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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011–2016


Contents 1.0 Executive Summary

2

2.0 Introduction to the Action Plan

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3.0 Policy Context

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4.0 Cycle Provision and Routes

25

5.0 Cycle Theft and Security

50

6.0 Workplace Travel Planning 59 and Behaviour Change 7.0 Funding

68

8.0 Evaluating the Action Plan

72

9.0 Delivery Plan

74

10.0 Appendices

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011–2016

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

1.0

Executive Summary

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Executive summary The South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan is a cross-cutting, thematic report addressing a wide range of cycling related topics at a neighbourhood level. Commissioned by the London Borough of Lambeth and funded via London Eye Section 106, the development of the Action Plan was directed by a steering group constituted from landowners, statutory providers and industry representatives. The steering group was chaired by the National Theatre. Data collection and consultation were extensive, involving web surveys, one-to-one interviews, presentations and field research. The following exercises were undertaken: • Review of existing research materials and reports • Audit of cycle parking provision including security, usage and design • Cycle flow counts along cycle routes • Online attitudinal surveys for cyclists and non-cyclists • Presentations and debates at the South Bank Forum, South Bank Partnership, and Visitor Management Group • Metropolitan Police analysis of crime statistics with crime prevention recommendations • Study of large businesses approach to workplace travel planning • Case study of St Thomas’ Hospital’s cycling environment • Analysis of the funding climate with a view to implementing recommendations This work has contributed to an understanding of the cycling environment across a variety of themes.

Cycle routes are in need of some improvement, with maintenance levels and signage on National Cycle Route 4 along Belvedere Road and Upper Ground particularly commented upon. A programme of cycle training is proposed which must be extended to drivers of vehicles and cyclists, encouraging empathetic driving as well as confidence among cyclists. Consultation on a 20mph speed limit is proposed for particular areas. Cyclists are found to be underprovided for in terms of parking provision in certain areas, such as Waterloo Station, Upper Ground and Belvedere Road, where demand outstrips cycle stands. Provision principally takes the form of ‘Sheffield’ stands which are adequate but not optimal in terms of security or street furniture design. There are a total of 906 publicly accessible cycle parking spaces in the area, with a further 474 planned. The area suffers from particularly pronounced levels of cycle theft, and there is some debate as to whether this reflects a basic correlation between high numbers of available cycles and high thefts, or whether it also reflects a lack of resource for cycle crime prevention and detection. Resources for tackling cycle crime tend to be allocated on a sporadic basis and there is some suggestion that dedicated resources might help achieve a sustained decrease in crime figures. Police engage in intelligence-led patrolling to apprehend cycle thieves, who are in general terms described as professional and organised. Police have been variably successful, and arrests can mean the recovery of large numbers of cycles. However, sentences for cycle thieves are relatively lenient, and often served within the community. For this reason, court injunctions and Anti Social Behaviour Orders served on convicted cycle thieves might be considered as part of the toolkit to combat this crime.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Executive Summary

The discussion surrounding the issue of cycling on the River Walk remains controversial. Opinions volunteered are fairly evenly divided between local residents and their representatives who wish to see cycling on the riverside prohibited and London-wide cyclists who wish to see it permitted. The River Walk is not a designated cycle route and private landowners in the study area recommend that a no cycling rule in this location be enforced. The London Borough of Lambeth tested methods of enforcement on the Albert Embankment section between Westminster and Lambeth Bridges, for which the Council is responsible, and concluded that while dangerous or anti-social cycling should not be permitted, the focus should be directed towards improving the official cycle route on the streets parallel to the river.

The report’s findings and recommendations were ratified by the steering group, and the recommendations are summarised below. Relatively limited funding is available to implement the recommendations. Identified funding includes Section 106 from new developments, Transport for London (TfL) Local Implementation Plan (LIP) funding for Borough spending, Mayoral funding for local improvements to facilities in the vicinity of Barclays Cycle Superhighways, Department for Transport (DfT) funding, and private investment towards revenue earning initiatives such as charged, secure cycle parking.

Of the large businesses in the area that participated in the business study, many were aware of the benefits of workplace travel planning, and actively encouraged staff to travel to work sustainably. A neighbouring Business Improvement District has made progress in developing a ‘master travel plan’ which might be considered an appropriate model for the South Bank. Amongst other elements, the plan includes initiatives which encourage cycling, such as workplace showers, free cycle maintenance sessions, discounted locks, and secure cycle parking. There has been a high level of take-up of the Barclays Cycle Hire scheme. The study area hosts eleven cycle stations, holding 258 cycles, including the schemes’ busiest docking stations London-wide. Some businesses include hire cycles in their travel plans, encouraging staff to make use of them to travel between sites.

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Executive Summary

Recommendations1 Cycle provision and routes Route enhancements 1

Make major capital improvements to National Cycle Route 4 at Upper Ground and Belvedere Road including repair of surfaces and relaying of raised tables

2 Improvements to private section of Belvedere Road via Section 106 agreement 3

Improvements to cycling provision on both sides of Westminster Bridge Road at the junctions with Belvedere Road and Addington Street

4

Ongoing improvements to condition of cycle routes in wider area including repainting road markings, improved signage and Advanced Stop Lines, with full review to be carried out in 2011

5

Increased ongoing monitoring of cycle routes by highways inspectors according to developed guidelines on cycle route maintenance standards

6 Statutory consultation on 20mph speed limit on Upper Ground and Belvedere Road

River Walk policy 1

Private landowners Southbank Centre and Coin street Community Builders to support police and private security enforcement of a no cycling rule on the river walk between Oxo Tower Wharf and London Eye.

2 Support to encourage cyclists to use designated routes away from the River Walk. 3 Capital improvements to parallel route, National Cycle Route 4, to improve safety.

Parking provision 1 Increased parking provision to service:

– Upper Ground and Belvedere Road – Waterloo Station – Waterloo Road – Lower Marsh

2

Promote agreed designs for cycle racks and establish this as an addendum to the Action Plan, relevant planning documentation, and the South Bank Streetscapes Design Guide

3 Ensure suitable levels of parking provision as recommended in London Plan for all new developments 4

Work with Network Rail, Lambeth, regional bodies and government agencies to implement a secure cycle park or ‘active travel centre’ at Waterloo Station Work with local business groups such as Waterloo Quarter BID to ensure SMEs are aware of funding opportunities for cycle parking provision Seek to utilise carriageway space (including parking bays) rather than footways to meet demand for more cycle parking, where possible.

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Improvement scheme in Cornwall Road, at junction with The Cut, to decrease pedestrian/cyclist route conflict Promotion of existing online reporting mechanism for cyclists to report road maintenance issues

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Special consideration given to working with partners to ensure cycle lanes on bridges are kept clear, particularly from illegal traders

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1 Subject to identified funding

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Executive Summary

Cycle theft and security

Workplace travel planning

Crime prevention initiatives 1 MPS and Local Authority bike marking/registration days in central areas and at major employers

1 Develop coordinated approach to travel planning in study area and in consultation with neighbouring districts

2 Work with police and retailers to undertake bike marking and registration at point of sale

2

Arrange bespoke travel planning advice from TfL Business Engagement Team, including itemised capital measures listed for each business and a package of incentives for employees

6 Improved lighting at cycle stands

3

Encourage employers to sign the Department for Transport’s Cycle to Work Guarantee, committing them to providing minimum standards for cycling employees:

7 ‘Secure by design’ bike racks agreed and rolling programme of replacement where funding becomes available

– Secure, safe and accessible bike parking facilities for all staff who request them

8 Education on secure locking techniques in partnership with MPS

– High quality changing and locker facilities for all staff who request them

9 Anti Social Behaviour Orders and injunctions served on repeat offenders

– Offset the cost of cycling equipment through the tax savings of the ‘Cycle to Work’ scheme

Crime detection

– Bike repair available for cyclists on or near site

3 Lock discount scheme at workplaces 4 CCTV, recorded and monitored 5 Advice to public about reporting suspected bike thieves

1 Increased patrolling by police and security staff (also to act as a deterrent) 2 Increased CCTV surveillance of cycle racks

Secure parking 1 Secure cycle parking at Waterloo Station 2 Environmental audit to research factors such as lighting and CCTV 3 Pool bikes at large employers and at Waterloo Station

– An implementation plan including targets for take-up, training and incentives to cycle 4 Launch a local inter-organisational ‘London Cycle Challenge’ competition in summer 2012 5

4 Employers to encourage purchase of folding bikes for internal storage 5 Encourage use of Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme through travel plans

6

Encourage the formation of employee Bicycle Users Groups (BUGs) by disseminating best practice, template terms of reference etc


Executive Summary

“ It would be nice to see considerate cycling actively encouraged in this area” Survey respondent

Behaviour change

Other initiatives

Cycling and driving behaviour

1 Form an active travel group with local stakeholders to act as a delivery body for the Action Plan

1

Large employers and local authority to offer “JAUPT” training for drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGV’s), coaches and fleet vehicles to become cycle aware, with programme to be made available to all drivers, cost permitting

2

Cycle confidence training for employees and local people – companies with pool bikes encouraged to provide training to staff

3 Police and local authority advice operations on the River Walk 4

2

Collaborate with neighbouring partners on appropriate initiatives in the plan to achieve greater bargaining power with funders and for strategic consistency

3 Work to be undertaken to ensure local supply chain where practical 4 Supporting local employment e.g. – Local bike repair pick up service

Sustained enforcement of traffic laws to protect cyclists and pedestrians – including stopping cycling on pavements, issuing tickets for parking in bus/cycle lanes and illegal use of Advanced Stop Lines

Cycle security/correct bike locking practices 1 Police/Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) onsite advice 2 Leafleting 3 Etching/labels on bike racks 4 Labels attached to bikes rating lock/locking technique 5 Bike registration days 6 Talks to students at King’s College London Freshers’ Week

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– Homelessness bike repair project


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

2.0

Introduction to the Cycling Action Plan

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Introduction to the Cycling Action Plan The South Bank Cycling Action Plan is intended to support and inform the operations of the following:

The reasons for the group’s decision to fund the Action Plan and the policy areas it will cover are set out below.

• London Borough of Lambeth

The rationale for a neighbourhood cycle Action Plan The opening of the London Eye in 2000 and the continued success of the South Bank over the last ten years has contributed to an increase in annual visitorship to the South Bank from 3m to approximately 22m. This increase has encouraged, inter alia:

• Metropolitan Police • British Transport Police • Mayor of London/Transport for London • Large employers The scope of the Action Plan is broad in a policy context but focused geographically. It addresses a range of cross-cutting themes applied to the South Bank and Waterloo neighbourhood, including crime and community safety, sustainability, health and wellbeing, and public realm.

• An increased use of all modes of transport, and increased traffic congestion

The intention is to understand cycling within the wider context, in an effort to rationalise provision, where appropriate, along the themes outlined above.

The South Bank Partnership and London Borough of Lambeth seek to address the effect of this in the work outlined below. Each theme impacts in a different way on cycling activity.

The report and its recommendations therefore constitute an area Action Plan for cycling in the South Bank and Waterloo.

• A rise in particular types of crime and disorder • Pressures on the maintenance of the public realm

Background The South Bank Partnership is a crossborough, cross-party organisation, bringing together elected representatives, statutory organisations, and major local public and private sector stakeholders. Through its Visitor Management sub-group, chaired by the London Borough of Lambeth, this document was commissioned. The paper was funded via London Eye Section 106, which seeks to mitigate the impact of the London Eye development2.

2 The nature of the funding restricts the topical and geographical scope of the Action Plan, and it is suggested that local community groups contribute focus to the policy areas not covered herein. These might include programmes of education for school children, storage for cycles in housing estates, and other issues as identified in consultation with local residents.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Introduction to the Plan

On a larger scale, the Waterloo Station redevelopment, when delivered, will greatly improve the transport interchange at Waterloo, as will the planned development of Waterloo Square and the adjacent Elizabeth House. Other major capital schemes including King’s Plaza, Jubilee Gardens, The Cut, and the Lower Marsh Regeneration Schemes, are all currently at different stages of development, from design to completion. Other planning documents, including Lambeth Council’s Waterloo Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) and Unitary Development Plan (UDP), and the Mayor’s Transport Strategy, include guidance on providing facilities for cyclists and pedestrians, in new developments and existing publicly accessible environments.

Transport planning and modal integration The formulation of a cycle Action Plan considering routes, parking provision and sustainability is a key delivery component in the ambition to join up and manage the development of transport modes in the area. A number of projects, set out in Lambeth’s Local Implementation Plan (LIP) have already been delivered which attempt to reduce car use and congestion and rationalise transport modes, encouraging sustainable travel wherever possible.

Crime and disorder The South Bank Partnership and Lambeth Council’s Community Safety Divisions have formed strategic links with the Metropolitan Police and British Transport Police to address crime concerns. These include the central management of CCTV, the reduction of alcohol related disorder, antisocial behaviour, and petty crime. One such concern, reflected in various strategic documents is the enduring problem of cycle theft, and the Action Plan recommends a series of cohesive approaches to address the problem.

For instance, in 1997 streetscape improvements such as the Spine Route scheme on Upper Ground and Belvedere Road were implemented which encouraged walking, and this has since been enhanced through local branding and wayfinding schemes like the Legible London wayfinding pilot (see Fig 1 above). The Spine Route scheme is now in need of major refurbishment, particularly to ensure that as a cycle route it is in a suitable condition for commuter cycling. The LIP also contains plans to increase cycle parking and improve cycle routes.

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Fig 1 Legible London Signage


Introduction to the Plan

Local environmental quality Along with the above areas of operation, the South Bank Partnership, businesses and the Borough collaborate to deliver services on both public and private estate. Such services are designed to be flexible in order to address a wide range of concerns about the public realm, including litter, graffiti and street works. Bikes in some form are currently used to provide mobile tourist information, maintenance and cleaning services in the South Bank. Under the local environmental quality theme, the issues of cycle parking, street clutter and abandoned cycles are considered in the Action Plan. In addition to the direct interface between the activity of cycling and the public realm, the Action Plan addresses some of the less tangible aspects of the liveability agenda, including consideration of the health and wellbeing of local people, and issues surrounding environmental sustainability. These are discussed in section 4 on workplace travel planning. The Partnership, the boroughs and the Mayor also seek to reduce air and noise pollution, both for the health of local people and for the purposes of increasing general local environmental quality.

Local economy The drive to improve facilities for cyclists reflects the Borough and the South Bank Partnership’s commitment to encourage the development of the local economy. This is detailed in the Lambeth Economic Development Strategy and the Partnership’s manifesto ‘Under Pressure and on the Edge’. It is cyclists rather than car or bus users who are more likely to use shops along their route on impulse, since opportunities to stop are not readily available to users of other transport modes. Increased and appropriate provision therefore encourages local spend and forms a key driver for measures such as this Action Plan which encourage take up of cycling.

Health and social inclusion Local commitment to health, social inclusion and accessibility is a strategic priority and the encouragement of sustainable and cost effective modes of transport such as cycling and walking are readily undertaken by South Bank organisations to reinforce opportunities for access to the South Bank for all. Cycling is encouraged for its mental and physical health benefits. Improvement in the health of citizens reduces social isolation.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Introduction to the Plan

Scope

2 Cycle routes • What cycling policies (local, regional and national) currently exist which impact on the study area?

Given the above policy areas, preliminary discussion on the scope of the Action Plan suggested the following detailed areas of study:

• Are the cycle routes in the area appropriate and in a good condition?

1 Cycle parking provision • Are there enough places to park bikes on the South Bank?

• How many collisions involving cyclists are occurring over a given period in the study area?

• Is existing parking provision in the right place?

• Is it possible to reduce the number or likelihood of collisions involving cyclists?

• How will the Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme impact on the South Bank in terms of:

Is there a need for more cycle parking, and if so, what principles should be used to determine locations for new cycle parking?

• What should be the design principles for cycle parking: – To reduce theft? – In adherence with the agreed streetscapes design guidance? – To ensure robustness, longevity, maintainability and replaceability? – To reduce clutter? • Should there be an attempt to encourage cyclists to park in particular places rather than others, and based on what principles? Does the placement of cycle parking provision affect business or economic competitiveness? • What cycle provision is being planned and how is it being funded?

– Street clutter? – Ease of movement for pedestrians and road users? – Safety?

3 Crime prevention • What are the levels and types (e.g. snatch of bag from thief on cycle, cycle theft, criminal damage, dangerous cycling) of bike crime in the South Bank? How have these changed over time? • Where are the crime hot-spots and how can they be explained? •

What best practice exists in terms of reducing and preventing theft of cycles? Can this be applied in the study area? What methods have been used locally (e.g. Smart Water, secure bike parking, random checks), and which have worked?

• Is funding available for interventions that prevent cycle theft, such as a secure cycle park? • What methods are being employed to reduce the crimes of aggressive or careless driving to protect cyclists?

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Introduction to the Plan

4 Workplace travel planning • Which major businesses are engaged in workplace travel planning?

The group comprised:

• Is there best practice we can draw upon to encourage businesses to develop a travel plan for employees?

• London Borough of Lambeth

• If funding/assistance is available from a number of sources, which is the most effective? •

SELTRANS offer both consultancy and capital funding to major businesses to develop travel plans and implement measures such as showers and secure cycle parking. Is it possible to pool this assistance, e.g. for a central secure cycle park?

Steering group The process of developing and defining a strategy is necessarily a collective one. Therefore following approval from the VMG sub-group, a steering group was established to oversee the delivery of the document. The purpose of the steering group was threefold: to agree the aims and scope of the Action Plan, define the area of study and act as a central focus group on which to consult on the issues and iterations of the draft. It was agreed that to qualify for membership of the group, members should have a direct statutory responsibility for delivering cycling services or provision, contribute professional expertise in one of the policy areas being addressed or represent a major employer or landowner.

• National Theatre (chair)

• Southbank Centre • St Thomas’ Hospital • King’s College London • Network Rail • Coin Street Community Builders • Transport for London • Better Bankside Workplace Travel Planning • Metropolitan Police • South Bank Employers’ Group (SBEG, author and secretariat) It was agreed that the main aim of the group should be to “Formulate and agree a strategic, area-wide approach to cycling policy in the South Bank and Waterloo area”, and the steering group oversaw three key aspects of this: – Aims and objectives – Defining the area – Consultation and data collection

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Introduction to the Plan

Aims and objectives The objectives of the study, ratified by the steering group were: 1 To map and review current and planned cycle provision in the project area and produce guidelines for rationalising it in accordance with the Lambeth Road User Hierarchy 2 To review the policy on cycle routes 3 To produce site specific crime reduction plans in order to contribute to the reduction of cycle theft in the project area, focusing on crime hotspots 4 To encourage staff of major employers to cycle to work through workplace travel planning, and the provision of measures such as showers and interest free bike loans 5 To propose a local programme of education on secure cycle parking and crime prevention 6 To propose a local programme of education on road safety, reflecting the Lambeth Road Danger Reduction Strategy 7 To identify capital and revenue funding for measures in support of cycling where appropriate 8 To ensure that the Action Plan is adopted as policy by the local authority and local organisations, all of whom are committed to delivering its recommendations in partnership

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Introduction to the Plan

Fig 2 South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan survey area

Defining the area The area of study was defined by the steering group as that indicated in the map above (Fig 2).

2 The location of cycle routes, parking provision, perceived cycle parking demand and major businesses offering substantial cycle parking for staff

Due to the broad scope of the study in a policy context, the area of study was agreed after consideration of:

3 The resources available to collect field data

1 The boundaries of the South Bank and Waterloo neighbourhood (which includes a section of Southwark, included in the study for completeness)

It was acknowledged by the group that consideration should be given to the wider context. Planned developments and growth within neighbouring ‘opportunity areas’ such as Bankside, Vauxhall and Elephant & Castle are factored as key drivers for the predicted growth in cycling.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Introduction to the Plan

Consultation and data collection The steering group formed the principle consultative body during the development of the Action Plan. In addition, a consultation plan was ratified by the steering group which set out both the method of consultation and those wider groups and individuals to engage. Since the Action Plan was to be adopted as council policy, particular attention was paid to ensuring that statutory consultation procedures were observed.

In terms of consultation and data collection across the wider community, an attitudinal survey was sent via weblink to:

The Lambeth and Southwark resident communities through adverts in local press, and organisations representing local people via the South Bank Partnership website

It was agreed that the Action Plan should be consulted on as widely as possible, taking care to ensure a cross-section of views were considered. The consultation plan sought the views of users of all modes of transport, including cyclists, pedestrians, bus and train passengers and drivers. In addition, officers at Lambeth Council representing relevant departments (Planning, Community Safety, Environment, Transport and Highways, Transport Planning and Sustainability) were briefed on the strategy and advice was taken on existing documentation in the context of which the Action Plan would be formally considered.

Transport interest groups such as Lambeth and Southwark Cyclists, the London Cycling Campaign and Living Streets

Local councillors were briefed on the aims of the study and presentations were made at two South Bank Forum meetings.

• 13% local residents

Externally to Lambeth, it was agreed that officers in Southwark Council, Transport for London, the Metropolitan Police and the British Transport Police would be consulted to ensure that the Action Plan remained in accordance with existing guidelines on crime and safety.

• The staff of major employers

The survey attracted 524 responses with respondents broken down as follows (respondents were able to respond to more than one of the categories): • 40% regular commuters through the area • 37% visitors to the area • 35% employees in local businesses

• 1% business owners in the area 65% of respondents were self-categorised as ‘predominantly cyclists’ and 30% (159) were members of the London Cycling Campaign or local sub-groups. In addition to the general attitudinal survey, local employers were consulted on their provision of cycle facilities for staff. The results of these surveys are examined in more detail in relevant sections of the Action Plan.

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3.0

Policy Context

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Policy Context

Policy context Cycling has for some time been at the forefront of local, regional and national agendas but despite the health and environmental benefits, there remain a number of barriers to cycling in the city. Dialogue about cycling can be combative – particularly when debated in consideration of other modal options such as walking, driving and public transport – and this can contribute to the endurance of such barriers. Furthermore, the conflicting priorities inherent in place-making can create problems for those charged with providing facilities for cyclists. Transport Planners must decide how to balance factors such as convenience, street clutter, security or design aesthetics, and in many cases such decisions are necessarily based on the funding streams available at the time. Major investment in cycling is a relatively recent phenomenon in Britain and only in the last ten years has serious study provided the basis for public funding beyond standard cycle routes and bike racks. In recent years a wealth of information has been gathered to support cycling, highlighting benefits as various as social inclusion, local economies, air quality, crime reduction and health. These form the case for investment in borough strategies, such as the London Borough of Lambeth’s Cycling Action Plan3.

3 LB Lambeth Cycle Action Plan 2005/6 4 Cycling in London 2 Transport for London, 2009

In London investment also appears to have encouraged uptake, with a 107% increase in cycle trips at selected points in the period 2001–20094. TfL now estimate that 545,000 cycle trips are made in London each day5. Evaluation of the first three years of the Department for Transport’s ‘Cycle Demonstration Towns’ project has shown these to be a success, with a £140m investment equating to an average rise in cycling across the eleven towns of 27%. If indeed the link between investment and cycle usage is a causal one, this trend is set to continue. In 2010 the Mayor of London delivered a series of measures for cyclists in London including the Barclays Cycle Superhighways and the Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme. Supported by a major Transport Strategy6.

6 Way to Go: The Mayor’s Transport Strategy Greater London Assembly, 2009

5 Travel in London 2 Transport for London, 2010

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Policy Context

The spatial strategy for London, the London Plan7, also a Mayoral document, set out in 2008 the recommended standards for cycle parking across different land uses. These are shown on page 41. In October 2009, an announcement by former Secretary of State for Transport Lord Adonis pledged £14m, 10,000 new cycle parking spaces and ten new ‘cycle hubs’ in an effort to improve cycle facilities in Britain’s major rail interchanges, including Waterloo Station. Transport for London has been working with Network Rail and Lambeth Council to develop the hub as an ‘active travel centre’. This is due to be completed in Summer 2012. Some key reports published over the last few years helped to inform the context. TfL, being the principle direction setter for cycling strategy in the city, published a London Cycling Action Plan in 2004, with the vision “To make London a city where people of all ages, abilities and cultures have the incentive, confidence and facilities to cycle whenever it suits them”.

Both cyclists and non-cyclists identified walking as the most appealing form of transport, with the underground the least appealing. However cycling runs a close second to the least appealing modes of transport in the capital, in the opinion of non-cyclists. Unsurprisingly, amongst the cycling group, the reported appeal rises dramatically, with 89% finding the mode appealing. Demonstrating an awareness of the key benefits of cycling, around nine in ten agreed that cycling is a good way to get fit, that cycling provides good value for money, and that cycling makes a difference to improving the environment. At the same time however, Londoners indicate an awareness of the barriers, with nine in ten agreeing with the statement that ‘traffic makes people afraid of cycling in London’, and six in ten agreeing that cycling is stressful. This level of agreement is significantly increased from previous years’ studies.

Also, TfL’s ‘Attitudes to Cycling’ study in 2008 found that one in three Londoners had access to a bike in their household, and one in six had cycled at some point over the past year. 8% of Londoners reported to be ‘regular cyclists’ and one in twenty ‘occasional cyclists’. As has been reflected in other research studies, cyclists are more likely than the population as a whole to be male, under 55, living in inner London, in full time employment and ABC1.

7 The London Plan Spacial Development Strategy for Greater London Greater London Assembly, Oct 2009

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

“ South Bank area desperately needs more bike parking and most of all – secure bike parking” Survey Respondent

In a section of ‘Attitudes to Cycling’ dealing with the perception of cyclists’ behaviour, nearly half of respondents (48%) disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement that cyclists were ‘law abiding’, and 41% disagreed with the statement that cyclists were considerate, compared with 39% who agreed. 55% thought that cyclists were ‘dangerous’.

Mayor’s Transport Strategy The 2010 strategy sets out a 20-year plan for improvements to cycling infrastructure. The aim is to achieve a 5% modal share for cycling (currently 2%) by 2026; a 400% increase compared to the year 2000. The Mayor also aims to increase the number of cycle parking spaces in London by 66,000 by 2012.

In an effort to understand any negatively perceived behaviours of cyclists which could be addressed in the Action Plan, the report measures similar attitudes locally in Section 3.

The strategy recognises the part to be played by businesses and other local organisations in delivering improvements for cyclists, and pledges support to them to achieve this aim. In addition, support will be given to the Boroughs to encourage infrastructure improvement, better planning of highways, smarter travel initiatives such as workplace travel planning, changes to the Highway Code to encourage cycling and cycle training. The Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme and Cycle Superhighways are also reinforced throughout the transport strategy as a way of encouraging sustainable travel.

76% of cyclists felt safe in respect of the traffic they encountered on quiet roads, with this figure dropping to 27% for busy roads. The ‘absence of continuous cycle lanes’ and ‘lack of physical separation’ were identified as the most important of barriers for cyclists and potential cyclists. Three key Greater London Authority (GLA) strategic documents have been published to respond to the above data, with the aim of removing barriers to cycling and improving provision overall. These are summarised here.

The Mayor seeks to use planning powers to enshrine measures which encourage cycling in new developments, including public buildings. Short term measures include parking, showers and storage, whilst in the longer term it is proposed that the planning system supports a realignment of land use to make sustainable travel between residential areas and areas of employment opportunity increasingly viable. Finally, the Mayor pledges to work with Network Rail to improve cycle parking at stations to meet minimum levels.

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Policy Context

Mayor’s Cycle Safety Action Plan Published in 2010, the Plan sets out the aspiration to match the growth in cycling outlined above with a reduction in the rate of cycling casualties8. In addition the Plan aims to improve the perception of safety among potential cyclists, a major barrier to take-up, and place London at the forefront of cycle safety innovation. This is to be achieved via a variety of measures including: • Promoting the cycling safety message to all road users • Delivering new, safe cycle routes and facilities • Training to improve cycling and driver skills • Specific initiatives to tackle freight related cyclist casualties The above initiatives represent a £111m investment.

Mayor’s Cycle Security Plan Also published in 2010, the Plan details work the Mayor’s office and TfL will be undertaking with partners to reduce theft of cycles, including the creation of a dedicated police ‘Cycle Task Force’, bike marking and registration, and extensive environmental measures designed to cut crime. The crime reduction recommendations of the local cycle are closely aligned with the Mayor’s Cycle Security Plan.

London Cycling Design Standards At the time of writing, Transport for London is in the process of compiling an updated version of the 2005 London Cycling Design Standards report, a toolkit for local authorities to inform their choices about cycle rack provision. Much of the information contained in this toolkit is informed through TfL’s collaboration with the Design Against Crime Research Centre at Central St Martin’s School of Art and Design (DAC). DAC is a leading authority on secure cycle parking. Their Bikeoff project aims to reduce bike theft through research and product design, and the web-based resource draws together best practice in this field. The recommendations of the report are examined in relation to local provision on page 41.

Studies on crime The Metropolitan Police and British Transport Police conduct regular trend analysis of crime statistics. Data released in August 2009 revealed that Bishop’s and Cathedral’s Wards in Lambeth and Southwark are the sixth and seventh highest crime hotspots for cycle theft in London9.

8 Planned rate of reduction of killed or seriously injured (KSI) cyclists is 50% by 2010 compared to the 1994-98 average. 9 Apr 2008 – Mar 2009 Metropolitan Police figures taken from BBC News website 18 August 2009.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Whilst the West End receives the most reports of theft (439 in Apr 08 – Mar 09), Bishop’s and Cathedral’s wards were subject to 509 thefts in the same period, and the riverside area, from which the majority of the cycles were stolen is comparatively smaller than the West End. Therefore, it is possible to make the case that the South Bank is the area in London in which cycles are most at risk. The Metropolitan Police, the British Transport Police and private security services are present in large numbers in the area, and CCTV is abundant. There are two obvious conclusions that can be drawn from the high theft rate in relation to the high security presence. Firstly, cyclists often raise concerns that cycle theft is treated as a low priority by police, claiming that they view the crime as having a relatively low impact. This opinion is reflected in the report’s survey. Of the 321 cyclists who responded, 55% were dissatisfied with the way the police address cycle theft, with a third having been a victim of cycle theft within the past three years. Another supposition is that for whatever reason the high numbers of security personnel and CCTV in the area fail to act as a deterrent to bicycle thieves.

“ I think London could learn from Dutch cities like Amsterdam and Rotterdam in providing safe cycling in the city” Survey respondent

In interviews with police however, the point is often raised to counter this view, simply, that theft is likely to increase in an area hosting increasing numbers of parked cycles. Police arrests have risen marginally in the area, but the service continues to seek out new ways to prevent theft and improve arrest rates.

thelondonpaper by Hannah Summers 16 June 2009 “In a trial designed to measure the honesty of recession-hit Britons, researchers planted bikes in cities throughout the country and timed how long it took before they were swiped. London came out bottom in the honesty stakes after opportunistic thieves struck in just 17 minutes at London Bridge station.”

Thames Cycle Path Policy The section of the River Walk contained within the study area forms a part of the Thames Path National Trail. The Policy on Cycling on the River Walk is considered in light of the recommendations of the Thames Path Cycling Policy.

22


Policy Context

New infrastructure

Informed in part by the above policy work, two major initiatives were delivered city-wide in 2010 by the Mayor. The first of these cycling initiatives is the Barclays Cycle Superhighway project, which was launched in the summer of 2010. Route 7 from Merton to the City of London passes along Southwark Bridge Road, close to the study area. Cycle Superhighways are cycle routes with blue surfaces, designed to link London’s outer Boroughs into the centre of the city, and remove some of the barriers to cycling. Accompanying their implementation are opportunities for cycle training, on-street information and a fund for capital improvements within 1.5km of the Superhighway.

“ Waterloo is a major transport hub and the area should be well provided for in term of cycling facilities as this is also an important and increasingly used form of transport in London” Survey respondent

The Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme, also launched in the summer of 2010 saw the installation of 400 cycle docking stations at 300m intervals containing some 6,000 cycles for hire across central London. Operated by Serco on behalf of TfL along similar lines to the Vélib scheme in Paris, registered customers are entitled to take cycles from any docking station and drop them off at any other, at no cost for the first half hour of use, and at a rising cost thereafter. Costs per registration vary from a pound per day to £45 per year. Docking stations in the study area are illustrated in Fig 3 over the page.

Team London Bridge and Better Bankside Business Improvement Districts, in partnership with South Bank Employers’ Group will engage in discussion with TfL to seek access to this funding for measures recommended in this and other reports, including secure cycle parking.

10 http://www.tfl.gov.uk/roadusers/cycling

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Fig 3 Barclays Cycle Hire Stations

Cycle docking stations are not all on cycle routes, though the majority are. They represent key locations determined by TfL which are close to tourist attractions, large office buildings and shopping districts.

In the South Bank survey, 44% of non-cyclists thought they would make use of the Scheme upon its introduction, with a slightly higher percentage of cyclists, 49%, expecting to make use of the hire cycles.

Representing a second phase of implementation, Transport for London and Network Rail agreed 121 additional docking stations for Waterloo Station, now implemented. Where the first phase omits mainline stations (and hence rail commuter traffic) from the scheme, the second will seek to encourage those arriving in London via train to continue their onward journeys using hire cycles.

At least one major local employer, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Trust intends to encourage staff to travel between sites using the scheme, to encourage sustainable travel and reduce the number of thefts of cycles owned by staff. The Concert Hall Approach docking station was the most popular in the scheme Londonwide with 8,794 docks between 30 July and 19 September 2010. This has now been overtaken in the second phase with the Waterloo Station docking point.

24


4.0

Cycle Provision and Routes

25


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle provision and Routes Much research has been conducted locally which addresses the themes of this Action Plan. Some of this is existing research, and some was undertaken specifically for the Action Plan.

Cycle provision audit South Bank Employers’ Group collected and mapped the following data in the study area over a number of days in the summer of 2009: • The location and type of cycle parking • A snapshot of the extent to which cycle parking was being used • The ‘unofficial’ places cyclists locked their cycles • The hourly usage of key routes for cyclists at different times of day • The security of locking mechanisms used to lock cycles

The Metropolitan Police used some of this information to compile a report, crossreferencing mapped cycle parking locations with crime reports to identify crime hot spots. This report is included as Appendix 2 of the Action Plan.

Behaviours and attitudes The principal method for understanding the attitudes of cyclists and non-cyclists towards cycling issues was through the online survey, which elicited 524 responses from the local and wider communities. The raw data is reproduced in Appendix 5. These data illustrate in some areas the extent to which debate can be polarised between cyclists and non-cyclists. For instance, when asked whether they were concerned about cyclists breaking rules such as cycling on pavements or jumping red lights, 24.5% of cyclist respondents said they agreed, compared with 44.6% of non-cyclists.

• Numbers and locations of abandoned cycles This allowed them to determine several key pieces of information: • Whether cycle parking was in the right place • Whether there were locations in need of cycle parking •

Whether cyclists locked bikes to railings, lamp columns and other street furniture, due to an under-capacity of parking provision

• The extent to which cycles were secure from thieves • The routes cyclists took through the area at different times of day

26


Cycle Provision and Routes

Comparing the two sets of respondents also illustrated some of the barriers to cycling. When asked if they would feel safe cycling in Waterloo, 38% of cyclists responded that they would compared with 21% of non-cyclists. 50% of non-cyclists disagreed or strongly disagreed that they would feel safe. Another barrier for non-cyclists was the availability and security of cycle parking. Two thirds would be more inclined to take up cycling if secure cycle parking was available in the South Bank and Waterloo area, and 59% would be more inclined to do so if there were more cycle racks available. Cyclists would also be inclined to cycle more if there were secure cycling available, with 51% supporting the idea of a secure cycle park. Further examination of this and local authority data is undertaken in this report in relation to the main themes – cycle routes/ parking, cycle theft/security, and workplace travel planning/behaviour change.

Cycle routes Lambeth Council, as the principal highway authority for the area of study primarily sets the policy on cycling. However, Transport for London, which has responsibility for the strategic road network (TLRN), Southwark Council, Sustrans and various private landowners also contribute in different ways to cycle policy. This section of this report looks at the policies which inform the highway authorities’ approach to providing cycle racks and routes. Lambeth Road User Hierarchy Lambeth guidance states, ‘In considering the management of the road network (in accordance with Policy 11 of Lambeth’s Unitary Development Plan – Management of Road, Bus and Freight Networks) and the impact of development, priority will be given in case of conflict, to traffic in the following declining order: • Walking • Cycling • Buses • Rail Services • Taxis and minicabs • Motorcycles/scooters • Freight transport • Cars

27


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle Provision and Routes

The hierarchy broadly reflects both the modes of transport which are to be encouraged to reduce congestion and pollution, and also the relative potential to cause harm, with the most harmful modes at the bottom of the hierarchy. How it is applied is dependent upon the proposal or scheme.

The Spine Route (Upper Ground and Belvedere Road) is one such example. This highway serves as a service road for HGVs, a bus route, a national and local cycle route (Sustrans Route 4 and London Cycle Network Route 3) and a key walking route.

Respondents to the survey were asked how different modes of transport were, and should be prioritised in the area. The highest numbers of participants responded thus: Mode currently prioritised

Preferred order of prioritisation

1 Motorists 2 Buses 3 Pedestrians 4 Cyclists

1 Pedestrians 2 Cyclists 3 Buses 4 Motorists

Therefore the application of the hierarchy in this instance would be required to ensure that measures which further encouraged cycle traffic, in recognition of the ongoing requirement for freight transport would be acceptable, whereas measures which encouraged cycle traffic to the detriment of HGV traffic would not.

This illustrates that although respondents agreed with the principles of the Lambeth Road User Hierarchy, they arguably did not think the balance of prioritisation was being achieved by transport planners. The utilisation of the Road User Hierarchy as a guiding principle for the recommendations of the cycle Action Plan is generally accepted by the steering group. However representatives of the larger businesses that rely on HGVs to transport goods to site raise questions about its specific application in the South Bank area.

28


Cycle Provision and Routes

Lambeth Road Danger Reduction Strategy The Road Danger Reduction Strategy, presented to Lambeth Council’s Transport Partnership Forum in June 2009 resulted from published statistics on the causes of cyclist fatalities in the Borough. Research showed that 33% of fatalities involved vehicles turning left and 53% involved HGVs. This gave rise to a programme of education and training, to inform drivers of HGVs and cyclists. The Borough’s large fleet vehicles are now fitted with parabolic mirrors to minimise ‘blind spots’, and HGV drivers have been given cycle training to understand the experience of cycling on Lambeth roads. London-wide, of the fifteen incidents in which cyclists died in road accidents in 2008, nine involved lorries. The Mayor’s transport strategy proposes the trial of ‘Trixie mirrors’ – convex mirrors at traffic lights that enable drivers to see cyclists in their ‘blind-spot’. This Action Plan supports the trial, though some detail must be established in terms of ongoing funding for maintenance. Cyclists have been given training in Lambeth, showing them where to position themselves on the road to be seen clearly by drivers. This included the opportunity to sit in the cab of an HGV to recognise where blind spots might occur. This plan supports an expanded local programme of training for cyclists and HGV drivers which encourages a mutual understanding of the relative pressures faced by these types of road user, and which encourages confidence amongst cyclists.

The Action Plan also supports the implementation of engineering projects which look at reducing road danger. These include the removal of traffic calming measures where they are dangerous for cyclists though recognises the benefits of such measures in the vast majority of cases, and a comprehensive and ongoing programme of works as identified by a trained highways inspector. Finally, where particular highways such as the Spine Route support a number of modes of transport and are near residential areas and schools, it is recommended that a 20mph speed limit be introduced. In the case of the Spine Route, speeds are generally low, but a limit should be introduced and indicated via street signage. This would have no detrimental effect on delivery times and would reinforce the traffic calming measures designed to halt the use of Upper Ground and Belvedere Road as a ‘rat run’, protecting cyclists and pedestrians. The cornerstone of any recommendations on cycle provision must be safety for pedestrians and cyclists, in line with the Road Danger Reduction Strategy.

Cycling England guidance on planning cycle infastructure The Department for Transport has published best practice on designing routes through Cycling England, advising that five key design elements must be adhered to. These comprise Coherence, Directness, Attractiveness, Safety and Comfort.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Fig 6 Local Cycle routes

Cycle Route Implementation and Stakeholder Plan (CRISP) This key strategy forms the basis for providing and improving cycle routes in the area. The study area (both in terms of the strategy and the CRISP) contains Links 131, 132 (part) and 139, illustrated in the map above. Route 131 at Belvedere Road and Upper Ground also forms a part of National Cycle Network Route 4.

LCN Link 131

LCN Link 132

LCN Link 139

The CRISP makes recommendations for improvements to the Cycle Network, to remove physical barriers to cycling. These include removing conflict between vehicles and cyclists (or pedestrians and cyclists), improving road surfacing, removing non cycle-friendly gates and creating more space at junctions. The authors of the CRISP survey WS Atkins estimated the cost of recommendations to be ÂŁ150k, and some improvements have already been undertaken.

30


Cycle Provision and Routes

The CRISP and other field studies have given rise to a list, (Fig 7) of recommended improvement measures within or adjacent to the area: Fig 7 Lambeth Cycle Improvement Measures

Since they are within the study area, the Cornwall Road and Belvedere Road recommendations are examined further on page 35.

Location

Proposed Measure

Estimated Cost

Status/milestones

Hercules Road

Public realm improvements

£100,000

2012/13: Public consultation and design 2013/14: Implementation

Westminister Bridge Rd / Kennington Road / Baylis Road Junction

Guard rail removable, £200,000 lining improvements, resurfacing

July 2012: Guardrail removal September 2012: Experimental lining 2013: Resurfacing and permanent lining

Baylis Road by Spur Road

Kerb build-outs / road narrowing £10,000

January 2013

TBC

Additional cycle hire hire docking stations*

March 2013

£280,000

* Subject to consultation and approval

31


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Where highways inspectors apply standard rules to assess highway condition, it is recommended that a set of more sensitive standards be developed which could be applied by inspectors to assess cycle routes. For instance a pothole the depth of 20mm in a carriageway used by cars only is less problematic than one that is used also by cyclists. Guidelines will be developed to help highways inspectors determine the quality of the Council’s roads from a cyclist’s perspective.

“ Cycle Route Four is meant to be an alternative route for cyclists so they don’t need to go along the river. However, it is very poorly signposted and some sections are heavily degraded. It needs proper management and funding” Survey respondent

An online reporting mechanism will be created which will allow cyclists to report potholes in cycle lanes, for assessment by highways inspectors within agreed response times. This will be publicised on the local authority’s website.

Highways inspectors will be encouraged to undertake some inspections by bicycle. This will allow inspectors to understand the cyclist’s experience on borough streets.

32


Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 8 Pedestrian and cyclist counts 1 Belvedere Road 24/1/09 Cyclists 07.00 – 09.00 997 Peak Flow 08.15 – 09.15 238 Pedestrians 07.00 – 19.00 10,488 Peak Flow 08.15 – 09.15 1,382 2 2

Cornwall Road 24/11/09 Cyclists 07.00 – 09.00 786 Peak Flow 08.15 – 09.15 174 Pedestrians 07.00 – 19.00 18,200 Peak Flow 08.15 – 09.15 3,220

1

3 Frazier Street 24/11/09 Cyclists 07.00 – 09.00 Motorists 08.15 – 09.15 Cars/ Vans 07.00 – 19.00 HGV’s 08.15 – 19.00

3

Pedestrian/cycle counts

The London Borough of Lambeth also conducted a series of pedestrian and cycle counts in 2009, to determine the usage of cycle and other routes. The results as they apply to the study area are in Fig 8.

33

18 27 23 19


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle Provision and Routes

North Lambeth Cycle Surveys: Summary of Results In the report’s attitudinal study, cyclists and non-cyclists alike disagreed with the statement ‘The cycle routes in the South Bank and Waterloo are in a good condition’. In the case of cyclists, this could signify the need for the highway authority to make improvements, and in the case of noncyclists, may again represent a significant barrier to taking up cycling.

It is not possible to surmise from these data whether streets containing designated cycle routes encourage higher numbers of cyclists, or whether routes were planned for roads which would have supported high numbers anyway. However, there is a correlation between the two – Waterloo Road, the IMAX Roundabout and Belvedere Road/Upper Ground are all situated on cycle routes.

Fig 9 below shows a snapshot of cyclists observed on key routes through the study area, across a number of days in the summer of 2009: Transect/Estate

No of cyclists passing fixed point in 1 hr

Time of day

IMAX Roundabout

306

15:30

Belvedere Road/ Upper Ground

219

16:30

Waterloo Road

120

14:30

River Walk at Southbank Centre

72

16:00

The Cut

69

14:00

Stamford Street

45

10:00

Lambeth Palace Road

39

11:30

Coin Street river walk

27

11:00

Waterloo Station – Victory Arch

27

10:00

Albert Embankment

24

11:30

Waterloo Station Bike Park

18

11:00

The fourth highest concentration of cyclists recorded in the snapshot was on the River Walk (at rush hour) which is not a designated cycle route.

34

Fig 9 Cyclist Counts


Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 10 Belvedere Road cycle control

Whilst the South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan supports the CRISP’s main recommendations concerning route layouts, the CRISP requires updating to take into account the new junctions at Addington Street and The Cut.

The recommendation is made, supported by survey responses and the CRISP survey, that a reconfiguration of cycle provision from Westminster Bridge Road through Belvedere Road to Chicheley Street is designed and implemented. Current signage, markings, surface treatments and cycle crossing points are both inadequate and confusing to cyclists and this impact is compounded by major recent changes to the road layout relating to the peninsularisation of Addington Street. Much of this route follows the Strategic Route Network, and Transport for London must be involved in designing an acceptable route.

35


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 10 shows the cycle provision in place at each end of the privately-owned section of Belvedere Road, broadly described as the County Hall section. As revealed, signage, routes and markings are inadequate and representations have been made to the landowner Shirayama Shokusan Corporation to improve these.

A tally of cyclists on the River Walk at the Southbank Centre recorded a rate of 72 cyclists per hour, compared with 219 on the adjacent cycle route on Belvedere Road, at approximately 17.00.

A scheme has been submitted which makes some improvements, funded via Section 106 and agreed in September 2011, but these plans need to be considered in the wider route context to ensure uninterrupted passage at both ends. Also, the CRISP does not consider LCN + Cycle Route 3 along Cornwall Road. This includes provision for cyclists and also bisects two busy pedestrian crossings from Waterloo East to Brad Street and Emma Cons Gardens to The Cut, neither of which are controlled by crossing lights. A part analysis of the Cornwall Road route has been carried out and appended to the CRISP survey. The pedestrian/cyclist conflict at the junction with Sandell Street has been resolved (see Appendix 1) and resurfacing work has been undertaken the length of the street. However, a further recommendation is made that a scheme be developed at the junction with The Cut and Cornwall Road to increase pedestrian confidence when crossing Cornwall Road.

Cycling on the River Walk One route issue much commented upon in the attitudinal survey was that of cycling on the River Walk, with many pedestrians in favour of prohibiting the practice, and many cyclists in support of allowing it. Data was collected to understand the extent to which cycling occurs on the riverside. Lambeth Council conducted a study of cycling on the River Walk in May and June of 2008. One of the conclusions was that cyclists used the River Walk more often for work purposes than for leisure, with an 80% to 19% divide.

Riverside cyclists who do not cycle slowly with respect to pedestrians, or who do not dismount at pinch points such as at the Oxo Tower Wharf or Westminster Bridge were a concern to many respondents in the comments section of the survey, with both cyclists and pedestrians agreeing on this point. In addition, a visitor survey undertaken in 1999 detailed in the Thames Path Cycling Policy, found 85% of visitors walking and 14% cycling along the path. When asked if anything had spoiled visitors’ enjoyment of the Thames Path, the greatest level of dissatistisfaction was cited as being at cyclists. The River Walk is not a designated cycle route, and where it is privately owned between Westminster Bridge and the Oxo Tower Wharf, landowners currently encourage fast cyclists to dismount, but do not enforce a ban. On the publicly owned section of the River Walk between Lambeth and Westminster Bridges cycling has not been discouraged by the local authority, nor is a ban enforced by police. The land is not currently designated via Traffic Management Order as a footway, and enforcement is at the discretion of the highway authority where a) the footway is wide enough to allow safe passage for both cyclists and pedestrians and b) cycling has been an ongoing practice for a specified period of time. The land outside County Hall is owned by Shirayama Shokusan Corporation, not represented on the steering group, but due to the narrow pathway and high numbers of people, cycling is rarely possible in this section. A number of options were discussed that assessed the appraches available to landowners, with the safety and security of pedestrians on the River Walk as the paramount consideration. 36


Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 11 River Walk section within the study area

These options, ranging from the enforcement of a complete ban on cycling on the river walk, to educative methods to encourage cyclists to use NCN route 4 on roads parallel to the riverside, were tested by Lambeth Council using signage to reinforce various messages. It was concluded that the most effective and practical way of managing this issue would be the following:

1) Use the available resources to compel those cycling at speed or in crowded spaces to dismount. 2) Do not advertise or promote the river walk as a cycle route with signage or collateral. 3) Make gradual improvements to NCN Route 4 and use educative methods to encourage its use.

37


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 12 Parking provision

10 10 22

22

10 4

52

10

10 16

10

10

10

20

26 22 22

12

95 8

72

24

8

8

36

8

18

18

13 20

23

100

Cycle parking The issue of cycle parking, and the perceived under-provision thereof, is a key concern raised frequently by cyclists (see ‘attitudes of cyclists’, page 27). Identifying locations for cycle parking is a complicated process and must take into account a number of considerations, such as disability discrimination legislation, demand, convenience, safety and security. One of the main objectives of the South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan was to map existing provision with a view to understanding whether locations were appropriate, and to identify any further need.

Fig 12 indicates the location of publicly accessible cycle racks in the study area, and the number of parking spaces available in each location. The numbers inside each red circle indicates the number of cycle parking places at that location. There is a fairly even spread, with the greatest concentrated provision at Waterloo Station and St Thomas’ Hospital. Location No. of parking spaces (approx) Waterloo Station Waterloo Road St Thomas’ Hospital Southbank Centre The Cut National Theatre Belvedere Road Lower Marsh Stamford Street Upper Ground Addington Street

215 106 100 92 94 44 44 36 32 30 20

Total 813

38

12

18

10

4


Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 13 Demand hot-spots

5

4 6 3 7 8 13

9

2

10 12

1

11

Demand

Fig 13 shows rack capacity by indicating the racks which were observed as underused, and the locations where demand approached capacity. 1 Addington Street 15% 2 London Eye 54% 3 Southbank Centre 52% 4 Upper Ground/ Belvedere Road 90% 5 Coin Street 15% 6 Stamford Street 85% 7 King’s Plaza 39% 8 Victory Arch (No Provision) 9 Waterloo Station Bike Park 72% 10 Waterloo Station 93% 11 Lower Marsh 71% 12 Waterloo Road 94% 13 The Cut 40% 39


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle Provision and Routes

The capacity audit was conducted as part of the cycle audit in the summer of 2009, and it is therefore stressed that the data collected represents seasonal peak rather than average usage.

Cyclists reflected strong opinions in the SBEG attitudinal survey about cycle parking, with 81% disagreeing or strongly disagreeing with the statement that ‘there is sufficient cycle parking in the area’.

Percentage figures represent the extent to which cycle racks were being used at the time that the snapshot was undertaken. Those locations with high percentage figures represent ‘hot-spot’ areas most in need of more parking provision for cycles, observed through the snapshot exercise, and reinforced in responses from cyclists to the survey and businesses.

Planned provision Publicly accessible cycle spaces are being installed in the following areas in the next two years:

Waterloo11 Victory Arch Sheffield Station

94

In these locations, increased numbers of cycles were observed locked inappropriately to street furniture, increasing clutter and insecurity. There is a correlation between these areas and heightened cycle theft. The evidence above, supported by consultation with cyclists indicates that there is a lack of cycle parking provision in the following areas:

Doon Street12 Upper Ground Sheffield

34

Address

Area

Park Plaza

Westminster Sheffield Bridge

• Upper Ground/Belvedere Road • Waterloo Station • Waterloo Road • Lower Marsh The audit supports the assertion that further cycle parking is required in many of these areas, and it is recommended that, considered along with new cycle parking already being planned, racks are provided in these four locations.

11 These spaces have been delivered, with plans for further parking in development. 12 This development has achieved planning consent but no programme for construction has been released to date.

40

Rack type

Number 109


Cycle Provision and Routes

Lambeth Council also has plans to implement increased cycle provision in the public realm, and this will be carried out according to the need identified in the recommendations of this report, in winter 2010. Once procured, the Lower Marsh Regeneration Scheme design team should include in the design the provision of cycle facilities according to the levels recommended in the London Plan (see below). Longer-term planned provision for cycle parking spaces is set out in the funding section of the Action Plan on page 69.

The town centre areas of Waterloo contain a mixture of businesses, and although the above guidance goes some way towards recommending appropriate provision, as advised in the South Bank Streetscapes Design Guide, it is recommended that agreement be sought with developers and applicants for planning consent that, where cycle parking provision is required, funding is ‘pooled’ wherever possible for the delivery of strategic cycling objectives in the area as a whole rather than on an ad hoc basis.

Cycle parking standards The Mayor’s London Plan sets out the minimum standards recommended for public cycle parking, in relation to land use class: Use Class (appropriate to study area)

Cycle Parking Provision

Shops (food) Shops (non food)

1 space per 125 square metres 1 space per 300 square metres

Cafes and Restaurants Pubs and wine bars Take-aways

1 parking space per 20 customers 1 parking space per 100 customers 1 space for every 50 customers

Hotels

1 space for 10 employees

Hospitals

1 space per 10 visitors

Universities/Colleges

1 space per 10 staff or students

Libraries

1 space per 10 visitors

Cinemas

1 space per 50 seats

Leisure facilities period visitors

1 space per 20 peak

The London Plan does not provide a recommended figure for train stations.

41


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle Provision and Routes

Street furniture design and ‘clutter’ issues The Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 (Part IV) Section 63 gives powers to local authorities which enable them to provide bicycle stands in the public realm. Stands do not usually require planning consent, but local authorities must ensure that provision is suitable and does not serve as an irritant, particularly to pedestrians. Cycling related street furniture is usually implemented with regard to ensuring minimal impact on the streetscape, balanced with demand for cycle parking. The attitudinal survey confirmed that most people did not view cycle parking as clutter, and this would suggest that provision is to date well placed. However, provision can still be poorly planned and encourage clutter, and this should be guarded against. TfL’s London Cycle Design Standards (2005) states: ‘Locating the cycle parking in the right place is crucial. In addition, there are four essential requirements for the cycle parking facility itself: •

It should support any type of bicycle without damaging it – both when the bicycle is parked and when it is knocked

It should be possible to secure both the frame and the front bicycle wheel to the stand

Whether or not in use, a stand should not be a danger to pedestrians, particularly those who are blind or partially sighted, or obstruct pedestrian movements or desire lines

In public places the facility should not detract from the environment’

Fig 14 Victory Arch, Waterloo Station

The picture above, taken in 2007, shows cycles parked outside Victory Arch at Waterloo Station, which is now replaced with formal provision. It illustrates both how under-provision encourages people to lock cycles inappropriately, adding to clutter and obstruction, and also how poorly positioned racks decrease accessibility for cyclists. In this case, wind movements allowed the build-up of litter, contributing to poor area aesthetics. There are a number of key principles established in the South Bank Streetscapes Design Guide,11 which comprises part of the official guidance adopted by Lambeth Council on enhanced streetscapes design locally.

11 South Bank Streetscapes Design Guide South Bank Employers’ Group, 2004

42


Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 15 Southwark cycle parking provision

The guidance states: ‘New cycle stands [should be sited] at points of high demand and deter obstructive use of railings. These facilities should be regularly dispersed across the road network and adjacent cycle routes, transport interchanges, major public buildings, educational facilities and other key buildings and spaces. It is however important to ensure that other highway users are not inconvenienced. Siting must be assessed in conjunction with all other street furniture to avoid clutter and in particular not to block pedestrian desire lines.’ Some innovative measures have been trialled in the past which utilise multi-purpose street furniture to reduce the impact of clutter. This is particularly important in an area such as the South Bank, where hostile vehicle mitigation measures must be implemented to protect crowded places from terrorism. Where bollards or other protective measures are planned, it may be practical to increase their efficiency by designing them in such a way as to allow cycles to be locked securely to them. The picture opposite illustrates a further example of multi-purpose street furniture, implemented by the London Borough of Southwark – a planter which can also be used as a bike rack. This is not recommended as an anti hostile vehicle measure. Where practical, provision for parking cycles may be implemented at the expense of car-parking spaces. This is in many cases more desirable where pavements are particularly restricted.

43


Cycle Provision and Routes

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Fig 16 Parking provision in the South Bank Clockwise from top left: Sheffield Stand, bespoke Sheffield, Pennant Stand, Column mounted/ Cycle loop.

There are four different types of recommended cycle rack in the study area, the designs of which offer varying degrees of security, aesthetics, compactness, and durability. The vast majority of cycle parking in the study area provision comprises banks of ‘n’ shaped Sheffield stands, as is demonstrated below. Sheffield Bespoke Column Geo stands Sheffield mounted Pennant 300 65

7

35

44


Cycle Provision and Routes

Fig 17 ‘Camden’ stand Fig 18 Abandoned cycle, Southbank Centre

Although Sheffield stands represent the municipal standard, the St Martin’s Design Against Crime Research Centre has designed and launched a modified version – the Wave stand (see Fig 17) Also known as the ‘Camden’, this stand encourages secure locking practices close to the ground, and makes it easier to lock both wheels and the frame to the stand, which drastically improves security. The column mounted product, and in particular the cycle hoop shown on page 44 is an award-winning, anti-theft design which includes the added benefit of clutter reduction. Where it is not possible to provide sufficient parking spaces using this product alone, it is recommended in shopping streets and other destinations with little space for cycle parking.

Abandoned cycles One issue relating to street clutter is that of abandoned cycles. There are a large number of abandoned cycles in the South Bank and Waterloo area (see Fig 18), and these are removed and disposed of less frequently than is recommended to minimise the impression of neglect. In the audit, eleven obviously abandoned cycles were found in eight of the fifteen locations surveyed. These were cycles having sustained serious damage so as to be unrideable, cycle frames or individual wheels locked to cycle racks. A large number of locks were observed locked to racks.

45


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Whilst some of these could potentially still be in use, the practice of leaving locks at cycle racks was not encouraged by the landowners of the steering group, as it was impossible to determine which locks were abandoned and needed to be removed, and which were not. Legislative confusion and the complex landownership of the area have contributed to a policy vacuum on abandoned bikes, and an attempt to rectify this can be found in Appendix 4. This is a neighbourhood disposal policy which utilises area-wide services cutting across public and private land boundaries, but which requires the consent of landowners.

“ Waterloo is a major transport hub and the area should be well provided for in term of cycling facilities, as this is also an important and increasingly used form of transport in London” Survey respondent

To summarise the policy, abandoned cycles will be identified by the South Bank Patrol Service and South Bank Graffiti Removal Team and tagged inconspicuously with a date sticker. Once two weeks have passed, cycles are removed and stored securely for a further two weeks for collection, in the event that an identified owner wishes to retrieve their property. Landowners and the Council would be informed to direct all enquiries to South Bank Employers’ Group.

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Cycle Provision and Routes

Case Study Secure cycle parking at Waterloo Station In July 2004, in response to evidence that a lack of secure cycle facilities was discouraging modal shift, Lambeth Council commissioned a feasibility study investigating the options for a secure cycle park at Waterloo Station. In line with the aspirations of the London Mayor and the Department for Transport, and supported by the findings of this Action Plan, improvements to cycle parking at Waterloo are recommended, not only to meet current demand, but to provide capacity for increasing demand in the coming years. Furthermore, the provision of secure cycle parking meets certain other requirements, including the desire to reduce cycle theft and street clutter. Secure cycle parks in other London transport interchanges such as Finsbury Park and London Bridge stations have been broadly successful. Drawing on the lessons learned from these examples, some key recommendations can be made. Cycle parks should be:

1 Staffed wherever possible 2 Associated with a local cycle shop so that other services can be offered such as bike repairs and equipment sales 3 Able to offer other services via membership model, including laundry/dry cleaning, showers, lockers etc – known as an ‘active travel centre’. 4 Conveniently located with easy access to other transport modes 5 TfL-branded and well marketed via TfL website/printed collateral 6 Open at times appropriate to a commuter target market, but including evenings and potentially weekends 7 Able to offer an attractive charging structure, from individual day rates to corporate rates 8 Integrated within the travel plans of surrounding businesses The right conditions exist in Waterloo. There are two Evans Cycles stores within 300m of the station and arch space under the station itself which can be used in very limited ways, including cycle storage, as with the London Bridge Station facility. Demand is also apparent, both as demonstrated in the audits, and because of the station’s proximity to major offices, buses and the London Cycle Network. In addition, the Lambeth study showed a high level of dissatisfaction with parking facilities at Waterloo Station (80% of respondents to survey). Although improvements have been made since the time of the survey, secure cycle parking remains an issue and 45% of respondents are prepared to pay for secure cycle parking.

47


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

“ I would not ride in if I had to leave my bike in a bike rack in a public area. I would rather pay a premium for a secure facility” Survey respondent

In the case of existing secure cycle parks, funding was secured or part secured through the TfL former Cycle Centre for Excellence. Although subsidy cannot be discounted, raising finding is particularly challenging in the current climate. Public sector financial support should be accompanied by private sector investment, and a business plan demonstrating a path to profitability. It is likely that Waterloo Station will be in receipt of investment from a £10m fund pledged by the Department of Transport to improve cycle parking which, if forthcoming, would remove one of the significant barriers to realising the project. It is recommended that work is undertaken with Network Rail’s local delivery group to draw up plans for a cycle park, enter into negotiations with cycle retailers, assuming seed funding for establishment costs from the DfT budget, and potential consultancy support from TfL.

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Cycle Provision and Routes

Recommendations Cycle provision and routes Route enhancements 1 Make major capital improvements to National Cycle Route 4 at Upper Ground and Belvedere Road including repair of surfaces and relaying of raised tables

River Walk policy 1 Private landowners Southbank Centre and Coin Street Community Builders to support police and private security enforcement of a no cycling rule on the River Walk between Oxo Tower Wharf and London Eye. 2 Support to encourage cyclists to use designated routes away from the River Walk.

2 Improvements to private section of Belvedere Road via Section 106 agreement

3 Capital improvements to parallel route, National Cycle Route 4, to improve safety

3

Improvements to cycling provision on both sides of Westminster Bridge Road at the junctions with Belvedere Road and Addington Street

Parking provision 1 Increased parking provision to service:

4

Ongoing improvements to condition of cycle routes in wider area including repainting road markings, improved signage and advanced stop lines, with full review to be carried out in 2011

5

Increased ongoing monitoring of cycle routes by highways inspectors according to developed guidelines on cycle route maintenance standards

6 Statutory consultation on 20mph speed limit on Upper Ground and Belvedere Road 7 Improvement schemes in Cornwall Road, at junction with The Cut, to decrease pedestrian/cyclist route conflict 8 Promotion of existing online reporting mechanism for cyclists to report road maintenance issues 9

– Upper Ground and Belvedere Road – Waterloo Station – Waterloo Road – Lower Marsh

2

Promote agreed designs for cycle racks and establish this as an addendum to the Action Plan, relevant planning documentation, and the South Bank Streetscapes Design Guide

3 Ensure suitable levels of parking provision for as recommended in London Plan for all new developments 4

Work with Network Rail, Lambeth, regional bodies and government agencies to implement a secure cycle park or ‘active travel centre’ at Waterloo Station

5

Work with local business groups such as Waterloo Quarter BID to ensure smaller businesses are aware of funding opportunities for cycle parking provision (see page 68)

Special consideration given to working with partners to ensure cycle lanes on bridges are kept clear, particularly from illegal traders

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

5.0

Cycle theft and security

50


Cycle theft and security Cycle theft and security Cycle theft is a major concern among cyclists in the area. 110 respondents had had a cycle stolen in the previous three years, and 76 of them reported this theft to the police. Supported by the St Thomas’ case study on page 56, it can be surmised that police theft statistics reflect substantially fewer than the actual number of thefts occurring in a given period. In Bishop’s Ward, 249 cycles were stolen between April 2008 and March 2009, but in light of the rates of reporting reflected in the survey, it is likely that the figure could be higher. However, there are actions that can be taken to mitigate the impact of crime, and many examples of best practice exist which have resulted in a decrease in theft, including: •

In pursuit of the aims of the Action Plan, the cycle audit sought to determine the security of cycles locked in the study area14. A report mapping crime hotspots against cycle parking provision was compiled by a Metropolitan Police crime analyst. Reported crimes from the period January to December 2009 were cross-referenced against cycle racks in the South Bank area and recommendations were made, which can be found in Appendix 2. In addition, a Metropolitan Police Crime Prevention Design Advisor compiled a report following on-site analysis of the cycle provision in the area, in Appendix 3.

measures to prevent theft such as educating cyclists on how to lock cycles, secure cycle parking, high visibility patrolling and CCTV

• measures to detect theft, including plain clothes patrolling, public vigilance and CCTV In a more general sense, improved facilities encourage more cyclists and therefore greater surveillance, which in turn reduce both the fear of crime and the likelihood of some types of crime13.

13 A Secure Cycle Park for Waterloo Station, London Borough of Lambeth, 2005 14 Not including St Thomas’ Hospital. This location was considered and reported on separately by onsite police.

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Cycle theft and security

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle security in the study area Score

Number of Cycles

0/10

1/10

2/10

3/10

4/10

5/10

6/10

7/10

8/10

9/10

10/10

0

10

20

30

For the audit, cycle security was graded using criteria such as how the cycles were locked and what they were locked to. Data demonstrated a natural spread of behaviour, with a slight tendency towards more insecure locking practices –197 scored 5 or above, and 216 scored 5 or below:

40

50

60

70

80

There were few variations from area to area, and these were principally connected to the availability of cycle racks with security features built into the design, or crime prevention advice nearby, which correlated with improved locking practices. Unsurprisingly, more expensive bikes were locked more carefully and using more expensive locks15. Although this illustrates some understanding amongst the public about how to protect their cycles, in an area with thousands available, thieves still have a large number of poorly locked cycles to choose from.

15 Southwark Cyclists recommend that 20% of the cost of a bike should be spent on its lock.

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Cycle theft and security

It is interesting to note that educative material onsite appears to have a reinforcing effect on locking practices. Cycle rack locations featuring locking advice and guidance contained a higher proportion of securely locked bikes. The Bikeoff sticker in Appendix 5 demonstrates the correct way to lock a bike to a Sheffield stand for maximum security, and reflects the information currently given by police onsite. However, there is also a correlation between the cycle parking locations featuring crime prevention advice and those showing the highest rates of theft. This is reflected in the crime analyst’s report, which states victim negligence does not appear to be a factor. Further study is therefore recommended to understand the relationship between crime prevention advice and theft rates. At present, explanation for the high theft rates in areas where crime prevention advice is posted varies from suggestions that the theft rate would be still higher without the educative material being present, to the idea that the presence of such material encourages disproportionately high reporting of thefts to the police. 55% of cyclists responding to the SBEG survey thought that the police’s response to cycle theft was inadequate, and in their comments reflected a commonly held assumption that the police viewed cycle theft as low priority.

Police and security operations A crime prevention officer post based in Bishop’s Ward was deleted in 2008 in line with Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) policy. The post had been effective in attracting funds to the ward for cycle theft prevention work. Since that time there has been a shift away from dedicated crime prevention officers, in favour of Police Community Support Officers carrying out the crime prevention and advice role. In response to the ongoing high levels of theft, there is an increased police focus on detection with intelligence led patrols, which has resulted in a rise in arrest rate in Bishop’s Ward, (which includes the South Bank): Cycle related crime in Bishops Ward From 1 January – 31 December 2008 Classification

Total Arrests

Theft of Cycle

224

Handling

None

Going equipped * 3

2

3

Cycle related crime in Bishops Ward From 1 January – 31 December 2009 Classification

Total Arrests

Theft of Cycle

262

7

Handling

2

2

Going equipped

1

1

* Going equipped refers to the offence under the Theft Act (1968) of going equipped for stealing.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle theft and security

The ward is principally policed by two local teams. Firstly, the community based Safer Neighbourhoods Team (1 Sergeant, 2 Police Constables (PCs) and four Police Community Support Officers, who have been centrally involved in crime prevention and sting operations, but for whom cycle theft is not a current priority, as set by the Safer Neighbourhood Panel. It is recommended that a case is made for cycling to be prioritised by the Safer Neighbourhoods Panel in order to secure the resource necessary to carry out recommendations.

Details of any specific operations are restricted but in terms of crime prevention, the Police present regular advice sessions to the significant student population in the area and information is attached to cycle racks advising on the best methods with which to lock bikes. Local people are encouraged via various methods to register their property with national databases such as Immobilise.

Secondly, the ‘CONTEST team’ focuses on the riverside, policing the Community Security Zone. The team, which comprises a Police Sergeant, eight PCs and two PCSOs, provides counter terrorism patrols and community policing including duties in relation to cycle theft. CONTEST 2, a second pan-Borough police team is regularly tasked to assist the South Bank CONTEST 1 Team in patrolling where intelligence suggests that a larger police presence may be required in order to prevent crime. The MPS Lambeth Safer Transport Team, funded by TfL has recently adopted cycle crime as a priority, and the Safer Transport Command Police Cycle Task Force also funded by TfL, will mount operations across the capital aimed at reducing organised theft. The London Borough of Lambeth and private landowners provide a patrol service with a focus on illegal trading, public order and information. The service is not tasked to reduce cycle related theft, but discussions might be undertaken to include cycle crime prevention or detection within their remit.

Due to the sustained level of cycle theft in the area, the steering group recommend the provision of further police resource with a focus on theft prevention. The coordination of ongoing operations could serve to increase the arrest rate, particularly amongst organised criminal gangs. This is likely to involve coordinating existing resources such as the Cycle Task Force and Lambeth Safer Transport Team to arrange focused and sustained operations in hot spot areas. It is recommended that crime prevention advice to the public, funded by the TfL, continues wherever possible, including talks at King’s College London Freshers’ Week and in schools (via schools liaison officers), coordinating a wider programme of education, advice and guidance. Where a number of retail outlets specialising in cycle sales are located in Waterloo, an opportunity exists to establish a scheme whereby customers purchasing cycles are encouraged to register them or record frame numbers at point of sale. This is an action currently being progressed via the TfL Cycle Security Working Group and Retailers and Management Forum.

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Cycle theft and security

Although not all the cycles parked in the area are sold in the area, this would represent an innovative response to the problem which could be treated as a pilot and introduced in other areas if it proved successful in retrieving cycles. Registration days at major employers and in the neighbourhood have also proved popular and may be introduced as part of the crime prevention programme. In addition to police patrols, landowners and large businesses can also contribute to the drive to decrease cycle thefts, in the interests of the wellbeing of their staff. Many employers offer a cycle package to employees, including discounted locks, pool bikes and secure cycle parking. Security operations can help by ensuring CCTV is monitored, recorded and images are of sufficient quality to be submitted as evidence. Improving other conditions at cycle stands on both public and private land should also serve to deter theft. The steering group recommend a gradual programme of upgrade to current cycle racks with agreed, secure designs, improving lighting, and installing signage which draws attention to CCTV. The crime prevention report in Appendix 2 enters into some detail about the relative merits of such measures as they apply to the study area. Security staff, particularly on the major riverside estates should remain vigilant and task the public in this also. They should be trained to advise the public on locking techniques and assist in the removal of abandoned cycles, which contribute to a sense of neglect, and, because of the valuable rack space they use, compel other cyclists to lock cycles less securely to railings.

Racks should be located in areas where they are naturally overlooked, particularly by security staff. Existing racks which do not currently benefit from such surveillance include those with the highest theft rate and they should be relocated where feasible. Other initiatives The impact of the Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme on theft rates is unclear. Some security personnel have expressed reservations about the London scheme where cycles in similar schemes such as VĂŠlib in Paris have been stolen in unexpectedly large numbers (3,000 in the first year of operation and 8,000 to date). However, strategic encouragement of the use of the Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme may decrease theft rates of both private and hire cycles if the scheme is sufficiently secure. Thefts have to date, been very low. Also, the increasing popularity of folding cycles such as Bromptons might be encouraged, for instance among larger employers which have the room to store them on behalf of employees. Cultural institutions and other large organisations should also seek to provide storage for visitors who travel by bicycle, wherever possible. This is an increasing challenge for all visitor attractions as they are asked to accommodate increasing numbers of folding cycles in cloakrooms. Efforts should be made to exchange ideas on how this development can be managed.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle theft and security

Case Study St Thomas’ Hospital Situated directly across the Thames from the Houses of Parliament, St Thomas’ is one of the capital’s oldest and most well known hospitals. With a large bed capacity, thousands of visitors, staff and students, and also a focus on healthy living, facilities for large numbers of cyclists are provided.

• A significant majority of cycle thefts occurring were conducted by professional thieves

There are roughly 100 parking spaces for the public, in the form of Sheffield stands around the main entrance from Westminster Bridge Road, which receives 20,000 visitors a day, and at the Evelina Children’s Hospital. In addition, there are 100 spaces for staff in a secure area in the car park. A high concentration of cycles attract thieves and the crime statistics at the hospital support this. The hospital gained a dedicated police resource in 2008, responsible for reducing and preventing crime on the site. A part of this officer’s role is focused on reducing cycle theft, and he has noted a number of observations in the pursuit of this aim:

• Thieves tend to have a good knowledge of the market, and steal cycles that can be easily sold on • Cycles are usually stolen one at a time • There is a rising trend of ‘swap’ thefts – thieves cycling in on bikes which are then discarded for a new acquisition • The age range is broad, from 12 to mid-40s, with approximately ten repeat offenders • If apprehended and charged, sentences are usually confined to community sentences, cautions and fines below £100 •

Natural surveillance is not a significant disincentive to thieves – publicly accessible cycles tend to be stolen during the day, and mainly from Sheffield stands at the main entrance which receives sustained footfall throughout the day. The secure cycle storage area is targeted at night and during weekends

• CCTV footage is rarely of sufficient quality that footage can be used to prove serial offences •

‘Spikes’ in the figures are occasionally observed, including during half term holidays, with a sustained increase over the summer months

• There is a concern about the accuracy of statistics, where reporting is estimated to be around 50% the number of actual thefts • Cycles are sold on usually via internet retail websites or shops • Cycles have been traced to shops not in the vicinity of the hospital

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Cycle theft and security

Routine Activity Theory (RAT) states that when a crime occurs, three factors must be present simultaneously. Firstly, a suitable target (such as a high value bike) is available. Secondly, there is a lack of a ‘capable guardian’ to prevent the crime from occurring. Finally, a likely and motivated offender is present:

Capable Guardian

Crime prevention and detection measures which have been used in St Thomas’ include: • Removal of ‘hot-spot’ cycle stands • Plain clothes patrolling • Increased secure cycle parking provision • Education (including advice stickers, • A-boards, cycle registration days)

Motivated Offender

Suitable Target

All of these have met with some degree of success, but detailed analysis to determine the most successful techniques has not been undertaken. Such analysis is a recommendation of this report.

In the case of cycle theft, of these three factors, it is the ‘capable guardian’ element which is most easily manipulated and this is the area which receives the most investment. The definition of a capable guardian includes CCTV, police, patrolling street wardens etc. However, education of the public is in the longer term an effective tool, in that it can lead to awareness of vulnerability. The purchase of a more expensive lock will not act as a guarantee that the cycle will not be stolen, but it can remove the ‘suitability’ of the target in comparison with other nearby cycles.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Cycle theft and security

Cycle theft and security: summary of recommendations

Crime detection 1 Increased patrolling by police and security staff (also to act as a deterrent)

Crime prevention

2 Increased CCTV surveillance of cycle racks

1 MPS and local authority bike marking/registration days in central areas and at major employers

Secure parking

2 Work with police and retailers to undertake bike marking and registration at point of sale

2 Environmental audit to research factors such as lighting and CCTV

3 Lock discount scheme at workplaces 4 CCTV, recorded and monitored 5 Advice to public about reporting suspected bike thieves 6 Improved lighting at cycle stands

1 Secure cycle parking at Waterloo Station

3 Pool bikes at major employers’ premises and at Waterloo Station 4 Employers to encourage purchase of folding bikes for internal storage 5 Encourage use of Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme through travel plans

7 ‘Secure by design’ bike racks agreed and rolling programme of replacement where funding become available 8 Education on secure locking techniques in partnership with MPS 9 Anti Social Behaviour Orders and injunctions served on repeat offenders

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6.0

Workplace Travel Planning and Behaviour Change

59


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Workplace travel planning and behaviour change Workplace travel planning Travel plans are developed by businesses partly as a way of encouraging staff to travel to work sustainably, for instance by reducing single occupancy car use and encouraging cycling. They address the carbon footprint of the business, whilst reducing congestion, pollution and transport impact in the city at large. They also reduce road danger by encouraging safe modes of transport.

Major organisations within the study area were asked if they had a travel plan in place. Of the nine respondents, six did and five did not: Fig 20 Workplace travel planning by major organisations in study area Have a formal travel plan in place

Have no formal travel plan in place

Shell

St Thomas' Hospital

Southbank Centre

White House Apartments

Travel plans can include measures such as showers and lockers which encourage cycling to work, pool bikes which encourage sustainable travel during the course of the working day, and conference calling facilities and other home working support.

IBM

National Theatre

Waterloo Station

London Eye

Ernst & Young

ITV

Employers also have a responsibility to consider the transport choices and behaviours of both visitors and suppliers. This is of particular note in the South Bank, which receives 22 million visits a year, where many journeys can be made sustainably, and for those organisations which contribute to freight movement on the streets of Waterloo.

It should be noted however that many businesses provide facilities for staff, such as interest free bike loans and discounted locks, without having established a formal travel plan.

Coin Street Community Builders

Travel plans are now a planning requirement for new developments over a certain size and many of the large organisations in the South Bank have them. The quality of travel plans varies however and there is a limited framework for independent monitoring of their application. Instead, statutory authorities that encourage travel plans tend to rely on the economic and environmental benefits to encourage businesses to deliver them.

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Workplace travel planning and behaviour change

Fig 21 Parking provision against targets Company/ Site No of Secure cycle No of Employees parking spaces recommendation

London Plan

Actual figure 2 per 20 staff

Southbank Centre

100 1000

1 per 20 staff

National Theatre

50 800

1 per 20 staff 1.25 per 20 staff

IBM

100 1800 (est.)

1 per 250 staff

14 per 250 staff

Shell

120 3000

1 per 250 staff

10 per 250 staff

Ernst & Young (Beckett House)

30 1200

1 per 125 staff

3 per 125 staff

London Eye

8 349

1 per 10 staff

0.2 per 10 staff

St Thomas’ Hospital

100 4800

1 per 5 staff

0.1 per 5 staff

Waterloo Station

5 2490

Not available

0.02 per 10 staff

Of the respondents to the business questionnaire, the above parking spaces were provided for staff (see Fig 21). Employers vary in terms of their provision of cycle parking for staff, and the London Eye and St Thomas’ Hospital are under-providing according to London Plan recommendations. However, under-provision is not uncommon in central London locations and businesses continue to show commitment to increasing numbers of secure parking spaces for employees. There is little correlation between those businesses that have a workplace travel plan in place and the number of cycle parking spaces they provide as a percentage of employee numbers. However, this could be attributable to a number of factors, including the space available.

As part of the Lambeth Carbon Reduction Partnership project, Lambeth Council is working with TfL to encourage business not already implementing a travel plan to do so, with consideration for the cycle-related recommendations of this report. In addition, Lambeth’s Business Travel Network (LBTN) has funding for regular events aimed at encouraging businesses across the Borough to encourage staff to travel sustainably. Workplace travel planning presents an opportunity to strategically implement measures which encourage sustainable travel such as cycling, on an area-wide level. The London Borough of Southwark’s neighbouring Business Improvement District, Better Bankside, has developed a ‘Master Travel Plan’ including ‘global’ targets for encouraging sustainable travel amongst the employee population. It is recommended that, sensitive to the impacts on neighbouring distances, an area wide approach is adopted for travel planning in the study area.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Such area-wide approaches could encourage implementation funding from TfL, through the Better Routes and Places (BRaP) team, and funds which are being released to make improvements along the Mayor’s Cycle Superhighway routes. This is already being considered as part of the preparation for the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games, where pressures on the transport network will compel businesses to develop mitigation plans in terms of staff travel. South Bank Employers’ Group are leading on this locally. At the other end of the scale, the travel planning framework can be adopted by individuals, who can act as local champions within their organisations. An example is the ‘Bicycle Users Group’ (BUG), which works inside an organisation to improve facilities for cycling employees. Such groups are to be encouraged via the Action Plan, and best practice can be drawn upon inter-organisationally, via a local sustainable transport group, which forms one of the key recommendations of this report.

“ Luckily my work does provide showers. What would encourage me to cycle would be an expert to advise me on my safest route to work and who could advise me on cycle etiquette” Survey respondent

The ‘London Cycle Challenge’ initiative will encourage local businesses to compete to accumulate commuter miles made by bike, and get the most number of employees cycling16. It is recommended that the challenge is run in the Olympic year to encourage participation in healthy activity and react to the need to achieve pressure on the transport network during the games. Some workplaces will also offer incentives such as five minutes of holiday time for each return commuter trip made, up to a maximum of 2.5 days per year. The delivery element of this Action Plan will seek to tie these activities together to ensure best practice can be replicated across the South Bank area, in order to encourage active travel amongst employees.

In addition, employers might be encouraged to sign the Department for Transport charter, known as the ‘Cycle to Work Guarantee’. This has already been adopted by the NHS, and commits hospital management to providing certain minimum standards for cycling employees, including showers, lockers, and other elements discussed above.

16 www.cyclechallenge.tfl.gov.uk

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Workplace travel planning and behaviour change

Recommendations Workplace travel planning 1 Develop coordinated approach to travel planning within the study area, and in consultation with neighbouring districts 2

Arrange bespoke travel planning advice from TfL Better Routes and Places Business Engagement Team, including itemised capital measures listed for each business

3

Encourage employers to sign the Department for Transport’s Cycle to Work Guarantee, committing them to providing minimum standards for cycling employees:

– Bike repair available for cyclists on or near site – An implementation plan including targets for take-up, training and incentives to cycle 4 Launch a local inter-organisational ‘London Cycle Challenge’ competition in summer 2012 5

– Secure, safe and accessible bike parking facilities for all staff who request them – High quality changing and locker facilities for all staff who request them – Offset the cost of cycling equipment through the tax savings of the ‘cycle to work’ scheme

63

Encourage the formation of employee Bicycle Users Groups (BUGs) by disseminating best practice, template terms of reference etc


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Workplace travel planning and behaviour change

Behaviour change

Lambeth Council offers a free or discounted cycle training programme which is recommended as part of the Action Plan. Anyone living or working in the South Bank and Waterloo area should be given the opportunity to receive training where a need is identified. It is envisaged by the steering group that courses could be made a pre-requisite of interest free or bike loan or pool bike schemes offered by employers.

One of the key aims of the South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan as agreed by the steering group was to propose an ongoing programme of education along the following two themes: – Road user behaviour – Cycle security and crime prevention Although physical measures are one tool available to improve outcomes for cyclists, educating the public is equally important in ensuring accidents and thefts are reduced over the long term. This is recognised in the Lambeth Cycle Strategy. Road user behaviour Examples of road user behaviour that might be discouraged using education and training include: – Cycling on pavements – Careless driving – Speeding – Illegal parking in cycle lanes – Vehicles parking on the footway – Illegal use of Advanced Stop Lines by vehicles Through its Road Danger Reduction Strategy, the Council is committed to achieving a reduction in the number of people killed or seriously injured (KSI) on the Borough’s roads and at the same time encourage take-up of cycling. According to the Department for Transport, one way of balancing these aspirations is to ensure that those cyclists taking to the road have the requisite skills to cycle safely.

Any commitment required of the employer in terms of lost staff hours or financial contribution should be sufficiently low so as not to act as a disincentive. Where it has been demonstrated that many collisions involve HGV’s, a way of reducing the KSI figures is to train drivers of large vehicles to be aware of the limitation to their lines of sight. This is particularly relevant to drivers regularly serving the South Bank businesses such as the National Theatre, the Southbank Centre and ITV, all major businesses located on a busy cycle route. Lambeth provides JAUPT (‘Joint Approvals Unit for HGV Periodic Training’) at no cost and will continue to promote opportunities to South Bank businesses. Consideration will also be given for the many coach drivers that serve the area. With major developments planned for the area, an increase in site traffic will make the need for such training greater.

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Workplace travel planning and behaviour change

In the case of staff or regular drivers, it is recommended that employers’ provide opportunities for drivers to receive cycle awareness training on site. Employees who use fleet vehicles should also be given cycle awareness training. Lambeth Council won the London Cycling Campaign’s ‘Best Workplace Cycling Initiative’ award for a Exchanging Places scheme delivered with Veolia. This encouraged cyclists to ‘try out’ the cab of Veolia vehicles and receive a detailed explanation of the problem of blind spots by Cycle Training (UK). At the same time, Veolia fleet drivers were given cycle training to improve their understanding of cyclists’ needs. Such innovative schemes encourage empathy among road users and might be easily replicated in the South Bank and Waterloo neighbourhood. On the River Walk joint operations between the police and the local authority should be undertaken to educate cyclists on the River Walk about dangerous or antisocial cycling, with the definition of dangerous or antisocial cycling to be within agreed and reasonable parameters in consultation with cyclists.

“ With a little sensitivity on both sides pedestrians and cyclists co-exist” Survey respondent

Cycle security In order to reduce theft, it is recommended that a major and ongoing programme of education is developed between landowners, the police and local authority community safety divisions to advise cyclists on security issues across the neighbourhood. This would be targeted towards visitors to the South Bank, (residents and employees tend to have secure parking available) and would be conducted entirely in the public realm, in the vicinity of public cycle parking provision. The programme should be developed in consultation with field experts such as St Martin’s DAC Unit, and the Metropolitan Police, and might include elements such as: 1 Police/PCSO advice days at cycle stands 2 Leafleting in cycle shops and in other targeted locations 3 Information labels attached to bike racks 4 Labels attached to bikes rating lock/ locking technique 5 Bike registration days 6 Talks to students at King’s College London Freshers’ Week

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Behaviour change: summary of recommendations

Cycle security/correct bike locking practices

Cycling and driving behaviour

2 Leafleting

1

3 Etching/labels on bike racks

Large employers and local authority to offer “JAUPT” training for drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs), coaches and fleet vehicles to become cycle aware. Programme to be extended to all drivers, costs permitting

2 Cycle confidence training for employees and local people – companies with pool bikes encouraged to provide training to staff

1 Police/Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) onsite advice

4 Labels attached to bikes rating lock/ locking technique 5 Bike registration days 6 Talks to students at King’s College London Freshers’ Week

3 Police and local authority advice operations on the River Walk 4

Sustained enforcement of traffic laws to protect cyclists and pedestrians from stopping cycling on pavements, issuing tickets for parking in bus/cycle lanes, and illegal use of Advanced Stop Lines

66


Other cycling initiatives: summary of recommendations Some other recommendations are made which do not relate to the themes above. These may be categorised as overarching, strategic recommendations which facilitate the delivery of the aims and objectives. They are: Active Travel Group 1

It is recommended that an active travel group formed from local stakeholders should be created which acts as a delivery body for the Action Plan and promotes sustainable travel options. Reporting to the Visitor Management Group, chaired by the London Borough of Lambeth, the group would also help to identify and pool public and private investment from available sources.

This group would promote public transport and walking as well as cycling, including overseeing the local response to the South Bank and Bankside Legible London wayfinding pilot.

Neighbourhood working 2

Collaboration on appropriate policy initiatives with other neighbourhood delivery bodies on the riverside such as Better Bankside and Team London Bridge will enable greater bargaining power and strategic consistency. Such initiatives might include major events travel planning, a better bulk purchasing deal for equipment, and costs savings on joint marketing and education programmes.

Supporting local employment 3

67

Work should be undertaken with smaller businesses to ensure benefits for smaller local employers, including local procurement of goods and services where possible. Examples might include the promotion of a local bike repair pick up service, and a local cycle repair initiative run by a local homelessness charity. Local supply chains will result in benefits to micro businesses.


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

7.0

Funding

68


Funding There are a number of funding streams which can be accessed to deliver improvements. These are summarised below. Section 106 Section 106 funding, or ‘planning gain’ constitutes a legal agreement between a local authority and a developer which seeks to mitigate the impact of the development. It usually, but not always, comprises a capital sum, to be set against a number of predefined objectives, including extra school places, parking for residents, public realm improvements, and so on.

Section 106 funding generally allocated to public realm, streetscapes or traffic and highway schemes can also be used for cycle schemes. It is recommended that agreement is reached with developers to ‘pool’ Section 106 funding to deliver strategic priorities on cycling in the area, rather than ad hoc cycle provision. The London Eye revenue Section 106 funded the South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan and may be a potential source of funding for the delivery of some recommendations.

There are a number of negotiated Section 106 agreements against approved developments which could assist in delivering the capital measures set out in the recommendations section of this report, on page 49. In addition, the following agreements in Fig 22 are yet to be activated: Fig 22 Section 106 Agreements containing cycling provision

Section 106 Agreements containing cycling provision Development

Amount

Description

General Lying in Hospital £50,000

Implementation of cycle parking/cycle lane along York Road (or any other cycle related project)

York House Unknown Lambeth Place Road

Provision for 357 private and 46 public secure cycle parking spaces.

1 Westminster Bridge Road £994,044

Improvement of public transport facilities (including pedestrian and cyclist facilities). Committed to Lower Marsh Regeneration Project.

Land to the rear of the £285,106 General Lying in Hospital

Public Transport payment for improvement of public transport facilities including walking and cycling Committed to Lower Marsh Regeneration Project.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Funding

Greater London Authority/ Transport for London Transport for London’s former ‘Cycle Centre for Excellence’ has been a past supporter of projects, including subsidy for the London Bridge Bike Park, and in the development of any equivalent at Waterloo would be asked to contribute expertise if no funding is available. Internal reorganisation at TfL is now complete and the Better Routes and Places team within the Surface Transport Directorate, are engaged in an ongoing dialogue with stakeholders, to ensure the delivery of recommendations.

Funding is also available via the Mayor for pre-Olympic public realm improvements. Although this is planned for major area-based schemes, these are likely to include measures for cyclists as a matter of course.

In addition, the BRaP’s Business Engagment Team funds large businesses to implement measures which contribute to sustainable transport or workplace travel planning, including showers, lockers, secure cycle storage etc, and the corporate programme offers consultancy support for implementing travel plans.

Following TfL’s Junctions Review in Spring 2012, £1m was made available to improve the IMAX roundabout for the safety of cyclists. Local agencies, Lambeth and TfL will work together to identify and implement an appropriate scheme as part of a wider project to improve pedestrian and cycle routes through the area.

Following budgetary reorganisation, it is envisaged that support will still be available to businesses, which will have to demonstrate eligibility in relation to a number of criteria, which could include proximity or strategic links to the Olympic site, proximity to Barclays Cycle Superhighways or other cycle infrastructure.

Local authorities Lambeth and Southwark Councils are allocated funding to deliver the Mayor’s Transport Strategy through the Local Implementation Plan. There are a number of projects scheduled for delivery Boroughwide, including capital schemes already identified in the CRISP report (see page 30), and initiatives such as cycle training and new parking provision

Small grants of up to £10,000 are available via the Community Cycling Fund for London (CCFfL) to promote cycling in communities. Administered via TfL and the Big Lottery Fund, grants can fund bicycles, training and other initiatives which encourage cycling. TfL’s ‘Take a Stand’ initiative also offers grants for cycle racks to small to medium enterprises.

70


Funding

The Transport and Highways and Transport Planning and Strategy Divisions allocate budget to the maintenance of cycle routes, and the implementation of new measures, such as advanced stop lines (ASLs) and cycle lanes. Strategic measures such as cycle training and driver safety are also carried out via the Transport Planning and Strategy Division. Community Safety Divisions contribute funding for improvements where they impact on security. These could include measures to decrease cycle theft such as improved lighting, security enhanced cycle racks and education programmes. Funding for similar improvements has been made available on an ad hoc basis via the Metropolitan Police and Home Office.

It is also possible that, as in the case of a severely space restricted area such as the South Bank and Waterloo, employers could take a neighbourhood view and invest collectively in centralised provision where space is available. Therefore if businesses are unable for reasons of space to provide secure cycle parking, they could contribute investment towards a central facility. Alternatively, were such a facility to be built, businesses could lease a number of parking spaces on behalf of their employees, as a staff benefit.

Private investment Employers are increasingly investing in cycle facilities for their staff either in a formalised way through workplace travel planning and cycle strategies, or on a more ad hoc basis. The increasing number of Bicycle User Groups (BUGs) gives employees a collective voice with which to encourage investment.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

8.0

Evaluating the Action Plan

72


Evaluating the Action Plan We have seen how as cycling becomes ever more popular it impacts on various operational aspects of the community in different ways. In the process of responding to requests for information, stakeholders in the South Bank and Waterloo neighbourhood have shown considerable support for a rationalisation of cycle policy.

In this way it will be possible to analyse the relative efficacy of the recommendations, which will contribute to the case for future funding, and the initiatives to be funded. Data collection will be overseen by the Active Travel Group at the end of the five-year delivery period but impacts will be monitored throughout.

Insofar as it is possible, the recommendations are a reflection of a balance of the views put forward. They represent the desire to encourage cycling where the benefits of doing so are indisputable, within controlled and practical parameters.

The neighbourhood approach is also one which can be replicated in other areas of Lambeth to enable communities to encourage sustainable travel locally.

It is vital to measure the impact of the Action Plan as its phases are delivered. Impact will be measured against: a Baseline data collected in the attitudinal survey b Baseline data collected in the provision audit c Crime statistics d Accident figures e Workplace travel planning participation

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

9.0

Delivery Plan

74


Delivery Plan

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan

The plan sets out the aspirational targets for delivery in partnership with other agencies, and is contingent on the identification of further funding, and the formation of the Active Travel Group, which can oversee its delivery.

The plan seeks to deliver the recommendations of this Action Plan within five years, in partnership with local authorities, the Mayor’s agencies and other key stakeholders.

Recommendation

Delivered by

Responsible party

Formal adoption of Action Plan

Jun 2012

LBL

Establish South Bank Active Travel Group (ATG) to oversee travel planning and education elements of the Action Plan

Oct 2012

SBEG/LBL

Inaugural annual meeting of ATG to agree ToR etc

Oct 2012

SBEG/LBL

Quarterly meetings of group to deliver plan’s recommendations by theme

Ongoing

All

Consultation on 20mph speed limit for Spine Route

Autumn 2012

LBL

Recommend and carry out short term improvements to Cycle Route 4 at Belvedere Road including repair of surfaces and relaying of raised tables

Summer 2013

LBL

Negotiate with landowner to improve Belvedere Road cycle route

Summer 2013

Develop training and train highways inspectors to monitor cycle routes and compile ongoing programme of recommendations

Summer 2013

LBL

Improvements to cycling provision to both sides of Westminster Bridge Road at the junctions with Belvedere Road and Addington Street

Summer 2014

LBL/TfL

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Delivery Plan

Recommendation

Delivered by

Responsible party

Recommend and carry out general programme of improvements in study area, including ASLs, cycle lane enhancements etc

Ongoing

SBEG/LBL/TfL

Agree, design and implement new cycle parking provision according to recommendations

Winter 2011 and ongoing

SBEG/LBL

Work with Network Rail to implement secure cycle park at Waterloo Station

Summer 2012

SBEG/TfL/LBL/ Network Rail

Agree resourcing with police

Winter 2011

SBEG/LBL

Establish resources for ongoing crime prevention programme as recommended in the Action Plan including:

Dec 2012

Police/South Bank Business Watch

Spring 2013

Police/South Bank Business Watch

• Bike marking days • Advice and guidance to public • Presentation to freshers • Surveillance • Lighting improvements • ASBOs and injunctions • Develop an enforcement plan and enforce in areas where cycling is prohibited Establish resources for ongoing employer crime prevention programme as recommended in the Action Plan including: • • • •

Discounted lock and pool bike scheme Improved cycle racks and lighting Bike marking days Advice and guidance to public

76

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan Continued


Delivery Plan

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan Continued

Recommendation

Delivered by

Responsible party

Automatic cycle registration scheme at point of purchase established

2013

TfL

CCTV improvement scheme

2013

SBEG/South Bank CCTV Users Group

Develop or refine travel plans for major businesses of South Bank and Waterloo

Autumn 2013

ATG/TfL/LBL

Arrange package of measures for employees, including:

Autumn 2013

ATG/ Business/ Community Groups/ LBL

Work with smaller employers to ensure benefits are spread, including procurement of goods and services

Summer 2013

SBEG/ ATG/WQBID

Evaluation of impacts of improvement against baseline data

2014–16

ATG

Cycling conference

2013 and 2016

SBEG/ ATG

• Cycle maintenance sessions • Cycle and driver awareness training (also available to public) • Interest free bike loans

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

10.0

Appendix 1

Appendices

78


Appendix 2

Cornwall Road Proposed Cycle Route Improvements This scheme has been implemented as of December 2010.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix 2

Theft of Pedal Cycle Offences within South Bank Area in 2009 Area Covered by the South Bank Police Team.

01/01/2009 – 08/12/2009 Author: Matt Gale, Intelligence Analyst, Safer Neighbourhoods Desk, Lambeth Intelligence Unit, Date 08/12/2009 Introduction This document provides a brief summary of cycle theft crime patterns within the South Bank team’s area (Lambeth Borough), during 2009.

Terms of Reference Sgt Ronan Donohue of Lambeth’s South Bank Team requested the following data: •

List of monthly figures for pedal cycle theft during 2009. (Note: December’s figures are incomplete, as this work was completed on 8th December 2009).

• Locations where offences have taken place. • Analysis of where the offences occur in relation to currently existing cycle racks or parking areas. •

80

The work specifically looks at the area covered by the South Bank team, as defined in the map below (the un-shaded area within the red outline).


Appendix 2

Key findings/inferences 1 The main area for offences was the area around the Southbank Centre (Hayward Gallery, Royal Festival Hall and National Theatre area). 2

The majority of bikes were stolen from the provided bike racks, where they were adequately locked and secured. Victim negligence does not appear to be a factor.

3 Cutters were sometimes used by suspects to free bikes from their locks. 4

The main times of day for offences were noted to be the afternoon and evening periods. Very few offences occurred in the morning or overnight.

5

Existing CCTV coverage may or may not have a deterrent effect upon cycle theft crime. However, CCTV has been ineffective in terms of catching offenders.

6

Several informants said that they observed suspicious people loitering around the bike racks, and in some cases taking bikes. There are a number of possible explanations for non-reporting of such instances, including lack of information about who to report thefts to, the perceived seriousness of the offence and time factors.

Recommendations 1 Environmental audit to research factors such as lighting and CCTV coverage around the existing bicycle racks. 2 A more visible presence from security staff around the complex, especially during the busy afternoon and evening periods. 3

A higher awareness of bicycle theft amongst all staff. Staff to alert the Police on days when they believe bicycle thieves are operating, according to an agreed protocol.

4 Introduction of a system of labelling for each bike rack to help link bicycle racks to CCTV cameras. 5

Provide some sort of ‘call point’ within venues at the complex where informants can report concerns about suspicious people around the bike racks or other areas of the complex. A protocol could be developed for venue staff to know what action to take if such a report is received.

Crime Pattern Analysis Offences Per Month Pedal Cycle Thefts Jan-09

– 6

Jul-09

– 10

Feb-09

– 7

Aug-09

– 10

Mar-09

– 8

Sep-09

– 17

Apr-09

– 18

Oct-09

– 10

May-09 – 10

Nov-09

– 11

Jun-09

Dec-09

–2

– 18

81

Total – 127


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix 2

Locations of offences

The following maps show the reported locations for Theft of Pedal Cycle allegations during the period 01/01/2009 to 08/12/2009. It can be seen that the majority of offences have occurred in the area around the Southbank Centre (Royal Festival Hall, Hayward Gallery and Queen Elizabeth Hall) and National Theatre. The map shows the offences in that area in more detail.

82


Appendix 2

It should be noted that although there are 21 circles on the map, these actually represent 96 offences. This is because the ‘Geocoding’ process for crime locations sometimes places more than one crime in the same place. This would tend to make sense because cyclists will tend to park their bikes in similar locations – for instance in bike racks, or by attaching them to conveniently placed railings. This figure of 96 offences represents approximately 75% of all cycle theft offences within the South Bank area during 2009. It is also worth noting that four of the circles appear to be on Waterloo Bridge. These four stars represent ten offences.

Offences on and under Waterloo Bridge Of the ten offences that appear on the map to have taken place on Waterloo Bridge, nine were in fact under the Bridge, on Belvedere Road, or at bike racks or railings outside the National Theatre or British Film Institute. Of these nine, all were secured with D-Locks or chains. Five of these were secured to proper bike racks, and four were attached to other fixtures such as railings or trees. There was one offence that did actually take place on the bridge. The bike was secured with a chain, although the CRIS report is not specific about what it was attached to.

However, a more detailed study of these ten offences reveals that in fact most of them occurred underneath the bridge.

83


Appendix 2

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Reading through the CRIS reports for a random sample of twenty offences reveals the following breakdown of ways that bikes were secured when they were taken: Locked

Railings

Cable

Y

Note: ‘n/k’ denotes ‘not known’ ‘y’ in the locked column indicates the bike was locked, but the type of lock was not specified

Cycle rack

Other

Method Cut

D-lock

Y

Not known

D-lock

Y

Not known

Cable

Y

Not known

Not known

Y

Not known

Y

Y

Cut

Not Known

Y

Not known

Chain Y

Y

Not known Y

Cut

Cable

Signpost

Not known

Y

Y

Not known

Y

Y

Not known

Y

Y

Cut

Y

Y

Not known

Y

Y

Not known

Cable

Y

Not known

Chain

Y

Not known

Y

Y

Removed wheel from frame and took frame

Y D-lock

n/k Y

Cut Not known

84


Appendix 2

From this sample we can infer the following about the thefts of pedal cycles around the South Bank complex: • Nearly all victims locked their bikes in some way • 80% of victims had used the provided cycle racks •

It is not possible to surmise in many cases how suspects overcame the locks. However, using cutting equipment to cut through the lock is the main method used by suspects.

CCTV Some of the CRIS reports referred to CCTV cameras pointing at the bike racks in question. However, in most cases there seemed to be a reason why the CCTV did not assist investigators. Sometimes this was because the victim was unable to say which particular rack the bike was taken from. In other cases the camera was not trained accurately enough on the rack in question.

Recommendations 1 Environmental audit to research factors such as lighting and CCTV coverage around the existing bicycle racks. 2 A more visible presence from security staff around the complex, especially during the busy afternoon and evening periods. 3

A higher awareness of bicycle theft amongst all staff. Staff to alert the Police on days when they believe bicycle thieves are operating, according to an agreed protocol.

4 Introduction of a system of labelling for each bike rack to help link bicycle racks to CCTV cameras. 5

Other features of the CRIS reports Some informants and victims mentioned in CRIS reports that they had seen suspicious people loitering around the bike rack areas. It was not clear why victims did not report this to anyone, but possible reasons might be: • they did not know who to report it to • they were in a hurry as they were in the area to attend a performance Several victims were unclear about which precise rack they had left their bike in. This information may have been useful for the Police in tracing CCTV images.

85

Provide some sort of ‘call point’ within venues at the complex where informants can report concerns about suspicious people around the bike racks or other areas of the complex. A protocol could be developed for venue staff to know what action to take if such a report is received.


Appendix 2

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Days and times of offences

Number of offences occuring throughout the week

Monday

Times of Day

Tuesday

2300+

Wednesday

2200+

Thursday

2100+

Friday

2000+

Saturday

1900+

Sunday

1800+

Number 0 of offences per week

5

10

15

20

25

Days, times and number of offences

1700+ 1600+ 1500+

The chart above shows that offences occur throughout the week, with a drop on Sundays and Mondays, and peaks on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

1400+ 1300+ 1200+ 1100+ 1000+ 0900+ 0800+ 0700+ 0600+ 0500+ 0400+ 0300+ 0200+ 0100+ 0000+

0

5

Times This chart shows two peak periods: 1 early afternoon, around 1400hrs 2 evening period, 1900 to 2200hrs There were very few overnight crimes.

86

10

15


Appendix 3

Metropolitan Police Security Survey South Bank Cycle Crime Reduction Purpose The purpose of this report is to make crime reduction recommendations based on the current situation regarding cycle parking on the South Bank. The main problem area as identified by recent analysis is the area near to the main arts complex on the South Bank. Overview Cycle crime (Theft of Cycle) has increased incrementally as a consequence of greater numbers of people using cycles as a means of commuting or for leisure and lifestyle reasons. This increase in crime is fuelled by the demand for high value cycles and their overall accessibility and convenience. It is theorised that many stolen bikes are used as personal transportation by the suspect that stole the bike or sold through their own contacts locally or through internet auction sites. Location The South Bank and the Waterloo area with its arts and business links and vibrant day and night economy has historically been popular with commuters, tourists and residents as a place to visit or cycle to and consequently this area has a high transient population at varying times of the day and night. There is a need for secure high quality cycle storage and parking facilities to cope with increased demand.

Situation and Issues • The current cycle parking provision comprises on-street Sheffield stands for cyclists to secure their cycles to with their own locks. There are several issues that arise regarding current provision. •

Sheffield stands are often not fitted securely or anchored to the ground and can be simply lifted off their base mounts or forced gaining access to the bicycle.

• They are often placed in areas with limited surveillance opportunities. •

CCTV cameras are often of poor quality and badly sited or are often diverted to look at vehicular traffic or pedestrian activity and not the cycle provision.

• Lighting is often not adequate to deter criminal activity. •

Due to the design of the Sheffield Stand and the U locks commonly in circulation it is relatively easy to force the locks by applying torsion with a piece of wood or similar implement. This is made easier because most cyclists are not aware of the correct way to secure their cycle to stop this from happening.

• Bolt cutters are also sometimes used to facilitate the theft often in broad daylight in view of passers-by. • Crime reports are often not filed with the Police as the victim may perceive that recovery of their cycle is unlikely. Usually a report is only filed when the cycle is insured and the victim requires a crime number. Reporting often occurs at a later date. • On a related note, cycle stands should be placed a recommended minimum of 50 metres away from critical infrastructure for reasons of deterring terrorism.

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix 3

Successful crime reduction strategies • Several London Boroughs have addressed the problems of cycle theft in the past few years, including Haringey who have instituted several initiatives to reduce the impact of cycle theft by installing (with TfL) a storage facility near Finsbury Park Tube station that is manned by an attendant. Cyclists pay 50 pence for storage per day. The units did require a capital outlay but have proved a huge success in both usage and reduction in cycle related crime. It is interesting to note that the public are prepared to pay for cycle storage. As long as it is conveniently located and manned, this gives the person some level of reassurance that their cycle is still going to be there when they return. •

Another measure that has been successful is redesigning the Sheffield stands from an upside down U shape to a profile resembling the letter ‘M’. This enables a cycle to be secured at two points around the frame with two locks, thus reducing the risk that the bike will be attacked. This method requires signage and instructions to educate the cyclist in the correct way to secure their cycle to the stands but it is very effective.

One further option is encouraging cycle registration via the Immobilise website which is a free service and has had some success in recovering stolen property and gaining convictions.

Observations I can make the following comments, based on direct observation of 37 South Bank and Waterloo cycle provision locations: •

Location is very important – the Sheffield stands and racks that were in the most prominent positions with good natural surveillance all round, lighting and CCTV were the most popular.

Many of the facilities were full and it is clear that demand is high at the most popular locations near Belvedere Road because some users utilise trees and railings to chain their cycle.

Many facilities were likely placed as an afterthought to satisfy their service provision requirements with little regard to crime issues, increasing user risk.

Managed areas are the best places to store a cycle. Broken cycles attached to Sheffield stands and neglected cycles which have been there for a long time appear to put people off using that rack and consequently give off the wrong impression to anyone that crime and neglect is permissible and accepted in this location.

Clear signage at many locations indicating the location of the racks/ stands is needed. New signage is appearing at certain locations however that may address this point.

There is no manned cycle facility throughout the South Bank area as described above in use at Finsbury Park. All existing cycle provision comprises fixed stands or racks as described.

Many employers store their employees’ cycles within their office building as it is safer than using a street based rack or stand.

The heaviest demand seemed to be close to Waterloo Station terminus and the South Bank close to the Arts centre although this could vary due to times of the day.

88


Appendix 3

Recommendations • Whilst stands and racks are useful when coupled with good CCTV coverage, natural surveillance and adequate lighting, they can often lead to clutter in the street environment and reduce pedestrian space and sightlines. Due to heavy demand in the South Bank area it is clear that better provision and enhanced security for users is needed. •

There is a need to establish a large manned cycle storage facility either in cooperation with Waterloo Station or separately in the immediate South Bank area. Although it would need some capital outlay, this should be able to generate some revenue to sustain its operation at the same time as providing a secure and useful service. I think that most people who come to the South Bank would be willing to pay for this service if it was offered and it could have the advantages of generating business and reducing criminal opportunities for the surrounding area.

The existing racks/stands should be checked to see if they are securely anchored and marked with stickers showing how to correctly use the stand and offering crime prevention advice covering registration for example. Maps and additional lighting and CCTV should be considered at these locations. It is most important however that manned security patrol and manage these sites to ensure that some measure of ownership is established and in order to keep the facilities clean and as inviting as possible.

• Employers should ideally provide internal cycle lockers or storage that is managed for staff and visitors. •

If new street stands are considered in suitable locations they should be of the new M type design and not the standard Sheffield design. The new design offers other benefits in that it reduces loitering due to the fact they can’t be sat on or leant against.

Robert Harrison PC 342 LX Crime Prevention Design Advisor Lambeth Borough Police Division

Related information www.bikeoff.org

89


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix 4

South Bank and Waterloo Abandoned Bicycles Policy As the area has become friendlier to cyclists, the number of abandoned bicycles has grown. Not only do abandoned bicycles represent an eyesore, but they take up valuable bike parking spaces, may present trip hazards, and are a potential target for thieves. The South Bank Employers’ Group acts on behalf of local businesses to dispose of abandoned bicycles, bicycle components and locks, and our policy is set out below. Bike locks All bike locks without bikes attached to be removed and disposed of as and when they are identified.

Bikes 1 Clean Team and Graffiti Team to carry a stock of tags. When likely abandoned bikes are identified, operatives will tag the bike and take a photograph. 2 The tag will contain the following information: • The date the bicycle was tagged as abandoned • The date the bike will be removed by the South Bank Maintenance Team (2 weeks after tag date) • Bike’s model, colour, frame number and any identifying features • Works ID number of the SBMT operative tagging the bicycle • SBMT contact details The following statement should also be added to the tag: “This bicycle has been identified as abandoned and will be removed on or after [date] by the South Bank Maintenance Team. If you are the legal owner, please contact [telephone number] to inform us you have removed it or of your intention to do so. Once removed by South Bank Maintenance Team, the bicycle will be recycled.”

90


Appendix 4

3

Private landowners websites to carry a message saying all bikes left for two weeks or more will be removed and recycled. Signage carrying the same message is to be placed in the South Bank environment.

4

Details of the bike’s model, frame number and/or any identifying features will be logged at SBEG weekly and passed to the Metropolitan Police for cross checking against database of stolen bikes.

5

On the Friday after the tag expiry date all bikes and components will be taken to Lillian Baylis Old School on Lollard St, SE1, where they will be stored securely for two weeks. At this point, liability for the cycles will pass to the Sports Action Zone (SAZ).

6 After two weeks, if not collected by police, cycles and components will be separated into three categories: – Damaged cycle components, damaged frames etc. These will be collected by Lambeth’s bulk collection service on a regular basis, as arranged by SAZ. – Repairable cycles and useable components. These will become the responsibility of the SAZ/Young person’s cycle maintenance project. Weekly sessions will be run for local young people to bring cycles into useable condition for their own use. Those that are fixed but not claimed by young people participating in the project will be passed to the Kid’s Company. Spare parts will be disposed of as (a) above. – Working cycles in good condition. These will be given to local young people taking the after school cycle maintenance classes. Those not distributed in this way will be collected by the Kid’s Company Charity, for distribution amongst client user group. Upon collection liability for cycles and their use will pass to the Kids Company Charity.

91


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix 5

Attitudinal Survey Results Of the different modes of transport, please indicate how different groups are currently prioritised in the area by transport planners, with 1 being the highest priority, 4 being the lowest.

0 Buses Motorists

200

400

Of the different modes of transport, please indicate how different groups should be prioritised in the area by transport planners, with 1 being the highest priority, 4 being the lowest.

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

600

0

Pedestrians Cyclists

200

Buses Motorists

92

400 Pedestrians Cyclists

600

800


Appendix 5

Reason for being in South Bank and Waterloo area South Bank/ Waterloo resident

If you are coming from outside the area, how do you usually get to South Bank and Waterloo? On Foot

South Bank/ Waterloo business owner

By Car

South Bank/ Waterloo employee

By Bike

Regular commuter through the area

By Train

By Bus

By Tube

Visitor to the area

By Motorbike By Riverboat

0

50

100

150

200

250

By Taxi

0

To complete the survey, please let us know if you are:

Predominately a Non-Cyclist Predominately a Cyclist

93

50

100

150

200

250

300 350


Appendix 5

South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Non Cyclists: Which most accurately reflects your feelings about each statement? I would feel safe cycling in South Bank & Waterloo Cycle routes in South Bank & Waterloo are in a good condition I am concerned by cyclists who break the rules (e.g. cycling on the pavement) I would be more inclined to cycle if there was secure parking available I would be more inclined to cycle if there were more bike racks in South Bank & Waterloo I am satisfied with the way the police address bike theft Cycle racks and locked bikes clutter the pavement I intend to make use of the publicy available bikes which will be present For local employees only I would be more inclined to cycle to work 0

50

100

Strongly agree Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree Don’t know Strongly disagree

94

150

200


Appendix 5

Cyclists: Which most accurately reflects your feelings about each statement? I feel safe cycling in South Bank & Waterloo Cycle routes in South Bank& Waterloo are in a good condition I am concerned by cyclists who break the rules (e.g. cycling on the pavement) There is sufficient cycle parking in the area Bikes are safe if they are locked in the area I would cycle more if there was secure parking available I would cycle more if there where more bike racks in South Bnk and Waterloo I am satisified the way the police addresses bike theft Cycle racks and locked bikes clutter the pavement I intend to make use of the publicly available bikes Other

0

50

100

150

Strongly agree Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree Don’t know Strongly disagree

95

200

250

300

350


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix 5

Crime prevention advice on site in study area

96


Appendix 5

Bibliography Places Streets and Movement Companion Guide Traffic Advisory Leaflet DfT 2009

Streetscapes Design Guide South Bank Employers’ Group 2004

Stand and deliver: Cycle parking in London GLA Transport Committee June 2009

London Cycling Action Plan TfL 2004

Waterloo Station Secure Cycle Parking Study LB Lambeth 2004 London Borough of Lambeth Cycling Action Plan LB Lambeth 2005 Lambeth Unitary Development Plan LB Lambeth 2007 Mayor’s Transport Strategy 2009 Thames Path Cycling Policy National Trails 2000

Attitudes to Cycling Research Report (Synovate) Tfl 2008 Cycling in London Research Report TfL 2008 Mayor’s Cycling Safety Action Plan TfL 2009 Regional Cycle Security Plan TfL 2010 Travel in London 2 TfL 2010

97


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

Appendix 5

Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the many individuals and groups who helped with the preparation of this Action Plan, including:

– Lambeth Cyclists

– South Bank Cycling Action Plan Steering Group

– Better Bankside Business Improvement District

– National Theatre

– Team London Bridge Business Improvement District

– London Eye – London Borough of Lambeth – South Bank Partnership – South Bank Forum – South Bank Business Watch – Bishop’s Ward Safer Neighbourhoods Panel

– Living Streets

– Metropolitan Police – British Transport Police – Park Plaza Westminster Bridge for supplying survey prize And all those who responded to the questionnaires and requests for information.

– Waterloo Community Development Group – Visitor Management Group – TfL Cycle Centre for Excellence

98


South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2010 – 2012

Report authors South Bank Employers’ Group (SBEG) is an association of the major organisations in South Bank, Waterloo and Blackfriars dedicated to achieving the best possible experience for employees, residents and visitors to its area, which extends from Lambeth Bridge to Blackfriars Bridge and south to St George’s Circus. The Group is a non-profit company limited by guarantee, governed by a board appointed by its members, who are listed below. – BFI – British Rail Board Residuary – Coin Street Community Builders – Elizabeth House Partners – Ernst & Young – Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity – Guy's & St Thomas’ Hospital Foundation Trust – ITV – King's College London – London Development Agency

Our vision is to make the South Bank: a desirable destination for cultural pursuits, business, education and pleasure a place which supports and encourages investment and business growth a place with a flourishing and cohesive residential community a place which is welcoming to visitors a friendly, clean, colourful, safe, dynamic and diverse area. We achieve this for the benefit of those who work, study or live in the area, as well as the millions who visit each year. In partnership with the Mayor’s agencies, the London Boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark, members and associated employers and landowners, the Group has a strong track record and a continuing active role in the promotion and delivery of regeneration in the South Bank area, improved public realm, sustainability, destination marketing and visitor information, town centre management, promotion of development and economic growth, and all related planning, project and stakeholder management.

– London South Bank University – Network Rail – Park Plaza Hotels – National Theatre – Shell – Southbank Centre – The Merlin Entertainments London Eye – Whitbread Plc

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South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011– 2016

100


London Borough of Lambeth South Bank and Waterloo Cycling Action Plan 2011–2016

South Bank Cycling Action Plan  

South Bank Cycling Action Plan

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