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November 2012 • $5.00

On the Beat with Mark Stone:

The Evolution of the Percussion Activity Health: Minimizing the Risk of Noise Exposure Survey: Streaming Video – Beyond the Auditorium

Survey: Streaming Video

The Audience

Beyond the Auditorium

T

he people seated in the concert hall or the stands of a football field will always be the primary audience for a musical performance. However, with advances in modern technology, musical events can now reach across the globe, and in real time. From

simple set-ups like video chat or Skype to sophisticated usage of cameras, routers, and other equipment, there is a wide array of possibilities for sharing performances far and wide. Of course, there are challenges with broadcasting video, including equipment, expertise, and the time and effort involved with setting it all up. On top of that, concerns about copyrights are enough to prevent some school groups from making the dive.

For a closer look at how school groups are currently using video and streaming capabilities with their ensembles, this recent SBO survey asked readers to weigh in on this very 21st-century topic. And with almost 80 percent of respondents indicating that they shoot video of their performances, stay tuned, as the nature of this conversation is sure to evolve over the next few years.

Do you make video recordings of your ensembles’ performances?

No

40

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

79%

Yes

Yes

21%

$250-$500

15%

4%

33%

67%

No

Yes

63%

0-$250

$500-$1,000

21%

$1,000+

18%


November 2012

28 Mark Stone

All of the kids in the program are equal, whether it’s a piccolo player, a snare player, or a trumpet. They’re all important, and I need to make sure that they get the best opportunities they can to reach their potential.

” Contents Features

10 Report: Music Achievement Council

Technology: Instructional Resources

Resources to Assist Instruction and Creativity by John Kuzmich

W

hat is a master teacher, and what does it take to become one? While precise definitions vary, master teachers are leaders who have perfected the management of their class-

rooms and found ways to accelerate learning for all their students. Their expertise comes in recognizing that the educational process involves more than sharing content: it’s about creating independent learners who have the critical thinking skills to grow and thrive. I’ve met

tors are embracing technology in increasing numbers, not afraid to adapt it to their needs and situations. Professional development tools, such as those found at www.ti-me.org, are designed to give educators the resources they need to excel through courseware that covers the gamut of music software applications. These following three landmark books vividly illustrate how technology can be used to further develop teaching skills and student output.

Using Technology To Unlock Musical Creativity

44

Jeff Crowell of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire presents several exercises to improve control and musicality among percussionists.

28 UpClose: Mark Stone In this recent SBO interview, Mark Stone of Ayala High School discusses his world-class percussion program and the ongoing evolution of the indoor activity.

Scott Watson is the author of Using Technology To Unlock Musical Creativity: A Comprehensive Approach for Music Educators (Oxford University Press). His teaching style builds on traditional, face-to-face, K-12 and university formats, while incorporating technology through student projects. Scott has an extraordinary track record of teaching AP Music Theory courses. For the past eight years, 90 percent of his students received college credit, an unparalleled statistic for AP tests. His book is a game-changer that nurtures and develops students’ potential for music expression and offers project-oriented instruction covering composition, improvisation, arranging, and producing music and musicrelated projects. I particularly like how Scott offers a variety of practical ideas for

These concepts are especially impressive because they are supported by emerging research on creativity; they also represent cutting-edge instruction. Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity is divided into two parts. Part one is based on educational philosophy and a methodical pedagogical style. Part two deals with demonstrating practical ways that today’s music technology can be a dynamic aid in unlocking the authentic musical creativity inside every student. There are nearly 30 detailed lesson plan examples to show how technology can be a vital key to unlocking creativity from within

The Audience

course, there are challenges with broadcasting video, including equipment, expertise, and are enough to prevent some school groups from making the dive.

40

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

Do you make video recordings of your ensembles’ performances?

67%

Assuming you want to, do you have the ability and capaI don’t load performances online this issue 62% bility to stream performances live,because in realoftime? 63% 62% 21% Yes

0-$250

$250-$500

15%

$500-$1,000

4%

79%

No

33%

Yes

“Without paying fees, the advertisements on the streaming site are not always appropriate for families with young children, or any children for that matter. Sound is a challenge – streaming through the laptop doesn’t allow me to mix the 0-$250 63% concert prior to the performance. I also need someone who can run the equipment or I just leave it streaming through the whole concert, shifting bands around, preconcert stuff, and so on. It can be pretty boring viewing that way, but it can be $250-$500 15% edited after the fact if someone wants to see archived copies.” Steve Stenzel Lake Zurich Middle School North Lake Zurich, Ill. $500-$1,000 4% “Acquiring the laptop, camera, and cables was our biggest challenge (to our budget). Once obtained, it was very easy!” Peter Crosta $1,000+ 18% Orange Township Public Schools Orange, N.J. “Having a person on the camera/computer who is very comfortable with the technology involved.” Brad Thew Viroqua MS/HS Viroqua, Wis. “Making sure there are adequate broadband speeds on both ends, and sound quality.” Andrew Vickers Central Middle School DeWitt, Iowa School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

I don’t worry about it

$1,000+

67%

No

I make sure I have all the licenses

14% I don’t load performances online because of this issue

21%

Yes

Columns

62%

79%

No

I don’t worry about it

24% I make sure I have all the licenses

14%

4

Perspective

6

Headlines

48 New Products

I don’t load performances online because of this issue

53 Playing Tip 62%

54 Classifieds 56 Ad Index

Cover photo by Jose A. Fernandez, Chino Hills, Calif. Survey: Streaming Video

Get Your FREE SBO iPad edition at the App Store

The Audience

Beyond the Auditorium

T

he people seated in the concert hall or the stands of a football field will always be the primary audience for a musical performance. However, with advances in modern technology, musical events can now reach across the globe, and in real time. From

simple set-ups like video chat or Skype to sophisticated usage of cameras, routers, and other equipment, there is a wide array of possibilities for sharing performances far and wide. Of course, there are challenges with broadcasting video, including equipment, expertise, and the time and effort involved with setting it all up. On top of that, concerns about copyrights are enough to prevent some school groups from making the dive.

For a closer look at how school groups are currently using video and streaming capabilities with their ensembles, this recent SBO survey asked readers to weigh in on this very 21st-century topic. And with almost 80 percent of respondents indicating that they shoot video of their performances, stay tuned, as the nature of this conversation is sure to evolve over the next few years.

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

Do you make video recordings of your ensembles’ performances?

79%

Yes

No

21%

Yes

33%

67%

No

I don’t worry about it

24%

62%

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

15%

4%

18%

79%

No

14%

2

$250-$500

21%

Yes

I don’t load performances online because of this issue

John Kuzmich examines several resources for advancing professional development.

63%

0-$250

$500-$1,000

$1,000+

SB&O School Band and Orchestra® (ISSN 1098-3694) is published monthly by Symphony Publishing, LLC, 21 Highland Circle, Suite 1, Needham, MA 02494 (781) 453-9310, publisher of Musical Merchandise Review, Choral Director, Music Parents America and JAZZed. All titles are federally registered trademarks and/or trademarks of Symphony Publishing, LLC. Subscription Rates: one year $24; two years $40. Rates outside U.S.A. available upon request. Single issues $5 each. February Resource Guide $15. Periodical-Rate Postage Paid at Boston, MA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER/SUBSCRIBERS: Send address change to School Band and Orchestra, P.O. Box 8548, Lowell, MA 01853. No portion of this issue may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. The publishers of this magazine do not accept responsibility for statements made by their advertisers in business competition. Copyright © 2012 by Symphony Publishing, LLC, all rights reserved. Printed in USA. I make sure I have all the licenses

44 Technology: Instructional Resources

41

24%

18%

40

40 Survey: Streaming Video

18%

18% What are the biggest challenges associated with streaming video online?

“I don’t want to deal with any of the copyright issues. The 24% I don’t worry about it Web has made many things for us in music very easy, but I Yes 33% worry about thesure effect it has onlicenses abuse of the copyright laws.” I make I24% have all the Kurt Stalmann 14% Santana High School I make sure I have all the licenses 67%Santee, Calif. No I don’t 14% load performances online because of this issue

the time and effort involved with setting it all up. On top of that, concerns about copyrights

4%

4%

$1,000+

Yes videos 21% “We make available – some public for everyone to School Band and Orchestra • November 2012 45 view and some private for only the band members so that YesYes they can critique their 79%to im21%performance and look for ways prove. This is especially helpful with marching band perfor79% No mances because the view (movement/drill) is so important from an audience’s standpoint.” No 21% Jan 79%Hare No Delphos St. John’s High School Delphos, Ohio I don’t worry about it

equipment, there is a wide array of possibilities for sharing performances far and wide. Of

40

$500-$1,000

$1,000+

67%

No

technology, musical events can now reach across the globe, and in real time. From

79%

15%

$250-$500

$500-$1,000

he people seated in the concert hall or the stands of a football field will always be the

21%

63% 15%

$250-$500

33%

No

primary audience for a musical performance. However, with advances in modern

No

63%

0-$250 0-$250

33%

Yes Yes

simple set-ups like video chat or Skype to sophisticated usage of cameras, routers, and other

Yes

If yes, how expensive was the cost of implementing that capacity/equipment?

Do you upload those performances to the web?

T

For a closer look at how school groups are currently using video and streaming capabilities with their ensembles, this recent SBO survey asked readers to weigh in on this very 21st-century topic. And with almost 80 percent of respondents indicating that they shoot video of their performances, stay tuned, as the nature of this conversation is sure to evolve over the next few years.

“Our district does not presently have the infrastructure to support such an endeavor.” Tom Crawford Emily Gray Jr. High Tucson, Ariz.

“Matters related to confidentiality and privacy keep me Yes 79% from trying this avenue.” No Cheryl Cornish 21% Clancy Scool District Clancy, Mont. No 21%

Beyond the Auditorium

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

as creativity with keyboards, sound recording apps, multi-track music production, computer music notation, and instructional software with curriculum integration. For instance, in the chapter on computer music notation (programs like Finale, Sibelius, and Noteflight), Scott shares a lesson called “Pedal Point Duet,” in which students employ a simple pedal point in the lower part of a brief duet for two like instruments. The upper part follows

“We make videos of our marching band and audio recordings of our concert bands. Parents are asked to video their child’s section during our shows. I ask for a zoom and wide angle variety to highlight needs for improvements. Each week there is an evening rehearsal inside our stadium that is open to the parents. They learn our concerns in the show and then know where to record. They post to YouTube and send me a link. It works quite well.” Bob Beshears Garland High School Garland,79% Texas Yes

that remove distractions and help students focus. 4. Remove parameters and limitations that stifle creativity and lead to contrived expression. 5. Facilitate improvisation. 6. Engage in coaching interaction. 7. Foster opportunities for feedback and critique. 8. Employ performance and recital.

find they are, themselves, life-long learners searching for

16 Health: Noise Exposure

22 Performance: Percussion

1. Allow students to share themselves. 2. Offer compelling examples to imi-

new and better ways to reach and teach. These educa-

44

music students of all backgrounds. A companion website has been created to further supplement the book. Visit www.oup.com/us/musicalcreativity to find links to the major web resources mentioned in the text, files to support various lesson plans, and sound and movie clip examples of most of the projects described in the book, as created by actual students. The diverse lesson plans in the second part of the book cover topics such

tate and inspire. Survey: Streaming Video 3. Employ parameters and limitations

many of these teachers in my clinics over the years. I

SBO checks in with the Music Achievement Council, a volunteer panel of music industry retailers, manufacturers, and suppliers who have joined forces to help educators meet classroom challenges.

Researchers from a government occupational safety organization look at noise exposure in music classrooms and give some safety tips to prevent or minimize hearing damage.

technology-based creative music activities, locating lesson plans and resources, and assessing creative work with a variety of music teaching ideas. There are detailed plans for incorporating the concepts that link to NAfME National Standards, with adaptations for grade level and technology proficiency. Outstanding are the activities designed especially for novice users with free or low-cost music applications. Scott’s book offers fresh ways to use the technology tools that many educators already have. The creative projects he presents are both flexible and adaptable depending on grade level, available technology, and the teacher’s and students’ experience, comfort, and confidence with technology. The only prerequisite is nominal familiarity with a personal computer, but no specialized software or hardware knowledge is required. The strength of Scott’s text is how it is structured on a set of eight principles that successfully draw out student creativity.


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Perspective

Entrepreneurial Educators The actual quote from the famed movie Field of Dreams is, “If you build it, he will come.” However, in the case of our featured director this month, the common misquote is more apropos – “If you build it, they will come.” Mark Stone, director of bands at Southern California’s Ayala High School, has developed a championship program from scratch using his unique entrepreneurial spirit to drive his success. The differences between an entrepreneurial business start-up and an educational start-up are not really that far apart; one is focused on building a new product or service and the other on building an educational program for students. Both take the seed of an idea that extends from a need in the marketplace and gather the resources to fill that need. Both require investors or administrative support, the business plan/ educational program outline, leadership, employees, and most importantly, customers or students as the primary target. Stone shows us how he accomplished this feat with little support from the traditional sources by gaining the necessary help from unorthodox places. Having a vision is an essential part of launching any successful venture. Without a clear goal in mind, it’s impossible to know the direction in which you’re going. Mark saw that what was being done in other states was not being done in his “Having a vision locale and, rather than simply accept the situation, is an essential part he took his vision and went about seeking ways to of launching any establish and build upon it. Part of this initiative included launching the Southern California Persuccessful venture.” cussion Alliance to provide students with an outlet to learn, hone, and showcase their indoor percussion talents and encourage more schools and students to participate. He took his own program from a start-up to one of the top groups in national competitions like WGI. Sometimes we all look at our surroundings and feel that we’re stuck with a situation that simply can’t be changed. However, Entrepreneurs of all types may see these same situations and determine that they are going to change the status quo. In schools, there are often significant roadblocks of funding, administration, lack of parental support, and so on. It is encouraging to know that, with the right amount of effort, thought, and fortitude, these situations can slowly but surely be improved. Whether your goal is large or small, short term or long term, you’ll find some great insight from this story of a leader whose determination illustrates one path to building a superior program…

Rick Kessel rkessel@symphonypublishing.com Join the conversation on:

4

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

®

November 2012 • Volume 15, Number 11 GROUP PUBLISHER Sidney L. Davis sdavis@symphonypublishing.com PUBLISHER Richard E. Kessel rkessel@symphonypublishing.com Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR Christian Wissmuller cwissmuller@symphonypublishing.com EDITOR Eliahu Sussman esussman@symphonypublishing.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matt Parish mparish@symphonypublishing.com Art PRODUCTION MANAGER Laurie Guptill lguptill@symphonypublishing.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Andrew P. Ross aross@symphonypublishing.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laurie Chesna lchesna@symphonypublishing.com Advertising ADVERTISING SALES Iris Fox ifox@symphonypublishing.com CLASSIFIED SALES Steven Hemingway shemingway@symphonypublishing.com Business CIRCULATION MANAGER Melanie A. Prescott mprescott@symphonypublishing.com

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three maraderie. These are the Confidence. Character. Ca fidence con e rming Arts program. Th tenets of the Disney Perfo uired to of stages. The character req to perform on the grandest essential And the camaraderie that’s perfect your chosen craft. part And when your group takes to come together as a team. a in t’s tha er ts program– wheth in a Disney Performing Ar they lls ski the p or festival– these are performance or a worksho ive lus ne, becoming part of an exc will learn, sharpen and refi e this shared once-in-a-lifetim group of artists bonded by The Arts. means to earn your Ears For it at wh is is Th ce. en eri exp ir Ears for has what it takes to earn the So if you think your group 095. 5-4 -71 planner or call 1-866 the Arts, contact your travel

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Headlines Oberlin Grad and ICE Founder Claire Chase Named MacArthur Fellow

Flutist and new-music trailblazer Claire Chase was recently named a 2012 MacArthur Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, which carries a $500,000 award dispersed over the next five years. Commonly known as “genius grants,” the MacArthur Foundation’s annual awards support “exceptional merit and promise of continued creative work.” Chase is a 2001 graduate of Oberlin Conservatory of Music. That year, she co-founded the trailblazing International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) in Chicago. Chase has focused on opening new avenues of artistic expression for the 21st–century musician, as well as providing students in public schools whose music programs have been cut with innovative music education programs. The ICE, now an ensemble of 33 instrumentalists, tours throughout the world and is currently the Ensemble in Residence Claire Chase at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. It has premiered over 500 works and released acclaimed recordings on labels like Bridge, Naxos, Tzadik, and New Focus. Throughout this year, they are set to perform 65 concerts in five different countries.



www.ice.org

NAMM Foundation Invites Educators to 2013 ‘Music Education Days’

The sixth annual “Music Education Days” will be held January 26-27 at the 2013 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) Show. Hosted by the NAMM Foundation, music educators and school administrators will have access to NAMM’s premier industry-only music product trade show, where they will have an opportunity to preview the latest instruments, products, and tools relevant to today’s music classrooms. “Now in its sixth year, Music Education Days continues to celebrate and support music educators in their very important role of inspiring children to learn to play music,” said Mary Luehrsen, executive director of the NAMM Foundation. “This event brings together

Percussive Arts Society 2012 Industry Awards Announced

The 2012 Percussive Arts Society Industry Awards class represents five individuals and one international chapter, each of whom has developed important careers and service to not only PAS, but the percussion world as a whole. The PAS President’s Industry Award recipient is Dave Black, who has been the director of Percussion Acquisitions at Alfred Music Publishing over the past 27 years and has received two Grammy nomination certificates and over 20 consecutive ASCAP Popular Composer Awards. The Outstanding PAS Chapter Award went to the PAS Australia Chapter. The Outstanding PAS Service Award went to Kathleen Kastner, professor of Music at Wheaton College who has served PAS in roles including PAS Board of Directors, Scholarly Research Committee Chair, associate research editor for Percussive Notes, and more. The Outstanding PAS Supporter Award went to Christopher Smith, a drummer and Senior Product analyst for FinishMaster, Inc. in Indianapolis, Indiana who serves as PASIC volunteer coordinator. Finally, the Percussive Arts Society Lifetime Achievement Award in Education was given to Marty Hurley and Alan Shinn. Hurley served most notably as instructor and arranger for the Phantom Regiment Drum & Bugle Corps, as well as director of Dave Black bands at Brother Martin High School in New Orleans from 1974 until his death in 2011. Shinn’s work as an educator and performer has spanned over 30 years, with the majority of those years spent teaching at Texas Tech University. Currently serving as principal timpanist with the Santa Fe Pro Musica and Lubbock Symphony Orchestra, Shinn has always maintained an active performing schedule providing students with a ‘working musician role model.’ The recipients were honored in an awards presentation during PASIC 2012 in Austin, Texas at the Austin Convention Center.



www.pas.org 6

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

music education professionals to network with the industry and each other, but it also offers tools to create even better music programs in their districts.” Music Education Days will again feature inspiring musical performances each morning, followed by session briefings and program highlights. Afternoon breakout sessions will cover topics for music educators ranging from “How to Start a Mariachi Program” and “Technology for Music Educators” to “Adding Group Guitar to Your Program” and “Top 10 Tips for Music Teacher Success.” In addition to networking and reviewing best practices, teachers will have the opportunity to explore miles of new music


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Headlines product displays; examining new products and technologies they can use in their schools. Registration for Music Education Days is open online – there will be no registration onsite.



www.nammfoundation.org

ONLINE SURVEY Does your school field competitive Winter Guard or Percussion Ensembles?

No

44%

Yes

56%

Visit www.sbomagazine.com and let your voice be heard in the current online poll – results to be published in the next issue of SBO.

Letters Bob Morrison’s article in the September issue is right on – many music educators have little or no idea how their state will react to the new teacher evaluations. We all need to be aware and proactive. Bob reports that “music teachers will be measured by outcomes in … math!” That will not happen in most states, but I would be ok with it at my school. Our district recently published a report for teachers that revealed all of our students’ test scores from highest to lowest. The entire first two pages were all orchestra or band kids – that should mean that the orchestra teacher and I would be the highest paid teachers in the district since cause shows that we are the only common factor in these kids’ lives! I am NOT joking, and if our state or district ever uses test scores to pay teachers more, I will persist in making our case. Kevin Paustian Past President, Washington Music Educators Association Mt. Baker Middle School 8

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012


Mastering music is more than a destination. It’s about all of the experiences you have along the way. We give you the freedom to experiment, find your own solutions, and evolve. But we also give you a structured and demanding curriculum that will test even the most talented musicians. You’ll be prepared to succeed in the world of music. Wherever it takes you. Learn more at berklee.edu

WHERE MUSIC TAKES YOU


Report: Music Achievement Council

The Music Achievement Council: An Educational Resource

O

ne of the wonderful aspects of this digital age in which we live is the immediate access to so much information. Music educators, like professionals in many other indus-

tries, can now reach out via a click of a mouse and a few taps on a keyboard to browse virtually limitless relevant and helpful content, some of which might even serve to improve skill sets and advance careers. The Music Achievement Council (MAC) is a panel of music industry professionals who share the singular goal of wanting to assist and promote the teaching of music. Although the MAC predates the information age by several years, the Council has evolved with the times, and now has available on their website a wide array of materials designed to help educators address common challenges found in music classrooms across the country. “The original meeting, which grew into what is now known at the Music Achievement Council, was held at the National Association of School Music Dealers (NASMD) annual meeting in 1982,” says MAC member Steve West of West Music, a music retailer with locations across Iowa and Illinois.

10

“Manufacturers and retailers came together to discuss ways of addressing a number of concerns and problems school music programs were experiencing in the early ‘80s. The organization went through several evolutions and settled about 15 years ago on the current seven-person council.”

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

Originally, the MAC started out with the objective of bringing awareness to music industry manufacturers, suppliers, and retailers about the challenges music Rick Young educators face. “It’s almost like a bi-partisan group, including Joe Lamond, the CEO of [music products trade organization] NAMM, three people from the manufacturing and distribution side of the music products industry, and then three people from the retail side,” notes Rick Young, who, in addition to being the MAC chairman, is also senior vice president of Yamaha Corporation of America. “The idea was that we knew that there were concerns facing music educators, and the question was how we could build awareness of these concerns and then find ways to help alleviate them. That mission has evolved over the years. The awareness angle is important, but at this point I think everyone knows that music programs are based on the quality and job


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done by the music educator. Areas like budgets, scheduling, and so many other things can be really problematic. If you talk to any retailers who are strong in school service, they will all say that the educator makes all the difference in the world – the retailers get it.” The premise is that with better preparation for the many challenges music educators face – in all aspects of instruction and program management – educators will be more suc-

cessful, and more kids will receive quality instruction. Young notes that the Council’s efforts are not an indictment of the preparations future educators receive during their college years, so much as an acknowledgement of the complexity and difficulty of running a quality music program. “We now have products that we have updated to what makes sense for today’s educators,” says Young,

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

“including The Practical Guide to Recruitment and Retention, Tips for Success, videos, and the wisdom and insight from people like Tim Lautzenheiser, Marcia Neel, and Charlie Menghini of Vandercook College. The Council has recently expanded, taking on two positions that we call educational advisors, Marcia Neel and Charlie Menghini. Those two individuals are really plugged into what’s happening out there. Marcia is an expert in understanding the challenges facing educators out there in the trenches, while Charlie runs a college that focuses on preparing future generations of music educators. There are these needs that aren’t being met, so we have to raise awareness so we can help educators – especially those new to the job – do better and have more success. None of us can afford to have the current rate of attrition to educators continue.” One key hurdle for the Music Achievement Council has been simply finding ways to put the materials that they produce in the hands of as many educators as they can. “That was a big challenge when I came on board in 2004,” Young admits. “We have these great products that we are continually updating, but our big question was how we were going to get them out to the educators. To make that happen, we’ve started the ‘state-by-state’ initiative. We have had spokespeople doing sessions on our materials at state MEAs and bringing that awareness to the teachers. We pass out literature and products to 100 or 150 people at a time. Now we have everything on a flash drive. It’s really easy to get that information out to people and keep everyone updated through those methods or on our Facebook page. We also have a database of teachers we’ve spoken to at the state conventions, and we let them know when we have new articles or materials that might be helpful to them. The whole delivery system has become much better. “The whole key is about getting support for the educators. If they use these materials, they’ll be more suc-


cessful, and our real goal is to help retain good, successful educators. With the addition of our educational consultants, we now have a viewpoint that we may have been missing. We had the manufacturing and distribution side, we had the retail side, and we had the NAMM side; the one side that was missing was the true music educator perspective, and that’s what these folks will bring. We think they will help us get our message out to a broader audience, and they also are in touch with the latest trends and challenges facing educators.” Marcia Neel, the former music supervisor for Las Vegas’s Clark County School District, is the person who has been presenting sessions on the MAC materials at state MEAs. “A lot Marcia Neel of times, teachers’ needs might not be what you might perceive them to be,” she notes. “Some of their needs are more along the lines of areas of training in planning or logistics that they didn’t get while they were in school, but that business people completely understand. For example, younger or less experienced educators might not understand how to lay out an instrument replacement plan – something like a five-year plan to make sure that their students are playing quality instruments that aren’t in disrepair. That is where the Music Achievement Council is coming from in terms of what it’s brought about in its publications for teachers. “We have wonderful materials, and as I travel around the country presenting them, I’m amazed by how many people aren’t aware of these free tools that are out there for them to use in their classrooms. The Music Achievement Council’s goal is to help music educators be better teachers. Educators should know that they aren’t out there all alone. Everything from how to perform effective advocacy, the business side of music education, managing a budget, even things like classroom management and organizing and programming a concert – it’s all covered.

These are wonderful and helpful tools. It’s like a music ed program in a box, all available online for free at www. nammfoundation.org/music-achievement-council, and at music education conferences across the country.” Bill Harvey of Buddy Rogers Music notes that the members of the MAC don’t necessarily consider themselves experts, so much as conduits of this expert information. “The council has done a lot of research by talking to

many really successful people,” he says. “That’s how we all learn. There’s tons of information that successful educators have shared with us, and we’ve formatted it into a number of different materials that we’re trying to get out there – on the website, the thumb drives, videos, and so on. Our job is not to find the solutions, but to listen to the people who have found the solutions, and then go and share those ideas and best practices with

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

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THAT’S MY SOUND!

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“MOUTHPIECES THAT PLAY TO THE BACK OF THE ROOM”

educators through our presentations, our materials, and our websites.” The next phase of the MAC’s research will focus on the attrition that occurs among music students between middle school and high school. “That’s one area where we lose a ton of kids,” says Young. “Our educational consultants are actively researching this topic by asking successful educators out there, ‘How have you bridged that gap?’ For the last four years, we’ve been videotaping educators at the Midwest Band Clinic to get their best practices in a format that we can share with other educators. We will simply be asking people how they do that, and we’ll build our next materials out of the responses we get to that question – how to maintain retention from junior high into high school. Once we formulate those materials, we’ll identify the next area of challenge and then we’ll address that one.” “We’re a relatively unknown organization, which is okay as long as the important conversations are still happening out there,” says MAC member George Quinlan Jr. of Midwest retailers George Quinlan, Jr. Quinlan & Fabish. “The question sometimes comes about whether or not this is some kind of forprofit venture, because there are retailers and manufacturers involved. This is a volunteer effort. The industry only grows when school band and school orchestra programs recruit more students and retain them longer. We really have the same goals as educators in this respect. People think there might be a hidden agenda when they see major companies like Yamaha and Hal Leonard are involved, but there really isn’t. It’s a volunteer group that wants to help educators reach more students and keep them involved in music.”

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012


Health: noise exposure

Noise Exposures in School Music Classes and Marching Band Rehearsals By Lilia Chen, MS, CIH, Scott E. Brueck, MS, CIH, and Maureen T. Niemeier, BBA

T

he National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), was recently asked to evaluate a high school band director’s noise exposure during music classes and band rehearsals (see “The Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program”). The band director was concerned about hearing loss from loud noise while teaching music classes, and during band rehearsals and performances. Music classes included fifth and sixth grade band, music arts, and marching band rehearsal. Most classes had 15-30 students. The marching band had about 90 students and band rehearsal lasted 50 minutes each day. Music classes were held in the 1,700-square foot band room. The marching band rehearsed in the band room or in the 6,000-square foot cafeteria. The band director sometimes taught lessons after school which contributed to his overall noise exposure.

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Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) NIHL is a permanent condition caused by damage to the nerve cells of the inner ear; it cannot be treated medically.1 In most cases, NIHL develops slowly from repeated noise exposure over time, but the amount of hearing loss is usually greatest during the first several years of noise exposure. NIHL can also result from exposure to very loud noise for short periods of time, or even from a single exposure to an impulse noise or continuous noise, depending on the intensity of the noise and the person’s susceptibility to hearing loss.1 Noise-exposed employees can develop substantial NIHL before they realize it. Hearing often worsens with age, but exposure to loud noise can in-

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

crease how quickly hearing loss occurs. Even mild hearing losses can interfere with a person’s ability to understand speech and hear important sounds. Some people with NIHL develop tinnitus, a condition in which a person hears sound in one or both ears (often described as ringing, hissing, buzzing, whistling, clicking, or chirping like crickets), but no external sound is present. Tinnitus can be occasional or constant, and the volume can range from soft to loud. Currently, there is no cure for tinnitus. One study of 104 music educators found evidence that being a high school band director carried a slight risk for NIHL.2 However, fewer than 20 percent of the high school band directors had NIHL, and the degree of loss was highly variable. In anoth-


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er study, 45 percent of student musicians aged 18 to 25 years had NIHL, compared to 11.5 percent of people in the same age range in the general population.3 A study of university music students indicates that how close the band director and students are to specific groups of instruments can affect noise exposure levels.4 The study found that brass instrument players had significantly higher aver-

age noise exposure levels (95.2 dBA) compared to woodwind players (90.4 dBA), percussion players (90.1 dBA), vocalists (88.4 dBA), or string players (87.0 dBA) (see “Noise Exposure Limits” for an explanation of noise measurements). Since music teachers and students may also be exposed to loud music outside of the classroom, it is important to educate them about the risk of hearing loss from excessive noise exposures and inform them

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about ways to protect and preserve hearing (see “Recommendations”).

Noise Exposure Limits Occupational noise exposure limits in the United States have been developed by NIOSH, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and safety and health organizations. Employers are encouraged to follow the more protective NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL),5 but the law requires them to adhere to the OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL) and Action Level (AL). 6 When employees’ noise exposure levels exceed the AL, employers must institute a hearing conservation program which includes noise monitoring, audiometric testing, providing hearing protectors, training and education, and record keeping. When noise exposures are greater than the PEL, employees are required to wear hearing protection. Noise measurements are reported in units of A-weighted decibels (dBA). The decibel (dB) scale is logarithmic, so increases of 3 dB, 10 dB, and 20 dB represent a doubling, tenfold, and hundredfold increase of sound energy, respectively. A whisper is 30 dB, a normal speaking voice is 60 dB, a powered lawn mower is 90 dB, an ambulance siren is 120 dB, and a jet engine during take-off is 140 dB.

Noise Exposure Measurements and Results

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We measured the band director’s noise exposure during marching band rehearsal in the cafeteria, and we measured his noise exposure in the band room for an entire school day. Because the band director was the only employee who taught music classes and rehearsals, we also measured noise on each side of the band room. We measured the dimensions of the band room and cafeteria and calculated reverberation times (the time it takes for a sound to decrease 60 dB from its original intensity) for these areas. The band director’s full work day noise exposure did not exceed the

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

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OSHA PEL of 90 dBA, but reached the OSHA AL of 85 dBA and was above the NIOSH REL of 85 dBA. Noise exposures were the highest during marching band rehearsals and averaged 97 dBA when rehearsal was in the band room and 95 dBA when rehearsal was in the cafeteria. Noise levels exceeded 100 dBA numerous times during rehearsals. Noise levels on each side of the band room were below the OSHA AL or PEL. Our results showed that increasing the distance between the band director and the students decreased noise exposure. Reverberation times in the cafeteria and band room were appropriate for teaching music classes (and within ranges recommended by other researchers), but the band room was too small for the number of students in the marching band. We evaluated the band director’s noise exposure, but not the students. Students are likely to have lower noise exposures from school-related activities, because they spend less time in music classes and rehearsals. However, for the range of the noise levels we measured during rehearsals, overexposures could occur in 30-60 minutes. We recommend administrators educate teachers, students, and parents involved with music (especially with the marching band) about NIHL symptoms (see “Noiseinduced Hearing Loss (NIHL)” and prevention (see “Recommendations”).

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The Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program Based on a federal law, NIOSH conducts health hazard evaluations (HHEs) to investigate possible workplace health hazards. Employees, employers, or union representatives can ask our comprehensive team of experts to investigate their health and safety concerns by requesting an HHE. Our team contacts the requestor and discusses the problems and how to solve them. This may result in sending the requestor information, referring the requestor to a more appropriate agency, or making a site visit (which may include environmental sampling and medical testing). If we make a site visit, we prepare a report that includes recommendations specific to the problems found, as well as general guidance for following good occupational health practices. HHE reports are available on the Internet (www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/).

Recommendations We provided the following recommendations to reduce noise exposures during music classes and marching band

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that a high school band room for 60 to 75 musicians have a floor space of 2,500 square feet and a ceiling height of 18-22 feet.7

rehearsals. The recommendations are based on basic principles that are also applicable in other schools. • Hold marching band rehearsal outside or in a room appropriately sized for the number of band students and acoustically designed for musical rehearsals and performances. Until an acoustically-designed space for musical rehearsals and performances is available, hold marching band rehearsals in other spaces such as the cafeteria or a larger room with sound absorbent materials. If rehearsals must be in the current band room, all students should be asked to play softly and focus on technique. They should practice louder dynamics when rehearsals are outside or in a larger rehearsal area. One organization recommended

Resources and Links NIOSH HHE Program information: www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/HHEprogram.html OSHA hearing conservation program information: www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/noise/hcp/index.html www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3074.pdf NIHL information: National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders WISE EARS!® campaign at: www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/ wise/Pages/Default.aspx. For more detailed information on the methods, results, and recommendations of this evaluation, see www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports/pdfs/20110129-3160.pdf.

and include training on using hearing protectors. Audiometric testing allows for the early detection of hearing loss and provides opportunities for interventions.

• Stand away from surfaces off which sound can bounce, such as blackboards, when leading music classes and marching band rehearsal. If this is not possible, then cover such surfaces with sound absorbent material.

• Share information on the symptoms and prevention of NIHL with band students and their parents (see “Resources and Links”).

• Move the students farther back in the classroom to create more distance from the band director.

Lilia Chen, MS, CIH, is an industrial hygienist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program in Cincinnati, OH.

• Provide the band director with flat attenuation “musician” ear plugs until an acoustically appropriate space for musical rehearsals and performances is available and noise levels are below occupational exposure limits. These hearing protectors reduce sound levels evenly across frequencies to maintain sound quality. Administrators should provide training for the proper fit, use, and care of the ear plugs. • Establish a hearing conservation program for the band director and other music teachers in accordance with the OSHA hearing conservation standard [29 CFR 1910.95] and NIOSH recommendations (see “Resources and Links”). This program should provide guidelines for reducing the risk of hearing loss, include annual audiometric testing and follow-up,

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Scott E. Brueck, MS, CIH, is an industrial hygienist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program in Cincinnati, OH. Maureen T. Niemeier, BBA, is a freelance technical writer/editor in Cincinnati, Ohio. She has written and edited public health documents for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and other clients since 2002.

Mention of company or product names does not imply endorsement by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

1. Berger [2003]. Berger EH, Royster LH, Royster JD, Driscoll DP, Layne M, eds. “The noise manual.” 5th rev. ed. Fairfax, VA: American Industrial Hygiene Association.

Cutietta RA, Klich RJ, Royse D, Rainbolt H [1994]. “The incidence of noise-induced hearing loss among music teachers.” J Res Music Ed 42(4):318–330. 2.

3. Phillips SL, Henrich VC, Mace ST [2010]. “Prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in student musicians.” Int J Aud 49(4):309–316.

Phillips SL, Mace S [2008]. “Sound level measurements in music practice rooms.” Mus Per Research 2:36–47.

4.

NIOSH [1998]. “Criteria for a recommended standard: occupational noise exposure” (revised criteria 1998). Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 98-126.

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

29 CFR 1910.95. Code of Federal Regulations. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, Office of the Federal Register.

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Wenger Corporation [2001]. “Planning guide for secondary school music facilities.” Owatonna, MN: Wenger Corporation.

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Performance: Percussion

The Musical

Percussionist

Expanding students’ musical potential through a technical approach By Jeffery Crowell

M

aking music is our ultimate goal, that’s a given. However, when playing percussion and engaging in the act of be-

ing “percussive,” it’s not necessarily the most musically capable or nuance-oriented interaction one can have with an instrument. The human voice or breath or a bow has much more shaping potential than the act of striking something. The short moment we percussionists have to interact with our instruments leaves little time to learn as much as we can – those are just the facts. So what can we do about it? Our art is packed with things that aren’t necessarily our fault, but are definitely our problems to deal with. I feel it helps students understand that it’s not their fault, too, but they still have deal with the end result. Take rushing for example. How many great jokes are there about drummers rushing? Lots. Why? Because they are true! For example, show me someone who always alternates hands when playing notes that last a split second – even if marked quarter notes – and I’ll show you someone that anticipates each entrance slightly. When you anticipate an entrance you’re technically coming in early. Do that twice in a row and you have a recipe for pushing the tempo. Bingo. Like I said, it’s built into our craft and it’s not something we do consciously, but that doesn’t change the fact it’s a real issue that we have to address. Something that falls into this category is that many young percussionists play with less than a full stroke and rebound, and not by choice. They do this automatically, and that’s what I want to help fix. If an educator wants to have a more

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

legato or warm sound from an instrument, that needs to be generated from a more relaxed movement that falls toward the instrument and comes back to where it began. If you’re not in control of your playing and therefore, by default, don’t maximize that type of potential, aren’t you limiting yourself? The answer is yes, and I have a way to fix that.


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The Piston Stroke

including ones that plays more into the instrument, some that don’t return all the way, or others (used in marching drums) where we catch the stick just after contact, and so on. But what I’m talking about here specifically is a full piston stroke, and here’s why I like to train my concert percussionists in this way. If we train and can automatically and consciously play with the most movement possible (a full return to starting position), then every other sonic choice becomes less work or I don’t have to return “all the way back up.” If we can’t or haven’t fully trained this full rebound, then you’ll limit your return. This could be “not quite the work of the full stroke” and The beginning of the stroke, up as high as you’d like it then that becomes your 100 to begin. percent potential. When, if musically needed, you need a full rebound stroke by default, it becomes more than you are normally used to doing. Isn’t it easier to do less than normal? If someone said I could do less work and get paid more, I’d say, “Sign me up!” For simple purposes here, I’m defining what many might call a piston stroke. Use whatever term you want but it’s a stroke that starts high, falls toward the instrument, and returns back up to where it initiated.

The halfway point of the stroke, where it interacts with the instrument.

The end of the stroke.

There are many different types of strokes for different types of sounds, 24

“The purpose of working on this is to give your percussionists an awareness of what they are doing, so when they want to play consistently, they can.”

The goal of all of this is to provide students with the maximum amount of sound potential – to give them the most diverse sonic potential from a playing standpoint and be in conscious control of it. I make the analogy of having the biggest toolbox with every possible tool in it. If I need a small Phillips head screwdriver, not only do I musically want to have one, but I want to have six varieties of them. I never want to need something I don’t

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

have. This is the same thing, just from a musical standpoint. When performing, if I need a quieter sound with the same sound quality, I can do that. If you listen to many young percussionists, when they get quieter, they change the way they play the stroke. Same thing applies to faster and slower passages. Watch someone playing fast alternating strokes that gradually slow down and you’ll notice the way they generate their stroke will change. They’ll normally move from a very rebounded/ full stroke to one that stays closer to the head after it strikes it. Why? Because they have the time to keep it there. By definition, though, that’s a different movement, and that’s not necessarily what I want. I maybe want the same sound I get at the faster speed at the slower speed, too. Don’t change your movement unless you want to. To me, that means don’t change your sound or type of articulation unless you are specifically and intentionally trying to change it. The point here is that percussionists do this often, without really ever noticing it. Again, the purpose of working on this is to give your percussionists an awareness of what they are doing, so when they want to play consistently, they can. Without this control, our playing becomes limited – and

we have less potential when it comes to color/timbre and ultimately musical expression. I want to make clear that I don’t always play with this type of stroke/ articulation. I make conscious choices of what I want and then draw from my technical ability to execute these sounds. The ability to play the entire range movement available is what I have to draw from, so I feel like I don’t have a wall or limit on what I can or can’t do. Since I’m able to run what I would call a complete spectrum of movements or articulations, when I


play I’m merely choosing my best option for that particular situation. If I were to not be able to execute the required movement, I would be limited in my musical potential. If we’ve already established that we as percussionists have less articulative potential when compared to other instrumentalists, if we limit amount in some way and are not maximizing what we can do, then we’re really taking away from our musical potential.

Developing Consistency Then how do we train that full stroke? It’s actually quite simple in concept, but will take some physical training. I remember re-tooling myself at age 27 during my DMA work, how easily I understood what I needed to do, but how I couldn’t cheat the hours that it took me to reach my goal. Stick with it and it’ll happen. Before we get to the exercise, I mentioned something in my last article that needs repeating here. We as percussionists have to know what we are doing when we play and how to control the mechanics of our playing. A big part of this is listening to what we are getting from a sonic and musical standpoint. If a conductor tells me he or whe would like my crashes to sound slightly darker, then not only do I need to know how to do that, but I need to know the sound I just got. Simple, right? Ah, but to the percussionist it’s difficult! It’s difficult because our instruments are much more instantly gratifying – hit a drum and it sounds okay. Get a beginner on a French horn and it will take time for the sound quality to improve. Hand a beginner a stick and have them hit a drum and it’s really not half bad. We percussionists get a pretty good sound – good enough, right? Well, in our world B+ doesn’t cut it, we want to shoot for A+. Therefore, the mere act of having your percussionists really listen to what they are doing can open their ears to a whole world that’s been there all along, they might have just been missing it. So as your percussionists practice, in order to incorporate the concepts presented below, they need to be constantly aware of what they are doing. Practicing in front of a mirror is a great way to give them that front perspective to their playing. After they have the exercise memorized, they can also look down on their hands and observe what’s going on. Watching and listening are the two best ways they can teach themselves. The following exercise will help teach students about consistency and stroke. Since it’s simple in design, it allows the student time to focus on how they are moving, how they are holding the stick, how that stick is moving in their hand, the sound they are getting, the consistency of that sound between hands, and so on. As I tell them, “If you want to sound consistent, then you need to play consistently.” Again, a very simple concept, but once they start to really listen with detail, they’ll find there’s quite a bit that they are missing. It also has some interesting parts to it, such as 3/4 time and varied groupings of stickings, so there’s an element of focus that is required. That’s a good thing, because it keeps the player engaged in playing it – students can’t just turn off their brain and get through it. This exercise was written by my teacher when I was at the University of Southern California, Erik Forrester, and I’m amazed at how well it works as a tool to controlling and hearing consistency. Let’s call it Exercise A: Exercise A

There’s no tempo indication. Take it slow enough to feel and control each 16th note. Maybe eighth note = 50. Speed is not the end result, consistency is and the only way to work on movement is take things slowly. Students will be tempted to take it fast, not only because we’re fascinated with playing fast (we just are!), but because they’ll see 16th notes and just want to play them quickly. Exercise A

works on fighting that temptation on both levels. What is Exercise A? Essentially it’s constant 16th-notes where the stickings change. They go from groups of fours, to threes, to twos, then to alternate strokes in the last measure. Obviously percussionists will play the sticking used in that last bar more often, but what this exercise helps us do is to get a “running start” at them. Pick one bar that your students statistically will play the most consistent stroke-wise upon first trying this exercise? Measure one. The least consistent? Measure four. So if measure four’s stroke control is the goal here, then what we’re really doing is starting with the easy and working towards the more difficult. To think of it on a horizontal time plane, the full piston stroke here would then essentially make a “V” type shape. I would consider this a single stroke for this exercise. So by default then the first four 16th notes in the first bar in the right hand would look like “VVVV.” The key thing here is to play each stroke the same. What happens is that on the notes that finish several in a row on a particular hand (the fourth of the fours, the third of the threes, the second of the twos, and actually all the single strokes), the percussionist might end those down closer to the drum. Why? Because they can – they don’t continue on so there’s time to keep them there. But that’s not the same type of stroke. Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. I do if I want to, but not by default. You’ll find that as they get closer to the last measure, it gets harder and harder to make sure that “last” stroke comes back up, since they get fewer and fewer groups of the same hand stickings. The one bar we play the most, the last, is the one that’s the hardest since it’s always changing between hands. They should practice on practice pad, preferably something that doesn’t have a gum rubber surface. I say this because they need as much sonic feedback as they can get and gum rubber is very quiet. I prefer a coated head practice pad so I can hear lots of texture when I play. The more feedback I get on how I’m sounding, the better. They should also practice it at about a mf volume. You need a good amount of motion to practice motion, so barely

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

25


moving off the practice pad won’t help train your ability as well, so think of it at 10” or so off the pad. The beauty to this exercise is that it’s short and to the point. The ultimate goal is for the director to turn his or her back when the student plays and to not be able to hear any sound variations. All the notes are written equally so they should sound that way. It works on a lot without seeming to really do much – that’s why I like it. I do have a couple of other variations, one that works mostly on two-beat variations, and another on three-beat variations. They are Exercises D and E. The same thing applies to these with

tempo: students should take them nice and slow so as to digest every stroke and train themselves to be aware of what they are doing. By focusing on this movement and making sure percussionists are aware of the sound and color they are making, it will enable them to be in conscious control of how they are moving. The results are musicians who are in total control of how they are moving and can then make choices based on what they want to do and not what just might happen. Another great result of this is that their attention to detail and consistency can only be increased, and their touch on other instruments that aren’t as neces-

Exercises D & E

26

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

sarily as responsive as a drum (such as the bar of a mallet instrument or wood blocks) will be increased as well. I’m all about being efficient and when I can practice something that benefits my overall playing, I’m more than willing to do it. This is one of those exercises that will truly help your percussionists. Remember, our stoke type should be a matter of choice. I guarantee you’ll hear a difference in their playing. Dr. Jeffery Crowell is an associate professor of Music and coordinator of the Wind and Percussion Division at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, where he is the director of Percussion Studies, as well as assistant director of the award-winning Jazz Studies area. He is active throughout the United States as a performer, clinician, adjudicator, and educator with recent performances in South Africa, Argentina, Uruguay, and at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. Dr. Crowell is also a member of the Percussive Arts Society’s Education Committee.


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SBOUpClose: Mark Stone

On the Beat with Mark Stone:

By Eliahu Sussman Photos by Jose A. Fernandez

A Southern California native, Mark Stone already had his sights set on running his own band program early in his high school career. “I was one of those kids who always had a suggestion about how to do things,” Stone recalls. “Eventually, my high school band director grew a little tired of it. After I made a comment about trying something a certain way, he said, ‘Stone, when you have your own band, you can do it your way. Until then, this is my band and we’ll do it my way.’ That’s when I thought to myself, ‘Okay, I’ll have my own band some day.’” 28

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

The Evolution of the Percussion Activity


“We focus on the kids and we focus on the process.�


Fast-forward to the present, and Mark Stone’s own band program at Ruben Ayala High School in Chino Hills, California is recognized as a powerhouse on the national stage. The reigning Western Band Association grand champion is a five-time Winter Guard International (WGI) world class gold medalist and five-time Bands of America regional champion, among numerous other accolades. Beyond the awards and championships, Ayala High School’s competitive indoor ensembles boast fabulously intricate and complex shows that push the frontier of adjudicated marching, percussion, and guard activities. It wasn’t always like that, though. Stone developed the band program at Ayala from scratch, agreeing to take the job before Ayala High School had even been built, a little over 20 years ago. SBO recently spoke with Mark to learn about his process of developing a program from the ground up, the challenges and rewards of running top-flight percussion ensembles, and the evolution and future of the activity.

30

School Band & Orchestra: When you first agreed to build a program at the new Ayala High School, did you have any idea what it might end up becoming? Mark Stone: Originally, when I came here, I didn’t know what I didn’t know. Luckily, I was starting a new program, so I was able to grow as a director as the program itself grew. I was really fortunate that in my second semester here I picked up a percussion instructor named Ike Jackson. For the past 23 years, he and I have worked together to build this program. He’s always been a great motivator. I’ve always had spring drum lines. Back in the day, we were doing it outdoors, kind of like a miniature field show, and eventually that evolved into the indoor activity. We got involved in WGI in the late ‘90s. Our first WGI championships were in Phoenix in 1998, where we surprisingly made finals. We felt we were successful and that that was a great experience, so we’ve gone back almost every year since. It was a life-changing experience, and a career-changing experience.

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

Ayala Band Program At a Glance Location: 14255 Peyton Drive, Chino Hills, Calif. On the Web: www.ayalapercussion.com Students in Band Program: 250 Students in School: 2,300 Director of Bands: Mark Stone

Recent accomplishments

• Six-time Sothern California Percussion Alliance (SCPA) World Class Gold Medalists • Five-time Winter Guard International (WGI) World Class Gold Medalists (concert and marching) • Eleven-time Western Band Association (WBA) Championship Finalists, current WBA Grand Champion • 2004 Bands of America (BOA) Grand National Championship Finalists • Two-time BOA Grand National Semifinalist • Five-time BOA Regional Champion Scan this code with a smart phone to view the Ayala High School Marching Percussion in action!


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SBO: How did you build the student base and awareness of the new program?

SBO: A life- and career-changing experience? How so? MS: In California, with all due respect to my peers, things were on a different level than in states like Indiana, Texas, or Georgia. A lot of that is from the support standpoint. We have a ton of talent and resolve here in California, but we just don’t get the support that programs in other states get. So when we first left the state and saw what programs from other parts of the country were doing, we realized that we could do those things, too, we just had to figure out how. That’s when we really got started. SBO: What steps did you take from the realization that you could do more to actually making it happen?

MS: We did a few things. We were actually in our own circuit out here. At the time, we felt that it was not sufficiently driving the activity in California. My staff and I, along with three other programs, started our own circuit, the SCPA, the Southern California Percussion Alliance. We brought out WGI judges, so we were able to get top-level input, critique, and commentary at our local shows. We have great instructional staff here in California. It’s almost like our own little cottage community of percussion instructors, and we all work really well together. Even though the programs around here are extremely competitive, all of the instructors are very warm and open to each other. The activity grew. In many ways, California is probably the Mecca of indoor drum lines right now.

MS: We said we had an indoor drumline, and the kids just flocked to it. There are some problems with music education in the concert setting where the percussionists are often overlooked. A band director might spend 40, 50, or 60 percent of the time balancing a brass chord or working on a woodwind technical figure, while the percussionists are just sitting in the back doing very little. But if you tell these kids that they’ve got a competitive activity that they can participate in, they’ll leap at it. Especially when we started going back to WGI and the students were able to participate on the national stage, the kids really do love it. We also have a feeder program, Canyon Hills, our junior high school, which has a very good indoor drumline. That JV team feeds our varsity. Our community, Chino Hills, actually has two high schools – Chino Hills High School and Ayala High School – and both of those indoor drumlines are extremely competitive, and our community really supports it. SBO: Does the success and strength of your indoor program feed into your stage ensembles? MS: It does, to an extent. The indoor percussion program is a beast: either you ride it, or it rides you. Some band directors may be a little afraid of it because it can be a bit of a beast. It takes a lot of support, time, and a lot of equipment. We just have to strike a balance. I have to communicate with my instructors and they have to be on the same page with me. I need to have performers in my symphonic band and my concert band, and they also need the right equipment for those ensembles to be successful, so it is a trade-off.

“The indoor percussion program is a beast: either you ride it, or it rides you.” 32

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012


There have been times in the past when we require our section leaders to be in our top stage ensembles, but right now due to academic pressure, kids just don’t have time in their day to do both activities. I’m usually able to fill my stage ensembles with percussionists who are interested in participating in those programs. Plus, the students who are considering becoming band directors or music majors know that they have to have a well rounded musical experience. There aren’t professional opportunities for number three bass drum, but there are professional opportunities for a timpanist in an orchestra or something like that. SBO: How do you go about setting up your competitive indoor ensembles? MS: It’s really just a continuation of the marching season. We believe that the marching band sets up winter indoor, and that winter indoor sets up marching band. We’re always looking towards the next semester. Generally what we do is move the marching percussion section into the indoor ensemble. There are always going to be some adjustments we have to make. For example, this year we have seven snares and seven cymbals on the field, and we’re not sure we’ll take that many on the indoor ensemble. There are some students that choose not to do second semester, due to the time commitment. Also, due to the travel – sometimes the expense keeps kids out, too, even though that’s something that we work to prevent all the time.

need. It’s a serious commitment. What I’m really proud of is that not only do these kids commit all their time and effort, they’re also extremely academically successful. The average GPA of my group during the peak of the marching season, which is the most difficult time, is usually around 3.5, and that’s without weighted grades. I’ve had valedictorians and salutatorians come out of my program all the time. SBO: How does that schedule work for students who also play sports or have other interests in addition to music? MS: In the marching band and concert bands, I have virtually every athletic team represented. Second semester, that becomes very difficult because of the time constraints. We do have some student athletes who participate in indoor ensembles, but it’s not as common as it is in some of my other ensembles. And that is, by the way, a reason that some percussionists will choose to be in the symphonic band rather than the competitive indoor ensemble. SBO: When did the idea of competitive events first become appealing to you, and how do you use that as an educational tool? MS: I’ve been in the competitive arena with percussion ensembles since I was aware that it was possible. When I came to Don Lugo in 1985, they already had an outdoor winter drumline, and I just continued that. There, I learned to appreciate what it did for the kids and I just always con-

SBO: What are the particular practice demands for your percussion groups? MS: During indoor season, the marching group goes Monday and Wednesday nights, with Wednesday afternoons being sectionals. The concert group goes Monday and Friday afternoons. So a student who does both is probably in rehearsal for about 15 hours a week. SBO: And that’s extracurricular? MS: Yes. That is in addition to a percussion class, which works on all of that material, depending on

tinued it. One of my philosophies is that all of the kids in the program are equal, whether it’s a piccolo player, a snare player, or a trumpet. They’re all important, and I need to make sure that they get the best opportunities they can to reach their potential. The other thing I discovered once we became successful was that it really was the motor that drove the program, in a lot of ways. Due to the success, achievement, and opportunities for the drumline members, we felt that it was important that we also give the marching band the same opportunities, so that’s when we started competing nationally with the marching band. Color guard was right along there with the School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

33


drumline. It’s easier to start along that path with the indoor, because it’s easier to compete. Getting the marching band on the same competitive level as schools like Avon, L.D. Bell, and Broken Arrow is very difficult. Whereas because of the local atmosphere here, we were able to pretty quickly reach a level where we could compete in the percussion ensemble. For the kids, competition is a great motivator. You have to be very careful with it, though. We take competitive arts very seriously here, but we never talk about the competition. We never talk about what other schools are doing with their programs. We focus on the kids and we focus on the process. If we do that, the success will come. The students’ job is to be a performer. My job is to be a competitor. I’ll give them a great opportunity for success, all they have to do is try their best to reach their potential. When the kids know they’re gunning for the top spot or the top-five or whatever the opportunity is, that’s a really great motivating factor. It also gives them the opportunity for the kids to work together as a group, set goals as a group, and evaluate their progress and successes – it gives them life skills. SBO: Sure, as does sharing a stage with and hearing other outstanding musical groups. How have these activities evolved since you’ve been a part of it on the national stage? MS: Color guard had already evolved significantly by the late ‘90s or 2000, but the drumline was still in its infant stage. In the past 10 to 12 years, I like to think that the activity has evolved tremendously. I like to think that we have been a part of the vanguard of evolution. There are other groups involved, also, of course, but we like to think we’re a part of it. SBO: Where do you see the activity going? MS: One development is the use of technology. When we got started, the use of PA systems was very limited. Now it’s not unusual to have complete digital sound systems, along with remote access and remote control. The use of lighting has been changing over the past year, and that’s going to keep changing for a while – I don’t know where it’s going to settle in. We used video monitors in both concert and the marching group. The use of video is going to be very interesting. I’m not sure if it’s going to be an asset or a hindrance, but it will be interesting to watch its evolution. We learned some things about using the video with our concert group last year, and we’re going to utilize it in a different manner this year with the marching group. It’s about bringing in the new technology, learning how to apply it to the program, and using it as efficiently as possible. Some of these non-musical elements can help tell a story. In some ways, our concert group last year acted as a soundtrack to a video. That might not have worked out perfectly, because it may have drawn away from what the students were doing as performers. We just need to be a little smarter about how we utilize this – whether we just use it as a color source, or if we’re going to use it as a visual effect. Other people are using lights in their drums and all kinds of other creative applications. And then there’s the use of the PA system, different synthesizers, and looping. We don’t loop, but we sample. Now we can use songs with words. You can’t record it and it can’t be looped, it has to


be signaled with a sampler, but that’s an entirely new skill and activity that we do really well here in California. That’s just one of the skills that through the camaraderie of our local instructors, they’ve been able to adopt. SBO: Sounds like quite a sophisticated show. MS: The sophistication and investment in time, effort, and design is amaz-

ing. It’s amazing what is done to put 30 kids on the floor for about eight minutes. SBO: It sounds like a great opportunity for your students, but also one that is really challenging to put in place. MS: I think a lot of it is first the decision to do it, and then to have a vision for where you want to go. Obviously, when we started this, we had

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

no idea where we were going to end up. It was just an evolution from year to year where we got better, we got smarter, and we did more. For any new director looking at getting into it, there are a couple of things that it’s going to do for your program. It’s definitely going to build the skill set of your front ensemble. My mallet players are on a level that I never would have imagined before. And the same thing with the battery – but the marching band is already doing a lot of that stuff. We have been really helped by corporate support, sponsorships and so on: implements, heads, and instruments. We’re being sponsored by Tama right now and we’re R&Ding their drums for them. I have many sets of drums right now – I have more than I can use! Some of them are at different stages of development, and some of them we’re not going to use, but just to have all the equipment for the kids to play is great. Also, the students got to interact with the engineers and designers of the drums. The owner of Tama and the engineer of the instrument fly in and talk to the kids and give them a chance to make suggestions on what will make the drum better. Then, when we see the next generation of the drum, the kids suggestions are right there in it. That’s an irreplaceable experience for my students. If I were young and going to start this again, my suggestion would be to start with a concert percussion group. It’s more like what happens in the concert band and requires less investment. You don’t have to have a big floor or props; it’s simply musicians performing music. Bring up the level, and if the marching activity looks attractive, then make a move in that direction. The marching activity is where you need the visual designer and the props, and that’s a whole other portion of the job. SBO: With all of the challenges among public school funding in California, how are you able to afford the staff that it takes to put together such a complex show? MS: There was a day when I ran this program on fundraising. We were always broke and never had everything we needed, but we just did our best.


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In 1996 or so, our district office said, “Hey, why don’t you just charge fees?” So I set about establishing a fee system that went in conjunction with the fundraising. Eventually, the parents just said, “I don’t want to fundraise – I’d rather just write you a check.” That’s when we moved to a system built around donations. In my community, we are not allowed to charge fees, only charitable donations and right now donations are doing fine. Also, when parents donate to our program, there are a lot of matching donations from corporate sources. Because we are a non-profit entity, it’s a tax write-off. So if an employee makes a donation to a non-profit, some employers will match it. That has been a great source of revenue for us.

SBO: Any other thoughts on percussion ensembles and the impact they have on your students and your program? MS: Competitive percussion groups are a viable activity that is great for the kids. At first it’s intimidating. It’s scary to see how good – and how big – the top groups are. But you don’t have to be on that level, say, with five or six marimbas. The students are going to get the same experience whether they’re in first place in World or last place in Scholastic A. The only real difference in the experience between first place and last place is the five minutes during the award ceremony. At any level, students go to rehearsal and work to achieve something with their friends and peers, and they get that opportunity to perform

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

in front of the audience. That’s the important part – it’s not about winning, it’s about competing and performing well. Most states, where appropriate, have an indoor circuit, and if you’re happy there, stay there. And if you start to achieve at the highest level and outgrow that circuit, then try out for a regional competition. You don’t have to start at the top. Start at the bottom, work your way up, and see how it fits into your program. Make sure that your instructors are on board with the idea that it’s all about the full program. Just be careful that the indoor activity doesn’t take over the band program. That can happen, because you get percussion people who are totally focused on their activity. But it’s the band director’s job to make sure that they fit into their niche of the overall program. If you use that focus to enhance the rest of the band program, it’ll be a real help to all of your ensembles.


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Survey: Streaming Video

The Audience

Beyond the Auditorium

T

he people seated in the concert hall or the stands of a football field will always be the primary audience for a musical performance. However, with advances in modern technology, musical events can now reach across the globe, and in real time. From

simple set-ups like video chat or Skype to sophisticated usage of cameras, routers, and other equipment, there is a wide array of possibilities for sharing performances far and wide. Of course, there are challenges with broadcasting video, including equipment, expertise, and the time and effort involved with setting it all up. On top of that, concerns about copyrights are enough to prevent some school groups from making the dive.

For a closer look at how school groups are currently using video and streaming capabilities with their ensembles, this recent SBO survey asked readers to weigh in on this very 21st-century topic. And with almost 80 percent of respondents indicating that they shoot video of their performances, stay tuned, as the nature of this conversation is sure to evolve over the next few years.

Do you make video recordings of your ensembles’ performances?

79%

Yes

No

21%

0-$250

$250-$5

$500-$1, 40

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

Yes

33%


“We make videos of our marching band and audio recordings of our concert bands. Parents are asked to video their child’s section during our shows. I ask for a zoom and wide angle variety to highlight needs for improvements. Each week there is an evening rehearsal inside our stadium that is open to the parents. They learn our concerns in the show and then know where to record. They post to YouTube and send me a link. It works quite well.” Bob Beshears Garland High School Garland,79% Texas Yes “Matters related to confidentiality and privacy keep me Yes 79% from trying this avenue.” No Cheryl Cornish 21% Clancy Scool District Clancy, Mont. No 21% Do you upload those performances to the web?

“Our district does not presently have the infrastructure to support such an endeavor.” Tom Crawford Emily Gray Jr. High Tucson, Ariz. If yes, how expensive was the cost of implementing that capacity/equipment?

$250-$500

$1,000+

67%

Yes videos 21% “We make available – some public for everyone to view and some private for only the band members so that YesYes they can critique their 79%to im21%performance and look for ways prove. This is especially helpful with marching band perfor79% No mances because the view (movement/drill) is so important from an audience’s standpoint.” No 21% Jan 79%Hare No Delphos St. John’s High School Delphos, Ohio I don’t worry about it

“I don’t want to deal with any of the copyright issues. The 24% I don’t worry about it Web has made many things for us in music very easy, but I Yes 33% worry about the effect it has on abuse of the copyright laws.” I make sure I24% have all the licenses Kurt Stalmann 14% Santana High School I make sure I have all the licenses Santee, Calif. 67% No I don’t 14% load performances online because of this issue Assuming you want to, do you have the ability and capaI don’t load performances online this issue 62% bility to stream performances live,because in realoftime?

Yes

21%

No

I don’t worry about it

4%

4% 18%

$1,000+ 18% What are the biggest challenges associated with streaming video online?

67%

No

15%

$500-$1,000

33%

No

15%

$250-$500

$500-$1,000 Yes

63%

0-$250

33%

Yes

63%

0-$250

62%

79%

“Without paying fees, the advertisements on the streaming site are not always appropriate for families with young children, or any children for that matter. Sound is a challenge – streaming through the laptop doesn’t allow me to mix the 0-$250 63% concert prior to the performance. I also need someone who can run the equipment or I just leave it streaming through the whole concert, shifting bands around, preconcert stuff, and so on. It can be pretty boring viewing that way, but it can be $250-$500 15% edited after the fact if someone wants to see archived copies.” Steve Stenzel Lake Zurich Middle School North Lake Zurich, Ill. $500-$1,000 4% “Acquiring the laptop, camera, and cables was our biggest challenge (to our budget). Once obtained, it was very easy!” Peter Crosta $1,000+ 18% Orange Township Public Schools Orange, N.J. “Having a person on the camera/computer who is very comfortable with the technology involved.” Brad Thew Viroqua MS/HS Viroqua, Wis. “Making sure there are adequate broadband speeds on both ends, and sound quality.” Andrew Vickers Central Middle School DeWitt, Iowa School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

41


79%

No

For those that stream live or keep past performances online, how do you approach the issue of copyright? I don’t worry about it

24% I make sure I have all the licenses

14%

Additional comments

I don’t load performances online because of this issue

62%

“I’m not sure about copyright laws. Everyone that I have asked seems to have a different interpretation of them.” Jeff Ehardt North Branch Area Schools North Branch, Mich.

Quality Instruments

“I share privately with parents and students. We are not benefiting financialy from these videos – educational purposes only” Tom Cook Fort Atkinson High School Fort Atkinson, Wis.

42

“We work very hard to make sure we have secured copyright permission. I suspect some slip through without copyright approval, but most are approved. If we know we have selections that are not approved, we typically do not post them on the web.” Don Reddick Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais, Ill.

That Your School and Students Can Afford

“We are in the beginning of a new era of sharing information that can literally take place in the palm of your hand. The music ed world needs to be current. I don’t make money by posting my videos; it just provides publicity for the composer and pride for my students.” Russell Kahle McPherson Middle School McPherson, Kan. “I don’t care for this medium and will likely not ever use streaming video.” Charles Whitmer Lincoln Jr. High School Coldspring, Texas

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

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Technology: Instructional Resources

Resources to Assist Instruction and Creativity by John Kuzmich

W

hat is a master teacher, and what does it take to become one? While precise definitions vary, master teachers are leaders who have perfected the management of their class-

rooms and found ways to accelerate learning for all their students. Their expertise comes in recognizing that the educational process involves more than sharing content: it’s about creating independent learners who have the critical thinking skills to grow and thrive. I’ve met many of these teachers in my clinics over the years. I find they are, themselves, life-long learners searching for new and better ways to reach and teach. These educators are embracing technology in increasing numbers, not afraid to adapt it to their needs and situations. Professional development tools, such as those found at www.ti-me.org, are designed to give educators the resources they need to excel through courseware that covers the gamut of music software applications. These following three landmark books vividly illustrate how technology can be used to further develop teaching skills and student output.

Using Technology To Unlock Musical Creativity Scott Watson is the author of Using Technology To Unlock Musical Creativity: A Comprehensive Approach for Music Educators (Oxford University Press). His teaching style builds on traditional, face-to-face, K-12 and university formats, while incorporating technology through student projects. Scott has an extraordinary track record of teaching AP Music Theory courses. For the past eight years, 90 percent of his students received college credit, an unparalleled statistic for AP tests. His book is a game-changer that nurtures and develops students’ potential for music expression and offers project-oriented instruction covering composition, improvisation, arranging, and producing music and musicrelated projects. I particularly like how Scott offers a variety of practical ideas for 44

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012


technology-based creative music activities, locating lesson plans and resources, and assessing creative work with a variety of music teaching ideas. There are detailed plans for incorporating the concepts that link to NAfME National Standards, with adaptations for grade level and technology proficiency. Outstanding are the activities designed especially for novice users with free or low-cost music applications. Scott’s book offers fresh ways to use the technology tools that many educators already have. The creative projects he presents are both flexible and adaptable depending on grade level, available technology, and the teacher’s and students’ experience, comfort, and confidence with technology. The only prerequisite is nominal familiarity with a personal computer, but no specialized software or hardware knowledge is required. The strength of Scott’s text is how it is structured on a set of eight principles that successfully draw out student creativity.

music students of all backgrounds. A companion website has been created to further supplement the book. Visit www.oup.com/us/musicalcreativity to find links to the major web resources mentioned in the text, files to support various lesson plans, and sound and movie clip examples of most of the projects described in the book, as created by actual students. The diverse lesson plans in the second part of the book cover topics such

as creativity with keyboards, sound recording apps, multi-track music production, computer music notation, and instructional software with curriculum integration. For instance, in the chapter on computer music notation (programs like Finale, Sibelius, and Noteflight), Scott shares a lesson called “Pedal Point Duet,” in which students employ a simple pedal point in the lower part of a brief duet for two like instruments. The upper part follows

1. Allow students to share themselves. 2. Offer compelling examples to imitate and inspire. 3. Employ parameters and limitations that remove distractions and help students focus. 4. Remove parameters and limitations that stifle creativity and lead to contrived expression. 5. Facilitate improvisation. 6. Engage in coaching interaction. 7. Foster opportunities for feedback and critique. 8. Employ performance and recital. These concepts are especially impressive because they are supported by emerging research on creativity; they also represent cutting-edge instruction. Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity is divided into two parts. Part one is based on educational philosophy and a methodical pedagogical style. Part two deals with demonstrating practical ways that today’s music technology can be a dynamic aid in unlocking the authentic musical creativity inside every student. There are nearly 30 detailed lesson plan examples to show how technology can be a vital key to unlocking creativity from within School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

45


some parameters such as beginning and ending on the first scale degree and following a musical contour. Teacher coaching – easy to do because of the technology – facilitates the inclusion of good writing using repletion and phrasing in the duet. For this or any activity, teachers can coach students as they work on laptops, iPads, in a computer lab, or at a small cluster of computers in the back of a room. Coaching and peer feedback may also be facilitated by projecting student work on a screen or interactive whiteboard. “The ‘rules’ or parameters help focus the creative energy of this activity and pretty much guarantee that students will create a musically satisfying result,” says Scott. Another of his principles, employing performance or recital at the conclusion of a creative activity, could include informally going around the room having students share their work or works-in-progress, posting student products on a class website or wiki, screening a movie of student work along with popcorn and soda, or something more formal like staging a concert or recital for other classes, administrators, and/or parents. An example of this is the CD his Music Production class produces each fall, which includes student-produced

winter/holiday tracks and is sold to the school community to raise money for a student-selected charity. Last year, they raised $2,500 for a local homeless shelter.

Music Arranging & Composition Rarely do composition and arranging books bridge the gap between technique and creativity. But in Jazz Composition and Arranging in the Digital Age, authors Richard Sussman and Michael Abene do so in a dynamic way, helping students and teachers use Sibelius and Finale to engage in composition. What distinguishes this book is that the material is presented with the idea of doing much of the creative work using notation software. This book is organized in three sections. The five chapters in the first section provide an overview of the content being presented, as well as basic information covering the book’s philosophical, aesthetic, and musical considerations. Section two is made up of 13 chapters on writing for a small jazz

ensemble of three to six horns plus a rhythm section. Most chapters contain musical examples, many of which are available as audio recordings and/or software files on the companion website. Most chapters end with music exercises and software tips illustrating the application of music notation software to the topic at hand. This section is designed to also be used as a semesterlong syllabus. The 15 chapters of section three concentrate on writing for a large jazz ensemble with eight brass, five reeds and a rhythm section. Chapter formats are similar to that of section two with many musical examples, audio recordings, and software files on the companion website, located at www. oup.com. Most chapters end with musical exercises and software tips illustrating the application of music notation software. The publication’s extensive companion website provides listening examples for each chapter as well as enhanced software tips, appendices of basic principles and an expanded recommended listening list. This site has a wealth of resources containing information and musical examples integral to understanding the material in the book.

Literacy, Music & Technology Connection Zig Wajler is the author of Literacy, Music & Technology Connection, released by Alfred Music Publishing. Zig is a dynamic teacher who inspires his students to surpass all expectations in generating music accomplishments. The engaging lessons in this book focus on real-world applications and create a positive learning environment for students and teach46

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012


ers. This results in an exciting, positive learning experience. The lessons tie together lyrics, music, and technology as learning tools in student-driven activities. Zig offers opportunities for students to create, compose, record, and produce original songs. This book is straightforward and easy to use, no matter your technology backgrounds. The CD loop library and associated lessons are designed to guide K-12 students through the composition process. The nucleus of each lesson is organized with the T.P.A.P concept: Think, Plan, Assemble, and Produce. The Think and Plan word lessons are designed as Language Arts tools. The Assemble lessons integrate loop-based music software with music and lyrics. The Produce lessons are designed to arrange music and to prepare the students to record their voices. The software is formatted to play on a standard CD player but can be played via a computer’s media player, such as Windows Media Player or Quick Time. I like the cookbook approach of getting students engaged in music first before providing a formal curriculum. The lesson plans provided in each chapter are outstanding. Zig explains, “I design the majority of my lesson plans by listening to student suggestions. The key here is to be an ‘active listener.’ I find this is an excellent teacher-to-student tool when reinforcing the art of listening, which lends itself directly to effective communication. The students seem to be aware of the end result of the projects we create in the classroom, such as contemporary songs, skits, adaptations of plays, not to mention all the different forms of writing (expressive, persuasive, reflective, literary, and poetry). This is one way students can make a connection outside the classroom, and somehow relate to textbook learning, not only in the music or technology class, but across the curriculum.”

cators who have been shy to incorporate technology. They are all uniquely different, offering proven strategies that incorporate technology in daily instruction. Yet, they all show ways to use technology tools to engage students in authentic creative musical experiences that heighten musical/aesthetic understanding. For samples and examples, be sure to visit the supplemental website to this article, online at: www. kuzmich3.com/SBO112012.html.

Dr. John Kuzmich Jr. is a veteran music educator, jazz educator and music technologist with more than 41 years of public school teaching experience. He is a TI:ME-certified training instructor and has a Ph.D. in comprehensive musicianship. As a freelance author, Dr. Kuzmich has more than 400 articles and five text books published. As a clinician, Dr. Kuzmich frequently participates in workshops throughout the U.S., Europe, Australia, and South America. For more information, visit www.kuzmich.com.

Closing Comments We are fortunate that these master teachers have made the effort to share their successful approaches. These texts are great resources for any eduSchool Band and Orchestra • November 2012

47


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cians, including Mike Roylance, tubist for the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Williams has been an educator for nearly three decades, teaching at the junior high, high school, and college levels. He recently retired from his position as director of bands at Boca Ciega High School in St. Petersburg, Florida, where his jazz ensembles consistently received superior ratings throughout his tenure. Mr. Williams has also been involved in the drum corps and marching band arena for over 20 years. He is the former Brass Caption Head for the world champion The Cadets drum and bugle corps; Suncoast Sound drum and bugle corps; and Magic drum and bugle corps; and is presently a brass consultant for the Glassmen drum and bugle corps.



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Afro-Peruvian Percussion Ensemble: From the Cajon to the Drum Set from Sher Music Afro-Peruvian Percussion Ensemble is designed to be useful for any level of musician – beginning to advanced. The book contains music charts with the specific rhythms played by the cajon, congas, cowbell, bongos, cajita and quijada – as well as bass and guitar parts – for major styles of Afro-Peruvian and Creole music. The various rhythms are also shown being adapted to the drum set, with and without other percussion instruments playing. Readers will encounter a valuable history of the development of Afro-Peruvian mu48

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012


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Tuba virtuoso Harvey Phillips tells the story in this autobiography of his life and career from his Missouri childhood through his days as the performer with the King Brothers and the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circuses and his training at the Juilliard School. Phillips was distinguished professor of music emeritus at Indiana University Bloomington and was world renowned as a tuba soloist and brass quintet member. Phillips was a founder of the New York Brass Quintet and served as vice president of the New England Conservatory of Music and became Professor of Music at Indiana University. The creator of an industry of TubaChristmases, Octubafests, and TubaSantas, he crusaded for recognition of the tuba as a serious musical instrument, commissioning more than 200 works. Mr. Tuba conveys Phillips’s playful zest for life while documenting his


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important musical legacy, including an extensive gallery of photographs and a forward by Indiana University’s David Baker.

PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT

1. Publication Title: School Band and Orchestra. 2. Publication No.: 0019-072. 3. Filing Date 10/1/12. 4. Issue Frequency: Monthly. 5. No. of Issues Published Annually: 12. 6. Annual Subscription Price: $24. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: School Band and Orchestra, 21 Highland Circle, Ste. 1, Needham, Norfolk, MA 02494. 8. Complete Mailing Address of the Headquarters or General Business Office of the Publisher: (Same as #7). 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Richard E. Kessel, 21 Highland Circle, Ste. 1, Needham, MA 02494; Editor: Eliahu Sussman, 21 Highland Circle, Ste. 1, Needham, MA 02494; Managing Editor: None. 10. Owner (If owned by a corporation, its name and address must be stated and also immediately thereafter the names and addresses of stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of stock): Zapis Capital Group, LLC; Leon Zapis, 26202 Detroit Rd. Ste. 300, Westlake, OH 44145; Richard Bongorno, 26202 Detroit Rd. Ste. 300, Westlake, OH 44145; Maria Wymer, 26202 Detroit Rd. Ste. 300, Westlake, OH 44145; Donna Thomas, 26202 Detroit Rd. Ste. 300, Westlake, OH 44145; Renee Seybert, 26202 Detroit Rd. Ste. 300, Westlake, OH 44145. . 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: None. 12. (For Nonprofit Organizations - Does Not Apply) 13. Publication Name: School Band and Orchestra. 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: October 2012. 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation. Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months/ Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: a. Total No. Copies : 14,493/14,280 b. Legitimate paid and/or requested distribution: (1) Paid/ Requested Outside-County Mail Subscriptions:. 9,998/10,036 (2) Paid/Requested In-County Subscriptions:.0/0 (3) Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, and counter sales:.0/0 (4) Requested copies distributed by other USPS mail classes:.0/0 c. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation:. 9,998/10,036 d. Nonrequested distribution: (1). Outside county nonrequested copies:.4,185/4,084 (2) In County nonrequested copies:. 0/0 (3) Nonrequested copies distributed through other USPS mail classes:0/0 (4). Nonrequested copies distributed outside the mail: 142/0 e. Total nonrequested distribution:. 4,327/4,084 f. Total Distribution:14,325/14,120 g. Copies not distributed:168/160 h. Total: 14,493/14,280 i: Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 69%/71% 16. This Statement of Ownership will be printed in the November 2012 issue of this publication. 17. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions and/or civil sanctions. Richard E. Kessel, Publisher

School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

51


now on the iPad /PWFNCFSt

On the Beat with Mark Stone:

The Evolution of the Percussion Activity Health: Minimizing the Risk of Noise Exposure Survey: Streaming Video – Beyond the Auditorium

Survey: Streaming Video

The Audience

Beyond the Auditorium

T

he people seated in the concert hall or the stands of a football ďŹ eld will always be the primary audience for a musical performance. However, with advances in modern technology, musical events can now reach across the globe, and in real time. From

simple set-ups like video chat or Skype to sophisticated usage of cameras, routers, and other equipment, there is a wide array of possibilities for sharing performances far and wide. Of course, there are challenges with broadcasting video, including equipment, expertise, and the time and effort involved with setting it all up. On top of that, concerns about copyrights are enough to prevent some school groups from making the dive.

For a closer look at how school groups are currently using video and streaming capabilities with their ensembles, this recent SBO survey asked readers to weigh in on this very 21st-century topic. And with almost 80 percent of respondents indicating that they shoot video of their performances, stay tuned, as the nature of this conversation is sure to evolve over the next few years.

Do you make video recordings of your ensembles’ performances?

79%

Yes

No

21%

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Teaching Tonal Bass Drum “When teaching the bass drum section split parts, I noticed that the written part is often based on the dotted-quarter note. Within a onemeasure frame, have the students play three exercises based on the dotter-quarter note: a) 1 – 2+ – 4 b) 1+ – 3 – 4+ c) 2 – 3+ – 1(of the next measure). In essence, each exercise is permeated by an eighth note. Play these exercises unison until the students are comfortable with them. After that, assign (a) to bass drum 1, (b) to bass drum 2, (c) to bass drum 3, and (a) to bass drum 4. Continue in this sequence if you have more than four bass drummers. This also works well for sections that only have three bass drummers.” William K. Ricketts Southside High School School San Antonio, Texas Submit your PLAYING TIP online at www.sbomagazine.com or e-mail it to editor Eliahu Sussman at esussman@symphonypublishing.com. Winning entries will be published in School Band and Orchestra Magazine and contributor will receive a prize gift compliments of EPN Travel Services, Inc.

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Your Music. Your Education. Your Opus. Symphony Publishing | 21 Highland Circle, Suite 1 | Needham, MA 02494 | (781) 453-9310 | FAX (781) 453-9389 | 1-800-964-5150 School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

53


Classifieds Arrangements

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shemingway@symphonypublishing.com School Band and Orchestra • November 2012 55


Ad Index

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COMPANY NAME

E-MAIL/WEB ADDRESS

Air Turn

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26

Antigua Winds, Inc.

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38

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Bob Rogers Travel

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46

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EPN Travel Services

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Fiesta-Val Music Festivals

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Four Winds Travel & Tour

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Good For The Goose

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50

Hunter Music Instrument Inc.

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42

J.J. Babbitt

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Legere Reeds ltd.

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MakeMusic, Inc

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Meredith Music Publications

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National Educational Music Co.

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Northeastern Music Publication

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50

Pearl Corp.

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Performing Arts Consultants

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Peterson Strobe Tuners

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Sabian Ltd.

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Smart Chart Music

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Super-Sensitive Musical String Co.

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Vic Firth Company

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Woodwind & Brasswind

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Avedis Zildjian Co.

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School Band and Orchestra • November 2012

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5 cov4

8

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Networking the Jazz Arts Community ‌

‌ Local to Global! ATTEND OUR

4TH ANNUAL JAN 2–5, 2013 CONFERENCE ATLANTA, GA Evening Concert Artist Lineup Wednesday 1/2 $MBSL"UMBOUB6OJWFSTJUZ+B[[0SDIFTUSBt&NPSZ'BDVMUZ+B[[2VJOUFUt̓ 'SFEEJF$PMF2VBSUFUt3VGVT3FJET2VJFU1SJEF Thursday 1/3 #PPLFS58BTIJOHUPO)417"+B[[$PNCP*t$ISJTUJBO)PXFT(SPVQt #SJB4LPOCFSH&OTFNCMFt,SJT#FSH5IF.FUSPQMFYJUZ#JH#BOEXJUI $ISJT7BEBMB 8BZOF#FSHFSPO $MBZ+FOLJOT Friday 1/4 $FOUSBM8BTIJOHUPO6OJWFSTJUZ7+&t̓5IF6OJWFSTJUZPG.BOJUPCB/PSUIFSO "MUFSOBUJWF+B[['BDVMUZ&OTFNCMFt̓#FSLMFF(MPCBM+B[[*OTUJUVUFXJUI +PIO1BUJUVDDJt̓"SNZ#MVFTXJUI8ZDMJòF(PSEPO Saturday 1/5 ,PCJF8BULJOT(SPVQXJUI#PCCZ#SPPNt̓6/5+B[[4JOHFSTt̓,BSBDIBDIB XJUI.BFTUSP'SFEEZi)VFWJUPw-PWBUPOt6OJWFSTJUZPG.JBNJ'SPTU $PODFSU+B[[#BOEXJUI%BWF-JFCNBO

Become a member and register for the conference today at

JazzEdNet.org


Profile for SBO School Band & Orchestra

School Band and Orchestra November 2012  

The November issue of SBO magazine,

School Band and Orchestra November 2012  

The November issue of SBO magazine,

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