Page 1

…and how are the children? A report on the status of the children of Washington County and their families

2015 edition

Washington County Coalition for Children Washington County Coalition for Children

1


Who we are and how we got here

Some of the Coalition’s accomplishments • 5 major statistical reports on our children’s well being • An on-line Children’s Behavioral Health Directory • 12 Annual Children’s Issues Forums • 9 Holiday Gift Drives for Teens • 90+ trainings for area providers on children’s mental health issues • Proven bullying prevention programs in area elementary and middle schools • The Feelin’ Groovy Emotional Literacy Project for more than 500 2nd graders every year • Downloadable podcasts for parents on mental health topics • Annual awards to unsung heroes who care or advocate for the County’s youth • Annual “Chalk It Up Against Bullying” community arts events in downtown Wakefield and Westerly

T

he Washington County Coalition for Children is the region’s advocate for children. We fill a special role: to identify and advocate for the needs of area children. Our members – social service agencies, advocates, parents, providers, legislators, town officials, and volunteers – meet this daunting task in three ways: 1. We ask “How are the Children? and identify gaps in services for children throughout Washington County 2. We advocate for children on every level from town hall and the local papers to the state house 3. We act as a catalyst and facilitator to bring together concerned people and organizations to seek and devise solutions The Coalition began in 2001 as the Washington County Risk Response Team. Frustrated by increasing numbers of children “falling through the cracks,” advocates and nonprofits joined together to fill the gaps in services. The first step was to compare the documented need versus the actual resources available in the County. The result was our first of what were to be several groundbreaking reports: The Status of Children and Families in Washington County: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment. The study cited 39 gaps in services, laying the foundation upon which a better community for children could be built. Since that first report, the Coalition has hosted 12 annual Children’s Issues Forums to discuss the most recent data and to invite community input in developing priorities for action. The Coalition launched – and still maintains – several work groups, all volunteer, to address priorities from children’s mental health to early child care & education to bullying. The Coalition has always been all volunteer except for a part-time coordinator. We are funded by various grants, gifts, and memberships that start at only $10. For more information about the Washington County Coalition for Children, please visit

www.washcokids.org or contact Coalition Coordinator Susan Orban at wccc@washcokids.org or (401) 788-2347

2

Washington County Coalition for Children


Acknowledgements This report would not have been possible without the assistance of the dedicated professionals who shared their time, expertise, and encouragement. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of: • Rachel Cain and Sam Viner-Brown, RI Department of Health • Eileen Botelho, RI Dept. of Education • Joseph DeSantis, Peg McGovern, & Sean Walsh, South County Community Action • Elaine Dorazio, RI Supreme Court, Domestic Violence Unit • Vincent Flood & Amanda Martin, RI Statewide Planning • Lisa Hildebrand, RI Assoc. for the Education of Young Children/BrightStars • Linda Katz, RI Poverty Institute • Nicole Lagace & Jessica Cigna, HousingWorks RI • John Neubaur, RI KIDS COUNT • Cheryl Watson, South Shore Center/ Gateway Healthcare Special thanks to URI student intern Amanda Dolan, who conducted the preliminary research for this report. Also Stephen and Judi Wood, who provided most of the photographs for this report. Thanks, too, to Rick Schwartz, who provided technical assistance in developing this report, and provided the layout and design.

“. . . and how are the children?” The traditional greeting among the Masai tribe in Africa acknowledges the high value that the Masai place on their children’s well-being. Even warriors with no children of their own respond: “All the children are well” … indicating that life is good, peace and safety prevail, and – despite daily struggles – caring for their children is the Masai’s priority. If only this were true for all the children in Washington County. . . We hope that, as you read this report, you will consider what you or your organization can do to improve the lives of children and families in our community. We invite you to join the Washington County Coalition, whose members constantly seek those changes.

Table of Contents Section 1: Who are our children and families?

Page 4

Section 2: Where do our children live?

Page 11

Section 3: Are our families financially stable?

Page 17

Section 4: Can our families feed their children?

Page 23

Section 5: Who cares for our children?

Page 30

Section 6: Are our children healthy?

Page 39

Section 7: Do our special needs children have services? Page 55 Section 8: Are our children safe?

Page 61

Section 9: How are our teens?

Page 71

Washington County Coalition for Children

3


who are our children and families? 4

Washington County Coalition for Children


County’s child population drops 12% over ten years Every town sees loss in kids

W

hile child population grew 3% across the United States, the number of children living throughout Rhode Island decreased by 10% between 2000 and 2010.

In fact, Rhode Island was one of only three states to lose 10% or more of its child population during the same period.* In Washington County, child population dropped 12% from 28,228 in 2000 to 25,491 in 2010. Towns with the greatest losses in child population included: Narragansett 20%, South Kingstown 14%, and Westerly 12%.

* The Changing Child Population of the United States: Analysis of Data from the 2010 Census, AECF KIDS COUNT Working Paper, November 2011)

Children and youth under age 18, 2000 and 2010 2000 Washington County: 28,882 1,712 1,506

Charlestown

1,589 1,334

Exeter

2,011 1,845

Hopkinton Narragansett New Shoreham

2010 Washington County: 25,491

2,269

2,833

185 163 6,848 6,322

North Kingstown 2,014 1,849

Richmond South Kingstown

5,416

Westerly

4,787 0

6,284

5,406

1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 Number of children

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Fact Finder

Washington County Coalition for Children

5


Child population is mostly homogenous 88% of children are white

T

Racial diversity among County children under age 18

Washington County total: 3,025 he child population in Washington County is largely homogeneous. Near1,038/4.07% Hispanic ly nine out of every 10 children – or 88% of 288/1.13% Black the 22,466 children – are White/Caucasian. Reflecting national and state trends, American Indian/ 275/1.08% the Hispanic population in Washington Alaska Native County has nearly doubled since 2000 to Asian 400/1.57% 4%. Though Latinos comprise the largest minority in Washington County, their Native Hawaiian 5/0.02% numbers pale compared to the state, where Latino children comprise 21% of the total. Another race 50/0.20% Children of two races (3.8%) are second, with Asian children third. 2 or more races 969/3.80% Black children and American Indian/ 0 150 300 450 600 750 900 1050 1200 Alaskan Native children are nearly the Number of children/Percentage of total Washington County population same at fourth, but totalling little more Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Fact Finder than one percent. In all, an estimated 3,025 (12%) of Washington County’s children are ethnic and racial minorities.

6

Washington County Coalition for Children


Percent of children living with single parents, 2000 and 2010 2000 Washington County: 20%

2010 Washington County: 25% 18% 20%

Charlestown Exeter

One in four of County’s kids lives with single parent Average still under state’s 31%

C

hildren living with single parents are those who live with a parent without a spouse, male or female. Children living in single-parent families are more likely to live in poverty than children living in two-parent families. Financial stress and child care burdens explain some of the differences.

15% 14% 17% 18%

Hopkinton

24% 24%

Narragansett 19%

New Shoreham

20% 21%

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown Westerly

28%

15% 13% 19% 20% 26%

28%

Rhode Island

30% 31%

United States

31%

34%

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Percentage of children

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Fact Finder

Washington County Coalition for Children

7


Children not living with parents, 2010 Washington County total: 1,938

Grandparents fill in when parents aren’t there to raise their children ‘Non-relatives’ edge out other relatives caring for children

W

ho fills in when parents aren’t there to raise their children? Two thirds (66%) are being raised by their grandparents. Of the remaining children not being raised by their parents, 14% live with other relatives and 20% live with nonrelatives.

Charlestown

15 20

141

106

Living with non-relatives=382

Exeter

23

105

82

Living with other relatives=278

Hopkinton

46

24

113

Narragansett

45

38

166

New Shoreham North Kingstown Richmond

Living with grandparents=1,278

183 249

6 57

49

32 16

South Kingstown

81

Westerly

82

353

247 104

152

31

248 83

360 269

434

0 60 120 180 240 300 360 420 480 Number of children Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Fact Finder

8

Washington County Coalition for Children


Rate was 4 per 1000 in 2013 The data in the chart reflects the number of Washington County children under age 18 whose parent(s) are serving sentences with the Rhode Island Department of Corrections. There were 103 such children in 2013. These children not only experience disruptions in their living arrangements, but are at increased risk for child abuse/neglect, attachment issues, aggression, financial hardship, and poor academic achievement

Children under age 18 with incarcerated parents, 2009-2013 Number of children with incarcerated parents

Number of children with incarcerated parents drops to fewest in five years

180

162

150

131

143

120

121 103

90 60 30 0

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI Dept. of Corrections as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

9


Children with incarcerated parents as of September 2013 Washington County total: 103 Charlestown

3

Exeter

8

Hopkinton

6

Narragansett New Shoreham

13 0

North Kingstown Richmond

25 0

South Kingstown

20 25

Westerly

0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 Number of children Source: RI Dept. of Corrections as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

10

Washington County Coalition for Children


where do our children live? Washington County Coalition for Children

11


Schools identify 164 of County’s children as homeless

F

amilies can become homeless due to lack of affordable housing, unemployment, low-paying jobs, extreme poverty, and decreasing government or child support. Domestic violence, mental illness, substance abuse and frayed social supports can also lead to homelessness. Children in homeless families are more likely to experience anxiety or depression, childhood asthma, developmental delays, test below grade level in reading and math, drop out of school, or become teen parents.

Homeless students, 2012-2013 Washington County total: 164 high Schools

Chariho

25

Exeter-West Green.

3

Narragansett

5

Block Island 1 North Kingstown South Kingstown

44 15

Westerly

71 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Number of homeless students Source: RI Dept. of Education, Office of Student, Community, and Academic Supports

12

Washington County Coalition for Children


Affording a 2 bedroom apartment in Washington County, 2013 Average rent

Can low- to moderate income families afford an apartment in Washington County? No.

I

n 2013, Rhode Island households earning $30,000 or less could not afford to rent an average-priced 2-bedroom apartment in any Rhode Island city or town. In Washington County, the most affordable average rent was $1,081, requiring an annual income of $43,240.

Income needed per year

Income needed per hour

Charlestown $1,652

$66,120

$33.91

Exeter $1,081

$43,240

$22.17

Hopkinton $1,186

$47,440

$24.33

Narragansett $1,219

$48,760

$25.01

New Shoreham

Unavailable

North Kingstown $1,204 Richmond Unavailable

– $48,160

– $24.70

South Kingstown $1,296

$51,840

$26.58

Westerly $1,100

$44,000

$22.56

Source: 2014 Housing Fact book, HousingWorks RI@RWU

Washington County Coalition for Children

13


Affording a single family house in Washington County, 2013 Can low- to moderate income families afford to buy a house in Washington County? No.

I

n 2013, the most affordable town in which to purchase a home in Washington County was Hopkinton with a price of $213,800, but that required an annual income of $66,758. Affordability issues are more pronounced in Washington County given the competition for beachfront properties and the demand for URI off campus housing.

Median Sale Price

Monthly mortgage

Income needed/Year/Hour

Charlestown $289,450

$1,998

$79,925 (Y) or $40.99 (H)

Exeter $299,000

$2,182

$87,274 or $44.76

Hopkinton $213,800

$1,669

$66,758 or $34.24

Narragansett $365,000

$2,492

$99,700 or $51.13

New Shoreham $1,100,000

$6,960

$278,406 or $142.77

North Kingstown $285,000

$2,204

$88,141 or $45.20

Richmond $222,000

$1,732

$69,265 or $35.52

South Kingstown $295,000

$2,190

$87,597 or $44.92

Westerly $269,500

$1,890

$75,601 or $38.77

Source: 2014 Housing Fact book, HousingWorks RI@RWU

14

Washington County Coalition for Children


Volatile housing market, stagnant wages contribute to unaffordable homes Prices leap 84% between 2000-05, then drop 39% between 2005-13

I

n Rhode Island, housing rose and fell dramatically, but low income people remained in the same predicament throughout: housing costs grew while their incomes dropped. Consider these statistics: • Between 2000 and 2005, Rhode Island’s median house price grew 84%, peaking at $337,566 • But between 2005 and 2013, prices plummeted and the price of a single family home fell 39% • Despite the eight-year drop, families still had to increase their spending on housing 20% • While housing costs grew, the lowest income renters saw their incomes fall 4%

Comparison of median house sale prices in Washington County, 2003 versus 2013 2003 2013 Charlestown

$299,900 $289,450

3%

Exeter

$279,900 $299,000

7%

$232,500 $213,800

Hopkinton

8% $347,250 $365,000

Narragansett

5%

$800,000 $1.1m

New Shoreham North Kingstown

$285,000 $260,000 $222,000

Richmond

$329,000

15%

$321,500 $295,000

South Kingstown

$267,750 $269,500

Westerly 0

13%

8%

1%

$60k $120k $180k $240k $300k $360k $800k $1.1m Median value of homes

Source: 2014 Housing Fact book, HousingWorks RI@RWU

Washington County Coalition for Children

15

38%


Children under age 18 living in homes receiving LIHEAP (Low Income Home Energy Assistance), 2013-2014 2013 total: 1,614

10% rise in children in homes receiving LIHEAP assistance One year rise: 2013 to 2014

L

IHEAP (Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program) helps residents living at or below 60% of RI’s median income stay warm in winter through direct payments to their heating vendors. Children served increased 18% in South Kingstown and 19% in Westerly in 2014

2014 total: 1,792 107 126

Charlestown 64 56

Exeter

137 161

Hopkinton

134 145

Narragansett 3

New Shoreham 4 425 410

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown

23

41 246

300 457

Westerly

567

0 80 160 240 300 360 420 480 560 Comparison between 2013 and 2014 of numbers of children living in homes receiving home energy assistance through the LIHEAP program. Source: South County Community Action, Inc.

16

Washington County Coalition for Children


are all our families financially stable? Washington County Coalition for Children

17


Nearly 4 of 5 of County children have all parents in the workplace

S

eventy eight percent of Washington County children (under age 18) have all parents – either a single parent or both parents - in the work force, up significantly from 68% in 1990. Families with all children in the workforce often need community supports, such as child care and summer camp programs.

18

Children with all parents in the workforce, 2010 Washington County total: 78.2% Washington County children

78.2%

All Rhode Island children

Washington County Coalition for Children

74.9%

0 25% 50% 75% 100%

% of children with both parents or their only parent in the workforce Source: 2010-2012 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates as calculated by RI Statewide Planning


Families with children under age 18 living in poverty Washington County: 6.9%

Charlestown only local town in “double digits” with 11.9% of families living in poverty No town nears state’s 15.3%

T

he good news is that none of Washington County’s nine towns matches the state average of 15.3% of families living in poverty, although Charlestown comes closest with 11.9% The bad news is that one of every 14 families in the region is living under the poverty line, and that’s true for five of the nine towns. Only Hopkinton and Richmond have less than 4% of their families in poverty. Poverty is a key social determinant of health that increases the risk of disability, illness, addiction, and social isolation.

Rhode Island: 15.3%

Charlestown

11.9%

Exeter Hopkinton

5.2% 3.1%

Narragansett

5.4%

New Shoreham

9.3%

North Kingstown

8.8%

Richmond

3.7%

South Kingstown

6.8%

Westerly

6.6%

Wash. County

6.9%

Rhode Island

15.3% 0 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16% Percentage of families with children living in poverty Source: American Community Survey, 2008-2012, American Fact Finder

Washington County Coalition for Children

19


Median income for families with children under age 18 Washington County: $92,853 Charlestown

Region’s median family income relatively high Every town exeeds RI median income

W

ashington County towns range in median household (with children under age 18) income from a low of $76,115 (Westerly) to $106,769 (Exeter). In a sign of relative affluence for the region’s children, each of the nine towns surpasses the state’s median income of $72,872. With four towns over $100,000 and three more over $90,000, the Countywide median is a considerable $92,853.

Rhode Island: $72,872 $81,538

Exeter Hopkinton

$106,769 $82,567

Narragansett

$101,375 $104,766

New Shoreham North Kingstown

$100,972

Richmond

$96,813

South Kingstown

$95,177

Westerly

$76,115

Wash. County Rhode Island

$92,853 $72,872 0 15,000 30,000 45,000 60,000 75,000 90,000 105,000 120,000 Dollars in income Source: American Community Survey, 2008-2012

20

Washington County Coalition for Children


Core group of families rely on financial assistance, work supports, safety net benefits

R

I’s RIte Works program provides part of a safety net for families with children by providing limited cash assistance and work supports, including employment services, SNAP benefits, health insurance & subsidized child care. RIte Works enrollment has declined significantly with the passage of stricter time limits in 2008. To qualify, families must be living in extreme poverty with incomes below one-half of the federal poverty level. Maximum monthly benefit for a family of 3 is $554 per month.

Number of children in families receiving assistance

RIte Works enrollment down since enrollment changes in 2008

Children whose families received Rite Works benefits, 2009-2013 480

437

400

362

387

320

340

342

240 160 80 0

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

21


Children in families receiving cash assistance, December 2013 Washington County total: 362 Charlestown

10

Exeter

12

Hopkinton

23

Narragansett New Shoreham

44 0

North Kingstown Richmond

117 9

South Kingstown

60

Westerly

87 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 Number of children in families receiving cash assistance Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

22

Washington County Coalition for Children


can our families feed their children? Washington County Coalition for Children

23


Local WIC enrollment drops Offers nutrition education/vouchers

24

Washington County Coalition for Children

1400 Number of area families enrolled in WIC

W

IC is a federally funded supplemental nutrition program for pregnant women and children (under age 5) with incomes at or below 185% FPL (Federal Poverty Level). Eligible families receive nutrition education and vouchers they can use in local grocery stores to purchase select food items. In 2001, when the Coalition began tracking data, 1,228 women and children were enrolled in WIC. Enrollment peaked during the Great recession, and has since returned to historic levels, perhaps in relation to a smaller population of children in the region.

Washington County WIC enrollment, 2009-2013 1,404

1350

1,331

1300 1250

1,229 1,225

1200 1,189

1150 1100

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI Department of Health as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Women and children participating in WIC, September 2013 Washington County total: 1,225 Charlestown

61

Exeter

46

Hopkinton

96

Narragansett New Shoreham

87 5

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown Westerly

253 61 232 384 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Number of children Source:RI Dept. of Health, WIC Program as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

25


Area enrollment in SNAP steadily rises

Washington County children under age 18 enrolled in SNAP, 2009-2013

SNAP new name for food stamps

26

Washington County Coalition for Children

3600 3,114 Number of children enrolled in SNAP

S

NAP refers to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly known as Food Stamps). SNAP helps low-income families obtain better nutrition through monthly benefits they can use to purchase food at local grocery stores and some farmers’ markets. Adequate nutrition is important for children because it is linked to all aspects of growth and development with lifelong consequences. SNAP enrollment for children in Washington County increased 32.5% over the past five years, with the highest enrollment to date of 3,510 children in 2013.

3000

3,510

3,457 3,406

2,650

2400 1800 1200 600 0

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Children under age 18 receiving SNAP as of October 2013 Washington County total: 3,510 Charlestown

220

Exeter

113

Hopkinton

234

Narragansett New Shoreham

299 11

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown Westerly

841 152 621 1019 0 150 300 450 600 750 900 1050 1200 Number of children Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

27


Enrollment in subsidized school lunches at 5 year high

Students receiving free/reduced cost school lunches, 2009-2013

Up 1,300 since first tracking in 2001

28

Washington County Coalition for Children

4000 Number of area students receiving lunches

F

ree/Reduced Price Lunch Program helps ensure students from lowincome families can afford to eat at least one nutritious meal every day, during the school week and school year. Enrollment in the program in Washington County has fluctuated considerably over the past 5 years, but 2013 saw the highest enrollment ever: 3,969 children. This is an increase in enrollment of more than 1,300 children since 2001, when the Coalition first began tracking data. At the time, there were 2,636 students receiving subsidized lunches.

3,969 3,899

3900

3,838

3800 3700 3600

3,649

3500

3,536

3400

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI Department of Education as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Students receiving free/reduced price lunches, 2012-13 2012 Washington County: 3,838

2013 Washington County: 3,968 844 888

Chariho 249 247

Exeter-WG

315 289

Narragansett New Shoreham

15 12 769 820

North Kingstown South Kingstown Westerly

591

640 1055 1073

0 150 300 450 600 750 900 1050 1200 Number of children Source: RI Department of Education as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

29


who cares for our children? 30

Washington County Coalition for Children


Child care slots by type, 2008-2014 1500

1,455 Age 3-5 slots

1400

Center-based slots for preschoolers increase 11%, while after-school availability falls 14%

1300 1,304

Others stay essentially the same

1000

1,368

1200 1100

900 800

Number of child care slots

L

icensed child care is available in: centers for infants and toddlers ages 0-3, centers & preschool programs for ages 3-5, family child care homes for ages 0-12, and after-school programs for ages 6-12. Access to stable, affordable, high quality child care is essential for parents to maintain employment. Child care slots in all categories in Washington County have fluctuated over the past five years: Center-based slots for ages 3-5 have increased by 145 slots or 11%, while after-school slots have fallen 116 slots or 14%.

1,449

1,343

812 AFTER SCHOOL slots

700 600 500

705

728 609

583

under Age 3 slots

696 652

583

611

522

400 300 200 100

FAMILY CHILD CARE HOME SLOTS

155

136 114

137 138

0

2009 2010 2011 2013 2014

Source: RI DCYF as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

31


Early care and education capacity, January 2014 Total County Center slots for children under the age of 3 = 611 Total County Center slots for children ages 3-5 = 1,445 Total County Family Home Care slots for children ages 0-12 = 137

13

Charlestown

28

Exeter Hopkinton Narragansett New Shoreham

0 16 17

44 58

0 12 0

22 173

384

22 0 0

28 216

South Kingstown Westerly

63

8

North Kingstown Richmond

74

6

482

46 152 11

322

0 70 140 210 280 350 420 490 Number of early care and education slots available Source: RI DCYF as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

32

Washington County Coalition for Children


After school program capacity, January 2014 Washington County total slots: 696 Charlestown

60

Exeter

74

Hopkinton

52

Narragansett

60 0

New Shoreham North Kingstown

181

Richmond

88

South Kingstown

50

Westerly

131 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 175 200 Number of after school program slots

Source: RI DCYF as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

33


Jumps from 9 to 52 in one year

B

rightStars, RI’s Quality Rating & Improvement System, ranks licensed child care centers, Head Start programs, preschools, family child care homes, and before/after school programs with 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest) stars based on established quality standards. Participation is voluntary. Fifty two of Washington County’s 66 sites (79%) are now participating. Research has shown that quality learning environments can significantly impact children’s skill acquisition and success in school and life.

34

Washington County Coalition for Children

BrightStars participation, 2011-2014 Washington County total: 52 60 Child care sites accepting subsidies

Participation in child care quality program multiplies tenfold in just four years

52

50 40 30 20 10 3

0

9 5

2011 2012 2013 2014 Source: BrightStars online database (www.brightstars.org)


Local sites strive to attain top ranking in BrightStars program

Child care sites BrightStars rankings Washington County sites ranked: 52

Three of 52 reach five star maximum

I

n 2014, RI DHS mandated participation for all sites accepting subsidies, awarding them one “starting star” (★) for meeting state licensing requirements – adding 18 new county sites with one-★ designations. All are now actively engaged in improving their rating Three sites have attained the top rating of five stars: • Sunshine Child Development Center (North Kingstown), a child care site • Charlestown Early Learning Center (Charlestown), a child care site, and • Westerly Public Schools’ Before/After School Enrichment Program.

★★★★★

3 13

★★★★ ★★★ ★★

5 13 18

0 3 6 9 12 15 18 Number of sites being ranked BrightStars online database (www.brightstars.org)

Washington County Coalition for Children

35


Distribution of DCYF-licensed sites with BrightStars enrollment, December 2014 Washington County total licensed sites: 66 Charlestown

4

Exeter

4

Hopkinton

4

Narragansett New Shoreham

6 4 BrightStar enrollees

6

Total licensed sites

3

1 1 1

North Kingstown Richmond

Enrolled in BrightStar: 52

13

13

6

3

South Kingstown

17

13

Westerly

9

10

0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Number of licensed child care sites Source: BrightStars online database of participating programs (www.brightstars.org) and RI DCYF online child care provider directory (www.dcyf.ri.gov/day_care_provider.php)

36

Washington County Coalition for Children


After high in 2010, child care subsidies in area drop steadily

Youth receiving child care subsidies, 2009-2013

15% fewer in 2013 than 2010 315

316 Number of youth receiving subsidies

F

amilies working at least 20 hours per week and earning less than 180% of the federal poverty level (FPL) are eligible for a child care subsidy from the RI Department of Human Services. For good reason. Infant care costs rival the costs of in-state tuition at public universities. The average 2013 full-time costs in RI were: • Center-based infant care $12,097 • Center-based preschool care 9,587 • Family child care home 8,715 • Center-based school age care 6,786 The state provided 268 child care subsidies for area youth in 2013, the lowest number in the past 5 years.

308 300

296

292 290

291

284 276 268

268 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI DHS InRhodes Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks and M.M. Bodah, Statewide Survey of Child Care Rates in RI as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

37


Child care subsidies by town of residence, 2013 Washington County total subsidies: 268 Charlestown

8

Exeter

9

Hopkinton

6

Narragansett New Shoreham

25 0

North Kingstown Richmond

110 8

South Kingstown

43

Westerly

59 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 Number of children receiving subsidies Source: RI DHS InRhodes Database as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

38

Washington County Coalition for Children


are our children healthy? Washington County Coalition for Children

39


1 in 4 of County’s children receives Medical Assistance But nearly 1,500 uptick since 2001

40

Washington County Coalition for Children

Number of area children enrolled in Medical Assistance

M

edical Assistance provides essential health coverage for low income, medically needy populations, including children under age 19, pregnant women, & foster children. Those enrolled in RIte Works and SSI are automatically eligible for Medical Assistance. Enrollment was moderately stable over the past five years – an increase of less than 200 enrollees – with even a moderate decrease in 2013. That masks the successful health insurance outreach efforts of RI KIDS COUNT and the RI Economic Progress Institute responsible for the major increase in the number of children covered since 2001 when only 4,639 children were enrolled.

Children under age 19 enrolled in Medical Assistance, 2009-2013 6200

6,150

6100 6,034

6,087

6000 5900 5800

5,808

5,849

5700 5600

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Children under age 19 receiving Medical Assistance, 2013 Washington County total: 6,087 (23.9%) Charlestown

399

Exeter

243

Hopkinton

481

Narragansett New Shoreham

536 28

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown

1,383 338 1,045

Westerly

1,634 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 Number of children Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

41


Washington County women with delayed prenatal care, 2004-2012

But births needing care have not

D

elayed Prenatal Care is defined as care beginning after the first trimester of pregnancy. Early prenatal care is linked with better health outcomes for both mothers and infants. While the number of women in Washington County with delayed prenatal care has decreased with fewer births since we began tracking data, the county rate (% of births with delayed prenatal care) has not (see next chart).

42

Washington County Coalition for Children

Number of women with delayed prenatal care

Numbers drop for women receiving delayed prenatal care 600

514

500

490 400

458

429 383

300 200 100 0

2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 20082008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Women with delayed prenatal care, 1996-2000 and 2008-2012 1996-2000 total: 483 (7.2% of births)

2008-2012: 383 (7.8%)

(Percentages not calculated for towns with fewer than 500 births per year) 29

Charlestown

14 18 22

Exeter

56

Hopkinton

27

Narragansett

25 25

New Shoreham 2

10 62/4.1%

North Kingstown

102/10.0%

26 32

Richmond

56/4.2% 81/8.2%

South Kingstown Westerly

201/14.7%

78/6.8% 13.7%

Rhode Island 9.2%

0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 Numbers (and percentages) of women with delayed prenatal care Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2002 & 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

43


Infant deaths show sharp drop in last five-year period

44

Washington County Coalition for Children

38

36

34

Number of infant deaths

I

nfant mortality refers to deaths of children before they reach their first birthdays. “Infant mortality rate� is the number of deaths per 1,000 live births. Infant mortality is associated with maternal health, quality of prenatal care, and socio-economic conditions. Causes include premature births, low birthweight, congenital anomalies, SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome), maternal complications, and unintentional injuries. Both the number and rate of infant deaths fell, from 36 and 6.1/1000 during the five-year period 2004-2008 to 20 and 4.1 from 2008-2012.

Infant mortality, 2004-2012

30

33

32

32

26 22 18

20 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 20082008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Infant mortality, 2008-2012 Washington County total: 20 (4.1/1,000 births) (Rates not calculated for towns with fewer than 500 births per year)

Charlestown

1

Exeter

1

Hopkinton

0

Narragansett

1

New Shoreham

1

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown Westerly

6/rate=5.9 2 2/rate=2.0 6/rate=5.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Number of infant deaths up to age 1 Source: RI Department of Health, Center for Health Data & Analysis, as cited in the 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

45


County sees welcome drop in births earlier than 37 weeks

Preterm births, 2004-2012

Follows national and state trends

46

Washington County Coalition for Children

525 Number of preterm births

B

irths prior to 37 weeks gestation are considered “Preterm Births�. Multiple birth infants, e.g. triplets, are more likely to be born preterm. A preterm birth can be a major contributor to infant mortality and is associated with physical disabilities, learning difficulties, and behavior problems later in life. Consistent with national and state trends, both the number and rate of preterm births in Washington County have declined from 610 (10.4% of all births) in 2004-2008 to 426 (8.7% of all births) in 2008-2012.

630

420

610 564 519

477 426

315 210 105 0

2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 20082008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Preterm births, 2008-2012 Washington County total: 426 (8.7%) (Percentages not calculated for towns with fewer than 500 births per year)

Charlestown

33

Exeter

18

Hopkinton

33

Narragansett

44 6

New Shoreham North Kingstown

71/6.9%

Richmond

31

South Kingstown

81/8.2%

Westerly

109/9.5% 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 Number(and percentages) of preterm births

Source: RI Department of Health, Center for Health Data & Analysis, as cited in the 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

47


Births of low-weight infants drops steadily for five years Reduces serious health risks

Low birthweight infants, 2004-2012

I

48

Washington County Coalition for Children

425 Number of low birthweight infants

nfants weighing less than 2,500 grams (5 lbs. 8 oz.) are considered “low birthweight�. Although low birthweight is often a result of a preterm birth, infants from full-term pregnancies can also be born seriously underweight. Infants with low birthweights face greater risk of illness, disability, and infant mortality than do infants of normal weight. Both the actual number and rate of Washington County infants with low birthweights declined considerably from 2004-2008 (412 babies with low birthweights, 7.0% of all births to families in Washington County) to 2008-2012 (308 babies with low birthweights, 6.3% of all births). That represents a 25% drop in low birthweight infants, and a 10% drop in the percentage of such births.

412

400 375 350 325

381 357 334

308

300 275

2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 20082008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Low birthweight infants, 2008-2012 Washington County total: 308 (6.3%) (Percentages not calculated for towns with fewer than 500 births per year)

Charlestown

18

Exeter

13

Hopkinton

21

Narragansett

23 4

New Shoreham North Kingstown

57/5.6%

Richmond

19

South Kingstown

72/7.3%

Westerly

81/7.1% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Number(and percentages) of low birthweight infants

Source: RI Department of Health, Center for Health Data & Analysis, as cited in the 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

49


County’s breastfeeding rate nears national target goals Exceeds state average by 15%

50

Washington County Coalition for Children

Breastfeeding rates, 2004-2012 Washington County Percentage of new mothers who are breastfeeding

B

reastfeeding data measures the number of mothers who are exclusively breastfeeding at the time of hospital discharge. Breastfeeding is recognized worldwide as the best method of feeding and nurturing infants for optimal growth and development. Over the past five five-year cycles, nearly three of every four new mothers in Washington County were breastfeeding when they left the hospital. That figure far exceeds the most recent state average of 62%. High breastfeeding rates can be attributed to the work of the County’s two community hospitals with long histories of promoting breast feeding. South County Hospital was the first and Westerly Hospital the third hospital in Rhode Island to receive the “Baby Friendly USA designation, a national honor. Healthy People 2020, a program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [www.healthypeople.gov] has set a target goal of 82.9%.

Rhode Island

80 75

77%

75% 72%

73% 74%

70

% 65 61%

60 55

58% 57%

62%

59%

50

2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 20082008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Percentage of new mothers breastfeeding, 2008-2012 Washington County total: 3,669 (77%) (Percentage of women who were exclusively breastfeeding at time of hospital discharge)

Charlestown

80%

Exeter

75%

Hopkinton

77%

Narragansett

76% 82%

New Shoreham North Kingstown

73%

Richmond

80%

South Kingstown

72%

Westerly

77% 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 Percentage of new mothers in each town who were exclusively breastfeeding

Source: RI Department of Health, Center for Health Data & Analysis, as cited in the 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

51


Drop, then increase for asthma hospitalizations Most common chronic ailment for children of all ages. leads to school absences, hospitalizations

Hospitalizations of children under age 18 for complications from asthma, 2004-2012

A

52

Washington County Coalition for Children

130 Number of hospitalizations

sthma is a chronic respiratory disease that causes periodic episodes of wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness. Asthma can be life threatening. Asthma is the most common chronic condition among children and a leading cause of their hospitalization and missing school. In 2012, 1 in 10 children in the United States had asthma. Although children are more likely to visit emergency rooms than be hospitalized, asthma is still the third highest cause for hospitalization for children under age 15. The first chart reflects hospitalizations only; the second chart reflects hospitalizations and emergency room visits.

127 118

115 100

122

93

85 70 55

61 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 20082008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Source: RI Department of Health as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Emergency room visits and hospitalizations as a result of asthma in children under age 18, 2008-2012 Emergency room visits: 698

Hospitalizations: 122

49

Charlestown

7

Exeter

28

6

61

Hopkinton

15 32

Narragansett N/A N/A

New Shoreham 0 North Kingstown

178

46

Richmond

30

8

South Kingstown

72

15

Westerly

203

25

0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 Number of visits and hospitalizations

Source: RI Department of Health, Center for Health Data & Analysis as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

53


275 youth underwent emergency mental health evaluations locally in 2013 Six-month study revealed more than half were hospitalized

I

n 2013, South Shore Center reported 275 emergency mental health evaluations were conducted with Washington County youth (168 at South County Hospital and 107 at Westerly Hospital). Typically, youths seen in hospital emergency rooms are in crisis and at risk of harming themselves and/or others. Available disposition data for youth evaluated between January and June 2013 revealed: • 58% required psychiatric or acute residential placements • 53% of those needing psychiatric hospitalization had to “board” in the ER waiting for a psychiatric bed • Of those evaluated but not hospitalized (42%), nearly 90% were referred for outpatient counseling. Another 4% were referred to homebased services and 1% to a partial hospitalization program.

54

Youth Emergency Mental Health Evaluations Dispositions January-June 2013 6-Month Total Washington County Youth Emergency MH Evals = 123

75% (53 of 71) had to board in the hospital ER waiting for psychiatric beds

Washington County Coalition for Children

Outpt Counsel 37% (46) Psych Hosp/Acute Residential 58% (71)

Other 42% (52)

Sources: South Shore Center, Emergency Services

Home Based 4% (5) Partial Hosp 1% (1)


do children with special needs get services? Washington County Coalition for Children

55


11% of County infants and toddlers received Early Intervention in 2013

388

Just under state rate of 12%

380

Washington County Coalition for Children

372

Number of children

C

hildren ages birth to 3, who are developmentally delayed or have a diagnosed condition associated with delays, qualify for Early Intervention (EI) services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). EI enrollment has fluctuated modestly over the past five years, with a high of 386 infants and toddlers enrolled in 2010 and a low of 341 in 2013.

56

Children ages 0-3 enrolled in Early Intervention, 2009-2013 386

374

364 356

361 354

348 340

341 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source:RI EOHHS as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Early Intervention enrollment by town, 2013 Washington County total: 341 Charlestown

28

Exeter

13

Hopkinton

27

Narragansett New Shoreham

22 0

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown

90 6 66

Westerly

89 0 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 Number of children enrolled in Early Intervention Source: RI DHS EOHHS as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

57


% of children enrolled in Special Education by town, 2013 Percent of County children enrolled in Special Education lower than state average

S

chool districts are required under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to identify, evaluate, and educate children ages 3-21 with disabilities. Special education services are important to the long-term success trajectories of children with disabilities Special Education enrollment in Washington County for the 2012-2013 school year was 14.2% of the student population, compared to 17.2% for the state of Rhode Island as a whole.

Washington County: 14.2% or 2,395 students Chariho Exeter-WG

12% 14%

Narragansett

18%

New Shoreham

22%

North Kingstown

13%

South Kingstown

13%

Westerly

17%

Rhode Island

17% 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 Percent of town’s children enrolled in Special Education Source: Rhode Island Department of Education, Office for Diverse Learners as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

58

Washington County Coalition for Children


Special education enrollment by need, 2012-2013 Washington County total special education enrollment: 2,395 DISABILITY

Autism spectrum

270

Developmental delay

237

Emotional disturbance

177

Health impairment

393 658

Learning disability Intellectual disability

87

Speech disorder Other

443 81 75 150 225 300 425 500 575 650 Number of students enrolled by disability Source: Rhode Island Department of Education, Office for Diverse Learners as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

59


County vs. State special ed rates by type of disability, 2012-2013

Washington County = 2,395 (14.2%)

Rhode Island (17.2%)

DISABILITY 1.50% 1.50%

Autism spectrum

1.50% 1.75%

Developmental delay Emotional disturbance

1.0% 1.75% 2.25% 2.50%

Health impairment

2.75%

Learning disability Intellectual disability

0.5%

1.50% 2.5% 3.0%

Speech disorder Other

6.0%

0.5% 0.5% 0 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% Percentage of children with specific type of disability Source: Rhode Island Department of Education, Office for Diverse Learners as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

60

Washington County Coalition for Children


are our children safe? Washington County Coalition for Children

61


Child abuse and neglect rate remains high in County

C

hild abuse describes physical, sexual, and/or emotional harm. Child neglect refers to physical, medical, emotional, and educational neglect, as well as a failure to provide for basic needs. The data reflects the number of victims in “indicated” investigations of child abuse and neglect – requiring a preponderance of evidence that abuse/ neglect had occurred.

62

Number of victims in “indicated” investigations

More than 1,100 children in five years from 2009-2013

Child abuse/neglect victims, 2009-2013 270 258

255

249

240 225

224

224

210 195 180

Washington County Coalition for Children

185 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Source: RI DCYF RICHIST as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks


Victims of child abuse, 2013 Washington County total: 249 (9.8 per 1,000 children) Charlestown

14/rate=9.3 per 1,000 children

Exeter

6/4.5 per 1,000

Hopkinton

10/5.4 per 1,000

Narragansett New Shoreham

35/15.4 per 1,000 0

North Kingstown Richmond

54/8.5 per 1,000 11/5.9 per 1,000

South Kingstown

45/8.3 per 1,000

Westerly Rhode Island

74/15.5 per 1,000 Statewide rate=14.0 per 1,000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Number and rate of victims of child abuse Source: RI DCYF RICHIST as cited in 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children

63


Partnership wraps support around families facing challenges with their children 136 children, 0-18, take advantage

T

he local Family Care Community Partnership (FCCP) works with families to provide appropriate services and resources, including natural supports (persons and resources that families can access independently from formal services). FCCP services are voluntary, but children have to be at risk of DCYF involvement. Eligible families include those with children with serious emotional disturbances (SED), as well as those at risk for child abuse or neglect. FCCP is also for children leaving temporary community placement and children at risk of foster placement and children at risk with the juvenile justice system.

64

Youth served by FCCP, by age, 2014 Washington County total: 136 Ages 0-5

52

Ages 6-12 Ages 13-18

Washington County Coalition for Children

49 35 0 7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 Number of children served by FCCP Source: South County Community Action, Inc.


Children supported by FCCP, 2014 Total Washington County youth served: 136 Charlestown Exeter

10 1

Hopkinton

5

Narragansett New Shoreham

7 1

North Kingstown Richmond South Kingstown

32 7 31

Westerly

42 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Number of children Source: South County Community Action, Inc.

Washington County Coalition for Children

65


Children of all ages witnessing domestic violence incidents Most cases involve ages 0-3

D

omestic violence is the use or threat of force against a current or former partner in an intimate relationship that results in fear and physical/emotional harm. In 2012, police responded to a total of 725 incidents of domestic violence in the towns of Washington County. A reported 459 children were present in 241 or 33% of these incidents. While the impact of domestic violence on all children is significant, young children exposed to “toxic stress� are especially vulnerable.

66

Number of children witnessing domestic violence by age, 2012 Washington County total: 459 Ages 0-3

165 96

Ages 4-6 Ages 7-12 Ages 13-17

Washington County Coalition for Children

117 81 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 175 200 Number of children witnessing domestic violence Source: Domestic Violence Training & Monitoring Unit, RI Supreme Court


806 children witness arrests over five years

T

he most serious domestic violence incidents result in police arrests. From 2008-2012, police data reveal that 806 Washington County children were present during domestic violence arrests.

Children present during domestic violence arrests, 2008-2012 Number of children present during DV arrests

After nearly 20% decline, number of children present during domestic violence arrests on the rise again

175 175

174

168 161 154

161 152

147 140

144 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Source: Domestic Violence Training & Monitoring Unit, RI Supreme Court

Washington County Coalition for Children

67


Domestic violence arrests where children were present, 2012 Washington County total arrests: 174 Charlestown Exeter

9 N/A: Exeter does not have its own police department

Hopkinton

10

Narragansett New Shoreham

31 1

North Kingstown Richmond

35 3

South Kingstown

34

Westerly

44

RISP* Hope Valley RISP* Wickford

4 3

* Rhode Island State Police

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 Number of domestic violence arrests where children were present Source: Domestic Violence Training & Monitoring Unit, RI Supreme Court

68

Washington County Coalition for Children


Students reporting being bullied, 2012-2013 Most middle schoolers report bullying experiences Half the schools exceed state average

B

ullying is the repeated unwanted, aggressive behavior among children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. Bullying includes physical aggression as well as name-calling, rumor spreading, harassment, threats, property destruction, exclusion, and coercion and can occur face-to-face, through rumors and gossip, or via social media. More than half the students at nine of the County’s 10 middle schools reported at least one bullying incident in the past 12 months. Half the schools exceeded the state average of 59%.

MIDDLE Schools

Chariho Middle

55%

Exeter-WG Jr. High

67%

Exeter-WG Metcalf

66%

Narragansett Pier Block Island NK-Davisville

63% 48% 51%

NK-Wickford SK-Broadrock

56% 50%

SK-Curtis Corner

61%

Westerly Middle

63%

Rhode Island

59% 0 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Percentage of student body that experienced at least one type of bullying in past 12 months Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)

Washington County Coalition for Children

69


Types of bullying reported by students, 2012-2013 Experienced insults or name calling Was pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on Had rumors spread about

MIDDLE Schools

Chariho Middle

44%

28%

33%

Exeter-WG Jr. High Exeter-WG Metcalf

SK-Broadrock

51% 48% 42%

28%

Block Island

NK-Wickford

46%

33%

Narragansett Pier

NK-Davisville

51%

34%

41% 35%

22%

34%

20%

31% 41%

21% 19%

SK-Curtis Corner

39%

30% 31% 28% 29%

Westerly Middle

47% 37% 48%

30%

Rhode Island

27%

41% 44% 36%

15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Percentage of student body that experienced at least one type of bullying in past 12 months Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)

70

Washington County Coalition for Children


How are our teens? Washington County Coalition for Children

71


More than a third of County high school students are sexually active Many don’t use contraception

T

his data reflects the percentage of high school students in each town who answered the following questions: • Are you sexually active? • If ‘Yes’, did you use contraception the last time you had sex to prevent pregnancy? Slightly more than a third (34.4%) of 1,507 Washington County high school youth acknowledged they were sexually active. Of those, more than one in five (22.2%), or 335 students reported they did not use any form of contraception the last time they had sex. While all the towns were below the state average in sexual activity, three of nine towns were higher in the lack of use of contraception.

72

Student self reports of sexual activity, 2012-2013

Reported being sexually active high Schools

Didn’t use contraceptives most recently 40.9%

Chariho Exeter-WG

26.1% 24.3%

5.9%

36.7%

Narragansett Block Island North Kingstown South Kingstown Westerly Rhode Island

Washington County Coalition for Children

29.7% 21.1% Numbers too small to indicate

36.5%

18.5% 27.5% 30.3% 24.4% 25.3%

36.3% 37.9%

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 Percentage of sexual activity and non-use of contraception per town Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)


Teen births continue to drop Following state and national trends

B

Teen births, 2004-2012 310 300 Number of teen births

irths to teen mothers (ages 15-19) threaten the health, development, and futures of both parents and children. Teen childbearing is strongly associated with poverty, educational attainment, and other disadvantages. Consistent with state and national trends, both the number and rate of teen births have fallen by a third in recent years in Washington County. In 2004-2008, there were 12.3 teen births per 1000 births, with a total of 310 teen births. In 2008-2012, the rate had dropped considerably to 8.6/1000 and 249 total births. In Rhode Island and nationally, fewer teens are sexually active. Those who are are more likely to use contraception, with many more options available to them.

310 302

290 280 270 260 250

273 263 249 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 20082008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Source: RI DHS INRHODES Database as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

73


Births to teens (ages 15-19), 2008-2012 Washington County total: 249 (8.6%) Charlestown

14/12.2%

Exeter

16/11.4%

Hopkinton

26/21.4%

Narragansett

10/3.9% 1/percentages not calculated for towns with fewer than 500 births overall

New Shoreham North Kingstown

48/10.9%

Richmond

21/19.5%

South Kingstown

45/3.2%

Westerly

68/22.2% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Number of births to teens ages 15-19

74

Source: RI Department of Health, Center for Health Data & Analysis, as cited in the 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

Washington County Coalition for Children


More than 300 County teens Student self reports of teen dating violence, 2012-2013 report being hurt physically by Washington County total: 311 partners in dating relationships Dating violence also includes emotional and psychological harm

T

een dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, or psychological/ emotional violence within a dating relationship among youth ages 13-19. Data here reflect high school students responding to the question: • During the 12 past months, did someone you were dating or going out with physically hurt you on purpose? Three hundred and eleven (311) Washington County high school youth answered ‘yes’.

high Schools

Chariho

90

Exeter-WG

15

Narragansett

25

Block Island 1 North Kingstown South Kingstown Westerly

78 41 61 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 Individual reports of teen dating violence Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)

Washington County Coalition for Children

75


County teens acknowledge receiving sexually explicit photos on phones, email, etc.

S

exting describes the act of sending sexually explicit photos via cell phones or other electronic media. The data here reflects area high school students’ responses to the question: • Have you been sent sexually explicit pictures by text message, email, or a social networking site like Facebook or Twitter? A total of 758 Washington County high school youth reported they had received sexually explicit images.

Student self reports of ‘sexting’, 2012-2013 Washington County total: 758 high Schools

Chariho

190

Exeter-WG

37

Narragansett

78

Block Island 2 North Kingstown South Kingstown Westerly

212 112 127 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 Individual reports of ‘sexting’ Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)

76

Washington County Coalition for Children


Student self reports of drugs at high school, 2012-2013 Washington County total: 434

Illegal drugs accessible in local high schools

D

ata here reflect high school student responses to the question: • In the past 12 months, has anyone offered, sold, or given you an illegal drug on school property? A total of 434 Washington County high school students acknowledged access to illegal drugs at their public high school.

high Schools

Chariho

101

Exeter-WG

13

Narragansett

35

Block Island 1 North Kingstown South Kingstown Westerly

114 87 83 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Individual reports of drug availability Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)

Washington County Coalition for Children

77


Student self reports of illegal prescription drug use, 2012-2013 County youth not immune to prescription drug craze More than 300 admit they have used illegal prescriptions

D

ata here reflect area high school student responses to the question: • Have you used prescription drugs (such as Oxycontin, Percocet, Vicodin, codeine, Adderall, Ritalin, or Xanax) without a doctor’s prescription in the past 30 days? A total of 313 Washington County high school students admitted illegal use of prescription drugs.

Washington County total: 313 high Schools

Chariho Exeter-WG Narragansett Block Island

83 15 26 No information available

North Kingstown

73

South Kingstown Westerly

63 53 0 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 Individual reports of illegal prescription drug use Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)

78

Washington County Coalition for Children


Percentage of student self reports of substance use, 2012-2013 Alcohol use (current)

Marijuana use (ever)

high Schools 28%

Chariho

35% 20% 18%

Exeter-WG

29%

Narragansett Block Island North Kingstown

34% No information reported No information reported

23%

South Kingstown

25%

Westerly

25%

Rhode Island

32% 34% 35% 28%

36%

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Percentage of students reporting usage Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)

Washington County Coalition for Children

79


One in four County high schoolers report signs of depression Many have thoughts of suicide

D

epression is a common, but serious illness affecting mood, most often requiring treatment to get better. Nationwide, approximately 11% of adolescents have a depressive disorder by age 18. The data here reflect the percentage of each high school student body’s responses to the following questions: • During the past 12 months, did you ever feel so sad or hopeless almost everyday for two weeks or more in a row that you stopped doing some usual activities? If ‘yes’: • Did you ever seriously consider killing yourself?

Percentage of student self reports of depression, 2012-2013 Admitted signs of depression high Schools 26.7%

Chariho Exeter-WG

12.8%

Block Island

25.1% 11.2% 36.8% Numbers too small to calculate

North Kingstown South Kingstown Westerly Rhode Island

Washington County Coalition for Children

14.5%

5.9%

Narragansett

One in four (24.2%) or a total of 1,058 Washington County high school students who responded to the questions admitted they had experienced signs of depression.

80

Admitted thoughts of suicide

25.2%

10.7% 20.5%

6.2% 13.7% 12.1%

28.8% 29.2%

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 Percentage of students Source: SurveyWorks! 2012-2013 High School Reports (http://infoworks.ride.ri.gov)


Few County youth placed at RI Training School

Youth in the care or custody of Rhode Island’s Training School, 2009-2013

Community placements found more effective in combating delinquency

50 Number of youth in care or custody

Y

outh age 18 or under who commit crimes are adjudicated to the care and custody of the RI Training School (RITS), including their secure detention facility for minors as well as other community placements Fewer youth are being sent to the Training School because communitybased alternative programs have been shown to be more successful and cost effective than incarceration. As a result, the number of Washington County youth detained at the RITS dropped 56% from 2012 to 2013.

51

50 45

45 40

42

35 30 25 20

20 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: RI DCYF RICHIST as cited in 2010-2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbooks

Washington County Coalition for Children

81


Number of youth detained at Rhode Island Training School, 2013 Washington County total: 20 Charlestown

2

Exeter

0

Hopkinton

1

Narragansett

3 0

New Shoreham North Kingstown

7

Richmond

0

South Kingstown

5

Westerly

2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Number of youth Source: RI DCYF RICHIST, as cited in the 2014 Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook

82

Washington County Coalition for Children


T

Want to make a difference in the lives of children & families in Washington County? Become a Coalition member, for as little as $10

he Washington County Coalition for Children accomplishes a lot with just one part-time coordinator and a tiny budget. Your very affordable membership and generous donations will be carefully and strategically used. Members can also volunteer on unique projects, like the annual Chalk It Up Against Bullying community arts event, Feelin’ Groovy emotional literacy project in 2nd grade classrooms, promoting Youth Mental Health First Aid, and creating parent podcasts. We offer exciting opportunities to be involved. Contact Coordinator Susan Orban at wccc@washcokids.org or (401) 788-2347.

Washington County Coalition for Children c/o VNS Home Health Services 14 Woodruff Ave., Suite #7 Narragansett, RI 02882

www.washcokids.org

Washington County Coalition for Children

83


For prices on one or more printed copies of “and how are the children,� contact Coalition Coordinator Susan Orban at wccc@washcokids.org or (401) 788-2347.

Washington County Coalition for Children c/o VNS Home Health Services 14 Woodruff Ave., Suite #7 Narragansett, RI 02882

www.washcokids.org

84

Washington County Coalition for Children

And how are the children 2015  

The status of children living in in southern Rhode Island as reported by the advocacy group Washington County Coalition for Children www.was...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you