Savvy360 Maui - Fall/Spring 2023-24

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MAUI

C U RAT E D T RAV E L + L I F EST Y L E


Be bold. Be beautiful.

Be You.

MAUI

Four Seasons Resort Maui

HAWAII

Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

Four Seasons Resort at Hualalai

OAHU Halekulani Hotel

The Kahala Hotel and Resort

www.hildgund.com


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DISCOVER + PLAN + COLLABORATE

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CONTENTS

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SAVING WAIHE‘E

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10

Local Vibe

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Mindful Traveler

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Stewards of the ‘Āina

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Aloha Spirit

Growing nuisance ... catch a wave ... king fish ... royal beauty ... frequent fliers ... and local lingo.

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ALOHA SPIRIT

Less than an hour from most of Maui’s towns but seemingly worlds away lies Waihe‘e Coastal Dunes, some of the most magnificent and significant acreage in the Hawaiian Islands.

The Hawaiian Way

PHOTO COURTESY: RACHEL OLSSON

A few ways to have an impact and give back to Maui during your stay.


MĀLAMA MAUI Please travel with compassion and respect. Many of the people you may interact with on Maui survived an extraordinary traumatic event. The impacts of the August 8 fires are still fresh in their minds and weigh heavily on their hearts. Please help support local businesses and be mindful and patient with all those you interact with during your stay. To support ongoing relief efforts, please consider making a donation to: https://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/maui-strong


CONTENTS

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SONGS OF THE SEA

HISTORIC WAILUKU TOWN

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TASTY FINDS

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Ocean Crooners

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Destination Wailuku

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Art That Talks Story

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Shop Local

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Organic Legacy

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Hot Spot

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Culinary Q&A

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What We Love Now

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Experience Maui

The humpback whales return to Maui's waters and sing their soulful melodies.

Immerse yourself in local scenery, culture, provisions and gourmet eats in this historic town nestled in the shadow of the ‘Iao Valley.

Creativity runs deep in the Sabado family.

Get your shopping fix on Maui at these artistic finds on the island.

Exploring Kīpahulu’s organic “fruit forest.”

Dine under the stars and feel worlds away at VANA Paia, an oasis in the heart of Pā‘ia town.

Chef Zack Laidlaw of Hui Momona Farms.

Epicurean finds around the island.

Start planning your trip with our curated guides.

PHOTO COURTESY: (TOP LEFT) RACHEL OLSSON; (COVER) JUPITER IMAGES

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PAUMaui.com Please Drink Responsibly. PAU Maui Vodka 40% ABV / 80 Proof © 2023 Hali‘imaile Distilling Co. Makawao, HI


EXPERIENCE SEE + DO | 89

BEACHES | 105

GET THE SAVVY360 APP

GOLF | 117

MASTHEAD

ry

EAT + DRINK | 127

SHOP + STYLE | 145

rip to get the

and. From keling spots, ISLAND LIVING | 155 scape.

KEVIN GEIGER DANIEL DUVAL MUN SOK GEIGER MICHELLE LACOUR JASMINE CHAGNON KRYSTAL KAKIMOTO RACHEL OLSSON DINA RUIZ MORGAN EASTWOOD BROOKE REHMANN MARY TROY JOHNSTON DIGITAL SAVVY360 APP on THE APP STORE/GOOGLE PLAY SAVVY360.COM CONTACT FOR COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS, EMAIL US MAGAZINE@SAVVY360.COM

MAPS | 159

Morning Yoga Wailea Beach

Outrigger Canoe Paddling Wailea Beach

TRAVELOGUE | 169 8

Lunch & Bubbles The Bubble Bus

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Visit us at Whalers Village and Kahului Airport across Gate 19 O‘AHU | MAUI | BIG ISLAND | KAUA‘I | MAUIDIVERS.COM


LOCAL VIBE

Growing Nuisance Everything seems to grow higher than anywhere else in Hawai’i. The African tulip tree (Spathodea campanulata) takes off reaching for the sky, growing approximately six feet a year. Since it is not indigenous to the islands, its spectacular growth is a concern because it can overtake the native species of the forest, namely ‘ōhi‘a lehua (known for its lei-making flowers and sacred symbolism), ‘ōlapa (flowering forest tree) and maile (a fragrant vine whose flowers are also used in lei-making). The African tulip threatens to take in all the sunshine for its own species and shade out the others, putting in jeopardy the multi-storied tropical rain forest so wonderfully ecologically balanced and consisting of a rich diversity of ferns, mosses, shrubs and trees. The tree is so invasive that it was nominated in the “100 of the World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species” in the Global Invasive Species Database. Furthermore, the flowers have a natural defense killing bees and possibly other species who harvest its pollen. It can be tempting to plant the African tulip, known as “the flame of the forest” for its showy reddishorange blossoms, as it is beautiful. However, local communities have realized the benefits of stopping invasive species and what is at risk. Preserving the incomparable beauty and harmony of the landscape of Old Hawai’i has become a priority. Efforts are succeeding to stop the planting of African tulip trees and clearing the established population. 10


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DINE | @seascapemaui


LOCAL VIBE

Boogie the Day Away

When it comes to water sports, surfing gets most of the attention here, which is not surprising since the sport was born in Hawai‘i. But boogieboarding (or bodyboarding) along our shores can provide just as many fun opportunities to hit the waves—plus it’s much easier. Boogieboarding has been adapted from the long wooden boards of the ancient Hawaiians into a much smaller, wider board thanks to Tom Morey, who invented the Boogie Board and named it that because of his love of music. Today, the typical boogieboard is made from foam, making it lightweight and inexpensive. Boogieboarding is something anyone can try as long as they are comfortable in the ocean. First-time riders, and even more experienced riders from other areas of the world should heed some advice in regards to our unpredictable ocean conditions. First, find the perfect waves for your skill level. For newbies, look for waves around one to five feet in height as well as a lifeguarded beach. Also, be sure that the waves break in a particular pattern and aren’t too unpredictable or choppy. Be mindful of steep shorebreaks to avoid serious injury, because the powerful waves can slam you into the ground beneath. You also want to be mindful of what’s below you like sharp rocks and reefs.

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LOCAL VIBE

King Fish Moi (Pacific threadfin) was the preferred fish of Hawaiian ali‘i (royalty), even bred and stored in fishponds for that purpose. Those outside the royal circle were forbidden to eat this delicacy. A white, mildly flavored fish is versatile in terms of preparation. Fishermen who cast from shore for moi that swims in the shallow waters, often close to reefs, are tempted to grill it onshore. Home cooks may choose to poach it in a wok and flavor it with Asian ingredients (think ginger, sesame oil and shoyu) so that it makes a good accompaniment to a rice bowl. Moi also finds its place in haute cuisine throughout the Hawaiian Islands where it is now farmed in several places offshore in deep water cages. Some of the dishes that take the fish to the height of culinary skill include moi encrusted in potato flakes that resemble fish scales or steamed in green ti leaves (aka, palm lily and cabbage palm). It can also be served as sashimi. The whole fish typically ranges in size up to eight pounds but, remarkably, one came in at 10 pounds, 4 ounces caught on Kaua‘i in 2008. The preparation and presentation of the whole fish, Asian-style, is as impressive as it is delicious.

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LOCAL VIBE

Royal Beauty Pīkake (Jasminum sambac) is an Arabian jasmine so alluring it caught the attention of Hawaiian ali‘i (royalty). Princess Ka‘iulani named it after her prized peacocks at the end of the 19th century. Its legendary beauty has endured as suitors have chosen the flower to give to their beloved; brides have selected to wear it as a lei at their wedding ceremonies; and hula dancers have considered it a favorite adornment. The blooms before opening are in the shape of an oval pearl, softly fluted at the edges and closely fit together to form a lei as beautiful as any pearl necklace which is especially stunning in multiple strands. It provides the perfect shape for the lei in the poepoe style (gathered into a circle). The irresistible heavenly scent is the essence of floral. It carries the attraction to another level, making it a desired ingredient in aromatherapy and luxury body ointments and perfumes. Recognized for its soothing and calming effects, pīkake is the perfect choice in an essential oil. To be balanced and harmonious or to be royally adorned, one who luxuriates with pīkake realizes its promise of being in touch with the exotic aura of Hawai’i.

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M A U I L O C AT I O N S The Shops at Wailea Whalers Village Ka’anapali – Blue Ginger and Blue Ginger Kids Queen Ka’ahumanu Center M A U I O A H U K A U A I H AWA I I blueginger.com


LOCAL VIBE

Frequent Fliers It’s hard to imagine that a bird seen here in Hawai‘i spends its summers in the Arctic. Yet, for the Pacific golden plover, kōlea in Hawaiian, gives new meaning to the term “snowbirds.” Their annual migration covers nearly 3,000-miles of non-stop flying from Alaska to Hawai‘i, which takes between three to four days. They are found throughout the Hawaiian Islands foraging for food starting sometime around August until around May. When they return home to the tundra to mate, the males often return to the same spot they found success the year before. There, a monogamous pair nests directly on the ground, using the deception of an injured wing to lure predators away from the nest. Adults are covered with spotted feathers of gold and black, with a striking white border. Plovers have two different kinds of plumage during the year—dark brownish feathers with gold spots on their backs during winter and a colorful breeding plumage in the summer with black feathers on the back with gold and white flecks and black belly. Be sure to keep an eye out for these long-distance fliers as you cruise the beach—you might just catch a few of them enjoying a lunch of small crustaceans and mollusks along the shore. The males may be easier to spot since they start to sport a tuxedo-like appearance, especially during April, before they head back to look sharp for breeding season.

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LOCAL VIBE

Local Lingo In Hawai‘i, the cultural tradition of uniting to form a hui (group, club or association) runs deep. It is in keeping with another cultural value, lōkahi, that celebrates teamwork. The spirit of helping one another or pitching in together, is putting into action lōkahi. The ancient Hawaiian fishing method of members of a community coming together to extend a long net into the ocean and pull the net back together into shore once the fish have been ensnared is an example. The event, which sees the catch shared among those who came together for the hukilau (community fishing event), demonstrates what can be accomplished through many hands working together. In recent years, the idea of forming a hui to continue the ways of the past has come back into the current culture. The use of the Hawaiian word has reached a peak as well as the number of cooperative groups formed. Hui have been formed to preserve the art of handweavers and sustaining the growth of limu (seaweed) and the ancient ways of collecting it. The Hawai‘i Handweavers’ Hui founded in 1953 has a branch on the Big Island. The Limu Hui was formed in 2014 to “gather the gatherers” who gather and care for native Hawaiian seaweed. One of the most famous founders of a hui was Duke Kahanamoku who became legendary for putting surfing on the map. Along with Ken Winter and Knute Cottrell, Duke founded Hui Nalu O Hawai‘i (Club of the Waves) in 1908 that still thrives today as a canoe club on Maunalua Bay on O‘ahu.

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SHARE ALOHA Please travel with respect, compassion and patience. Be mindful of your hosts as you enjoy your time on Maui and consider giving back during your stay.

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MINDFUL TRAVELER

Respectful Return As Maui continues its phased reopening following the devastating wildfires of August 2023, visitors can play a crucial role in helping the island’s recovery. When traveling to the island of Maui, an important thing to remember is to know where you are allowed to go and respect the regulations set by local authorities. Lahaina remains closed as work continues to remove debris left in the wake of the wildfires. Within this zone, there are dangers to the public so it is important to stay informed on the latest guidelines put out by the government. While on the island, visitors can support local businesses and keep the money they spend within the community. By shopping, dining and playing, the money you spend directly impacts local families. From small to large purchases, each dollar matters as these families work to rebuild everything they lost. And finally, it is important to lead with aloha. The aloha spirit is needed now more than ever as the community adjusts to life after the wildfires. The community suffered the loss of loved ones, homes and businesses. By leading with hō‘ihi (respect) during interactions with others, we can all move towards healing the island and community.

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Beach Buddies Brighten the day of a shelter dog and treat them to a day of their dreams by volunteering to be a Beach Buddy with the Maui Humane Society. Offered on Wednesdays and Fridays, this program aims to reduce the stress levels of shelter pups by getting them out in nature and paired with an animal-loving volunteer. The enriching day has a positive impact on the overall well-being of the dogs and greatly improves their mood and behavior—two aspects that can help improve their chances of being adopted. After signing up online, volunteers meet at 10:45 a.m. on their selected day. Following a brief orientation, volunteers meet their dogs which have been paired with them based on activity levels and comfort handling dogs. Before departure, volunteers receive backpacks loaded with supplies for their day including water bottles, dog dishes, treats, towels and potty bags. A list of possible destinations, a card with emergency numbers and a seat belt are also included to keep your shelter dog safe while riding in cars. From there, the day’s agenda is entirely up to the volunteers! Whether splashing in the water at a local beach, enjoying an outdoor picnic or visiting a drive-thru for a little snack, volunteers can put together a perfect day for their shelter dog. All dogs are returned by 4 p.m. when they bid their volunteers goodbye and fall asleep after a day of fun. Maui Humane Society Beach Buddy Program; (808) 877-3680; Available Wednesdays and Fridays; mauihumanesociety.org/beach-buddies

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MINDFUL TRAVELER

Pitching In Be a community scientist and help reduce the amount of marine debris by spending a day volunteering for the Pacific Whale Foundation’s Coastal Marine Debris Monitoring Program. Participation is easy. Simply pick up your supplies and head to the coast! Volunteer kits include upcycled grain bags donated by Kohalā Brewery and Waikīkī Brewing Company, disposable gloves and a datasheet. Kits are available at the PacWhale Eco-Adventurers’s Ocean Store in Mā‘alaea and Maui Brewing Company in Kīhei. Once at the beach, collect debris you find along the shore and tally the type of material. Once you are done collecting debris, the final part of this volunteer opportunity is to log the information from your datasheet to help the program keep track of debris found on our beaches. The program started in 2013 and has documented over 50,000 pieces of debris collected and removed from our beaches which can kill and injure wildlife, spread invasive species, leech pollutants and ultimately endanger the health of humans. Coastal Marine Debris Monitoring Program; (808) 249-8811; pacificwhale.org/conservation/marine-debris

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Restoring Culture Since 2002, Maui Cultural Lands has worked to reforest Honokōwai Valley and the surrounding Kā‘anapali area with native and endemic Hawaiian plant species. With the support of the community and traveling volunteers, their group has cleared over ten acres of land uncovering historic rock walls and ancient heiau (places of worship), helping to reconnect the Maui community with their past. Join their mission by volunteering during their workdays held each Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The group gathers at Honokōwai Valley before heading out to remove invasive species and help stabilize native resources. The significance of the valley is especially important to the Maui community for what it once was home to. Archaeological studies revealed that the Honokōwai Valley was a place of homes, farms, trails and heiau that self-sufficiently supported over 600 families. Today, Maui Cultural Lands is working to restore the valley to its former forested splendor. To volunteer, organizers ask that you wear closed-toe shoes, longsleeve shirts and pants, and bring sunscreen, mosquito repellent, lunch and water. While the work is labor intensive, the group believes that by the power of laulima (many hands working together), this vibrant valley will have a second opportunity to shine. Maui Cultural Lands; (808) 276-5593; mauiculturallands.org; Volunteer on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

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STEWARDS OF THE ‘ĀINA

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Less than an hour from most of Maui’s towns, but seemingly worlds away, lies Waihe‘e Coastal Dunes, some of the most magnificent and significant acreage in the Hawaiian Islands. story DINA RUIZ images RACHEL OLSSON

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I ola ka ‘āina, i ola kākou nei. Hawai‘i's lands thrive and nourish its people.

The Waihe‘e Coastal Dunes and Wetlands Refuge is a jewel being brought back to its original luster, and your help is welcome in the figurative polishing. The refuge is managed by the Hawai‘i Land Trust, known as HILT, with a mission to “Protect and steward the lands that sustain Hawai‘i and to perpetuate Hawaiian values by connecting people with ‘āina (the land).” HILT manages seven community preserves on the islands, covering 20,000 precious acres, with the Waihe‘e Refuge representing 277 of those. Waihe‘e’s re-emergence as a revered space and community food source is being created by locals and visitors alike, side by side, hands in the soil, smiles on faces. Waihe‘e Steward and Educator Kia‘i Collier says it’ll leave volunteers with the finest souvenir they can take home—a true connection to Maui. “Putting their hands in the dirt makes them part of the refuge. It gives volunteers a consciousness of being in the space and how your mana (spiritual energy) can contribute to the ‘āina, help it grow [and] be better.” Dr. Scott Fisher, HILT’s Director of Land Stewardship, agrees. “Every volunteer who comes to any of our properties is undoubtedly enhancing the life of the land through their actions. There is a connection to every other volunteer who is contributing to the existing life, and the kuleana (responsibility) lives with you forever. Even if you live on the Continent, any experience you have here you take with you to your own home.” Once the volunteers are gathered, it doesn’t feel like work for Kia‘i Collier and his colleagues, who relish teaching people from all over the world about what was, in ancient times, a community focal point. The Kapoho site was once home to villages, shrines and most importantly, a fishing and taro pond that fed hundreds of locals. “We love sharing knowledge about the space and culture. It is a coastal wetland, one of the four wetlands on Maui, and already has a unique environment. The 277-acre wetland is surrounded by

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93 historical sites on the property. We also have four heiau (temples used to worship ancient Hawaiian Gods) and the inland fishpond,” Collier explains. “And from 1919 to 1970, the Waihe‘e dairy was on the land. A lot of the old timers still remember going down to the dairy. It’s diverse and unique; and now we’re protecting it.” The work being done presently is setting the stage for the pond to be filled again with native fish. “ October [2023] is 20 years since we’ve been working at Waihe‘e. When we first purchased it, we reached out to the community and asked what they saw [and] wanted. One of the main things, besides healing the land, was, ‘We want to see the fishpond restored.’ So from day one, the community wanted to see that,” Dr. Fisher says. “The fishpond has a dual use, growing taro and raising fish. It’s what is called lo‘i (pond/field agriculture). Culturally, kalo (taro) is an ancestor of the Hawaiian people. There is a familial connection. To Natives, taro is your elder brother. It is your most valued crop.” The efforts aren’t just for nostalgia. Dr. Fisher explains the multiple environmental benefits from the overall restoration. “What it does is capture sediment that would have been discharged, so it’s also a sediment retention basin which contributes to the health of the reef. Captured sediment helps produce food. These are linked systems, and our kūpuna (elders) knew this. If you have these linked systems, everyone thrives. The land, the species, the fish, the birds and the people. When the land thrives, we all thrive.” It’ll take some time, but eventually, water will be diverted back into the surrounding wetlands, just as it flowed in days gone by—many days gone by, as in centuries. The site was thriving more than 500 years ago during the reign of Chief Pi‘ilani. “Right now, the wetlands are dry. We don’t have water due to water diversion,” Kia‘i Collier explains. “To make the space better, to bring back the system to how it was, is to


KIA‘I COLLIER

DR. SCOTT FISHER


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He ali‘i ka ‘āina; he kauwā ke kanaka. The land is a chief; man is its servant.

bring back the water. In three years, we will build back the waterway, the auwai. It’s a unique project because we are using the old waterway, but it will be modernized with some piping. Another factor is when the water level drops down in summer, we need to keep it wet.” Dr. Fisher says only minor modernizations will be utilized. “Traditional hydrology is a very different system now that can’t be entirely replicated from the 1500s. What we want to do is use resources available to us, and that is what we’re doing.” That’s where volunteers come in as one of the precious resources. Meeting on the property several times a month, those interested in what’s called voluntourism can get busy. “If it weren’t for the volunteers—we’ve had thousands who have contributed so much to the native ecosystem, it’s been a critical thing—we’d be at a fraction of where we are now,” says Dr. Fisher. “We throw them into the purpose of what their work is contributing to, what we’re doing, why, the benefit,” Collier adds. “We explain our overall vision of what the place is going to look like five to ten years from now.” On Fridays and one Saturday a month, an average of five to fifteen dedicated souls show up to get to work. It’s not a spa day, but the results might feel as invigorating as a good massage. “It’s engaging. We make it more about education. We make it fun, but also, we do work. It’s about being able to retain their interest, so they come back,” Collier says. Dr. Fisher agrees. “In a nutshell, it’s not easy. It’s hot, and we work in the rain. But all that falls away when the work is so transformative.” Those interested in helping will be in excellent hands. Project leaders Dr. Scott Fisher and Kia‘i Collier are both born and raised in Hawai‘i and have devoted their life’s work to the environment and—as you’ll find in so many places in Maui—preserving and perpetuating native culture, or mo‘olelo. Dr. Fisher

is currently obtaining his second Ph.D. in Earth and Ocean Science and was recently granted one of only six awards in the entire country for his work on wetland preservation. Kia‘i Collier was formerly employed as a cultural ambassador by a large hotel. But during the pandemic he switched gears to land stewardship and quickly rose through the ranks. Both men love nothing more than to educate others on how to make the acreage as functional and beautiful as it was when their ancestors walked the land. Volunteers will also learn about, and be asked to adhere to, local customs. “Before we get started, we ask people to remove their hats to expose their fontanel (on their heads)—their manawa. It’s their most sacred space. We are entering the ‘āina kūpuna (the land of the elders), and the experience of time on the land and understanding your space on the land is transformative. When you put your hands in the dirt, you spread out the responsibility and caring of the land.” Exotic, green pests are the focus of a typical, four-hour volunteer shift. “We have invasive plants, so volunteers help with planting native plants and maintaining the areas where the ecological restoration is happening so native plants can grow and thrive,” Collier says, pointing out it’s all about the way of the wai (water). “All this is the bigger picture … all that needs to be done before the water comes back. Invasive grasses and vines are aggressive, and that’s without water! We need to get rid of the problem now before we bring in water.” The site itself is a step back in time. Upon arrival, you’ll notice massive sand dunes, found nowhere else on island. “It is an ancient landscape. We have 200-feet-high dunes. They are the highest, last unmodified late-Pleistocene period dunes on Maui. You’ll see the Kapoho fishpond, beautiful wetlands, endangered species and shorebirds, but then you have

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such a rich layer of culture on top of it. The most invigorating thing is connecting with the kupuna (elders). I have a photo of myself there when I was four months old. For me, personally, I can see my path on that property. And now, I’ve been there almost every day for 20 years,” Dr. Fisher says, his voice still full of passion. The federal government is also impressed with what’s happening at Waihe‘e. Earlier this year, HILT was granted more than $800,000 from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, or NOAA. It’s a staggering victory for everyone. “The grant will help the community by bringing back water into Kapoho and completing the restoration of the fishpond to provide food for our neighboring communities. We can help improve the southern auwai (aqueduct) so our farmers above us are also able to have a waterway system. With the NOAA grant, we improve our refuge and the neighboring community to give them resources to farm and keep traditional practices,” Kia‘i Colier explains. Those in charge are entrusted with executing a vision that, even twenty years ago, seemed daunting. But, donating some of your precious time to the speed along fruition is far from complicated. “The formula I see is this: When you get people out on the land, that sense of aloha ‘aina (love of the land) is cultivated. Once you have that sense, we malama (take care of ) it, and the love of the land is built up. The more people who are hiking, camping and volunteering, all that builds up the generational vision we have of people taking care of the land in the future. If we can encourage people to get involved, we know the mission can outlive us. It’s an important thing to be passed on from one generation to the next.” Kia‘a Collier says visions of the future fuel the enthusiasm. “When they come back, they can say, ‘I was here when there wasn’t water!’ They can show their kids. Maybe their kids will work with us someday. We turn it into a generational thing. It gives them a sense of connection.” So, if you choose to forgo a morning of lounging, shopping, golfing or surfing, your connection is waiting nearby, and it doesn’t cost a thing. In fact, it pays off in many ways. To learn more about volunteer and preservation efforts, visit hilt.org/waihee.

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Huli ka lima i lalo, mā‘ona o ka ‘ōpū. When you work the land, you will be filled and fed.

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ALOHA SPIRIT The Hawaiian Way story AMBER NIGHTINGALE images RACHEL OLSSON

Aloha. A ubiquitous word that has become entwined with the identity of Hawaiʻi, aloha symbolizes more than an amicable greeting, luxury seascape holiday or nostalgic gift shop find. With an enchanting allure unique to the Hawaiian Islands, the Aloha Spirit contains deep cultural roots that embody a universal message. Whether experienced by faraway visitors or homegrown locals, aloha holds a legacy of its own.

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"The Spirit of Aloha is from within... Aloha begins with you." What is the Aloha Spirit? Attempting to describe the Aloha Spirit is near impossible, like explaining the feeling of a rapturous scarlet-tinted sunset or the soothing remedy of human touch. It goes beyond definition and is without a location—an omnipresent energy that lives everywhere. Outwardly (excluding trendy island ware) the Aloha Spirit may be perceived in simple acts of kindness, hospitality, truth, integrity and steadfast patience in otherwise agitating paradise-laden traffic jams. Core values in family, reverence for nature and the foundational understanding of the connectedness that binds humanity, all allude to the transcendental Aloha Spirit. “The spirit of aloha affects everything we do, not so much in words, it doesn’t come from the mouth—it comes from the action. To show you have aloha is from your action and how you deal with things. Aloha is the center of all things Hawaiian,” describes Na‘auao Pane‘e, a Hawaiian Language teacher. Hawaiian History, Ethics and Western Influence Ancient Hawaiian values were centered on a foundation in the Aloha Spirit. As a core element in cultural ideology, practices and spirituality, aloha directly translates from the root word hā, which means “the breath of life.” This breath penetrated every aspect of Hawaiian existence and resulted in a way of life where appreciation, gratitude and the spirit of generosity prevailed. Some may disagree with the genesis since aloha isn’t actually alohā. Some etymologists believe it’s more likely to have originated from the Samoan word “alohfa” or the Māori word “aroha,” which both words mean love. Mary Kawena Pukui in the Hawaiian Dictionary defines aloha as “love, affection, compassion, mercy, sympathy, kindness, grace, charity and greeting.”

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Aloha ‘āina (love for the land) was also an essential understanding that illuminated a sincere respect for the earth. Hawaiians emphasized the recognition of mana (spirit) found within nature’s bounty, and that how we relate to it is imperative. Communing with nature was a metaphor for family values, such as honoring kupuna (elders) and ancestors, while guiding children in the aloha tenets. Underlying these interpersonal relationships was the pivotal connection one had with their self. By cultivating a perceptive awareness and understanding of one’s own being, Hawaiians affirmed all areas of life would prosper. When Westerners arrived in Hawaiʻi, this sturdy foundation of aloha was hugely compromised. In 1778, Captain Cook’s famed discovery occurred, which led to an influx of Western thought and influence. The concept of aloha became a way to coin the dignified nature of Hawaiian culture. Along with ships, sailors and disease came Christian missionaries who found common threads in aloha ideology to suffuse their religious beliefs. Many Hawaiian rulers were Christianized and a new set of community, cultural and political values soon took precedence. For decades that ensued, the arrival of immigrants and other settlers led to a diluted expression of the Aloha Spirit that barely permeated island culture. However, when Hawaiʻi became America’s 50th state in 1959, a revival in the acknowledgment of aloha arose. Tourism, Politics and Commercial Culture With its newfound statehood, Hawaiʻi quickly became the exotic travel destination of choice for intrigued mainlanders. It was a time of profound transition, and the strikingly increasing rates of visitors spawned a new status for Hawai‘i—it was birthing a tourism-based culture. Clearly, Hawaiʻi emanated an idyllic quality that the other


states did not, and tourists craved the multicultural ambiance. Suddenly, the Aloha Spirit became a commonplace column heading in newspapers and a key topic of political discourse. In 1986, the Aloha Spirit was written into state law, found in the Hawai‘i Revised Statutes—which still exists today. It states, “The ‘Aloha Spirit’ is the coordination of mind and heart within each person. It brings each person to the self. Each person must think and emote good feelings to others.” These basic doctrines of aloha instilled a remembrance in the governmental arena that perpetuated cultural roots and defined Hawaiʻi’s unique subjective paradigm. Lively lūʻau, poi pounding, hula performances and surfing all exuded the island tourism niche that embraced the spirit of aloha, which also fashioned a

destination image that glimmered commercialism. Finessed in beach resort branding, mass produced souvenirs, and as an epochal greeting that’s still standard, aloha did admittedly shine as an asset that fueled a healthy economy and lured inquisitive tourists. This commodified version of aloha is one that is recognized by most. Has aloha evolved into a marketing scheme to drive tourism? Some academics might suggest, pointing its finger in objectivity, that the Aloha Spirit has been manipulated to fabricate a culture with profitable aims, while acting as a political band-aid to relieve multicultural tension. Aloha becomes like wearing a modish frame of rose-tinted glasses that promises a therapeutical antidote to life’s challenges. Has aloha retained its cultural virtue?

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Live Aloha Despite its modernized quasi-commercial status, the Aloha Spirit is not confined to a showy storefront t-shirt or cutesy morning coffee mug. It contains within it an unshakeable heritage that is bound by nothing and undeniably beautiful—a pure essence that cannot be dominated or destroyed. Perhaps the external expression of aloha has been forcibly resized to fit the ever-changing needs of contemporary society. This present-day rendition of aloha does not devalue it, but rather presents a warm memento of a rich spirit with profound cultural and universal significance. Revered hula master and international Hawaiian cultural presence Puna Dawson illuminates, “The Aloha Spirit is from within. It is that spirit of truth that can be found in every culture—not just Hawaiian. It is an understanding and appreciation for life…all of life’s gifts, and how we share them with one another. Aloha begins with you.” The Aloha Spirit is a shimmering emanation of Hawaiʻi that is infinite and irreplaceable. It’s the 42

gentle reminder to breathe, close your eyes, enjoy the breeze, hear the birdsong and smile candidly at a stranger. Aloha resides in forgiveness, nurturing a friend, reverence for nature, counting your blessings and loving who you are and others. For me, it’s a heartfelt inhalation that enlivens appreciation for the beauty of creation and our shared experience as human beings. Aloha is a mutual understanding for those blessed to live on the islands—a decree that cannot be reckoned with. Although the Aloha Spirit can be found in abundance across Hawaiʻi with seriously few residents living without, it is not bound to Hawaiʻi, but instead encompasses a global relevancy. It ripples across the sapphire ocean to inspire a righteous vision where family, natural resources and the connection with oneself and others are cherished. Throughout history and the present stylish informality of aloha, the essence remains the same. May you experience the true legacy of the Aloha Spirit—feeling its eternal breath of life.


What is aloha? When asked to define aloha, we often hear many of the same definitions. Those may begin with “hello, goodbye, and I love you,” which aloha does indeed mean. And we often hear that aloha means more than that; it means compassion, empathy and unconditional love for thy neighbor and fellow man. Some say aloha is the recognition that another’s pain is our pain, and another’s suffering is our suffering, which can also be true. I also like to view aloha in other ways, which my learnings with my kumu (teacher) have helped me see. Because as we learn what aloha is we must develop behaviors and tools to act it out and implement it in our lives. Aloha is not just something that just resides within our hearts and mind, it must be realized by words and deeds in the physical world. So, the question really is: How do we live aloha; how do we act with aloha; and what behaviors and traits can we acquire—what skills can we train to better do that? For instance, presence and awareness play a part in aloha. Being present can help us to detect more quickly when someone around us is in suffering or pain and needs a helping hand or a shoulder to cry on. Situational awareness helps us to recognize when we are standing in the middle of the aisle or sidewalk, blocking someone’s way past. Aloha is not just about the big things; it’s also about the little. I can express aloha by aiding in the reduction of suffering on the planet, by coming to the aid of a friend or stranger, or simply by stepping out of someone’s way before they ask, by holding a door open, or by helping someone out of their chair. But if we don’t train those skills of being present and aware, moments of living aloha pass us by every day without us even realizing. It is one thing to read and understand the definition of aloha. It is another entirely to practice the skills that allow us to see when to put that understanding into action. Like learning to read, once one begins to learn these skills, seemingly ordinary occurrences become moments to offer aloha, like unintelligible signs become readable directions. KAINOA HORCAJO Hawaiian Cultural Ambassador & Practitioner The Mo‘olelo Group

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To travel with aloha means… “First, ask before entering. Second, please and thank you is a sign of respect. Third, it is not what you say, but what you do. While here on vacation, nānā (look, observe, pay attention) to your surroundings and the people of this place. For example, while seated in the airplane after landing, stay seated like the locals do. Take a look around and wait your turn to disembark. We encourage visitors to seek out volunteer opportunities to best learn from the kama‘aina (local residents). Volunteer opportunities can be found on the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority website.” KALIKOLEHUA STORER Area Hawaiian Cultural and Training Specialist Andaz Maui Resort & Spa, Hāna-Maui Resort and Hyatt Regency Maui Resort & Spa

To share aloha means… “It is crucial to share authentic and accurate Hawaiian knowledge and culture with our guests. By doing so, we allow the opportunity for those who come here to visit, to understand the place that they are visiting, the people of that place and the stories and history that make it what it is today. Through this sharing of knowledge and education, our po‘e ho‘okipa and malihini (visitors), will gain a deeper respect for this ‘āina and this place we call home.” KAMAHIWA KAWAʻA Manager of Hawaiian Culture Fairmont Kea Lani

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To understand aloha means… “Through life’s ebbs and flows, our spirit of aloha remains strong and steadfast. I define aloha as a way of existence, of living in harmony with all those around you, in the spirit of love, compassion and grace. It’s oftentimes hard to put into words ... the best way to understand aloha is to visit Hawai‘i and experience it firsthand.” AUNTY WENDY TUIVAIOGE Director of Hawaiian Programs Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea

To define aloha means... Aloha means more than love, hello and goodbye. The spirit of aloha lives on forever and is woven into the fabric of our relationships, our connection to nature and the unconditional sense of community and place that lives within each of us. Aloha makes life in Hawai‘i different from any other place, and it’s something that can be felt from the moment you arrive. It is a warm presence of tranquility, grace, compassion and love that we carry with us. You must be willing to accept aloha first to be able to understand it. KALEI ‘UWĒKO‘OLANI Cultural Programming Manager and Leadership Educator Grand Wailea, A Waldorf Astoria Resort

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OCEAN CROONERS In the Presence of Giants

story MARY TROY JOHNSTON

The whales are back, soul sayers from the deep, believed to have evolved and survived over 40 to 50 million years. They are the transporters of great mystery, having traveled places and spanned time that dwarfs the more limited experience of mainly terrestrial humans, whose ancestors only go back some six million years. And, humpbacks are living for the moment in their winter playground, the waters of the Hawaiian Islands, where they also breed and birth their calves. >>>

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After all the millennia that have brought them here, humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) have an amazingly fresh approach to life. They are none the worse for wear after an approximately three thousand mile migration (requiring an equally long return trip) departing from the freezing waters surrounding Alaska. Theirs is one of the longest migrations among wildlife. Once in warmer waters, they are ready to frolic, mothers with their calves, individuals in sole performance with leaps and rotations, ready to display their acrobatic agility. Gigantic in size, they appear to be as limber and buoyant as smaller creatures. Indeed, the impressive arch of their backs exaggerated when they are preparing for a deep dive earned them the name, humpback. They have a varied repertoire of performance moves. The fluke (tail) moves are a major attraction. Lobtailing is a common behavior as the whales raise their tails out of the ocean only to give the water a hard slap and make their signature splash. When the whales slap their tails repeatedly, it seems they are doing more than

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demonstrating their acrobatic prowess. Scientists have come to believe that they might be engaging in a type of whale tail Morse code in which the slapping sound is a form of communication to other whales. Emily Boring, who participated in a research voyage with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), writes lyrically about witnessing the spectacle of the tail: “Slap, splash! it pounds over and over again in hypnotizing rhythm. We watch until long after sunset. No one moves. No one speaks. The whale never stops. The tail is still slapping as the humpback slides through fingers of fog, into darkness and out of sight.” She observes, “Something about the action was powerful enough to arrest twelve scientists in silent awe.” Researchers from the Whale Trust Maui were able to capture on video a rare display of a humpback tailsailing, a behavior more typical among right whales. The female humpback was observed several times snout down and tail sticking out of the water for an extended period of time, for roughly 10 minutes, as if maintaining


the whale’s version of upside down standing posture. It is impressive enough that the marine animal can manipulate an appendage in a spectacular way. Considering that the fluke can measure up to 18 feet wide, lobtailing is comparable to lifting and waving a small boat. However, fluke ability offers us a small glimpse into the fuller body maneuvers of the marine giant. Authoritative researcher Hal Whitehead studied breaching, the movement the whale makes when it hurls a large part of its body out of the water. Hal describes a true breach in the following fashion, “In a true breach the animal emerges from the water on its side, twist with flailing flippers and lands on its back,” this form of breaching taking place about “80% of the time;” other times, the form resembles more of a “belly flop.” A breaching whale is so awe-inspiring as the creature seems to accomplish the impossible, doing something the whale body does not seem designed to do. The rotund whale shape resembles a blimp and much less a

highly maneuverable fighter jet. A breach for a 25 to 40 ton whale represents extremely heavy lifting, especially if one compares the size to an African elephant that weighs between two and seven tons. As it turns out, the humpback’s body is perfectly designed for propelling itself, and so are the bumps (tubercles) along the outer edge of its fins that once seemed irrelevant and now are thought to be naturally engineered for air flow. A company by the name of WhalePower adapted the “bumpy” design for wind turbines and found the giant fans could operate more efficiently with less drag. Reflecting the inspiration from the whale, the company named the blade technology, Tubercle Technology. Among the mysterious unknowns of the humpback is why the males sing. Around 1967, biologist Roger Searle Payne discovered that the whale sounds, in a recording given to him, were much more than random noises emitted by body functions; he found that the sounds actually had sequences and set themes that repeated themselves, that is, they constituted what we

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know as song. Along with fellow researcher Scott McVay, Payne made new recordings, carried out experiments using spectrograms to detail the patterns created by song and eventually brought sound tracks and their theories to public attention. Payne introduced the singer Judy Collins to whale songs, which she, in turn, utilized as background music to her song, “Farewell to Tarwathie,” a brilliant composition that juxtaposed a ballad about whalers leaving their homes to join the whale hunt against the plaintive and haunting sounds and cries of whales. It’s hard not to get teary and emotional listening to her beautiful rendition. In this, Collins almost imperceptibly shifted the narrative from whale hunting to whale mystique. As the whale song entered the sensibilities of the mammal’s defenders, the conservation movement gained steam and culminated in the Endangered Species Act in late 1973 that protected whales in U.S. waters and a world backlash against hunting whales. Dr. Jim Darling, co-founder Whale Trust Maui, has studied whale songs since the late 1970s, even initially recording songs in Hawai‘i for Payne. Research has yielded insight into the context of the song. Jim says that we know “who sings,” “the adult males,” and “who they sing to,” “other adult males.” Research clearly indicates other adult males hear the song and adopt the song, or part of it, as their own. By the end of their time in Hawai‘i, adult males will be singing close to the same song. Furthermore, Jim has conducted research on four whale populations in Mexico, Hawai‘i, Japan and the Philippines studying their songs over three years to discover “shared phrases” and “shared parts” among distant whale communities. The songs constantly change resulting in what the researcher describes as “year to year variability in how similar songs were.” For example, in one year the song was “virtually identical” among whales across the entire North Pacific. There seems to be “no other explanation of sharing complex song unless the animals interact,” according to Jim. That statement, in 50

and of itself, shows us how far whale research has come in a relatively short period, from the study of isolated caracasses washed up on shore or hunted in the 1960s to the study of living whales interacting with each other and with us. Whereas whale researchers used to compare their science to astronomy, the subjects being so distant, suddenly the stars started to align and whale research began to yield some of the secrets of this heretofore inscrutable species. The first brave divers got into the water with the giants not knowing what to expect from their behavior; so little was known at the time. The humpbacks proved accommodative to closer inspection. The big change in the science in recent years has come from the development of new technologies, especially as of late, drone technology, which offers the bird’s eye view and is especially effective in the often pellucid waters of Hawai‘i. With humpbacks being so alive to our experience and imagination, the prospects for their survival have improved. Unfortunately, whale researchers confirm the oceans are changing in ways we do not yet understand, and that it is difficult to forecast the future for humpbacks and other sea life. It still remains important for us to take inspiration from the whale song. WHALE TALES 2024 Whale Tales is hosted annually by Whale Trust, a Maui-based nonprofit organization dedicated to whale research and ocean education. Whale Tales is both an educational event that bridges the information gap between scientists working in the field and the public and a means to raise funds to support whale research in Hawai‘i. All proceeds from the Whale Tales event are distributed to selected organizations and students to support whale research in Hawai‘i through the Whale Tales Beneficiaries Program. Whale Tales returns to Maui from February 16-19, 2024, hosted by The Ritz-Carlton Maui, Kapalua. Visit whaletales.org for a complete schedule and additional program and live streaming details.


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DESTINATION

WAILUKU story DINA RUIZ images RACHEL OLSSON

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elcoming to visitors but loved and lived-in by the locals, the little town of Wailuku has it all. Like broad shoulders supporting the ‘Īao Valley, it’s the Maui County seat with a mixture of government offices, churches and epic views. It also has everything you’d want in local scenery, culture, provisions and gourmet eats that won’t break your budget. Wailuku is conveniently located almost smackdab in the middle of the more populated and tourist-laden areas of the island, just minutes from the Kahului airport, Kīhei, Wailea, Pā‘ia and Lahaina. If the streets could talk, they’d say, “We’ve always stayed true to who we are,” but not without occasional reboots. Shops—many of them with movie-set looking facades—may have been in operation for one year or closer to 100 years. They may be owned by generations of one family or a start-up by a new entrepreneur. Head over to the heart of Maui and see for yourself! Once you steady yourself after arriving and seeing the jaw-dropping scenery, you’ll have plenty of activities to choose from at ‘Īao Valley State Monument. From leisurely walks to more

challenging hikes, it’s all there in the verdant, lush valley where the breeze and frequent cloud cover create a mystical beauty. You can almost feel the spirit of the warriors who fought during an inter-island invasion in 1790. The main attraction is the ‘Īao Needle, known to native ancestors as Kuka‘emoku. According to the State Parks website, the “needle” is an erosional geological feature that rises 1,200 feet from the valley floor. A nicely paved trail that’s just over half a mile long takes you to the most scenic viewpoint. For those who appreciate the exotic flowers and plants of Maui, there’s also a botanical garden on site. Please note that reservations are required for out of state guests. Visit gostateparks.hawaii.gov to make yours. Just down the road from the valley is ‘Īao Theater, which opened its doors in 1928 within a year of the first “talkies” (films with sound). Since then, Frank Sinatra has sung on stage, local teenagers have made their debuts and theater goers have taken part in history. Grab a seat for a live show at the home base of the locally renowned Maui On Stage Productions. The 413-seat venue

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sits proudly on the U.S. and Hawaiʻi register of Historic Places. It’s the only remaining historic theater on Maui, and it celebrates 95 years of performances, live and formerly on the big screen. If you don’t go inside, enjoy taking photos of the unique Mission-style architecture that stands out like a shining star. Then, grab a coffee and continue exploring the neighborhood. The coffee culture is strong, like the espresso, at the beloved Wailuku Coffee Company. Co-owners Megan Kanekoa (who had her own espresso stand as a teenager) and Jacqueline Goring are the brains behind this quaint shop “Where the Hip Come to Sip,” as they say. They have the classics—think flat whites and cappuccinos—covered, and the menu also branches out into options such as buttered coconut coffee and Thai coffee. Grab a breakfast wrap, midday sandwich or salad to go along with your brew. And, while coffee is queen, community comes first. The business supports local nonprofits and artists. In fact, fifteen percent of proceeds from its monthly art show sales go right back to charities on Maui. Walk a few minutes towards Main St. and you’ll find Native Intelligence, a shop bursting with offerings that are so well curated and beautifully

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displayed, you may think you’ve stepped into a museum. The husband and wife team Jenny and Kaponoʻai Molitau aren’t there to make a quick buck—respect for and perpetuating Hawaiian and Polynesian culture is the most important prospect of having their retail store. Jenny says quality is the top priority. “I think, ‘Would I buy this? Would I use this?’ before we carry it in the store.” With a focus on authenticity and craftsmanship, this is no tourist trap—this is where locals come to buy their wares. “Our cultural practitioners need books, clothing; and they choose consciously to support us. In doing that, they are supporting the community.” Locals depend on Native Intelligence, and visitors will be wowed by it. “We welcome tourists and those who are referred to us,” Jenny says. “They are always pleasantly surprised.” Just steps away is Rooted in Wailuku, a brickand-mortar shop dedicated to curbing plastic waste in a chic boutique and salon. Best friends and hālau (hula group) partners Ashley Schenk and Keli Lau got the idea after visiting a similar store on Kauaʻ i. Rooted in Wailuku is half salon (run by Keli) and half refill bar. Their timing in the neighborhood was just right. “We have more consciousness on how we consume and are more


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aware of waste and impact,” Ashley says. You can bring in your own container or purchase one there and fill it with whatever you need for home or body—from laundry soap to facial moisturizer. Many products are sourced from across the islands, with Hawai‘i-made skincare, sunscreen, soaps and hair bars aplenty. You might even feel lighter when you walk out the door. “The vibe is aesthetically clean, minimal, simple…it flows,” Ashley says. “A lot of people comment that it just feels good in here!” Foodies will delight in the variety of offerings throughout Wailuku. For a taste of Maui’s seasonal cuisine, it’s worth the drive from wherever you are on the island to get forkfuls of Chef Marc McDowell’s food, via his namesake Sixty Two MarcKet. Chef McDowell, trained at the Culinary Institute of America, and formerly at Grand Wailea Resort and Ritz-Carlton Kapalua, will make your day a whole lot better with his shining seasonal menus. This small but bustling restaurant is all about new flavors with classic local ingredients, highlighting herbs, spices and interesting vegetables such as ube, a purple yam. (Chef McDowell is also a certified master gardener.) The menu is dripping with familiar breakfast and lunch items with a twist. The bubble waffle is on par with the best Belgian you’ve ever had. Pancakes are purple from the addition of said ube and pair perfectly with a refreshing and vibrant green matcha latte. Then there’s sous chef Larry Badua’s famous crepes— get ’em savory or sweet. Treat yourself to a little of everything, then walk it all off with a stroll through one of the coolest towns around. When you’re in the mood for richly flavored pork broth, tonkotsu ramen or deep-fried whole fish called Nabeta, soft shell crab bao buns (the house favorite), or even truffle fries, meander

over to Umi Sushi. But try to get there early, because reservations aren’t accepted, and everyone around wants to try owner and head chef Jayse Sato’s food. (Don’t forget it’s BYOB.) Sato and his crew serve some of the most beautiful, flavorful sushi, sashimi, ramen and other classics with modern twists. The creations are stunning, with vegetable garnishes as pretty as flowers and edible accents you didn’t even know you wanted with your fresh fish, veggies and rice. Works of mouthwatering art come to life against stark black and white plates. Servers are cheerful and efficient. The atmosphere is unpretentious because the focus is on the food—a dinner you won’t soon forget. Sushi also reigns supreme at Miyako Sushi, Inc. but so do the snacks. It started with sushi 37 years ago as a takeout shop offering staples like Spam Musubi and cone sushi. But by 1990, owner Mike Miyako and his array of antiques and collectables started sharing center stage. Now, a trip to Miyako Sushi includes a trip for the senses. Extremely valuable figurines and Hawaiian artifacts mingle with old license plates and classic milk bottles. Mike says 95% of people come in for the food but almost always stay to check out the endless eye candy on the shelves, walls and counters. Miyako Sushi caters largely to those who are up before dawn. This hybrid restaurant-shop opens before dawn, welcoming fishermen, construction workers and visitors catching the early flight home. Mike doesn’t do the cooking anymore but says his staff of twelve, including his two daughters, make excellent dishes such as black Maki sushi, Manjū and even hotdogs. Pro tip: If Mike’s at the shop, ask to see his “Man Cave” where he keeps all his favorite stuff. He’s happy to show you.

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Experience more Asian-inspired flavors at Ichiban Okazuya, a takeout Mecca for Japanese cuisine. Here, there are no bells or whistles, just a focus on traditional quick-bite flavors (in classic take-out containers) for all your favorites, from chicken Katsu to curry stew. One of the differences here is the truly local vegetable selection. Skip a side of mac salad, and instead, you can enjoy stewed potatoes, burdock and lotus as side-order options (when available). Take note of the prices: The lunch special is about $15 including tax. Just seeing the old-school menu board is worth poking your head in the door. If you’re craving the island favorite loco moco—a savory meal of rice topped with a burger patty, a fried egg and gravy— or a classic cheeseburger and fries, saddle up to the counter at Sam Sato’s. The mom-and-pop diner excels at just about everything it serves, as evidenced by its 90 years in business. Sam Sato’s is most known for its “dry min” or saimin (basically, Hawaiʻi’s state soup) with dry noodles and the broth on the side. But they also serve fluffy banana pancakes, home baked fruit turnovers and Manjū, a traditional Japanese confection that rivals mochi. Don’t be deterred by the line to get in—droves of repeat customers will tell you it’s well worth the wait. What do you get when you toss the best patisserie classics from Japan, France and Maui into a Kitchen Aid mixer? An inventive bakery where the pastries are so beautiful, you might feel guilty for taking a bite. Everything at Shikedo Bento Patisserie is made daily, on site, with the best ingredients available, and as many from Maui as possible. The adorable animal-shaped cream

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puffs aren’t just for the keikis. Sit outside and enjoy the stunning murals nearby while you enjoy your Pavlova, Japanese roll cake or opera cakes which are layers of creamy mousse and ganache. There's also onigiri, which is sushi on rice, and beautiful bentos with your choice of miso pork belly, chicken karaage (Japanese fried chicken) or seared salmon. And when the mood strikes for a refreshing beverage or a night out on the town, head to Ester’s Fair Prospect and indulge in a tropical cocktail. Owner Suzanne Navarro says she and her staff are obsessive-compulsive about using only the freshest ingredients that can be found in their progressive establishment, and that’s a great thing. “An insane amount of detail goes into every drink. We make everything from scratch. We use top tier alcohol, high quality independent well pours and esoteric spirits. If we can’t juice it here, we don’t use it. That’s why we don’t have cranberry anything!” Grab a seat at the stylish bar, order some homemade pūpū (from sliders to chips and guac, using whatever is fresh and in season!) and let your mind run wild as you read the menu of one of Maui’s most eccentric and amusing locales. Maybe you’re in the mood for bourbon-centric “Stirred Down in Wailuku Town,” or a “Surf and Go Naked” featuring gin. Suzanne recommends her favorite drink: A classic daiquiri, Cuban style, with rum from St. Lucia, juice from local limes and cane syrup made by one of her friends. Buckle up for more flavors and fun; Navarro and her co-owner are opening a ‘70s retro tavern called The Parlay in early 2024.


‘Īao Theater, 68 N. Market St. Wailuku Coffee Company, 26 North Market St. Open Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sabado Art Gallery, 38 N Market St. Open Monday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Native Intelligence, 1980 Main St., #2 Open Monday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rooted in Wailuku, 1942 Main St., #103A Typically open Tuesday through Sunday but check @rooted.in.wailuku for store hours. Sixty Two MarcKet, 62 N. Market St., # 100 Open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Umi Sushi, 1951 E. Vineyard St., #1714 Open Tuesday through Saturday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Miyako Sushi, Inc.,1883 Wili Pa Loop Open Tuesday through Friday, 4 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday 4 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Ichiban Okazuya, 2133 Kaohu St. Open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sam Sato’s, 1750 Wili Pa Loop Open Monday through Saturday, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Shikedo Bento Patisserie, 2050 Main St., FC4 Open Tuesday-Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (2:30 p.m. on Saturdays). Ester’s Fair Prospect, 2050 Main St., Suite 1B Open Monday, Tuesday and Saturday, 3 p.m. to midnight, and Wednesday-Friday, noon to midnight.

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ART THAT TALKS STORY Creativity Runs Deep in the Sabado Family story MORGAN EASTWOOD image RACHEL OLSSON

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n a world where cultural, historical and geographic differences often divide people, art has the power to unite and empower generation after generation. The Sabado Art Studio, Gallery and Boutique, whose mission statement is to “beautify and educate,” has been at the forefront of Maui’s art scene, creating art that conveys the essence of Hawaiian culture. The Sabado brand is comprised of paintings by Philip Sabado, a world-renowned fine artist who embodies the spirit and history of the Hawaiian Islands and his life-long love of nature. Alongside Philip’s work are the paintings of his son, Erin Sabado, whose background in both fine art and artist representation have helped to garner the brand’s welldeserved respect. To accompany the visuals of each historical portrait are written stories by Christine Sabado, Erin’s mother and Philip’s wife, whose mana‘o—her written stories—ensure that each piece of art is conveyed in the way the artist imagined it. With gallery-boutique hybrids in Wailuku, Wailea and at the Westin Nanea in Kā‘anapali, the Sabado family has established themselves as an ‘ohana operation legacy within Maui’s art scene. “We all have our part in

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this,” Christine says, “and we’ve grown. That’s a little overwhelming at times, but it’s a good thing.” Philip’s paintings are classic, yet contemporary, and decorous but unpredictable. The timeless pieces depict ancient Hawaiian history, with themes of Hawaiian deities, ‘āina, mana and more. Hues of green, teal, crimson and magenta fill the canvas with scenes one sees on Maui’s landscape but with a contemporary twist. Ti leaves, which hold a significant place in Philip’s artistic sphere, are seen in many of his paintings. “That’s my Makua, my mother ti leaf. I started planting ti leaves, and every morning I wake up and look at them. I see the beautiful colors that come out of them. And it just makes me feel great as an artist, to be able to see nature at its best early in the morning, seeing the colors of the sea.” His process comes naturally to him as if presented by Madame Pele, the volcano deity, herself. “I’ll just put washes on my canvas, and I’ll wait to see who appears on the canvas. It’s like watching clouds. You look at clouds and suddenly, there’s a bird; or there’s a person; or there’s a bear in the cloud. I do the same thing with my canvas.”


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Mythology may be the word for it, but to Philip, he’s painting history. “The energy wants to be created. And this is why a lot of the paintings I do are of the period of Hawaiian mythology— because it is the moment where everything was oral. Nothing written. And what I’ve done is take the oral knowledge and brought it into a visual.” Whether a painting conveys waiwai, the traditional preciousness of water, or an abundance of kalo, also known as taro, providing for the people, it’s apparent that each painting is symbolic. “It’s a reminder for us to remember that this land, this ‘āina, is still alive,” Philip says. Originally from Molokai, Philip grew up on the pineapple plantation at Maunaloa. “The most important thing for me was fishing and hunting and really being with nature, having the opportunity to appreciate nature.” This respect for the land around him helped to develop an innate knack for beauty and art. “I think I was around seven years old and remember in those periods [there was] no television. So, there was nothing else going on except life. I used to just doodle around, and my mom saw the interest in what I was doing. She started buying me art supplies [and] let my natural ability come through.” Though his abilities were encouraged, they were never pushed, which is something Philip believes is vital for a young artist

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to develop their own style and techniques. “A lot of times I tell parents, ‘Don’t try to teach them when they’re too young’—don’t send them to art school or anything. They’re going to miss that opportunity of self-development, of being an artist.” After being in the military, Philip moved to Pasadena, California to continue his education at the Art Center College of Design. He and Christine settled down and started their family, all while balancing Philip’s budding career as an advertising illustrator, designer and eventually a senior art director. As a child, Erin appreciated his father’s hustle. “He did album covers [and] magazines, to a point where [executives] wanted to relocate him to New York which is where you had your best designers and illustrators; and that’s where he was at a crossroads.” Philip realized he had two choices: move to an urban jungle in a more corporate setting or go back to an island with an actual jungle and pursue fine art in his home of Hawai‘i. Fortunately for fine art lovers, they chose the latter. By the time the Sabado family moved back to Hawai‘i in the mid-1980s, the Hawaiian Renaissance was already underway for more than a decade. It was a period that saw Herb Kawainui Kāne design the Hōkūle‘a, and Peter Moon’s band, The Sunday Manoa, and their distinct, serene sound had become a household name. But it was also


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the time of a local art worldwide boom. Hawaiian cultural advisors were now vital to the hospitality industry, ensuring that resorts felt current, while keeping the integrity of the Hawaiian people. But to the dismay of Philip and Christine, they noticed that the art on display at hotels wasn’t authentic—and not painted by local artists. As Christine remembers, “Interior decorators were flown down from the mainland to interpret it [Hawaiian art].” When she asked a manager of a large hotel why they weren’t using local artists, he claimed that there weren’t any. “He had to wait for the world to evolve, wait for the correct moment in time,” Christine says of her husband. He finally found it when the Ritz-Carlton’s newly appointed Hawaiian cultural director Clifford Naeole sought Philip out specifically. “We were launched. And that was our breakthrough,” Christine recalls. “And then slowly the other hotels on Maui were doing the same.” Philip’s most important goal is to create authentic art that is beautiful but also educational. He takes the lessons depicted through the Hula and in the Kumulipo (the creation chant) and puts a face to them. With son Erin as his middle-man in most corporate settings, Philip can stay true to what he wants to bring to life on the canvas, while keeping businesses happy. “My father can create a mural of

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what Hawai‘i was hundreds, thousands of years ago, but at the same time bridge the branding and make it contemporary Hawaiiana. I do my best to explain that to a lot of these big general managers that think maybe we just paint a bunch of beautiful hibiscuses. But no, there’s much more to that, and that’s why they appreciate him,” Erin notes. Aside from being his father’s representation, Erin has worked as a fine artist for over a decade, with paintings that have a bright, flowy and modern feel. His art pays homage to his dad’s, while having a distinctive look of its own. “Most of my work is more contemporary in style, but the steps I take to finish are all what my dad taught me. No computers, just old school techniques.” The father-son duo have worked together on occasion, according to Erin, but their subjects vary. “All of my paintings are of Hawaiians, but when it comes to the mythology, the mysticism, he’s the master on that element. For me, I just like to see subject matter of florals, of different elements, colors of Hawai‘i, and I bring that into my watercolors.” Erin, a former artists representative, is also an astute businessman. “He’s a guy that’s not afraid to negotiate with corporate people.” Philip says, “The thing is that I’m old school. I don’t even have a cell phone—I don’t need it. They’ve got one, so I’m fine!


The thing my daughter tells me is, ‘Dad, just paint.’” And then there’s the matriarch: Christine adds her magic to the process through words. Before she started writing documents to hang beside the paintings, people who visited the gallery would ask for the story behind the art, and when Philip would explain, Christine realized that a written mana‘o was necessary to interpret the art in the way Philip intended it to be seen. “I’ve always maintained that our visitors come here hungry,” Christine explains. “They come wanting to know these things. They just don’t know how to get to them. They’ve done the coconut thing, the shopping, the snorkeling. But they’re still hungry for more information. I just saw the puka that said, ‘Why don’t we give them the stories as well?’ And then they’re going to go away more enriched.” While the mana‘o are Philip’s anecdotes, Christine condenses them into concise, polished excerpts. She proposed the idea of selling table runners and rugs with designs that correlate with the family’s paintings, which bring an element of functionality to their portfolio. The accomplishments of the Sabado family are endless, but a pinnacle has been their work with Kaiser Permanente. What started as a commission for The Rainbow Dialysis Lab in Lahaina has turned into painting and mural commissions at

nine Kaiser Permanente hospitals and healthcare centers around the Islands. The Sabados’ objective is to take away the cold, sterile feeling of a typical hospital and bring a little bit of home comfort to the hallways. “At the Moanalua Clinic,” Erin recounts, “we transformed this one floor to basically like a beautiful tropical Hawaiian rainforest. It was about 133 paintings, and two murals on one floor. And one of the reasons Kaiser likes to work with us is they feel that the art adds to the healing process.” The Lā‘au Lapa‘au (traditional healing) is always present when their art is present. Giving back to the community through painting donations, scholarships, lecturing and teaching, which they’ve been doing for over 35 years, is what is most important to the family of creatives. “We’re prouder of that than selling art. I think that’s the whole reason we came back to Hawai‘i again, because I realized that I’ve had some great experience in advertising and a great education from the mainland and in Paris, but the thing is, what’s next? I realized, as a local person in Hawai‘i, that the most important thing is giving back. You earn all this, and then what, you’re gonna throw it away? No, you give it back. That’s why we’re such a part of our community.” That is the Sabados’ legacy. As Philip explains, “For me, it’s Aloha. It’s just a gift of Aloha.”

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SHOP LOCAL

Inspired by the beauty of her island home, Susanna Cromwell creates inspiring art in the form of illustrations, unique framed paper quilts, original block prints and more. Regardless of the medium, expect flora, fauna and ocean life to be front and center. Though raised outside of Boston, MA, Cromwell's parents are from Cape Verde, a small archipelago off the West Coast of Africa, so she grew up fascinated by tales of island life. Today, those dreams of island life are a reality, as she resides here on Maui. Working as an artist and raising her four children, art has become a family affair. In fact, handcrafted frames are made by her husband using repurposed wood. Pieces have a decidedly vintage Hawaiian look, though her approach combines traditional Indian and Japanese block printing with unconventional techniques to create one-of-a-kind pieces. She’s inspired by aloha shirt designs from the 1950s and 60s, vintage botanical drawings and Matisse cut-outs, to name a few. Cromwell has led workshops at Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea, and her pieces have been featured in exhibits throughout the state, including Hui No‘eau Visual Arts Center in Makawao, as well as the Polu Gallery at the Sheraton Waikīkī on O‘ahu. But her work goes well beyond the shores of Hawai‘i, as she’s collaborated with beloved national brands such as Madewell and Slowtide. Note cards are great to send to loved ones, tote bags are perfect for carrying your farmers market goodies and original works will surely elicit conversations with house guests and, hopefully, put you back into a Maui state of mind. Find Susanna’s art at Cromwellhome.com, @susanna_cromwell_art

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IMAGE COURTESY: (TOP LT) SHANNON WILSEY; (TOP RT) TALIA PASHEY GANGINI; (BOTTOM) DANIEL JONES

Ode to Island Life


A Touch of Whimsy For a dose of color and fun in the sun without needing any SPF, look to Welzie Art. Inspired by the surf lifestyle, Welzie makes art using the same materials of which surfboards are made: fiberglass and resin. Playful pieces are hand-sculpted and bring this unique medium from the waves to your walls. In fact, many pieces were born out of his former studio at one of the most famous surf breaks in the world, Banzai Pipeline on O‘ahu’s North Shore. After spending the majority of his professional career on O‘ahu, the artist now resides on the Valley Isle, and since 2019, Welzie has been the artist in residence for Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort, where his colorful creations are on display throughout. More exclusive artworks can be found inside The Welzie Art Gallery, located on property and open to the public. The artist hosts various workshops and events at the resort’s gallery. Keiki (children) and adults alike can participate in a 75-minute class and go home with ready-to-hang original artwork. Larger groups can book blockprinting classes. A popular event held monthly at the gallery is Wine & Welzie, where guests can meet the artist, peruse the gallery, soak in the breathtaking views and sip on complimentary wine. In addition to his 3D pieces, Welzie has painted large-scale murals on O‘ahu and other places he’s traveled in search of the perfect wave, like Scorpion Bay in Baja, Mexico. Welzie is also available for commission pieces— think family portraits where people are painted as pineapples or colorful fish, each one representing a member of the family (the latter was actually a piece he created for a family in Wailea). Whether it’s original paintings, sculptures or surfboards, Welzie Art adds aloha and brings happy art to happy homes around the world.

PHOTO COURTESY: ANDAZ MAUI AT WAILEA RESORT

3550 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea, Maui, welzie-art.com, @welzie_art

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ORGANIC

LEGACY

Exploring Kīpahulu’s Organic “Fruit Forest” story + images VIOLET GASKELL

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huck and Lily Boerner have been growing tropical fruit and coffee on their family-owned and -operated, certified organic farm since 1972. Located on the southeastern slope of Haleakalā in the Kīpahulu district about ten miles south of Hāna, Ono Organic Farms is a veritable fruit forest with bunches of bananas hanging heavy on their stalks lining the drive through their farm, up to their home situated amongst coconut, papaya, acerola cherry and sapote trees. They live and breathe organic farming and passed the trait onto their children, including son Pueo, who lives on the property and has a hand in the business, as well as a food truck in Hāna town. “He was working a tractor by the time he was eight years old,” Lily says. Now that he’s in his forties, his teenage daughter Nicha says she wants to run the farm someday.


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Chuck first learned the virtues of organic farming and eating from his own “Grandpa Opa” who, nearing 60, sold his hotel in Upstate New York, became a vegetarian and moved to Hawai‘i to farm. He bought a plot of land near Hāmoa beach in Maka‘alae, planted fruit trees and earned the moniker “John Fruits” from his Hawaiian neighbors. He grew unusual fruits like tamarind and star apple and picked up old chickens from egg farms on the other side of the island and let them roam freely all over the orchard to serve as meandering fertilizers. Chuck grew up an island away in Mānoa Valley on O‘ahu, and his father, an engineer for the Navy, grew fruit in their yard and on his North Shore of O‘ahu property, but it was his trips to Maka‘alae that truly nurtured his desire to grow his own food. At 30, Chuck was nearing a five year trip around the world. He roved through India and Afghanistan and was camping out in Sri Lanka to take advantage of the virtually untouched waves when he got news that a nine-acre plot of land in Kīpahulu would soon be his. He returned to Hawai‘i and got to work planting fruit trees. Then in 1985, the Boerners learned that the Nature Conservancy was considering parceling off 300 acres of the Kīpahulu section of Haleakalā National Park, which bordered their land. Chuck’s parents sold their prized parcel on the North Shore and Chuck and Lily threw in what they had, and the land was theirs—under the condition that it would not be developed but would be used for agriculture in perpetuity. Later that same year, Lily gave birth to twins. Lily and her sister, who were living nearby on a property now known as Laulima Farm, gathered their friends and walked up the mountainside to a spot where Chuck had unloaded 100 baby banana trees. “We made a big feast and planted a big field. It was very

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exciting,” Lily recalls. Now, there are seventy varieties of tropical fruit growing at Ono Farms. Rather than a sight of monotonous rows, the orchards bend with the land; towering lychee trees butt up against woody branches heavy with spiky durian fruit, and thickets of banana line the paths. When Ono Farms first surfaced, there was no established market for organic local fruit and only the immigrant populations— Hawai‘i’s many Filipino, Chinese and Japanese residents — knew what to do with the more unusual fruit the Boerners were growing. So, they started working with markets, the first being Ooka’s in Kahului. “It was us and Wayne Nishiki—we were the only ones doing markets back then,” Chuck recalls. Now they are all in their seventies, and the Boerners are still farming and Nishiki still doles out generous samples at his Kihei roadside stand. Around the same time, Chuck became the founding president of the Hawai‘i Organic Association. There are now nine regular farmers markets on Maui and though the volume of agriculture being produced on-island has decreased since the sugarcane and pineapple fields were virtually discontinued, the number of small, diversified local and organic farms has steadily grown in recent years. Ono Farms is a production farm: bananas, papayas and avocados are sold to local grocers, market collectives and chefs, but demand for private tours has increased over the years. And now they offer regular private tours that include exploring their orchard and tastings. Lily says many people end the tour remarking that they’ve never experienced anything like it. “It’s a forest of fruit. The trees aren’t manicured; they’re mature and producing. And for people who don’t ever get off the beaten track, I think just to be in the oxygenrich environment affects them,” she says. Monday through Friday, on this rather large family


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farm, Chuck and his team take small groups by reservation only, up to three adults and two kids, on private tours through 50 acres of trees dripping with organic fruit. I grew up nearby in Hāna, and though I often ventured to Kīpahulu to jump in its cool, rushing rivers and hike through its lush, bambooladen mountains, I never toured Maui’s first organic commercial fruit farm. So, at 33, I decided it was high time I hopped in Chuck’s off-road mule cart to experience the fruit jungle that is Ono Farms. First, we rolled through a guava orchard, past the patterned trunks and fragrant yellow fruit hanging head-high. Chuck parked beneath a Wi apple tree and plucked one of the firm yellow orbs from a branch. Sliced open, the dull skin gave way to vibrant orange fruit. It tasted like a woody cousin of mango with notes of apricot. Native to the Caribbean, the mammee apple is one of many novel exotics Chuck and Lily have grown from seed over the years. Once on a trip to Australia, Chuck became enamored by ice-cream bean, a legume native to South America. In the airport, as boarding for his return flight to Hawai‘i was announced over the loudspeaker, he opened a three foot bean pod, removed the seeds, wrapped them in tissue paper and put them in his pocket. Reluctantly, he declared them when he landed in Hawai‘i, subjecting the fate of the beans to the Department of Agriculture. They were inspected and recorded, and since there was no soil on the beans, Chuck was allowed to keep them and plant them back on the farm. Now, a small cluster of ice cream bean trees thrive at Ono Farms. Over the years, Chuck and Lily have brought dozens of seeds, usually dried, back from their travels, including cacao from Costa Rica, which they now turn into chocolate. Next, we stopped in a papaya grove where the farm manager, Nick, and another worker, Pete, were harvesting the sweet, ripening fruits. Nick cut a papaya for us and presented it on a banana leaf. A descendent of O‘ahu’s Kahuku papaya, the Ono papaya is golden-hued inside and tastes like a subtle tropical melon and is less pungent than other varieties of the fruit. “It’s the papaya you want to keep eating when you’ve been eating papaya all your life,” says Chuck. From there, we tasted huge creamy avocados; flowery mountain apple; custardy durian; and whitesapote, the “pear of the tropics”. The Boerner’s

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favorite, the red sweetsop, was not quite in season. “We planted what we like to eat,” Lily says. At the end of the tour, the Boerners sent me home with a box of fruit, including a nutmeg pod that cracked open on its own a few days later. I consider myself a fruit enthusiast, but I’d never seen fresh nutmeg before. The glossy seed embedded in orange aril (mace) was a novel, sweet smelling reminder of my time at Ono Farms and of all the wonderful fruit I’ve yet to experience. The Next Generation: Olamana Organics When Ola Eleogram was a kid, Chuck took him and his brother on “surf safaris” around Maui with the Boerner twins and their friend Hank, whose dad farmed organic macadamia nuts. After spending their teens and early twenties as professional surfers, Ola and his wife Monyca bought a five acre property dotted with orange and avocado trees. They set to work revamping the farm, planted exotics like rollinia and soursop and a range of tropical and North American flowers, and turned their ‘ohana house into a guesthouse that is always furnished with a basket of fresh fruit from the farm and a one-of-a-kind, freshcut bouquet. Grocers on the other side of the island, including locally beloved Mana Foods buy from the Eleograms, and their fruit stand on Ula‘ino road is often stocked with creamy avocados and a variety of citrus fruits. Nearby farm experiences Aloha Grown Beauty offers tours with farm animals, and their farm shop carries natural beauty products, handmade lei and fresh-cut bouquets. Hāna Farms is famous for its selection of farm-fresh banana bread and other local goodies. Local musicians play at the farm’s restaurant, The Bamboo Hale, Friday nights while the kitchen serves up wood-fired pizza and farm salads. Like-minded Neighbors: Laulima Farm Laulima, a 13-acre regenerative farm with a diverse orchard and a range of field crops, including pineapple, ginger and turmeric, is half a mile past Ono Farms, towards Kaupō. The roadside farm stand offers fresh fruit, coffee, tea, farm popcorn and plant medicine.


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HOT SPOT VANA PAIA Discover a Culinary Gem Tucked Away in Central Maui story KRYSTAL KAKIMOTO images RACHEL OLLSON

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ine under the stars and feel worlds away at VANA Paia, an oasis in the heart of Pā‘ia town. Your culinary journey begins the moment you enter the restaurant and are given the option of four breathtaking dining spaces to choose from. Some head to the Jade Bar to enjoy their meals with prohibition-era cocktails, handshaken by VANA Paia mixologists. Others opt for the magnificent main dining area situated below a sprawling Hau Tree illuminated by twinkling lights that hang from above. For those wanting an interactive dining experience and a chance to get up close to the chefs, the Chef’s Table allows them a frontrow seat at the sushi bar and grill. However, if a little privacy is what you crave, the VANA Room is available to accommodate groups of up to sixteen people. Their tantalizing menu features Japanese-inspired cuisine blended with the flavors of the islands. The harmonious blend of East and West results in delightful fusion dishes like their Truffled Salmon which features seared filets of salmon dressed with ponzu sauce (Japanese citrus soy) finished with a splash of truffle oil. This refreshing and savory dish is

easily shared as a starter and a fantastic starting point for your culinary adventure. Other great starters include their VANA Caesar salad with miso Caesar dressing and Pork Gyoza served with chimichurri and ponzu sauce. Along with artistic presentation and deft attention to detail, another critical aspect of the menu of VANA Paia is an uncompromising requirement for fresh ingredients. By forging relationships with local farmers, fishermen, ranchers and producers, the chefs of VANA Paia can showcase the best ingredients and give guests an authentic taste of the island. Their sushi and sashimi are two excellent examples of the chef’s ability to source the best fresh fish caught from Maui waters. With the fresh catches, the VANA Paia sushi chefs skillfully create nigiri sushi utilizing local kampachi (yellowtail) and local tuna while also importing delicacies such as uni (sea urchin) and otoro, the rarest and most desired part of the maguro (bluefin tuna). VANA Paia also offers some of the best sushi rolls on the island, balancing bright flavors with refreshing textures that create sushi rolls bursting with umami 75


delectability. One signature sushi roll is their Vana Citrus Roll. Spicy tuna and crisp cucumber are enclosed within sweet sushi rice before being draped with filets of tuna, avocado, lemon garnish and ponzu sauce. While their menu does feature some of the best fish you can find on the island, the sushi chefs also offer a loaded Veggie Roll for guests looking for vegetarian options. The roll starts with thick slices of creamy avocado and spears of cucumber that are wrapped with nori (dried seaweed) and fluffy sushi rice. This uncomplicated, refreshing roll is then topped with sesame seeds before being served. When it is time to choose your entrée, the kitchen team at VANA Paia has a selection of dishes from both the land and the sea to tempt your appetite. One popular item is the Pan Seared Scallops which starts with plump, juicy scallops seared to a gentle golden crust and resting on a yuzu (Japanese citron) beurre blanc sauce and served with asparagus spears. Another entrée option that is beyond compare for steak lovers is their New York Strip. This tender piece of meat is grilled to guests’ preference and served with a Maui onion demi sauce, chimichurri sauce and crave-worthy crisped confit garlic potatoes. While all entrées are served with sides, you can also order additional hot plates of sides for the table to share. One highly soughtafter side that goes with nearly every entrée on the menu is their Sautéed Mushrooms. The dish starts by blending slices of nutty ali‘i mushrooms, tender

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oyster mushrooms and robust, smoky shiitake mushrooms in a hot pan seasoned with shallots and garlic. The resulting dish is bursting with flavor and texture imparted by the earthy mushrooms and the savory, garlicky oil. To complement its outstanding food menu, VANA Paia also offers a fantastic selection of cocktails created by a team of expert mixologists. One of their most popular cocktails is the Spicy Liliko‘i Mezcalita which starts with Banhez Mezcal, an artisanal mezcal created by natural fermentation and small-batch distillation resulting in a balanced yet complex flavor profile. Fresh liliko‘i juice, spicy habanero clover honey and fresh lime juice are added to the cocktail which is served in a Tajínrimmed glass. Other cocktails that mirror their fusion-inspired philosophy include the Makai Dragon which blends Tito’s vodka with yuzu juice, dragonfruit simple syrup and elderflower liqueur as well as their Gua “Vana” which combines Lunazul Blanco tequila with guava puree and Ancho Reyes—a chile liqueur produced in Puebla City, Mexico. For a night of delectable food and outstanding beverages in an intimate, hip ambiance, visit VANA Paia, a gem waiting to be discovered. VANA Paia; 93 Hāna Hwy., Pā‘ia, HI 96779; (808) 579-6002; vanapaia.com. Open Tuesday to Saturday from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. with live music Wednesday to Saturday.


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CULINARY

Q&A Chef Zach Laidlaw Hui Momona Farms story KRYSTAL KAKIMOTO images RACHEL OLSSON

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or Hua Momona Farms, providing the community with fresh, healthful food has evolved from a farm providing organic microgreens into a movement helping to nourish and strengthen the Maui community as it rebuilds following the devastating wildfires on Maui. In 2017, Gary Grube created Hua Momona Farms as a way to invest in the Maui community and provide local chefs and restaurants with high-quality microgreens. For two years, his team worked to prepare the land and construct the equipment necessary to launch the farm. To help achieve his vision, Grube brought Chef Zach Laidlow on board in 2019 as his connection between the farm and the kitchen. As Hua Momona Farms began to hit its stride, their operations were brought to a halt when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the islands in 2020. As the world shut down, tourists stopped coming to the islands, and restaurants were forced to reduce their hours or even close permanently. Business slowed for Hua Momona Farms, but their team was able to pivot to meet the changing needs of the community. The farm transitioned to offering Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) boxes loaded with fruits and vegetables that they began growing on their farm to supply local families with fresh ingredients. They also diversified their offerings

and began growing cucumbers, tomatoes, zucchini and more to complete their CSA box program. To complement this shift, the Hua Momona Foundation was formed to fight food insecurity on the island and to provide Maui’s youth with educational opportunities to learn how to sustain the agriculture of the islands. After wildfires tore through parts of Maui in August 2023, there was an unprecedented need for kōkua (selfless help) to immediately care for those who lost everything in the fires. Hua Momona Farms was equipped to again meet the needs of the community and is committed to playing a role in the long-term restoration of the island. Over the past months, their volunteer operations have evolved into a well-oiled machine providing essential relief to communities across the island. For Chef Zach Laidlow, the wildfires had a direct impact on his life. On August 8, he lost his home, community and every item he owned— from cooking equipment to family photos. Thankfully, he was able to survive the fires along with his girlfriend and their cat. But at age 34, he never thought he would be rebuilding his life from scratch. As he pushes forward, he focuses on his core beliefs and passion for life, cooking and the community as his backbone to lean against.

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Where were you born and raised? I was born and raised just outside of Chicago, Illinois in the suburbs. I spent a lot of time growing up in a small town called Burlington. That’s where I went to middle and high school and held most of my earliest jobs. What role did food play in your family? Growing up, food has always been very important to my family. I remember having very large feasts on every holiday with the whole family — grandparents, parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, cousins, nephews and nieces. We would gather at one house and have a beautifully cooked meal. It was a time for storytelling, laughing, joking and playing games — and eating way too much until you passed out on the couch! Always great times! How did you first get involved in the culinary industry? I started my first job in kitchens washing dishes at age 13 at Art & Alma’s, a steakhouse owned by a friend’s family. I would watch my brother Kiel cook and was drawn to it. He used to give me the end cut of Prime Rib, and it would make my night! I quickly knew then that I wanted to become a chef! What were some of your first jobs in the culinary industry after Art & Alma’s? After dishwashing, I knew that I wanted to become a cook, but I had to wait until I was 16 because it was “company policy.” As soon as I turned 16, they let me work behind the line. Right after high school, I went to Culinary School at Elgin Community College, “ECC,” where I earned my Culinary Arts and Hospitality Restaurant Management degrees. During culinary school, I was cooking at Bowes Creek Country Club and quickly rose in the ranks. How did your culinary path lead you to Maui and to become the Executive Chef of Hua Momona Farms? Funny story … after traveling the world for 12 years and cooking in different countries, I ended up back at Art & Alma as their Executive Chef. In 2016, I was cooking for a party of 22 guests when someone at the party asked to have a chat with me. I headed out and introduced myself, and that’s where I met Gary

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Grube, the owner of Hua Momona Farms. He loved the meal so much that he gave me his business card and mentioned he purchased a property on Maui that he wanted to turn into a farm and said to come work for him! When I was cooking in Australia, my visa was about to expire, and I was going back and forth about whether to renew it. I opened my wallet, saw Gary’s business card and a light bulb flipped on! I called Gary to ask if he was still looking for a chef for the farm, and he said yes! After doing some private cooking for Gary in Chicago, he flew me to Maui. What are some things about Maui and Hua Momona Farms that stand out to you? Maui has a very special place in my heart. Maui is where I started my little family with my beautiful girlfriend, Tina Carranza, and our kitty, Mochi. I love all the beautiful beaches and our loving community. Maui matured me as a chef — growing my own produce, curating my menus and working with local fishermen and ranchers. I mean, what a chef’s dream come true! And Hua Momona Farms means everything to me. I started this farm from scratch and so much blood, sweat and tears went into this project. I consider the farm my baby. What are some of your favorite local ingredients to work with? I love the local fruits that I can source from Hana or Upcountry Maui — star fruit, rambutan, jaboticabas, longan berries, pineapples and oranges are the juiciest! What is your philosophy towards food and cooking? My approach to food is simple. I focus on utilizing local ingredients with no waste involved. A lot of my cooking lately has been around 80% vegetables and fruits and 20% animal protein. I love eating light, clean, fresh, vibrant, bold, tasty ingredients. I’m inspired by Nordic cuisine which focuses on utilizing what the land has to offer by foraging or gathering. My techniques would be more Frenchinspired, and my plating would be more modern. I love molecular gastronomy and how many ways I can transform an ingredient.


If you had an entire day off, what would your perfect day look like? Boy, that’s a tough one! I would probably wake up at about 7 a.m. with a nice double shot of espresso. By 8 a.m., go to Westside Bagel to get my bagel fix. Then, I would gather some friends to go to the beach where we would go floating, BBQ on the grill, catch some sun rays (probably get a little burnt because I’m Irish) and listen to good music while surrounding myself with the best people who inspire me to be the best person I can be. Then, around dinner time, I’d probably be tired from being in the sun and ocean all day, so I’d think about ordering some food, watching a nice movie and relaxing. Island time, baby! HUA MOMONA FARMS WILDFIRE RELIEF The Hua Momona Foundation organizes volunteers to provide fresh meals in the farm-to-table style of Chef Zach for the Maui community. From Monday through Friday, volunteers can join the team of Hua Momona Farms to laulima (many hands working together) and grow the ingredients that directly nourish Maui’s community. Farm shifts are available from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and are ideal matches for those who enjoy outdoor activities and spending some time in the warm sun. Once the vegetables are harvested, they are handed off to the kitchen prep team who are on-site Monday through Saturday helping to chop, dice and prep the ingredients that are then turned into nutritious meals for the island residents. The final part of this volunteer chain is the delivery drivers who distribute delicious meals throughout the community on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Hua Momona Farms; 246 Keoawa Street, Lahaina, HI 96761; (808) 862-MAUI (6284); huamomonafarms.com; Farm Volunteer Days Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.; Kitchen Prep Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Meal Deliveries Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

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WHAT WE LOVE NOW

Sweet Start Whether stopping by for a morning jolt or a midday pick-me-up, Momona Bakery & Coffee Shop has everything to satisfy your cravings and give you the boost you need. Coffee lovers can start their day with a cup of their rich, aromatic coffee served hot and brewed fresh throughout the day. Also on their beverage menu is a delightful combination of espresso shots, chai lattes and flavored lattes. To pair with your morning beverage, their bakery offers a dazzling assortment of freshly baked goods. When you visit, be sure to look for their signature medialunas. Argentinian for “half a moon,” these pastries are smaller than croissants, slightly denser and a tad sweeter than their French counterpart. Other favorite pastries include their decadent brownie cakes, iced cinnamon rolls and liliko‘i croissants. In addition to their outstanding pastries, the bakery also offers an excellent selection of savory offerings—perfect for breakfast or lunch! Be sure to visit their shop for one of the best avocado toasts on the island. It all begins with smashed avocado arranged atop white toast, whole wheat toast, gluten-free toast or a croissant. The dish is garnished with cherry tomatoes, alfalfa sprouts, pomegranate seeds and edible flowers before being drizzled with olive oil. When you’re looking for a special way to start your day, or need to refuel between activities, stop by Momona Bakery & Coffee Shop for a peaceful respite from your everyday life to enjoy their thoughtfully created drinks and baked goods. 7 East Ka‘ahumanu Avenue, Kahului, HI 96732; (808) 214-3589; Instagram @momonabakery; Monday through Wednesday and Friday, 6 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Thursday, 6 a.m. – 2 p.m.; Saturday 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Sunday, 7 a.m. – 2 p.m.

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‘Āina Inspired Inspired by nature and the art of ancestral feasting, Kiawe Outdoor’s alfresco dining experiences center around fire, legendary wines and reimagining what is possible. The spark for Kiawe Outdoor grew organically when founder, Yeshua Goodman, began hosting outdoor dinners with friends and realized the impact these dinners had. After heading to the mountains loaded with primal cuts of meat, produce sourced from farmers markets and bottles of dazzling wines, the group would cook their meal in open flames and dine under the stars. He quickly saw the impression these meals created and founded a company to share these same experiences with the public. Goodman, an Advanced Sommelier with the Court of Masters who grew up on Maui, offers fully customizable, immersive dining experiences. Signature dishes include Lawalu (wrapped in ti leaves) Snapper, Venison tartare and sourdough bread cooked directly in the coals slathered with Kīhei mango butter and gathered sea salt. After connecting with Kiawe Outdoor and sharing your preferences, their team goes to work to handle all the details surrounding your event. As guests mingle and dine, they can watch chefs expertly create their meals over open-fire grills brought to the venue. Goodman and his team work to source ingredients from the ‘āina (land)— from locally grown produce to invasive boar and deer—each component of the meal telling a different part of the story of the land. Each course is then paired with wine sourced from around the globe to create an unforgettable dining experience. For more information, visit kiaweoutdoor.com.

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WHAT WE LOVE NOW

When hunger hits, visit South Maui Gardens and their eclectic collection of food trucks assembled at their outdoor food oasis. Located just a short walk from the ocean and Kalama Park, you can find some of the best food trucks on the island showcasing cuisines from around the globe. One cornerstone food truck is Blue Door Bread & Pizza Company which has guests lining up to purchase their 100% organic, 48-hour leavened, hearth-baked artisan sourdough breads and pizzas. Others are enticed by the aromas of Aloha Prime Eatery and their slow-roasted prime rib served alongside hand-whipped potato puree, cream of spinach, horseradish cream and au jus. Aloha Prime’s maxim of fresh ingredients to create classic dishes, with a flair, will satisfy everyone in your party. From their Seared Ahi Mango Salad to their French Dip Sandwich loaded with thinly sliced prime rib, the depth of their offerings will delight all eaters. And for those looking for plant-based options, be sure to visit Papio’s Place, a 100% vegan food truck with a faithful following. A few crowd favorites include their Mac’n Trees, al dente cavatappi pasta served with their Mac’n cheeze sauce and broccoli “trees,” and their Street Tacos that offer guests the choice of carnitas-style mushrooms and jackfruit, chorizo created from edamame and sunflower seeds or Okinawan potato pastor. Once you secure your food, dine in their beautifully landscaped outdoor space and enjoy the live music available Monday through Saturday. 35 Auhana Road, Kīhei, HI 96753; southmauigardens.com/kihei-food-oasis; Hours vary by vendor.

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PHOTO COURTESY: RACHEL OLSSON

Food Paradise


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Tread lightly. Raise your consciousness. Reduce your impact.

We hope that you enjoy this very special place. Help us preserve its beauty as you explore with a heightened level of awareness, intention and respect. Mahalo nui loa.


EXPERIENCE THE ISLAND OF MAUI 89

SEE + DO

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BEACHES

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GOLF

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EAT + DRINK

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SHOP + STYLE

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ISLAND LIVING

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MAPS

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TRAVELOGUE

DOWNLOAD THE SAVVY360 APP

This link will take you to the appropriate app store to install the app, where you can create a trip, start building your itinerary, collaborate with friends, and more...

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Explore. Plan. Collaborate. Download the Savvy360 app and get more out of your Maui experience. Scan to get the SAVVY360 app

Or visit SAVVY360.com

PLAN YOUR PERFECT DAY IN THE APP

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SEE + DO Experiences 90 MAUI OCEAN CENTER aquarium 91 OLD LĀHAINĀ LŪ‘AU lū‘au 92 NORTHSHORE ZIPLINE TOUR zipline 93 SUNRISE DELUXE SNORKEL boat tour 94 PINEAPPLE FARM TOUR farm tour & tasting 95 HALI‘IMAILE DISTILLERY TOUR distillery tour & tasting 96 HAWAI‘I WILDLIFE DISCOVERY CENTER cultural center & museum 97 CACAO FARM TOUR & CHOCOLATE TASTING farm tour & tasting 98 ‘IAO VALLEY STATE MONUMENT hiking & scenic lookout 99 HALEAKALĀ & BEST OF MAUI TOUR sightseeing tour

Sights 100 DRAGON'S TEETH hiking & sightseeing

101 KAPALUA COASTAL TRAIL hiking & sightseeing 102 KULA BOTANICAL GARDEN garden tour 103 MAKAWAO FOREST RESERVE hiking

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Maui Ocean Center AQUARIUM in CENTRAL MAUI

› AUTHENTIC. RESPECTFUL. LOCAL. › IMMERSIVE 3D FILM SHOWN DAILY

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

› AQUARIUM OPEN DAILY 9AM-5PM

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Maui Ocean Center is a must-do experience for visitors of all ages. Overlooking Mā‘alaea Bay, this indoor-outdoor facility is home to one of the world’s largest collections of living Pacific corals. While the aquarium’s mission for the past 25 years is to share the wonder and beauty of Hawai‘i’s native marine life, such as tropical fish and rays, they also educate on ocean conservation and Hawaiian culture, including a powerful exhibit on Kaho‘olawe. Maui Ocean Center inspires guests by bringing them below the water’s surface: Walk through a 54-foot-long underwater tunnel surrounded by manō (sharks); visit the Turtle Lagoon to observe Hawai‘i's cherished honu (sea turtles); and take an immersive surroundsound journey with life-sized koholā (humpback whales) in their 3D Humpbacks of Hawai‘i Exhibit and Sphere Experience. Located in Mā‘alaea Harbor (808) 270-7000 • mauioceancenter.com 192 Mā‘alaea Rd., Wailuku (Map A, PG 160)


Old Lāhainā Lū‘au LŪ‘AU in WEST MAUI

Located in Lāhainā (808) 667-1998 • oldlahainaluau.com 1251 Front St., Lāhainā

(Map F, PG 166)

› A HAWAIIAN CULTURAL EXPERIENCE › TABLE SERVICE—NO BUFFET OR BAR LINE › BEAUTIFUL OCEAN VIEWS

THIS BUSINESS WAS AFFECTED BY THE LAHAINA TRAGEDY. PLEASE CHECK THEIR WEBSITE FOR REOPENING DATES.

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

When you step through the gates at the Old Lāhainā Lū‘au, you’re swept into a well-preserved epicenter of Hawaiian culture, storytelling and feasting with a breathtaking ocean view. Located on the west side of Maui, Old Lāhainā Lū‘au takes pride in presenting an authentic Hawaiian lū‘au experience. Get serenaded by local musicians playing island melodies on the ‘ukulele. Take a seat, order a drink and settle in for an evening of their award-winning production of legendary music and hula that will take you on a musical journey through the history of Hawai‘i. Take epic photos with silhouettes of palm trees dancing in the tropical breeze as the sun sets into the ocean, the tiki torches are lit and the food and drink service begins. Old Lāhainā Lū‘au is known for having some of the best hula dancers and most talented entertainers on the island.

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NorthShore Zipline Tour ZIPLINE on MAUI'S NORTH SHORE

› GUARANTEED FUN! › FAMILY FRIENDLY!

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

› MAUI'S BEST GUIDES!

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Experience the thrill of Maui's freestyle zipline adventure as you glide among towering eucalyptus trees on state-of-the-art ziplines. Traverse tree-to-tree suspension bridges and ascend high towers for an adrenaline-pumping experience. Marvel at panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean and the verdant North Shore jungle during your journey, soaring 70 feet above the ground at speeds up to 40 miles per hour. Throughout the tour, guests are accompanied by seasoned guides, ensuring both safety and non-stop fun. With comfortable, state-of-the-art harnesses and belay systems, every adventurer is guaranteed security and ease. Embrace the spirit of "hang loose" in the heart of Maui's jungles with a unique and encouraging team on a historic World War II landmark site known as “Camp Maui,” which served as a military training base and was home to the Fighting 4th Marine Division during World War II. Great for both experienced and first-time zippers. NorthShore Zipline Located on the slopes of Haleakalā (808) 269-0671 • nszipline.com 2065 Kauhikoa Rd, Haiku (Map A, PG 160)


Sunrise Deluxe Snorkel SNORKEL & SAIL in SOUTH MAUI

Kai Kanani (808) 879-7218 • kaikanani.com 108 Wailea Ike Dr, Ste. 1203, Wailea (Map A, PG 160)

› CHECK IN AT MALUAKA BEACH › TOUR BEGINS AT 6:15AM › SHUTTLE SERVICE FROM WAILEA RESORTS

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

Experience the most exclusive snorkeling tour to Molokini on Kai Kanani Sailing Charter’s Sunrise Deluxe Snorkel tour. As the only catamaran in Wailea-Makena, home to the most luxurious resorts in Hawai‘i, the Kai Kanani II offers ocean adventures just five minutes from most Wailea resorts and just three miles from Molokini crater. This magical marine preserve features the clearest water in all Hawai‘i and over 250 species of fish. Their location allows guests to experience something special: Molokini without any crowds. Guests are rewarded with a professional, full-service crew, a delicious three-course meal and world-class snorkeling. In addition, Kai Kanani offers daily sunset sails from this pristine south Maui location. During Whale Season, December through March, the Adventure Whale Watch is offered with guaranteed sightings.

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Pineapple Farm Tour FARM TOUR in UPCOUNTRY MAUI

› VISIT THEIR ONLINE STORE › FREE PARKING ON SITE

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

› EXPLORE THE FARM

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Nothing is more synonymous with the Hawaiian landscape and culture as the pineapple, and the sweetest pineapple in the world is grown on Maui. Maui Pineapple Tour’s passion is to share the history, culture and hard work that goes into producing this iconic fruit. Join them at their beautiful, upcountry Hali‘imaile farm to experience a working pineapple farm. Travel through the pineapple fields in an air-conditioned vehicle while knowledgeable guides explain the growing cycle and cultivation techniques of Maui Gold Pineapple, which is famous for its extra sweet flavor and can’t be found anywhere else in the world. After exploring the farm, guests are guided through the processing factory and shown how pineapple is tested, sorted and packaged. Best of all, you get a free pineapple with every tour! Their pineapples are approved and packaged for airport transport. It’s truly a fun and delicious top-rated experience for everyone! Maui Pineapple Tour (808) 665-5491 • mauipineappletour.com 883 Hali‘imaile Rd., Makawao (Map A, PG 160)


Hali‘imaile Distillery Tour TASTING TOUR in UPCOUNTRY MAUI

Hali‘imaile Distilling Company (808) 758-5154 • haliimailedistilling.com 883 Hali‘imaile Rd., Makawao (Map A, PG 160)

› VISIT GIFT SHOP OR ONLINE STORE › PICK UP RECIPE CARDS AFTER THE TOUR TO CRAFT YOUR OWN COCKTAILS!

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

Tour the Hali'imaile Distilling Company and sample three of their handcrafted, locally made, authentic Hawaiian brand spirits. Located in the heart of Maui’s pineapple region, Makawao, Hali'imaile Distilling Company is a craft distillery utilizing local Maui ingredients to create “Hawai'i in a bottle.” The pristine surroundings of Upcountry Maui and access to clean air, pure water, exquisite agriculture and a wonderful community allows them to produce ultra-premium Hawaiian spirits. Starting with local ingredients and distilling in small batches using unique stills, their one-of-a-kind spirits are mixed with crystal clear Hawaiian spring water. You may recognize their products, as they are premium brands known for their superior quality and taste: Pau Maui Vodka, Mahina Premium Rum, Paniolo Blended Whiskey and FID Street Hawaiian Gin. Tours and tastings are offered Monday-Friday, and guests under 21 are welcome.

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Hawai‘i Wildlife Discovery Center CULTURAL CENTER & MUSEUM in WEST MAUI

› A DYNAMIC BLEND OF ART & SCIENCE CELEBRATING HAWAI‘I'S MARINE LIFE

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

› AN INTERACTIVE "KIDS' ZONE"

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Located on the third floor of Whalers Village in Kā‘anapali Beach Resort, Hawai‘i Wildlife Discovery Center is an extraordinary multimedia, interactive venue with stunning murals, photos and videos featuring native marine wildlife, a “Kids' Zone” learn and play area, and over 30 exhibits on conservation, marine debris, whaling era and Hawaiian cultural values. HWDC highlights the work of Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund in protecting native flora and fauna via fieldwork, education, marine debris removal, conservation, research and advocacy campaigns. Learn how you can be pono (righteous and caring) with protecting native species and habitats. All ages are welcome to enjoy the Discovery Center, which is a donationbased nonprofit that depends on your support to continue doing their important conservation work. Open daily from 10:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Hawai‘i Wildlife Discovery Center (808) 900-7124 • hawaiiwildlifediscoverycenter.org 2435 Kā‘anapali Parkway, St. H-14, Lāhainā (Map E, PG 165)


Cacao Farm Tour & Chocolate Tasting FARM TOUR & TASTING in WEST MAUI

Maui Ku‘ia Estate Chocolate (808) 793-6651 • mauichocolatetour.com 78 Ulupono St Suite 1, Lāhainā (Map F, PG 166)

› CHOCOLATE TASTING FLIGHTS AT THE FACTORY STORE AND CAFÉ › DRINK PAIRINGS AVAILABLE

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

Your journey begins at the Maui Ku‘ia Estate Chocolate Factory in Lāhainā, the largest chocolate factory in the state of Hawa‘i. Tour guides drive you to the private cacao estate nestled in the foothills of the West Maui mountains. Featuring over 20 acres of cacao trees, professional and friendly tour guides lead you from “farm to bar.” This interactive and educational tour introduces you to their cacao trees, the hands-on fruit harvesting techniques, and finishes with an exclusive 9-piece tasting of their award-winning chocolate. After the farm tour, you are returned to the factory for shopping or more chocolate experiences. A guided chocolate tasting is available in the beautiful upstairs open-air pavilion complete with a selection of wines, beers and spirits that can be paired with the flights of chocolate that are offered.

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‘Iao Valley State Monument HIKE & SCENIC LOOKOUT on KOHALA COAST

› ENTRANCE ($5) & PARKING FEES ($10) › PAVED TRAILS ARE SLIPPERY WHEN WET

SEE + DO | SIGHTS

› FOR SAFETY, DON'T SWIM IN ‘ĪAO STREAM

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At 1,200 feet high from the valley floor, the monolithic ‘Īao Needle (Kūkaemoku) Monument is one of the most beloved natural landmarks in Hawaiian history. This vegetation-covered lava remnant is a sharp ridge that’s an extension of the surrounding West Maui Mountains and is reached by a short trail to a windy overlook in ‘Īao Valley. Used as a lookout point for the Maui army during the Battle of Kepaniwai in 1790 before succumbing to Kamehameha I’s campaign to unite the Hawaiian Islands under his rule, it is also a historic burial ground since the 15th century. The needle is easily accessible from the parking lot, with the paved main trail being about .6 miles, including steps to the top, and arterial trails of another .5 miles that feature several types of flowers and fauna. It’s recommended to go early in the morning when clouds are less likely to obscure the view. Closed for improvements through April 15, 2023. Located near Wailuku dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/parks/maui/iao-valley-state-monument/ Take ‘Īao Valley Rd. from Main St. in Wailuku to park (Map A, PG 160)


Haleakalā & Best of Maui Tour SIGHTSEEING TOUR in UPCOUNTRY MAUI

Polynesian Adventure Tours (800) 622-3011 • polyad.com Hotel pickup from major Maui hotels

› EXPERT, LIVE NARRATION › ROUNDTRIP TRANSPORTATION › DRESS WARMLY

SEE + DO | EXPERIENCES

Experience Maui’s highlights on this laid-back journey showcasing nature’s finery and charming country towns. Haleakalā is truly magnificent in the daytime hours with its steep slopes bathed in sunlight. Observe endemic Nēnē geese in their native habitat and discover the secret of the rare silversword plant, referred to as ‘āhinahina (very grey) in Hawaiian. Grab a bite in historic Makawao, a former paniolo (Hawaiian cowboy) town and hot spot for locals and visitors alike. Afterwards, enjoy a short walk past a meandering stream and through a forest bursting with Hawaiian plant life. Gaze high above at the iconic ‘Īao Needle—a natural outcropping jutting from the mountain side. The needle is covered in emerald green vegetation and towers 1,200 feet over ‘Īao Valley, rich with history as an ancient burial site for Hawaiian royalty. Tour departs at 6 a.m. and returns at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesdays. Check for current schedules.

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Dragon's Teeth HIKING & SIGHTSEEING in WEST MAUI

› WEAR HIKING SHOES › SMALL PARKING LOT AVAILABLE

SEE + DO | SIGHTS

› BRING PLENTY OF WATER

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Located in one of Maui's premier resort areas, Kapalua, Dragon’s Teeth is an amazing ancient volcanic rock structure that looks like large, jagged teeth hugging the coastline at Makāluapuna point. Adjacent to the The Ritz-Carlton Maui, Kapalua, Dragon's Teeth is near two beaches: D.T Fleming Beach Park and Oneloa Beach. Also nearby is the Honokahua burial site, an ancient burial and religious site of the native Hawaiian people. There is a sign nearby explaining the significance of the land, but please be respectful and stay out of this area. Idyllic for watching sunrises and sunsets, swimming honu (sea turtles), humpback whales during the winter months and views of the distant island of Molokai, it’s no surprise this is a popular tourist destination.

Located in Kapalua Resort area Take Hwy 30 to Office Rd., turn right onto Lower Honoapi‘ilani Hwy. to small parking area for Dragon's Teeth (Map D, PG 164)


Kapalua Coastal Trail HIKING & SIGHTSEEING in WEST MAUI

Located in the Kapalua Resort area Parking on the south end of Kapalua Bay, or from D.T. Fleming Beach on the north side. (Map D, PG 164)

› WEAR HIKING SHOES OR STURDY SANDALS › TAKE IN THE GREAT OCEAN VIEWS, NATURAL GREENERY AND BEAUTIFUL BEACHES

SEE + DO | SIGHTS

Located on Maui’s northwest coast, near Lāhainā and Kā‘anapali, the Kapalua Coastal Trail runs alongside the ocean that takes about two to three hours out and back. This is a very popular trail with walkers and runners and offers some of the most beautiful views on Maui, from beautiful beaches and waves crashing on lava rocks to verdant landscapes of native plants and luxurious hotels. The trail terrain is mostly paved, but varies from pavement, sand and gravel to wooden walkways and stairs, as you make your way from Kapalua Bay to Honokahua, where D.T. Fleming Beach Park is located. Approximately 3.5 miles roundtrip.

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Kula Botanical Garden BOTANICAL GARDEN in UPCOUNTRY MAUI

› FASCINATING TIDEPOOLS › POPULAR SNORKEL SPOT NEARBY

SEE + DO | SIGHTS

› PICNIC TABLES ON-SITE

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For the plant lovers, spend a day exploring the breathtaking Kula Botanical Garden. Located on Kekaulike Highway near the Kula Highway junction on the slopes of Haleakalā, this 8-acre botanical garden features a collection of exotic tropical and semi-tropical plants, as well as waterfalls, a covered bridge, a koi pond, carved tiki exhibit and bird sanctuary. Established in 1968 by Warren and Helen McCord, it is still an entirely family owned and operated business and draws thousands of visitors each year. The garden is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and the admission fee for adults is $10.00 and $3 for children ages 6–12. Children under six are admitted free.

Located on the slopes of Haleakalā (808) 878-1715 • kulabotanicalgarden.com 638 Kekaulike Ave., Kula (Map A, PG 160)


Makawao Forest Reserve HIKING in UPCOUNTRY MAUI

Located at the end of Kahakapao Rd., near Makawao (Map A, PG 160)

› ALWAYS BE PREPARED WHEN HIKING: HAVE STURDY HIKING SHOES OR SANDALS, WATER AND SUNSCREEN

SEE + DO | SIGHTS

Makawao Forest Reserve is a 2,093-acre reserve located in upcountry Maui on the northwest slope of Haleakalā. Located four miles from downtown Makawao and fifteen miles from Kahului Airport, the reserve offers several multi-use single and double track trails, from easy to hard, for hikers and mountain bikers. As you make your way up Olinda Road (or Baldwin Ave.) from Makawao Avenue the air is cool and smells of Eucalyptus. After you pass the bird sanctuary (on the left), you will arrive at the forest reserve (on the right). Native and endemic plants and trees reside in this deciduous and coniferous forest while the sounds of singing birds fill the air. At 2,500 feet above sea level, the cool air is a pleasant reprieve from the heat of the beaches below.

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Please wear reef-safe sunscreen. Respect the ocean and sea life. Leave these beautiful places better than you found them.


BEACHES 106 MĀKENA BEACH STATE PARK south maui 107 POLO BEACH south maui 108 CHARLIE YOUNG BEACH south maui 109 KEONE‘Ō‘IO BAY (LA PÉROUSE) south maui 109 PALAU‘EA BEACH south maui 110 KAMA‘OLE BEACHES south maui 111 HONOLUA BAY west maui 111 OLOWALU BEACH west maui 112 KAPALUA BAY BEACH west maui 112 D.T. FLEMING BEACH PARK west maui 113 KĀ‘ANAPALI BEACH west maui 114 BALDWIN BEACH north shore 114 HĀMOA BEACH north shore 115 HO‘OKIPA BEACH PARK north shore 116 WAI‘ĀNAPANAPA STATE PARK east maui

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Mākena Beach State Park BEACH in SOUTH MAUI

› LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY FROM 8AM-4:30PM › PAID PUBLIC PARKING AVAILABLE

SEE + DO | BEACHES

› NON-RESIDENT ACCESS FEE OF $5/PERSON

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Located south of Wailea off South Kīhei Road, you will find one of Maui's favorite beaches if you are looking to avoid the crowds. With its beautiful white sand and views that aren’t obstructed by homes, condominiums, and hotels, Mākena (“abundance” in Hawaiian) Beach State Park is the place to get away and relax. Divided into two beaches—Big Beach and Little Beach—only the natural landscape, ocean, and Molokini and Kaho‘olawe islands are in sight. Big Beach, also known as Oneloa (“long [stretch of ] sand” in Hawaiian), often has high surf and a dangerous shore break, more suited for experienced swimmers and surfers, whereas Little Beach, with its small, gentle waves, is suitable for beginners. A short trail separates the two beaches, with lifeguards stationed at Big Beach. Little Beach has no lifeguard or amenities and has been known to be clothing optional. Located just south of Wailea 4670 Mākena Alanui, Mākena (Map A, PG 160)


Keoneopolo (Polo) Beach BEACH in SOUTH MAUI

Located at south end of Wailea resort area Kaukahi St. at Makena Rd., Wailea-Makena

(Map C, PG 163)

› NO LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY › ACCESS TO WAILEA COASTAL WALK › RESORT RESTAURANTS NEARBY

SEE + DO | BEACHES

This beautiful, sandy hidden gem is the southernmost beach in the Wailea resort area and fronts the Polo Beach Club on the south end and the Fairmont Kea Lani on the north end. With its sandy entry and gentle slope, snorkeling and swimming are popular activities during calm sea conditions around the rocky point at the north end of the beach. Stand-up-paddle boarding and boogie boarding are also popular for locals and visitors alike. Just be aware of large swells, especially during summer months, because dangerous rip currents form. The beach tends to be less crowded near the south end, while the middle stretch has a few trees that provide a shady reprieve from the sun. Facilities include showers, restrooms, picnic tables, barbecue grills and parking.

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Charlie Young Beach BEACH in SOUTH MAUI

› NO LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY › PARKING AREA

SEE + DO | BEACHES

› WALK TO RESTAURANTS NEARBY

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Located in downtown Kīhei at the northern end of Kamaole I beach, Charley Young Beach is a three-mile sandy beach that is popular for boogie boarding, stand-uppaddleboarding, fishing and watching amazing sunsets. This beach isn’t known for snorkeling, but it can be good when the water is calm. Strong rip currents and high surf does occur, especially during the winter months (November to March), so be aware of these conditions before venturing into the water. For snorkeling, make your way to the north reef, where you may spot honu (sea turtles). If you do encounter them, please give them at least thirty feet of space. Facilities include one portable toilet and one outdoor shower, but there is no lifeguard on duty. Parking is a challenge. There is a small parking lot that accommodates about three cars, but most people park about a block away at the corner of Kai‘au Place and South Kīhei Road. Located in downtown Kīhei Take South Kīhei Rd. to Kaiau Pl. (Map B, PG 162)


Keone‘ō‘io Bay (La Pérouse) BEACH in SOUTH MAUI

This charming and rugged coastline is a remnant of when Haleakalā erupted around 1790, and the surrounding area is home to several archaeological sites, including heiau (ancient temples), fishing shrines, canoe hale, and salt pans, giving you a glimpse into the lives of the Hawaiian natives who made their home on this a‘ā lava (rough, jagged lava) landscape. Also known as La Pérouse Bay, after the French explorer Captain Jean-François de Galaup, comte de La Pérouse, this is a favorite beach for fishing and observing pods of Hawaiian Spinner Dolphins, who frequently rest in the calm bay during morning hours. To access La Pérouse, drive to the very end of Makena Alanui Road at mile marker seven. A gravel parking lot is at the end of the road, which is where the path begins that leads you to the bay. No lifeguard on duty.

Located south of Mākena Mākena Alanui Dr. at mile marker #7, Mākena (Map A, PG 160)

Palau‘ea (White Rock) Beach This medium-sized sandy crescent beach enjoys minimal winds and calm waters compared to other south Maui beaches. Located between Mākena and Wailea, just south of the Fairmont Kea Lani and Polo Beach Club, this beach is perfect for snorkeling or taking a leisurely swim. While snorkeling, explore the rocky outcroppings at both ends of the beach or try boogie boarding to take advantage of the calmer waters and smaller swells, especially in the summer. There is a public park with parking on the side of Mākena Road. To access the beach, there are a few public access trails that may be hard to find, although, there is signage. So, keep an eye out. There is also a short dirt trail from Polo Beach that takes you through a small grove of kiawe trees to access the beach. No lifeguard on duty.

Located just south of Fairmont Kea Lani Wailea Alanui, Wailea-Mākena (Map C, PG 163)

SEE + DO | BEACHES

BEACH in SOUTH MAUI

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Kama‘ole Beaches BEACH in SOUTH MAUI

› LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY › WALK TO SHOPS & RESTAURANTS

SEE + DO | BEACHES

› SHOWERS, RESTROOMS & BBQ AREAS

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Kama‘ole Beach Park I, II, and III (Kam I, Kam II, Kam III) are popular familyfriendly beaches, with plenty of opportunities for swimming, snorkeling and sunbathing. With several amenities, you can easily spend the day at any one of these beaches. The beaches are within walking distance of each other, and there is parking at Kam I Beach Park, or you can parallel park on South Kīhei Road, which is closest to Kam I and II. Kam I and II are more kid-friendly, with their calmer shore breaks and fine white sandy bottom as you enter the water. Kam III is much smaller than I and II, has rocky areas dotting the length of the beach, and the water is rougher, so pay attention when engaged in activities here. Kam III is also very popular with locals, so weekends and holidays can get busy. Located in south Kīhei Kama‘ole I (Map B, PG 162) Kama‘ole II (Map B, PG 162) Kama‘ole II (Map B, PG 162)


Honolua Bay BEACH in WEST MAUI

This pristine bay is a popular destination for scuba diving, snorkeling, and surfing three miles north of Kapalua and about a 20-minute drive north of Lāhainā. Designated a Marine Life Conservation District, there is no fishing allowed (or taking of any natural resources); therefore, there is an abundance of diverse sea life, including honu (sea turtles), several reef fish varieties, vibrant coral formations, and the occasional spinner dolphin. The beach with its rocky shoreline is not ideal for sunbathing, but the sheltered bay makes it a popular spot for snorkeling, and the bluffs offer spectacular views. Surfing lessons are available but if you’re on your own, be aware of wave conditions in winter. There are no amenities or lifeguard, but there are port-a-potties in the small parking lot on the highway.

Located north of Kapalua Resort area Take Honoapi‘ilani Hwy. past Kapalua to lookout parking area, or just further for trail access. (Map A, PG 160)

Olowalu Beach A well-loved, popular spot for snorkeling, Olowalu Beach, also referred to as "Mile Marker 14" and Turtle Reef, is a quaint beach is located about seven miles south of Lāhainā on the Honoapi‘ilani Highway (Route 30), and known for its quiet, calm waves, unique coral system with over twenty-four species, and diverse wildlife, including a variety of fish, honu (sea turtles), manta rays and black tip sharks. Protected from high trade winds, the waters at Olowalu tend to be calm, especially in the morning, and the shore waters are shallow, making it ideal for children. Attempting to snorkel at low tide is not recommended, though, especially during a full or new moon. When the tide is low, the reef becomes so shallow that it sticks out of the water, making it difficult to navigate. Make sure to time your visit around the high tide if you plan to snorkel. No facilites or lifeguard on duty.

Located south of Lāhainā Park near mile marker 14 off Honoapi‘ilani Hwy. (Map A, PG 160)

SEE + DO | BEACHES

BEACH in WEST MAUI

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Kapalua Bay Beach BEACH in WEST MAUI

Discover this stunning crescent-shaped beach located on Maui's northwest coast. With its soft white sand, crystal clear waters, and surrounding lush vegetation, it's easy to see why it's often rated as one of the best beaches in the world. The beach is ideal for swimming and snorkeling, with calm waters that are perfect for beginners. It's also a great spot for sunbathing, picnicking, and enjoying water sports such as paddleboarding and kayaking. The beach is typically less crowded than other popular Maui beaches, making it a peaceful spot to relax and take in the stunning scenery. Here you will find plenty of amenities, including restrooms, showers and beach rental equipment. There are also several restaurants and shops nearby, making it a convenient location for a day trip. This is a great spot to experience the natural beauty and tranquility of Maui's coastline.

Located in Kapalua Resort Near the Montage Kapalua Bay (Map D, PG 164)

D.T. Fleming Beach Park BEACH in WEST MAUI

SEE + DO | BEACHES

Situated on Honokahua Bay, one of the six famous bays of West Maui, D.T. Fleming Beach Park is a long, sandy beach framed by ironwood trees. This is a popular bodysurfing and bodyboarding spot in West Maui with a break attracting many visitors and locals. While surfers flock here for consistent waves, snorkelers can explore colorful marine life just offshore when the ocean is calm, as the shorebreak can be dangerous here, along with a stong undertow when the surf is up. The beach is lifeguarded daily during peak hours, and includes amenities such as restrooms, showers and picnic tables. The beach can get crowded, particularly during high season, so we recommend getting there early.

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Located in Kapalua Resort Fronting the Ritz Carlton Maui, Kaplua (Map D, PG 164)


Kā‘anapali Beach BEACH in WEST MAUI

Located in Kā‘anapali Beach Resort Take Honoapi‘ilani Hwy. to Kā‘anapali Pkwy (Map E, PG 165)

› NO LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY › NO PUBLIC FACILITIES › GET THERE EARLY FOR A PARKING SPOT

SEE + DO | BEACHES

Running from Black Rock to Canoe Beach, this beautiful stretch of sand also sports a paved walkway for strolling by shops and restaurants—all while taking in sunsets, the beach, and cliff-jumpers from Pu‘u Keka‘a, or Black Rock. Here, a cliff diver lights torches along the cliff every evening as sunset approaches. For those interested in snorkeling, Black Rock is a great spot at the north end of the beach. Partially public parking is available between the beach and Kā‘anapali Parkway. Pay attention for the sometimes difficult to find “Beach Access” signs. Whalers Village is an alternative for parking, and you can have your parking ticket validated for three hours by one of the stores with a purchase. After three hours, parking is $3 per half hour.

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Baldwin Beach BEACH on NORTH SHORE

Located on Hana Highway between the town of Pā‘ia and the Maui Country Club, Baldwin Beach is a popular North Shore beach for locals and visitors alike—and considered one of the best sites on Maui for bodysurfing and bodyboarding—but has protected swimming areas on the east (Baldwin Cove) and west (Baby Beach) ends. During the winter, strong shore breaks can make this beach precarious for inexperienced ocean swimmers and boogie-boarders, so be mindful of the conditions and make sure to check with the lifeguards before going into the water. For those interested in Hawaiian culture, there is a trail behind the beach connecting Baldwin Beach to Secret Beach and Pā‘ia Bay that leads to an ancient burial site. Lifeguards are on duty, and restrooms, showers, barbecues, picnic tables and a pavilion are available. The beach is typically very busy on weekends and holidays.

Located near Pā‘ia town From Kahalui Airport, the beach is just before Pā‘ia on Hana Hwy. (Map I, PG 168)

Hāmoa Beach

SEE + DO | BEACHES

BEACH in EAST MAUI

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With its silky, salt-and-pepper sand, pristine landscape, and cobalt-blue water, Hāmoa Beach (once known as Mokae) is what you imagine all Hawaii beaches to look like. Located beyond the Hāna town limits on Pi‘ilani (31) Highway, this stunning crescentshaped beach is surrounded by cliffs and lined with native Hala trees, palm trees and various flora. Hāmoa is not protected by outlying reefs, which means powerful surf can be present but also makes it popular with surfers, boogie boarders and bodysurfers. It is recommended that snorkeling be done during the summer months when there are smaller swells, and the water is calmer. Facilities include public restrooms, showers and a foot washing station, but there are no lifeguards on duty. Parking is available on Haneo‘o Road but it’s on-street, the road is narrow, and the path down to the beach is very steep.

Located a short distance from Hāna Take Hāna Hwy. to mile marker 50 (Map A, PG 161)


Ho‘okipa Beach Park BEACH on NORTH SHORE

Located off Hana Hwy at Mile #9 179 Hana Hwy., Pā‘ia (Map A, PG 160)

› LIFEGUARDS ON DUTY › PICNIC TABLES & RESTROOMS › LARGE PARKING LOT AT LOOKOUT

SEE + DO | BEACHES

As a world-renowned destination for wind surfing, kite surfing and board surfing on Maui’s North shore, Ho‘okipa Beach is known for its big waves and high winds, especially in the winter season. If you decide to brave these waters, make sure you are experienced, as swimming is not recommended in the winter, but summer months bring calmer waters. Where the pavilions are located there are small areas for swimming and sometimes tidepools form in the middle of the beach that are safe for children. Just check in with the lifeguard towers located at both ends of the park for updates on the water conditions. If watching the surfers is more your speed, Ho‘okipa Lookout is where you can witness man effortlessly maneuver Mother Nature’s ferocity.

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Wai‘ānapanapa State Park BEACH in EAST MAUI

› SURF CAN BE TOO STRONG FOR CASUAL SWIMMING.

SEE + DO | BEACHES

› PARKING & ENTRANCE FEE

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The 120-acre Wai‘ānapanapa State Park is located at the end of Wai‘ānapanapa Road off Hana Highway in Hana and features the beautiful black sand beach—Pa‘iloa Beach, sea caves, seabird colonies, lava tubes, blow holes, native hala forest, heiau (religious temple) and breathtaking views of the turquoise-colored ocean. Dramatic lava rock stacks surround Pa‘iloa Beach, which is famous for containing more small black pebbles than fine sand. It’s not ideal for sunbathing, but it is popular for swimming (on calm water days), exploring sea caves (pay attention to the tide), hiking, shore fishing and sightseeing. Reservations are required ahead of time to enter the park and amenities include ADA accessibility, lodging, campsites (permit required), picnic tables, restrooms, showers, water fountains and trash cans. After arriving at the entrance gate to the park, you will need to show a mobile QR code to confirm your reservation. Parking is located to the right after entering the park. Located at the end of Wai‘ānapanapa Road off Hana Highway, Hana gowaianapapa.com (Map A, PG 161)


GOLF 118 PXG golf clubs + apparel 120 BAY COURSE AT KAPALUA golf course 121 PLANTATION COURSE AT KAPALUA golf course 122 KĀ‘ANAPALI KAI COURSE golf course 123 ROYAL KĀ‘ANAPALI COURSE golf course 124 MAUI NUI GOLF COURSE golf course 125 PUKALANI COUNTRY CLUB golf course

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PXG GOLF CLUBS in SOUTH MAUI & WEST MAUI

› SCHEDULE A CUSTOM FITTING TODAY! › THE GEN6s ARE GAME-CHANGERS › CHECK OUT THE PXG APPAREL LINE

Let’s set the record straight: You don’t have to be a great golfer to get custom fitted for clubs. In fact, beginners often have the most to gain from playing clubs that are properly fitted. PXG Fittings are immersive, data-driven, fully personalized and totally fun, focused on maximizing your performance, whether you are a novice or a scratch golfer. Once you are fitted by a Master Fitter for the right club heads, shafts, loft, lie and grips to suit your specs, these are the benefits can you expect from a PXG Fitting: Increased confidence on every shot from tee to green; longer distance and improved trajectory off the tee box; greater accuracy and consistency, even on mishits; improved short game on and around the green; and more enjoyment of the game!

SEE + DO | GOLF

Schedule your PXG club fitting now at PXG.com or by calling 844.PLAY.PXG.

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Parsons Xtreme Golf (844) 752-9794 • pxg.com Fittings locally at Kapalua Golf and Wailea Golf Course


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SEE + DO | GOLF


Bay Course at Kapalua GOLF COURSE in WEST MAUI

› PUT THIS COURSE ON YOUR MUST-PLAY LIST › STUNNING VIEWS & CHALLENGING LAYOUT

SEE + DO | GOLF

› CHECK OUT THE KAPALUA GOLF ACADEMY

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Known for its 17th hole, the only hole to play over the ocean on Maui, The Bay Course opened in 1975 and in that time has hosted over 20 major professional tournaments— the most of any neighbor island course in the state of Hawai‘i. From the first live prime-time televised event in golf at the 1983 Kapalua International to the Kapalua LPGA classic some 25 years later, The Bay Course has consistently faced the best players in golf and withstood the test of time and technology. Great champions and stories have emerged here, such as Ian Woosnam and David Llwellyn’s thrilling victory for Wales in the World Cup of Golf and Morgan Pressel’s nail-biting win at the Kapalua LPGA classic. Two of the most popular PGA players ever, Fred Couples and Davis Love III, have each earned victories here­—twice. The Bay Course should certainly be on the “must play” list for any golfer visiting Maui. Located in Kapalua Resort (808) 669-8044 • golfatkapalua.com 2000 VIllage Rd., Lāhainā (Map D, PG 164)


Plantation Course at Kapalua GOLF COURSE in WEST MAUI

Located in Kapalua Resort (808) 669-8044 • golfatkapalua.com 2000 Plantation Club Dr., Lāhainā

(Map D, PG 164)

› AN UNFORGETTABLE GOLF EXPERIENCE › PLAY WHERE THE PROS PLAY › STUNNING VIEWS FROM EVERY HOLE

SEE + DO | GOLF

Play the course consistently ranked #1 in Hawai‘i. This magnificent course was designed by Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore to complement its stunning location on the slopes of the West Maui Mountains, with breathtaking views of the ocean from every hole. Its par-73 layout spans an impressive 7,596 yards, providing a challenge for professional golfers, while also remaining very playable for the average golfer thanks to its wide fairways and expansive greens. The course features dramatic elevation changes and downhill tee shots, making it a truly unique and thrilling golfing experience. The 18th fairway provides an opportunity for golfers to hit one of their longest drives, with the help of its aggressive slope. The Plantation Course is also the host of the prestigious PGA TOUR's Sentry Tournament of Champions held every January, featuring the previous year's winners.

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Kā‘anapali Kai Course GOLF COURSE in WEST MAUI

› A SHORTER, MORE FORGIVING LAYOUT › BREATHTAKING VIEWS

SEE + DO | GOLF

› ORIGINALLY A SUGARCANE PLANTATION

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Once the vacation place of the Royal Chiefs of Maui, it was the perfect escape for royalty who enjoyed many games including a form of lawn bowling using stones on what are now the fairways of the Kā‘anapali Kai Golf Course. The course is beautifully landscaped with native flowers along the trails like the hibiscus, bougainvillea and plumeria, as well as the Norfolk Pines and coconut trees that border many fairways. Along many holes lie natural canals, gulches and lava rock boundaries. Redesigned by Hawai‘i’s most prolific golf course architect, Robin Nelson, the course focuses on strategy—not necessarily distance or strength— which is why this course is enjoyed by both the beginner and avid golfer. Your journey begins oceanside, then takes you into the foothills of the West Maui Mountains, offering breathtaking views of the ocean and neighboring islands. Located in Kā‘anapali Resort (808) 661-3691 • kaanapaligolfcourses.com 2290 Kā‘anapali Pkwy., Lahaina (Map E, PG 165)


Royal Kā‘anapali Course GOLF COURSE in WEST MAUI

Located in Kā‘anapali Resort (808) 661-3691 • kaanapaligolfcourses.com 2290 Kā‘anapali Pkwy., Lahaina

(Map E, PG 165)

› THE 18TH WILL CHALLENGE YOU › PLAQUES ON TEE BOXES SHARE HISTORY & STORIES OF KĀ‘ANAPALI

SEE + DO | GOLF

One of only two Robert Trent Jones, Sr. designed golf courses in Hawai‘i, the Royal Kā‘anapali course utilizes the rolling landscape to create gently sloping fairways and large contoured greens to provide for a challenging approach to each hole. Featuring a par-71 layout stretching 6,700 yards from the coastline up to the foothills of the West Maui Mountains, this course challenges a golfer's club selection and short game skills around the green. Arnold Palmer referred to the 18th as one of the best and most challenging closing holes he had played, with the entire stretch of the 449-yard hole hugging a brackish water canal, making for a memorable finish. As you make your way around, take in the scenic vistas and views of Lanai and Molokai in the distance, and be sure to check out the historical plaques on each tee which the share stories and history of Kā‘anapali.

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Maui Nui Golf Course GOLF COURSE in SOUTH MAUI

› BEST PRICED GOLF ON MAUI › TOPTRACER RANGE

SEE + DO | GOLF

› BEAUTIFUL CONDITIONS

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Situated in the heart of Kīhei, the Maui Nui Golf Club offers an exciting 6,404yard, par 71 layout. Designed with the trade winds in mind, usually hitting the course in the late afternoons, Maui Nui rewards those who play the fundamentals well: keeping the ball in play, putting, chipping, and playing within themselves, making it the fairest test of golf on Maui. Suitable for any player or skill-level, the course features an inviting opening hole, reachable par 5s, and exceptional views of the Pacific Ocean, Mt. Haleakalā, Molokini and the West Maui Mountains. Maui Nui is not only one of the best value courses on the island but has some of the best weather as well.

Located near South Maui resort areas (808) 874-0777 • mauinuigolfclub.com 470 Līpoa Parkway, Kīhei

(Map B, PG 162)


Pukalani Country Club GOLF COURSE in UPCOUNTRY MAUI

Located near Makawao (808) 572-1314 • pukalanigolf.com 360 Pukalani St., Pukalani (Map A, PG 160)

› SCENIC UPCOUNTRY VIEWS › PRO SHOP › KNOWN AS THE BEST GOLF VALUE ON MAUI

SEE + DO | GOLF

Discover the enchanting Pukalani Country Club, located just a stone's throw from Makawao. This golfing haven not only presents awe-inspiring vistas of the Pacific Ocean from its Upcountry setting but also offers a compelling challenge across its 18-hole course, designed by renowned architect Bob Baldock. Spanning nearly 160 acres and perched at an elevation of 1,100 feet on the slopes of Haleakalā, the club features a par 72, 6,962-yard journey from the championship tees, featuring a unique 19th green. Particularly notable is the third hole, presenting golfers with a strategic dilemma: execute a daunting iron shot over a ravine or opt for a precision chip into a dramatically situated green. Well-groomed fairways and greens make the club both demanding for the seasoned golfer and inviting for the novice. With its serene setting and a name that translates to "Entrance to Heaven," Pukalani Country Club is indeed a slice of paradise.

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#MAUISTRONG

OLD LĀHAI N Ā LŪ‘AU A LOHA MI XE D P LAT E STA R N O O DL E LEODA’ S KI TCH E N & P I E SH O P


EAT + DRINK 128 HUMBLE MARKET KITCHIN island-inspired 129 ROY‘S KAANAPALI asian fusion 130 KŌ regional cuisine 131 HUMUHUMUNUKUNUKUĀPUA‘A hawai‘i regional cuisine 131 OLIVINE italian cuisine 132 THE BIRDCAGE BAR tapas & cocktails 133 THE RESTAURANT AT HOTEL WAILEA regional cuisine 134 KA‘ANA KITCHEN hawai‘i regional cuisine 135 MORIMOTO MAUI japanese cuisine 136 TAVERNA italian cuisine 137 JAPENGO asian fusion & sushi 138 MAMA'S FISH HOUSE seafood 139 SIXTY TWO MARCKET farm to table 140 TIFFANY'S asian fusion 141 TIN ROOF local cuisine 142 PAIA FISH MARKET seafood 143 NUKA japanese cuisine & sushi

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Humble Market Kitchin ISLAND INSPIRED in SOUTH MAUI

› SEASONAL FARE WITH AN ASIAN TWIST › OPEN FOR BREAKFAST & DINNER DAILY

EAT + DRINK

› THREE PRIVATE DINING ROOMS

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A true grassroots story of the “American Dream” sort, Chef Roy Yamaguchi’s now world-renowned empire of culinary expertise was set in motion some 80 years ago when his grandfather left Japan for Maui. Originally intending to work on a plantation but spurred by the lack of food options, his grandfather opened an intimate eatery serving hearty portions of noodles, rice and stews for his fellow field workers. Humble Market Kitchin preserves this historical, familial context of Chef Roy’s story serving flavors reminiscent of his grandfather’s Asian culinary roots peppered with the fresh produce and proteins of Maui’s abundance. While the narrative is humble, today’s menu boasts Japanese Style Chicken & Mochi Waffles along with a Filet topped with a Braised Oxtail Marmalade—respectful (and impressive) elevations that Chef Roy’s grandfather would be delighted by. Located in Wailea Beach Resort - Marriott, Maui (808) 879-4655 • royyamaguchi.com 3700 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea

(Map C, PG 163)


Roy's Kaanapali ASIAN FUSION in WEST MAUI

Located in Kā‘anapali Resort (808) 669-6999 • royyamaguchi.com 2290 Kā‘anapali Parkway, Kā‘anapali (Map E, PG 165)

› CELEBRATING 30 YEARS ON MAUI › LUNCH DAILY 11AM-2PM, DINNER 4-8PM › RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

EAT + DRINK

In Hawai‘i, there’s sugarcane, palm trees and Chef Roy Yamaguchi. Whether a trusting friend (or the top search results) urged you to make a reservation at one of his restaurants, you witnessed his excellence on Top Chef, or you’re familiar with the list of James Beard Award winners, Chef Roy’s reputation precedes him. Roy’s Kaanapali has served as a living and breathing example of the service and cuisine exemplified by the Hawai‘i-based chef for over 30 years. With its location within Kā‘anapali Resort, loyal regulars and giddy Roy’s first-timers break bread (or sushi rolls) with West Maui’s famous mountains and the 18th hole of the Kā'anapali Golf Course in sight. A menu of Hawaiian fine dining immortalized by Chef Roy— including Mac Nut Crusted Local Catch, Roy’s Blackened Ahi and Jade Pesto Steamed Seafood—promise to make the entrée selection decision more difficult than the Friday night dinner reservation.

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Kō REGIONAL CUISINE in SOUTH MAUI

› OPEN DAILY FOR LUNCH & DINNER › SUNDAY BRUNCH WEEKLY 11AM-2PM

EAT + DRINK

› COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING

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While pineapple and coconut define Hawaiian cuisine for many, the truth behind the matter is a narrative of deep-seated, far-reaching culture that begins with kō, or sugarcane in Hawaiian. During Hawai‘i’s sugarcane plantation era, people journeyed from around the world to work in the fields bringing with them familial recipes to test out with local vegetables, meats and seafoods. It was this revolution that catalyzed today’s Hawaiian cuisine as we know it and serves as the drive behind the Fairmont Kea Lani’s Kō. Executive Chef Aris Aurelio recently took the helm after having worked in the resort’s kitchens since 1994. Drawing inspiration from his Filipino roots and Maui upbringing, Chef Aris blends traditional flavors with innovative elegance, as showcased in his signature Seafood Lau Lau, a surf take on a turf (typically pork) classic. This culinary intention translates across Kō’s entire menu—one rich with flavor, meaning and finesse. Located at Fairmont Kea Lani, Maui (808) 875-2210 • korestaurant.com 4100 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea

(Map C, PG 163)


Humuhumunukunukuāpua‘a HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE in SOUTH MAUI

This signature restaurant at Grand Wailea has been completely refreshed with a new concept and gastronomic approach. Set amid an idyllic beachfront lagoon and featuring stunning Pacific views, this award-winning dining destination has been transformed to embody an interactive seafood market atmosphere defined by freshness, creativity and taste. The new approach to the menu spotlights fresh, sustainably sourced seafood, including locally farmed fish from Big Island-based Blue Ocean Mariculture. The innovative menu offers not only a broad choice of approachable, familiar dishes, but also more refined dishes that at once challenge and reward ambitious palates, including a curated selection of oysters and exquisite Petrossian caviar.

Located at Grand Wailea, A Waldorf Astoria Resort (808) 875-1234 • grandwailea.com 3850 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea (Map C, PG 163)

Olivine ITALIAN CUISINE in SOUTH MAUI

Located at Grand Wailea, A Waldorf Astoria Resort (808) 875-1234 • grandwailea.com 3850 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea (Map C, PG 163)

EAT + DRINK

Combining inventive Italian cuisine with the stunning views of Maui, Grand Wailea’s new oceanfront culinary destination creates a dining experience rooted in fresh local ingredients, innovative takes on traditional flavors and warm service with a sense of aloha. Named for the olive-green mineral that is a component of Hawaiian lava flows, Olivine embraces the resort’s natural beauty, with the restaurant’s airy indoor-outdoor dining area surrounded by soaring palms and sweeping views of Wailea Beach and the ocean beyond. The Italian menu features handmade pastas and authentic dishes incorporating local produce and seafood sourced from Big Island-based, sustainable aquaculture operation Blue Ocean Mariculture. To highlight the array of herbs grown on property by the resort’s Head Landscaper Jim Heid, the menu also includes a seasonal initiative that infuses them into menu items, olive oils, cocktails and more to reflect the bounty provided by the resort’s lush vegetation.

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The Birdcage Bar COCKTAILS & SMALL PLATES in SOUTH MAUI

› NO BETTER PLACE TO END YOUR DAY— OR BEGIN YOUR EVENING.

EAT + DRINK

› OPEN AIR, OCEAN & SUNSET VIEWS

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Head to Hotel Wailea to enjoy a newly transformed lobby bar experience. Serving up elegant eats, artisanal cocktails and 180-degree ocean views—this is the way to end your day on Maui—or start your evening. The Bircage Bar boasts one of the best sunset views on Maui, with the space fully open to the outdoors and lounge seating featuring natural teak bar stools, tufted sofas and black marble tables. With a refined tropical aesthetic, including a handcrafted bar, bold prints and eclectic furnishings, this open-air space takes only a back seat to the ever-evolving culinary program led by Executive Chef Bryan McMahon. Open daily from 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Located at Hotel Wailea (808) 874-0500 • hotelwailea.com/dining 555 Kaukahi St., Wailea (Map C, PG 163)


The Restaurant at Hotel Wailea REGIONAL CUISINE in SOUTH MAUI

Located at Hotel Wailea (808) 874-0500 • hotelwailea.com/dining 555 Kaukahi St., Wailea

(Map C, PG 163)

› CREATIVE ISLAND-TO-TABLE DISHES › FRESH, SEASONAL INGREDIENTS › ALFRESCO DINING

EAT + DRINK

Discover the flavors of the islands in an alfresco setting with sweeping views of three Hawaiian Islands. The Restaurant at Hotel Wailea showcases its artistry with fresh, seasonal ingredients sourced from farmers and fishers throughout the region. The “culinary casual” fare reflects the best of the islands’ colors, scents and tastes. Guests create their own three- or five-course experience from a menu that speaks to every culinary preference. From its perch on the hillside above South Maui’s Wailea resort area, the Restaurant at Hotel Wailea offers panoramic ocean views from the upper lānai and intimate dining under the stars in the garden. Open daily from 5:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.

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Ka‘ana Kitchen HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE in SOUTH MAUI

› FAMILY-STYLE HAWAI‘I REGIONAL FARE › OPEN-AIR WITH SUNSET VIEWS

EAT + DRINK

› BOOK THE CHEF'S TABLE EXPERIENCE

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Ka‘ana, meaning “to share” in Hawaiian, delivers farm-fresh, seasonal and sophisticated food utilizing the unforgettable rich island flavors of Maui. The menu is curated nightly to stimulate a sense of adventure, adding local tastes and aromas with twists. The restaurant offers a unique, residential style setting with views of Mōkapu Beach and the cascading infinity pools of the resort. The restaurant's outdoor dining offers you front row seats to the sun setting over the horizon, while the indoor seating offers you a show as you watch the chefs create your dinner in the open-air kitchen situated in the middle of the restaurant. Helmed by Executive Chef Ritchard Cariagal, visit Ka‘ana and share these moments with the ones you love while they share the best family style dishes to you.

Located at Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort (808) 243-4750 • hyatt.com/andaz/oggaw-andaz-maui-at-wailea-resort 3550 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea (Map C, PG 163)


Morimoto Maui JAPANESE CUISINE in SOUTH MAUI

Located at the Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort (808) 243-4766 • morimotomaui.com 3550 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea

(Map C, PG 163)

› OCEAN VIEWS FROM NEARLY EVERY SEAT › OPEN FOR LUNCH DAILY, 12PM-2:30PM › OPEN FOR DINNER DAILY, 5PM-8:45PM

EAT + DRINK

When asking someone what their last meal would be, sushi will be the without-pause response nine times out of ten. There’s just something about the incomparable taste of fresh fish, sweet and tangy sushi rice, and some sort of fatty sauce drizzled lighthanded over the top. And while Hawai‘i’s corner-marts are famous for serving beyondthe-par sushi rolls, the Iron Chef’s restaurant Morimoto Maui at the Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort swiftly divides the line between sushi and sushi that is an artform. In both appearance and in taste, the offerings of cold and hot appetizers, entrees, sashimi and maki connote excellence—California Rolls made with real snow crab, ishi yaki buri bop with fresh yellowtail, and the tuna pizza, a crowd pleaser to be sure. While savoring Japanese cuisine at its finest, Morimoto Maui is positioned with 180° ocean views unintentionally (or not) serving as a reminder of just how fresh the meal ahead of you promises to be.

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Taverna ITALIAN CUISINE in WEST MAUI

› CLASSIC ITALIAN WITH A MODERN TWIST › COVERED OUTDOOR LĀNAI & FIREPITS

EAT + DRINK

› URBAN COCKTAILS & ROBUST WINE LIST

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Everyone’s hometown has a neighborhood gathering place—the restaurant you go to knowing you’ll see a familiar face while sipping on a tried-and-true cocktail with excellent food on its way. The aura is relaxed and casual but the experience is still curated. This is Taverna, located in the heart of Kapalua Resort. It is this mecca of togetherness that spurred Taverna to open its doors in 2016—but the fresh-made pastas, wood-fired pizzas, and hearty Italian classics truly fostered its reputation. Chef Roger Stettler is the one to praise for filling this open-air, ocean-view eatery with Italy’s most crave-able entrees and bites, this time with help of Hawai‘i's local olive oils (but keeping with San Marzanos, of course). Recline with friends of old and new in Adirondack chairs on the patio, snack on fresh bread and marinated olives, and sip on local, organic vodka mixed with a tea blend and whatever housemade juices happen to be in season and on lineup—if that isn’t a call to gather, we’re not sure what is. Located in Kapalua Resort (808) 667-2426 • tavernamaui.com 2000 Village Rd., Kapalua

(Map D, PG 164)


Japengo ASIAN FUSION & SUSHI in WEST MAUI

Located in Hyatt Regency Maui Resort & Spa hyatt.com/hotel/hawaii/hyatt-regency-maui-resort-and-spa/ (808) 667-4909 • 200 Nohea Kai Dr., Kā‘anapali

(Map E, PG 165)

› INDOOR & OUTDOOR SEATING OPTIONS › GREAT VIEWS & AMBIANCE › HAND-ROLLED SUSHI & HOT ENTRÉES

EAT + DRINK

A sophisticated dining experience showcasing Hawai‘i’s freshest, locally-grown products alongside exotic ingredients from the Pacific Rim, Japengo at Hyatt Regency Maui serves up world-class steaks, seafood, sushi and specialty cocktails. Take a culinary adventure showcasing modern Asian-inspired flavors with Hawaiian flair. Enjoy Japengo’s indoor and outdoor patio seating overlooking the resort’s waterfalls and famed Kā’anapali Beach, or watch as Maui's best sushi is rolled to order in the chic Sushi Lounge. Japengo provides the perfect ambiance for any occasion—whether you are celebrating an intimate moment or entertaining a large group.

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Mama's Fish House SEAFOOD on the NORTH SHORE

› A LOCAL LANDMARK › SEAFOOD-DRIVEN HAWAIIAN MENU

EAT + DRINK

› EPIC OCEAN VIEWS

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In 1960, Doris and Floyd Christenson—the husband-and-wife duo behind this revered Maui landmark—boarded a 38-foot, two-masted ketch with their 2 ½ year-old son, Keith, embarking on a multi-thousand-mile voyage through the Pacific Islands. Their years of adventures spent braving hurricanes along the equator, savoring fresh fish marinated in coconut milk and lime juice with Marquesan families, and hunting freshwater prawns in moonlight on the island of Nuka Hiva inspired every ounce of their now first-class restaurant. With a deep reverence for local fishermen and farmers, Mama’s Fish House has highlighted the hard work of these men and women since day one. Family owned and operated since 1973, Mama’s is now operated by the Christenson’s daughter, Karen, (with help from the up-and-coming third generation) and has cultivated a legacy of Pacific cuisine that demands you reserve your prized spot three to six months in advance—don’t miss the boat. Located in Pā‘ia (808) 579-8488 • mamasfishhouse.com 799 Poho Pl., Pā‘ia (Map A, PG 161)


Sixty Two MarcKet FARM-TO-TABLE in CENTRAL MAUI

Located in Wailuku (808) 793-2277 • sixtytwomarcket.com 62 N. Market St., Wailuku (Map H, PG 168)

› ROTATING SEASONAL MENU › ALSO A MARKET FEATURING HOUSEMADE ITEMS & LOCAL FARMER PRODUCTS

EAT + DRINK

SixtyTwo MarcKet, located in the heart of historic Wailuku Town, features innovative, farm-fresh cuisine in a crisp, tasteful atmosphere. There is no limit to what’s on the menu, as Chef Marc McDowell lets the ingredients guide their cooking styles and culinary creations. The restaurant is open for breakfast and lunch Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The menu, which rotates seasonally (every 62 days), is frequently complemented by specials, drawing inspiration from what’s in the harvest by local farmers or captured by local fishermen at that moment the very same day.

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Tiffany's Restaurant & Bar ASIAN FUSION in CENTRAL MAUI

› DINE-IN, TAKE-OUT & DELIVERY › OPEN THURSDAY-MONDAY FOR DINNER

EAT + DRINK

& FOR LUNCH ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY

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A Maui mainstay in Wailuku, Tiffany’s has been in business for close to two decades and has gained a very loyal following, including current owners Sheldon and Janice Simeon. The revamped menu features local-style “Hawai‘i Classics,” which include a strong focus on Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino and Portuguese flavors — the true food of Hawai‘i, and the diverse cuisine that Sheldon has become an ambassador for in recent years. The menu includes longtime favorites like honey walnut shrimp and steak bites with sizzling onions as well as new dishes inspired by Chef Sheldon Simeon’s recipes, such as kimchee fried rice; shoyu ahi poke with Maui onion and Yamasa sesame oil; and stir-fried squid with spicy gochujang and toasted sesame. Choose from a selection of local beers, classic cocktails and creative shots to pair with their mouth-watering food. Visit their website for specials.

Located in Wailuku (808) 249-0052 • tiffanysmaui.com 1424 Lower Main St., Wailuku (Map H, PG 168)


Tin Roof LOCAL CUISINE in CENTRAL MAUI

Located near Kahului Airport (808) 868-0753 • tinroofmaui.com 360 Papa Pl., Suite 116, Kahului (Map G, PG 167)

› TAKE-OUT & COUNTER SEATING ONLY › LOCAL CUISINE FROM TOP CHEF STAR CHEF SHELDON SIMEON

EAT + DRINK

The sound of rain on a tin roof in Hawai‘i is as commonplace as chickens in the road. It’s this rhythm of Mother Nature’s tune that ties James Beard Awardnominated and Top Chef finalist Chef Sheldon Simeon to his culinary roots in Hilo, Hawai‘i and provides the inspiration for his “mom-and-pop” shop, Tin Roof. This takeout-only diner serves up a menu that induces the ultimate food-FOMO — deciding upon a Kau Kau Tin (layered Hawaiian rice bowl) is only half the worry when wok-fried sun noodles and a Filipino-inspired birthday cake of chocolate mochi and peanut butter comprise the “extras” and “other grinds.” Mochiko chicken marinated 24 hours in ginger sake shoyu, roasted and deep fried DUROC pork belly, lemon-garlic shrimp — we suggest coming with a crew so you can get a taste of all this internationally recognized chef has to offer.

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Paia Fish Market SEAFOOD on the NORTH SHORE

› FRESH CATCH PLATES, BURGERS & TACOS › 3 LOCATIONS ON MAUI

EAT + DRINK

› OPEN DAILY LUNCH THROUGH DINNER

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Prior to the town’s thriving scene of colorful art galleries, down-home surf shops and mom-and-pop eateries, Pā‘ia was a sleepy but beloved little surf town where waterenthusiasts spent their time pre- and post-ocean activities. During the late 1980s, Paia Fishmarket opened their doors as a place for these North Maui residents to gather around family-style, talk story and enjoy large portions that filled their large appetites. While Pā‘ia has grown in number and prevalence, the Fishmarket remains rooted in this inaugural purpose. Long lines (typically dotted with local legends) ensure only the strong of heart get their hands on blackened opakapaka and the creamiest coleslaw that dreams are made of. With three locations on Maui and two on O‘ahu, the proof is in the pudding, but there’s nothing quite like a visit to the flagship.

(808) 579-8030 • paiafishmarket.com 100 Hana Hwy., Pā‘ia (Map I, PG 168) 1913 S. Kīhei Rd., Kīhei (Map B, PG 162)


Nuka JAPANESE CUISINE & SUSHI on the NORTH SHORE

Located on the North Shore (808) 575-2939 • nukamaui.com 780 Ha‘ikū Rd., Ha‘ikū (Map A, PG 161)

› LUNCH MON-FRI & DINNER DAILY › IZAKAYA + SUSHI BAR › FULL SERVICE BAR + COCKTAIL MENU

EAT + DRINK

When a restaurant and sushi bar only seats 50 at a time, you know it’s not a place to be overlooked. Clean, minimalistic and non-fussy, NUKA leads with the natural simplicity of Japanese cuisine, but a look under the hood proves to be a fine-tuned, well-oiled machine. During the processing of brown rice into white, the byproduct of bran or nuka is created. Fresh produce is buried in this nuka for fermentation, lending crispy vegetables of salty, tangy, soury bliss. NUKA’s dedication to milling their own rice and fermenting their own local produce serves as a testament to just how un-simplistic their simplistic is. Just as Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup repetitions appear unchallenging with a deeper look showcasing the fantastical, hand-painted wonder, NUKA’s menu of miso butterfish and flawless nigiri appear as everyday sushi bar bites with one taste revealing the complexities at play.

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Hawaii Titanium Rings® The ORIGINAL Exotic Inlay Titanium Ring MADE IN HAWAI‘I

Each Ring is Handmade for You! Customize Yours Today!

HawaiiTitaniumRings.com Blue Azule Gallery

The Shops at Grand Wailea 3850 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea (808) 874-3059

Glass Mango Designs

Whalers Village 2435 Kaanapali Pkwy., # N03, Kā‘anapali Resort (808) 661-7900

Karen Leis Gallery

Kahakuloa Kahekili Hwy., Wailuku (808) 244-3371


SHOP + STYLE 146 MAUI DIVERS JEWELRY jewelry 148 HILDGUND JEWELERS jewelry 149 WHALERS VILLAGE shopping center 150 KELIKI lifestyle boutique 151 BLUE GINGER boutique + accessories 152 THE PORTAL jewelry 153 SABADO GALLERY art gallery

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Maui Divers Jewelry JEWELRY in WEST & CENTRAL MAUI

› EXCLUSIVELY MADE IN HAWAI‘I › FOREVER GUARANTEE (WARRANTY)

SHOP

› HAWAIIAN BLACK CORAL, PEARLS & GEMS

146

Maui Divers started in 1958 as an adventurous diving company in Lāhainā, Maui. A diving expedition in the Moloka'i Channel led them to discover the Hawai‘i state gem, black coral, sparking their exploration into jewelry making. A year later, Maui Divers Jewelry was founded in 1959, and they began designing and manufacturing jewelry. Over 64 years later, Maui Divers Jewelry has become Hawai‘i's favorite and most trusted jewelry. Visit Maui Divers Jewelry on all major Islands and at MauiDivers.com. Plus, mention Savvy360 in-store and receive a free gift with qualifying purchases of $500 or more. Unforgettable memories await.

mauidivers.com (808) 661-1097 • Whalers Village, Kā‘anapali (Map E, PG 165) (808) 839-3655 • Kahului Airport, Kahalui (Map G, PG 167)


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SHOP


Hildgund Jewelers FINE JEWELRY in SOUTH MAUI

› EXTENSIVE DIAMONDS & STONES › HAWAIIAN HEIRLOOM BRACELETS

SHOP

› BESPOKE WILLIAM HENRY KNIVES

148

Founded in 1873, Hildgund is the ultimate in fine custom designs and handcrafted jewelry—every piece unique by its elegance, every piece one of a kind. They have a wide selection of precious and semi-precious colored stones plus many varieties of fine jade. The almost unlimited choice of their diamond collection is only of the highest quality. Customers worldwide have returned to a Hildgund location time and again, convinced that they have found one of the finest jewelry boutiques anywhere. And for the man who has everything, be sure to check out the exclusive knife collection for Hildgund by William Henry, who creates a range of tools so perfectly conceived and executed that they transcend superlative function to become superlative art. The typical knife takes more than eight months from conception to completion, like this custom design shown. Located in Four Seasons Resort Maui (808) 874-5800 • hildgund.com 3700 Wailea Alanui Dr., Wailea (Map C, PG 163)


Whalers Village SHOPPING CENTER in WEST MAUI

Located in Kā‘anapali Beach Resort (808) 661-4567 • whalersvillage.com 2435 Kā‘anapali Parkway, Lahaina

(Map E, PG 165)

› A MIX OF LUXURY & LOCAL BRANDS › DIVERSE DINING OPTIONS › AMAZING SETTING ON KĀ‘ANAPALI BEACH

SHOP

Nestled in the heart of Kā‘anapali Beach Resort, Whalers Village offers a truly unique shopping and dining experience for all visitors. With over 80 stores and restaurants, this open-air shopping center boasts an impressive array of designer brands, local artisanal crafts and delicious dining options. The center's picturesque setting overlooks the stunning Kā‘anapali Beach, making it the perfect place to enjoy a leisurely stroll while taking in the breathtaking scenery. When it's time to refuel, the center has a vast array of dining options, from casual cafés to upscale restaurants where you can savor local Hawaiian cuisine or indulge in a refreshing tropical drink at sunset. With its charming atmosphere and diverse offerings, Whalers Village is a must-visit destination on Maui.

149


Keliki BOUTIQUE in SOUTH MAUI

› BEACH CHIC CLOTHING, JEWELRY AND ACCESSORIES TO COMPLETE

SHOP

YOUR OUTFIT

150

Keliki is a locally owned, young contemporary beach boutique of tropical resort wear featuring colorful custom prints. Named after owner Kelsie, Keliki means “by the sea.” Inspired by the beauty of the Hawaiian Islands, Keliki offers beach chic style essentials ranging from tropical sundresses to coverups and two-piece sets. In addition to the exclusive Keliki line, the boutique also carries trend conscious brands and a variety of handpicked island-inspired accessories to complete any outfit. Visit Keliki beach boutique located at The Shops at Wailea.

Located at The Shops at Wailea (808) 633-4108 • keliki.com 3750 Wailea Alanui Dr., B-5, Wailea (Map C, PG 163)


Blue Ginger BOUTIQUE & ACCESSORIES in SOUTH, WEST & CENTRAL MAUI

› LIVE THE ALOHA LIFESTYLE › MATCHING FAMILY PRINTS › TIMELESS RESORTWEAR

blueginger.com (808) 667-5793 • Whalers Village (Upper Level), Kā‘anapali (Map E, PG 165) (808) 661-1666 • Blue Ginger Kids, Whalers Village (Lower Level), Kā‘anapali (Map E, PG 165) (808) 891-0772 • The Shops At Wailea, Wailea (Map C, PG 163) (808) 871-7002 • Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center, Kahului (Map G, PG 167)

SHOP

Live the aloha lifestyle in tropical resort wear from Blue Ginger. Perfect for any island occasion, Blue Ginger offers colorful, timeless resort wear sure to bring smiles and warm memories of the islands. Original batik prints inspired by the beauty of the Hawaiian Islands are available in comfortable clothing for all ages. A family run establishment, Blue Ginger has long been an island favorite with kama‘āina and visitors alike. With eight locations throughout the Hawaiian Islands Blue Ginger has something for everyone, from the youngest keiki on up. Colorful sundresses, caftans, aloha shirts, accessories and more. Celebrating 39 years of living the aloha lifestyle these exclusive prints and fashions continue to delight multiple generations.

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The Portal JEWELRY in SOUTH MAUI & UPCOUNTRY

› VISIT THE WAILEA SHOWROOM › HANDMADE IN SEASONAL COLLECTIONS

SHOP

› HEIRLOOM JEWELRY

152

Immerse yourself in the delicate splendor of The Portal, Maui's premier jewelry boutique where craftsmanship and conscience converge. Here, handcrafted jewels are created by talented artisans with meticulous attention to detail. The Portal is dedicated to providing GIA certified diamonds, precious gemstones and gold, ensuring that every piece supports a narrative of humanitarian excellence and features the collection of award-winning designer Denny Wong at The Shops at Wailea. More than just an accessory, each item is presented as a perfect gift, enveloped in elegant wrapping that befits the treasure within. Handcrafted in limited editions to guarantee exclusivity, The Portal's permanent collection is restocked twice a year, alongside a bespoke range of seasonal pieces designed to capture the imagination. Embrace the opportunity to acquire not just a statement piece, but heirloom jewelry, fostering traditions where today's luxuries become tomorrow's legacies, all while championing the wellbeing of their artisans. (808) 633-5095 • theportalmaui.com The Shops at Wailea, 3750 Wailea Alanui Dr., Unit EW17, Wailea (Map C, PG 163) 3660 Baldwin Ave., Ste. 1A, Makawao (Map A, PG 160)


Sabado Studio Galleries ART GALLERY on SOUTH SHORE, CENTRAL MAUI & WEST MAUI

sabadoarthawaii.com (808) 205-2809 • 38 North Market St., Wailuku (Map H, PG 168) (808) 280-4529 • 116 Wailea Ike Dr., Wailea (Map C, PG 163) The Westin Nanea lobby, 45 Kai Malina Pkwy, Kā‘anapali Resort (Map E, PG 165)

› ART INSTALLATION & PLACEMENT › THREE LOCATIONS ON MAUI › ART TO MATCH ALL BUDGETS

SHOP

As one of the leading Hawaiian art galleries on Maui, family owned Sabado Studio Galleries is passionate about and committed to creating unique works of art. Celebrated within the collector community, featured artist Philip Sabado creates art that is not only artistically beautiful but historically accurate. A unique feature of his artwork is how he imbues the mo‘olelo (stories) of Hawai‘i, expressing the essence of Hawaiian culture. In addition to representing Philip’s work, the galleries showcase his son Erin Sabado’s contemporary interpretation of Hawai‘i flora, as well as a variety of local, national and international artists. Stop by one of their three locations to shop for unique gift bundles, clothing and prints or preview the current collection and projects that are being produced.

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ISLAND LIVING 156 CORCORAN PACIFIC PROPERTIES resort living & real estate 157 INDICH COLLECTION fine rugs

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Corcoran Pacific Properties REAL ESTATE in SOUTH MAUI

› EXQUISITE MAUI PROPERTIES › A CULTURE OF SERVICE WITH EXPERIENCED

ISLAND LIVING

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS

156

Corcoran Pacific Properties, the exclusive Hawai‘i franchisee of The Corcoran Group, is a locally owned and operated company founded in 2005 with a simple philosophy: treating every client as a friend, and every transaction as if it was their own. Over the past 15+ years, honoring this philosophy, they established a culture of service and efficiency fueled by high-tech, smart investments in agents, and the tools they need to deliver world-class service while helping clients achieve their real estate goals. With clients at the heart of their business, Corcoran Pacific Properties is dedicated to excellence, innovation and to continuously raising the bar when it comes to impeccable service, expert insight, and a relationship-first approach. By choosing only the most successful, experienced real estate professionals and dedicating every resource to support their success, they’ve grown to be the brokerage of choice serving Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i Island. Located in Wailea Gateway Center (808) 589-2040 • corcoranpacific.com 34 Wailea Gateway Pl, Suite A-204, Kīhei (Map C, PG 163)


Indich Collection FINE RUGS in CENTRAL MAUI

Located near Kahului Airport (808) 877-7200 • hawaiianrugs.com • indichcoll@aol.com 259 E. Wakea Ave., Kahului (Map G, PG 167)

› THESE HAWAIIAN HEIRLOOM RUGS ARE DESIGNED BY LOCAL ARTISTS › CREATE YOUR OWN CUSTOM RUG

ISLAND LIVING

Indich Collection's unique designs are inspired by the casual elegance of the island lifestyle. As designers and manufacturers of Hawaii Rugs®, Indich uses traditional oriental carpet weaving techniques and materials to create some of the most artful rug designs found anywhere. Celebrating 42 years in Hawai‘i with the largest selection of area rugs in the Pacific Basin, and with their Custom Design Program, Indich offers clients virtually unlimited design, color and size options. Traditional, contemporary and tropical designs stir your imagination as you enter the "Art Under Foot" gallery. Free drop shipping island-wide and to the mainland with minimum purchase. Open Monday to Friday 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

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Raise your consciousness. Reduce your impact.

We hope that you enjoy this very special place. Help us preserve its beauty as you explore with a heightened level of awareness, intention and respect. Mahalo nui loa.


MAPS 160 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 168

ISLAND MAP the Valley Isle KĪHEI South Maui WAILEA TO MĀKENA South Maui NĀPILI TO KAPALUA West Maui KĀ‘ANAPALI TO HONOKŌWAI West Maui LĀHAINĀ West Maui KAHALUI Central Maui WAILUKU Central Maui PĀ‘IA North Shore

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MAP A 160


MAUI

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1 Haleakalā Visitor Center 2 ‘Iao Valley State Monument 3 Maui Ocean Center 4 Kai Kanani (check-in location) 5 Pineapple Farm Tour 5 Hali‘imaile Distillery Tour 6 Kula Botanical Garden 7 Makawao Forest Reserve 8 NorthShore Zipline 9 Hāmoa Beach 10 Hāna Bay Beach Park 11 Ho‘okipa Beach Park 12 Wai‘ānapanapa State Park 13 Honolua Bay 14 Keone‘ō‘io Bay (La Pérouse) 15 Olowalu Beach 16 Mākena Beach State Park 17 Pukalani Country Club 18 Mama's Fish House 19 Nuka 20 The Portal 21 Hāna-Maui Resort

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LEGEND See + Do Golf Beaches Shop Eat + Drink Live Stay

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Charlie Young Beach Kama‘ole I Beach Kama‘ole II Beach Kama‘ole III Beach Maui Nui Golf Course Akamai Coffee Co. Da Kitchen Tanpopo Fabiani's Bakery & Pizza Hawaiian Moons Natural Foods Koiso Sushi Bar Maui Fish 'n Chips Izakaya Genbe Miso Phat Sushi Roasted Chiles Nalu's South Shore Grill Nutcharee's Authentic Thai Food Paia Fish Market Peace Love Shave Ice Sansei Seafood Restaurant & Sushi Bar Tienda Del Sol Azeka Shopping Center Aston Maui Hill Hilton Grand Vacations Club Maui Villas Mana Kai Maui Royal Mauian Worldmark Kihei

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Polo Beach Palau‘ea Beach Wailea Beach Wailea Golf Course Kō Nick's Fishmarket Maui Duo Steak & Seafood Ferraro's Bar e Ristorante Spago Humble Market Kitchin Gannon's Humuhumunukunukuapua‘a Olivine Lineage Matteo's Osteria Monkeypod Kitchen Ka‘ana Kitchen Morimoto Maui The Birdcage Bar The Restaurant at Hotel Wailea Hildgund Jewelers The Shops at Wailea Keliki Blue Ginger Tiffany & Co. Louis Vuitton The Portal Wailea Gateway Center Wailea Town Center Wailea Village Sabado Gallery Corcoran Pacific Properties AC Hotel By Marriott Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort Destination Residences Wailea Fairmont Kea Lani Four Seasons Resort Maui Grand Wailea Maui Ho‘olei Residences Hotel Wailea Polo Beach Club Residence Inn Maui Wailea Beach Resort - Marriott, Maui Wailea Beach Villas 163


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Dragon's Teeth Kapalua Coastal Trail Kapalua Bay Beach D.T. Fleming Beach Park Nāpili Beach Bay Course at Kapalua Plantation Course at Kapalua A‘a Roots Alaloa Lounge The Banyan Tree Cane & Canoe Fond Honolua Store Joey's Kitchen Nāpili Farmers Market Taverna The Pour House Italian Kitchen & Wine Bar Sea House Restaurant Merriman's Ritz Carlton Maui, Kapalua Montage Kapalua Bay Parrish Collection Maui Napili Kai Beach Resort The Mauian on Napili Bay Napili Surf Beach Resort Napili Bay Resort Napili Shores Maui by Outrigger Hololani Resort Royal Kahana Maui by Outrigger

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Hawai‘i Wildlife Discovery Center Kā‘anapali Beach Kā‘anapali Kai Course Royal Kā‘anapali Course Cruzin' Cafe Farmers Market Maui Japengo Island Press Coffee Hula Grill Leilani's on the Beach Monkeypod KItchen by Merriman Longhi's Miss Arepa Roy‘s Kaanapali Whalers Village Blue Ginger Maui Divers Jewelry Louis Vuitton Keani Hawaii Na Hoku Tourneau Sabado Gallery Hyatt Regency Maui Resort & Spa Honua Kai Resort & Spa Kā‘anapali Ali‘i Kā‘anapali Beach Hotel Marriott's Maui Ocean Club Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa The Westin Maui Resort & Spa, Kā‘anapali The Westin Nanea Ocean Villas, Kā‘anapali The Westin Kā‘anapali Ocean Resort Villas Royal Lahaina Resort

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LAHAINA 1 Cacao Farm Tour & Chocolate Tasting 2 Old Lāhainā Lū‘au 3 Lahaina Cannery Mall

The community of Lahaina has been devasted by the tragic wildfires in August. Please use the Lahaina Bypass as you travel to West Maui and be considerate of those that are grieving. Pay strict attention to traffic routes and road closures and do not stop to linger or take photos during your trip in consideration of local residents. Mahalo.

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19 2

7

8

13

9

10

17

3

MAP G

KAHULUI

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Kahului Airport Kahului Heliport Alexander & Baldwin Sugar Museum Kanaha Pond State Wildlife Sanctuary Bistro Casanova Food Truck Park Krispy Kreme Maui Coffee Roasters Tin Roof Starbucks

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Whole Foods Blue Ginger Costco Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center Maui Divers Jewelry Maui Mall Village Pu‘unene Shopping Center Indich Collection Courtyard by Marriott Maui Kahului Airport

167


WAILUKU 6

5 3

9 1 7

2

15

4

13

10

8

14

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Maui Mystery Escape Room Niu Life Kitchen Sam Sato's SixtyTwo MarcKet Tamura's Market Tiffany's Restaurant & Bar The Empanada Lady Ululani's Hawaiian Shave Ice Umi Sushi Wailuku Coffee Co. 808 on Main Maui Lani Shopping Center Mele Ukulele Native Intelligence Sabado Gallery

12

11

MAP H

PĀ‘IA

MAP I

1

7 3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

13

11

9

6 10

8 12 4

5 2

168

Baldwin Beach Better Things Cafe Hāna Hou Surf Club Lima Cocina + Cantina nyloS Paia Fish Market Vana Paia Acacia Nuage Bleu Wings Hawai‘i Art Project Pā‘ia Kim McDonald Art Gallery Paia Inn


TRAVELOGUE 170 NOTES + SKETCHES document your travel adventures, the places you visit, experiences you encounter, or something weird you saw at the pool. 172 ITINERARY PLANNER prefer to keep it analog? You can still get the most out of your trip and start planning your itinerary here, just grab a pen and do it old school. DOWNLOAD THE SAVVY360 APP This link will take you to the appropriate app store to install the app, where you can create a trip, start building your itinerary, collaborate with friends, and more...

169


Maui

MY SKETCHES

170


Maui

MY SKETCHES

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Maui

D AT E

MY TRIP

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/ / BREAK FAST

pg #

D AT E

What do you want to do today?

M ORNING

LU NC H

AFTERNOON

DINNER

EV ENING


Maui

D AT E

MY TRIP

D AT E

/ /

/ / BREAK FAST

M ORNING

LU NC H

AFTERNOON

DINNER

EV ENING


Maui

D AT E

MY TRIP

/ /

/ / BREAK FAST

pg #

D AT E

What do you want to do today?

M ORNING

LU NC H

AFTERNOON

DINNER

EV ENING


Maui

D AT E

MY TRIP

D AT E

/ /

/ / BREAK FAST

M ORNING

LU NC H

AFTERNOON

DINNER

EV ENING


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