PUC Rio, Brazil Sylvia Ortega Martinez - Stoelting, Co., USA Micaela Pedrazas - University of Texas, USA Michaell Pedrazas - University of Texas, USA Ana Maria González Angel - Pennsylvania State University, USA Soad Bohorquez-Massud - CRISPR Therapeutics Yara Rodríguez Zabala - Northwestern University, USA 39


Academic Program Committee Coordinator: Oscar Hernandez Murillo- Harvard University, USA Sofía Espinoza -McKinsey and Co., USA Laura Florez - Johannes Gutenberg University, Germany Lucia Alvarado - Universidad Franz Tamayo, Bolivia Selection & Admission Committee Coordinators: Gerald Salazar - Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería - Perú, Rogelio Hernández-López - University of California San Francisco, USA Claudia Gil - Clubes de Ciencia México A.C., Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México Pablo Cardozo - The Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil Alberto Lazzaroni - Fluminense Federal University, Brazil Alicia Hernández - Clubes de Ciencia México A.C., Universidad de Guanajuato, México Angel Rafael Pool - Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mexico Laura Peña - Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico Bruna Paulsen - Harvard University, USA Logistics Committee Coordinator: Elisa Chaparro - Co-fundadora Sciente LAB, Universidad de São Paulo, Brazil Natalia Montellano - Universidad Católica Boliviana, Bolivia Ana María Pérez - Universidad EAFIT, Sistemas de Alertas Tempranas de Medellín y Valle de Aburrá -SIATA, Colombia. Laura Peña - Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico Gerald Salazar - Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, Perú Pedro Pousa -Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil Bianca Cervantes - Arizona State University, USA Nathan Newman -Arizona State University, USA Carmen Fernández - Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, Spain Ana Clara Accioli - EDEM, Brazil Technology Committee Benjamin Sánchez - Google Human Lab Marketing & Communications Committee Coordinator: Karen G. Barajas - The University of Hong Kong, China Cristian Saldaña - Instituto Tecnológico Superior de Irapuato, Mexico Evaluation Committee Coordinator: Carla Marquez Luna, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA

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Bruna Paulsen - Harvard University, USA Pablo Leal Cardozo - The Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil Susana Castro - UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA Fundraising Adrian Jinich - Weill Cornell Medicine, USA Benjamin Sánchez - Google Legal Froylan Hernández - University of Pennsylvania Volunteers Elisa Gonçalves de Andrade Moníze Silva Claudia Alexandra Gonzales Camacho Ittalo de Alvarenga Moreira Perdigão Isabela Gonçalvez Valeria Chuquimez Victória Vilela Nogaroto Júlia Camões Alves María Claudia Alvarado Huamán Eugênia Simões de Moraes Sulamita Ferreira Rocha Claudia Deysi Palacios Sánchez Maricielo Vaella Alarcon Brayan Leonardo Mendez Molina Raniele da Silva Moreira Beatriz Campos Codo Ana Daniela Saldarriaga Mayo Ana Clara Morgado Accioli Nathan Xavier María José Alván Oliveira César Joaquín Huallpa Robles (me) César Alonso Marín Aranda Mariana Aganetti Silva Flavia Alves Katherine Nieves Espinoza Chavez Pedro Antunes Pousa Débora Van Putten Chaves Carlos Eduardo Vásquez Roque Yara Victoria Gómez Peinado Pedro Pousa 41


Teachers Bernando Rey Moreno Sylvia Stella Amaral Joyce Pereira dos Santos Girlaine Pereira da Silva Bryann Avendano Darío Martín Genovese Sara Esthefania Vargas Gómez Joel Miguel Cordova Ponce Yudyt Soledad Edisson Camilo Avendaño Rodríguez Ana Lilia Juarez Vazquez Patrick de Oliveira Animations and Video Editing Federico Quintana - Dorsal, Mexico Chesco Hernández - Dorsal, México

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