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MUN Pres Rep 2010_cover_FA.pdf

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4:57 PM

WE T N A W R U O Y . K C A B D FEE

Office of the President, Memorial University of Newfoundland St. John’s, NL A1C 5S7 Canada Tel: 709 864 8212 | Fax: 709 864 2059 president@mun.ca | www.mun.ca/president

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT’S REPORT HIGHLIGHTS 2010

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10-09-22

WISH YOU WERE HERE...

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H S I W U O Y E R E W . . . E HER PRESI

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CONTENTS

Wish you were here

3

Arctic explorers

29

Raised relief

31

Higher elevation

5

The English patience

33

Shared journey

7

Best places

35

9

Global repositioning

On top of the world

37

Capital gains

11

Up, up and away

39

The passage to now

13

Transatlantic speeding

41

Dangerous migration

15

The map is in the mail

43

Greater depths

17

Trans-Canada

45

Making a mountain

19

Redrawing the map

21

VITAL SIGNS

46

Logical leaps

23

FINANCIALS

58

Stepping stones

25

LEADERSHIP

64

Going the distance

27

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY

71

CONTACT

72


NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR


Wish you were here I am finding my new adventure at Memorial exciting, and I cannot wait to see where it takes me. I am originally from Manitoba, but spent some of my youth in Saskatchewanand I feel right at home here. Memorial University was created as a living memorial to those Newfoundlanders killed in the First World War. With a special obligation to the people of the province, Memorial has had a major impact on the social, cultural and economic development of Newfoundland and Labrador and beyond. This report contains snapshots, in postcard form, of these successes during 2009–10. I was attracted to Memorial because of its sense of purpose, its outstanding reputation and its potential for growth. Not surprisingly, in this province many paths lead to each of Memorial’s campuses. But many adventures that begin here make the leap abroad. Our students are surmounting challenges worldwide, just as our faculty are engaged with the international community of scholars and researchers. Each postcard shares one story of Memorial’s impact somewhere in the world. We are on an exciting trajectory, just like this province. This report shows you some of the pathways that have led to diverse experiences and remarkable achievements. I hope you enjoy these adventures, and I wish you were here.

DR. GARY KACHANOSKI President and Vice-Chancellor Memorial University of Newfoundland

Dr. Gary Kachanoski Memorial University NL , Canada

P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

3


WESTERN NEWFOUNDLAND


Higher elevation This past year Memorial University’s west coast campus, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, received a new name. But that was just the tip of the proverbial iceberg. The college has been renamed Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland. The new name is one of a number of exciting developments for the growing campus. New residences and academic buildings are being built and the provincial government has made substantial investments in Grenfell, all aimed at ensuring the campus has the tools it needs to manage the next phase of its growth. These developments, and the opportunities they present, follow from a 2009 announcement made by provincial Education Minister Darin King and Finance Minister Tom Marshall. Grenfell’s budgeting process has also been refined to improve the campus’s ability to set priorities and expand both research and academic programs in key strategic areas. The result, when coupled with a boost in marketing, is expected to be an influx of new students and increased research capacity. As well, Grenfell’s senior administrator, a position that was previously known as principal, has been transformed into that of university vice-president. A search to fill this position permanently is underway. Overall, these adjustments to governance and nomenclature will reposition Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland, competitively and help it secure its place as a vital part of a leading university, recognized both nationally and globally.

Grenfell Campus Memorial University of Newfoundland Corner Brook , NL

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5


IRELAND


Shared journey This year two Memorial medical researchers shared an honour in the nation’s capital, where both were welcomed into the distinguished ranks of the Royal Society of Canada (RSC). Dr. Sean Brosnan, Department of Biochemistry, and Dr. Patrick Parfrey, Faculty of Medicine, joined about 1,800 RSC Fellows whose national and international acclaim has gained them membership in the country’s oldest, most prestigious scholarly organization. It’s not the first time the two researchers have travelled the same path —they even attended the same university in Ireland. Dr. Parfrey earned his medical degree at University College, Cork, while Dr. Brosnan did his BSc and MSc there before completing a DPhil at Oxford. Dr. Brosnan joined Memorial in 1972; 12 years later, Dr. Parfrey arrived. If scholarly achievement came with Air Miles, both researchers could travel the globe repeatedly. Whether exploring the role of amino acids in health (Dr. Brosnan) or investigating the clinical and genetic epidemiology of inherited diseases and evaluating health care delivery (Dr. Parfrey), they’ve made a substantial contribution to health care in this province and beyond.

Sean Brosnan & Pat Parfrey Ireland

These remarkable individuals have another thing in common: when asked about this newest honour, both were quick to credit their hardworking colleagues with helping pave the road to renown. P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR


Global repositioning Memorial will get its bearings, refine its headings and set the best course for continued success with the help of a new navigational tool: a comprehensive, university-wide research plan. In November 2009 Dr. Christopher W. Loomis, then president and vicechancellor pro tempore, launched development of the plan and sought feedback from a wide range of stakeholders. A group led by the vicepresident (research) took a 360º look at all aspects of research and creative activities, as well as considering the conversion of knowledge into products, practices and policies, and other forms of community engagement. The process was facilitated by Dr. Rob Greenwood of Memorial’s Leslie Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development. Grounded in the principle of freedom for researchers to pursue scholarly activities based on their expertise, curiosity and ingenuity, the resulting plan will help advance Memorial’s aspirations and objectives with external stakeholders and partners, including government and other funding partners. Most significantly, it will pinpoint research strengths, and allow for community input, a unique approach. The plan will enable Memorial to better allocate available resources in support of research, creative activity and scholarship.

Rob Greenwood Leslie Harris Centre NL , Canada

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GERMANY


Capital gains In 2007, they showed New York they had the right stuff. In 2008, they took Singapore by storm and emerged victorious. And in 2009 in Berlin, after three intense days of presenting, Memorial’s SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) team took third place in an international competition —one that involves more than 1,400 student teams from more than 40 countries. This was the fourth year in a row our SIFE team earned Memorial the accolade “the most enterprising campus in Canada” and the right to represent the nation at the SIFE World Cup. There, 24 Memorial University students representing the 90-member team showed off the sustainable, socially responsible projects they’d created. CEOs and business leaders from around the world evaluated team projects based on their success at creating economic opportunities for individuals and communities.

SIFE Memorial Berlin, Germany

But SIFE Memorial didn’t need to travel to make an impact in 2009–10. At home in St. John’s, the team partnered with the Department of National Defence to give medically-discharged Canadian Forces members training and mentorship as they developed business plans for their own futures. This new SIFE offering is the first program of its kind in Canada, a great gain for Memorial and the country.

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LABRADOR


The passage to now Mapping the route from early Inuit occupation of southern Labrador through transformative contact with Europeans to the current Labrador Métis way of life is a multifaceted, million-dollar project—one expected to deliver widespread benefits. Understanding the Past to Build the Future received $999,935 from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada through its Community–University Research Alliances program. Led by Faculty of Arts researchers, the in-depth examination of archaeological, archival, genealogical and historical records will form a detailed contour map of a people’s history. Archaeologist Dr. Lisa Rankin and her team initiated the project at the request of the Labrador Métis Nation. Labrador town councils, school boards, organizations and researchers are partnering in the project. A website and touring exhibitions will showcase the findings as they emerge. In addition, Memorial’s Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Studies, Dr. Mario Blaser, will work with community members to produce documentaries.

Lisa Rankin & Mario Blaser Labrador

The project findings will augment educational resources. They could also stimulate a nascent heritage tourism industry in southern Labrador and help create experts who can develop this business. And because Métis community members will be trained in archaeological, archival, ethnographic and educational methods, local people and governments will gain the right skills to take over management of these archaeological sites.

P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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GULF OF MEXICO


Dangerous migration It’s always an arduous flight for birds from Canadian nesting colonies to their winter destinations down south. But this year, seabirds leaving Newfoundland and Quebec will fly right into a new danger: oil slicks spilled in the Gulf of Mexico by the Deepwater Horizon explosion. That perilous prospect has Dr. Bill Montevecchi, university research professor of psychology, racing to develop an emergency response. During the massive Gulf of Mexico oil spill Dr. Montevecchi was an indefatigable expert resource for media outlets and others needing to know what effect the spill would have on seabird populations. Dr. Montevecchi studies bird behaviour. His previous tracking information indicates thousands of birds migrate from eastern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico in the fall and remain there for six months or more. While most breeders returning to Cape St. Mary’s this spring arrived unscathed, the first oiled bird recovered in the disaster is known to have been from an eastern Canadian colony—possibly from Newfoundland.

Bill Montevecchi Gulf of Mexico North America

Before the birds depart again for the Gulf, knowing nothing of the menace that lingers there, Dr. Montevecchi hopes to find financial support for an urgent initiative. He wants to put satellite tags on a total of 150 northern gannets and herring gulls in each of the next three years to learn precisely where they flock. That travel data will help him assess how this disaster will affect our migratory birds. P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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T H E N O R T H AT L A N T I C


Greater depths The right information, deeper data and the ability of this province to chart its own destiny: that’s the foundation on which the Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research (CFER) has been established at Memorial’s Fisheries and Marine Institute. It’s part of a $14 million investment the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is making in long-term fisheries science capabilities that will help make the province more self-reliant. Under the direction of renowned fisheries scientist Dr. George Rose, CFER will delve into today’s most important fisheries research questions, such as those relating to the ongoing recovery of groundfish stocks, particularly cod, and changes in crab and shrimp stocks. In addition to greatly enhancing our knowledge here at home, CFER will explore opportunities to collaborate with fisheries scientists in other parts of Canada and around the world, including in Ireland, Iceland, Norway, New Zealand and the United States.

George Rose Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research NL , Canada

The establishment of CFER coincides with many other marine-related advances, including the recent opening of the Holyrood Marine Base. These new initiatives will help improve ocean technology and the management of fisheries, industries of vital importance to people and communities in this province and around the world.

P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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VENEZUELA


Making a mountain It takes a long time for layer upon layer of sediment to make a mountain —and it has taken dedication and forethought to build Memorial’s Geoscience Society. When Tiffany Piercey and Emma Brand, both graduate students in the Department of Earth Sciences, organized a field trip to Venezuela, they were adding one more layer to their lasting legacy. In February they led 11 graduate and undergraduate students from Memorial to partner with ten students and a professor from Simón Bolívar University in Caracas. The trip was funded by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG), an organization Ms. Piercey has been active in for years. The group spent a week in the Venezuelan Andes studying sedimentary layers for clues about the climate of the past and what these suggest about present conditions and what they might mean. In planning the field trip, the pair were careful to include students they believe can take over the Geoscience Society in four years.

Tiffany Piercey & Emma Brand Caracas , Venezuela

The South American adventure was just one part of the legacy this duo has laid down. They’ve also relaunched a SEG chapter at Memorial and created a geosciences and youth education outreach program for students in the province. As Ms. Brand notes, their efforts all build toward this: “It’s about learning and bestowing the knowledge we have onto younger generations.” P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

19


NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR


Redrawing the map Additions and upgrades will change the landscape of the St. John’s and Corner Brook campuses, modernizing Memorial and furthering its reputation as a world-class institution. Memorial’s infrastructure plan, largely supported by the provincial and federal governments, is resulting in the rollout of over $210 million in capital projects on the St. John’s and Corner Brook campuses between 2009–13. The largest portion of this year’s infrastructure funding from the provincial government is being used to dramatically enhance laboratories. State-of-the-art equipment will ensure students in biology, chemistry, medicine and other fields receive the most up-to-date training in their professions. On the island’s west coast, new construction will add much-needed academic, research, computing and meeting space to serve existing and new populations at Grenfell Campus. Joined to the Arts and Science Building, this architecturally striking expansion will contain offices, dedicated study areas and small group rooms for the business program. New residences will be built on the Grenfell Campus.

Memorial University NL , Canada

Constructive enhancements have also been undertaken at the Health Sciences Centre. On the St. John’s campus, alterations to elevators, walkways, curbs, ramps and railings will provide greater accessibility for those with disabilities. Improved facilities, such as a simulation centre, new lecture theatres, standardized patient exam rooms and an expansion of research space for genetics and genomics, will give the Faculty of Medicine room to expand its enrolment from 60 to 80 future physicians starting in 2011. P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

21


EUROPE


Logical leaps A young philosopher from Newfoundland’s Southern Shore has been chosen to make a great leap. Joseph Carew, a native of Cape Broyle, is the first anglophone Canadian to win the prestigious Erasmus Mundus EuroPhilosophie Scholarship. The award, which has been given by the European Commission to just 17 students outside the EU, will bring the gifted philosophy graduate into the heartland of Europe’s philosophical traditions. With this scholarship, Mr. Carew will pursue his studies at three universities, where all his work will be done in either French or German. Fortunately, after completing his bachelor’s degree at Memorial, he spent two years honing those language skills. That proficiency is crucial to this intellectual leap: Mr. Carew plans to study the writings of thinkers like Kant, Hegel and Schelling in their original languages to uncover overlooked kernels of thought that could help surmount today’s impasses in science, politics and contemporary theory.

Joseph Carew Université Catholique de Louvain Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

This ten-month European tour includes stops at the Université de Toulouse II–Le Mirail in France; the Université Catholique de Louvain, in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; and Bergische Universität Wuppertal, in Wuppertal, Germany.

P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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IRELAND


Stepping stones An Irish postdoctoral fellow is connecting the dots between Newfoundland and Ireland—and between archaeology and history. Dr. James Lyttleton’s archaeological examinations of 17th-century settlements at Ferryland on Newfoundland’s Southern Shore and of Clohamon Castle in County Wexford, Ireland, show how Ireland served as a stepping stone to colonization across the Atlantic. This transatlantic journey began centuries ago with Sir George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore and an influential secretary of state under King James I. Keenly interested in the New World, Lord Baltimore invested £20,000 in Ferryland before moving on to Maryland. Both settlements brought in English colonists and spurred governments and adventurers to head further into the North American interior. By comparing the ruins of Ferryland’s Mansion House and County Wexford’s Clohamon Castle, this investigation could reveal how the Calvert family used the Ferryland building. And that may serve as a stepping stone for historians who want to understand how the newcomers adapted to a new world.

James Lyttleton Clohamon Castle County Wexford, Ireland

Dr. Lyttleton’s work has a myriad of financial supporters on both sides of the Atlantic. As well, he’s the first archaeologist to receive funding from MITACS Accelerate, a national internship program that links researchers with other organizations. His ongoing research will see a team of Memorial graduate students who’ve studied Ferryland step across the ocean to Clohamon. P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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EASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND


Going the distance Living on Canada’s coastline—the world’s longest—carries certain responsibilities, like providing measured and informed answers to some of the momentous questions that stretch out before us. A Memorial researcher will join other ocean experts to extensively explore some of the most urgent issues regarding the health of our oceans. Dr. Ian Fleming, professor with the Ocean Sciences Centre, is one of ten researchers on the Royal Society of Canada (RSC)’s Expert Panel on Ocean Climate Change and Marine Biodiversity. When it established this panel, the RSC noted that Canada had “a geographical, if not moral, imperative” to lead the world in understanding ocean health. The experts will focus on exploring the consequences of climate change; the influence of aquaculture on marine biodiversity; the type of legislation needed for the protection and recovery of marine life; and the federal government’s efforts in managing ocean resources in the Canadian public’s interest and in keeping with its international responsibilities.

Ian Fleming Memorial University NL , Canada

Dr. Fleming’s aquaculture research, his collaborative work with students and colleagues and other ocean-related studies at Memorial will further this vital study. A final report is expected in 2012.

P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

27


THE ARCTIC


Arctic explorers Now Memorial researchers can explore new depths as they investigate ice-covered regions, thanks to some solid new funding. A million-dollar investment in advanced technology for oil and gas development in frozen regions will be a catalyst for diverse research with hot revenue-generating potential. International energy services company John Wood Group PLC helped establish the Wood Group Chair in Arctic and Cold Region Engineering, which will study pipeline design, construction and operations for arctic and other northern settings. In addition to the Wood Group’s $500,000 sponsorship, the province’s Research & Development Corporation (RDC) contributed the same amount through its Industrial Research and Innovation Fund to build research capacity in this high-priority area. As Dr. Shawn Kenny assumes the chair at the Ocean Engineering Research Centre at the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, he brings with him two decades of crucial experience. He’ll lead innovative work that can strengthen local industry and train essential qualified personnel. The opening of the Autonomous Ocean Systems Laboratory at Memorial is also making ice-covered regions easier to explore. The new lab, established with generous financial support from the RDC, the Canada Research Chairs program and the Canada Foundation for Innovation, will generate knowledge and build technical expertise for working in harsh environments, and foster research by vastly improving access to ice-covered regions through the use of autonomous underwater vehicles.

Shawn Kenny Wood Group Chair in Arctic and Cold Region E ngineering The Arctic

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29


HAITI


Raised relief In the wake of Haiti’s horrific earthquake, five nursing students saw a lack in the relief efforts and resolved to do something about it. The students—Krista Howell, Megan Hudson, Jessica Hunt, Katyln Hynes and Jessica Peddle-Drover—discovered that the Canadian Nursing Students Association (CNSA) had no mandate to respond when major disasters struck. As part of a course assignment and with the full support of faculty in the School of Nursing, the students moved to fill the void. In January they presented their paper on global relief efforts in natural disasters to 400 participants at the CNSA 2010 National Conference in Quebec. They called on the organization, which has 25,000 members, to become involved when a massive natural disaster threatens the health and well-being of people, whether nationally or internationally. The paper also called for CNSA to facilitate and support nursing students’ fundraising efforts and their travel to disaster areas to give assistance. Good ideas should lead to good things, and these students have certainly sparked progress. As a result of their efforts, CNSA is outlining a clear plan of action, including the responsibilities of nurses and nursing students to assist in disasters.

Krista Howell, Megan Hudson, Jessica Hunt, Katyln Hynes & Jessica Peddle -Drover Haiti

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UNITED KINGDOM


The English patience Gillian Langor is on her way to Oxford University in the United Kingdom, and it’s a decidedly different sort of voyage than the engineering graduate has undertaken in the past. The St. John’s native has won the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship for Newfoundland and Labrador, which weighs academic, personal and societal achievement in its selection process. During her undergraduate studies, Ms. Langor participated in Memorial’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders. That led her to Ghana to work on programs aimed at improving the livelihoods of subsistence farmers. Then, after completing her studies last May, she strapped on a backpack and set off to travel South America. Now she’s heading to Oxford to study social anthropology—but this isn’t as unusual a path as it seems. She hopes combining this passion with her mechanical engineering credentials will be just the ticket for further adventure in international development and design.

Gillian Langor Oxford University Oxford, United Kingdom

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BANGLADESH


Best places Sylhet, Bangladesh, may seem like a world away, but Forhad Ahmad has made a brilliant transition from that small city to St. John’s, Newfoundland. Perhaps that’s not surprising. Sylhet also has a vibrant history and diverse cultural influences, and, like Mr. Ahmad’s adopted home, the region is renowned for its natural beauty. In 2007 Mr. Ahmad left his life in Bangladesh behind to pursue graduate studies in asset integrity management for oil and gas facilities. Accepted to four Canadian universities, he chose Memorial—and that choice has proven exceptionally rewarding. Despite being far from home and family, he slipped right into his new life. In fact, when he graduated in May with a master’s in mechanical engineering, he received the Chancellor’s Graduate Award, recognizing his outstanding leadership contributions to graduate student life and community. As well, his academic accomplishments garnered him the university’s Fellow of the School of Graduate Studies, the International Student Resource Centre’s Academic Excellence Award and the Hira & Kamal Ahuja International Graduate Fellowship.

Forhad Ahmad Sylhet, Bangladesh

He may have completed what he set out to achieve, but the welcoming people, the rich heritage and the vibrant opportunity here have won him over. Mr. Ahmad plans to build a career in the energy industry in Newfoundland and Labrador, which he calls “one of the best places in the world to work in this area.” P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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WASHINGTON


On top of the world Let’s just say that Memorial University has a thing for creating special annual reports. When your annual report is recognized among peers around the world as the best of the best in a given year, it’s a reason to celebrate. When this happens two years in a row, from among hundreds of entries each year, well, that signifies a different level of achievement and suggests that maybe your university is really good at this sort of thing. Memorial’s two consecutive grand gold medals from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) highlight the flair that Memorial exhibits when it comes to reporting its achievements to the world. CASE is the Washington, D.C.-based association that represents the communications, alumni and marketing professionals of universities globally, including the top universities in the world, such as Harvard and Oxford, all Canadian universities, and thousands of others. And since 2009 Memorial has also received more than 20 other national and international awards for its marketing and communications efforts. These awards include 12 honours in the 2010 Canadian Council for the Advancement of Education Prix d’excellence awards program, more than any other Canadian university among the 48 that entered. From its websites to its advertising campaigns, student recruitment efforts, alumni programs and audiovisual presentations, Memorial is recognized as an international leader in marketing and communications programs that truly stand out.

Council for the Advancement & Support of Education Washington, D.C., USA

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LABRADOR


Up, up and away Sometimes sticking close to home is the best way to get somewhere. Now a partnership between Memorial University and the Nunatsiavut Government in Labrador will let Inuit students complete a Bachelor of Social Work without having to leave the familiar territory of their culture behind. After a preparatory year in 2009, the program begins in earnest in the fall of 2010 with 20 students working on their bachelor of social work degrees. This group and the students who’ll follow will be able to complete a degree entirely in Happy Valley–Goose Bay. Memorial faculty will travel north to teach them, while some courses will be taught by local professionals. The program, which integrates aboriginal content and reflects Inuit culture and values, is designed to prepare graduates to practice in both Inuit and non-Inuit settings. The partners anticipate that most graduates will stay in Labrador to help meet the tremendous need there for social workers and services. The latest in a number of Labrador-based initiatives—from crafting a children’s geology book in the Inuit language to exploring how aboriginal governments are interacting with mining developments—the bachelor of social work program is just one piece of Memorial’s holistic approach to post-secondary education in all corners of the province. And considering our partnership with Newfoundland and Labrador’s public college, College of the North Atlantic, our rate of success can only go sky-high from here.

Nunatsiavut Government Happy Valley – Goose Bay Labrador

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AT L A N T I C O C E A N


Transatlantic speeding A new high-performance, super-fast transatlantic data connection will use Memorial’s St. John’s campus as a hub, linking North American and European researchers. It’s called the IceLink Project because it will use an undersea circuit in the northern polar region to link Canada and the United States to Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. In doing so, IceLink will establish one of the most advanced data transfer networks in the world, and create the first-ever direct connection between Canada and Europe. Built on the foundation of the pan-Atlantic network of world-class, high performance computing clusters known as ACEnet (Atlantic Computational Excellence Network)—of which Memorial played the lead developmental role—IceLink will connect two continents through collaborative opportunities, instant data access and ultra-high-speed computing. IceLink is a joint venture between NORDUnet (a collaboration between five Nordic National Research and Education Networks) and Canada’s Advanced Research and Innovation Network (CANARIE), the non-profit corporation that manages Canada’s ultra-high-speed research network. Close to 40,000 researchers at 200 Canadian universities and colleges, as well as hospitals and government laboratories, rely on this expressway, which runs hundreds of times faster than Internet connections. CANARIE’s equipment at Memorial University will establish a dedicated lightpath to New York, creating a conduit between European researchers and those in the United States.

NORDUnet and CANARIE Atlantic Ocean

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NEWFOUNDLAND


The map is in the mail A rare and valuable map housed at Memorial University is now getting widespread attention, thanks to its incorporation by Canada Post into a stamp celebrating Cupids’ 400th anniversary. In August 1610, English colonists led by Bristol merchant John Guy arrived where Cupids now stands on the north shore of Conception Bay on Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula and established an English settlement. It is the oldest English settlement in Canada, the only one to have been continuously occupied for four centuries. The Cupids 1610–2010 stamp features a portion of a 17th-century map of the Avalon Peninsula—the first map to show the settlement’s location. The map was prepared by then governor of Cupids John Mason around 1617, and first published in 1625. The map is held by Memorial’s Centre for Newfoundland Studies and it can also be viewed online through Memorial’s Digital Archive Initiative (www.collections.mun.ca/). More than one million Cupids 400 stamps will be in circulation—and making their way into mailboxes and stamp collections around the world.

Centre for Newfoundland Studies Memorial University NL , Canada

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CANADA


Trans-Canada With his roots deeply set in rich Canadian soil, his academic experience branching out exuberantly and his eyes firmly fixed on the future, Dr. Gary Kachanoski is the best possible harvester to cultivate Memorial’s academic growth. Born in Manitoba and raised in Saskatchewan, the university’s new president and vice-chancellor most recently served as vice-president (research) at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, where research revenue nearly doubled during his tenure. A world-renowned soil scientist, he was also the Bentley Research Chair (Soil, Water and Environment) and a professor of soil physics. His many academic achievements include induction into the Canadian Conservation Hall of Fame in recognition of his commitment to improved soil and water management. And his interests are diverse: he also served as executive director of folkwaysAlive!, an initiative of the University of Alberta and the Smithsonian Institution that fosters the creation, preservation and dissemination of musical cultural heritage. Dr. Kachanoski began his term at Memorial on July 1, 2010. His first official duty—laying a wreath at the Memorial Day commemorative ceremony—helped ground him in the unique history and heritage of this institution. As he sets his sights on the future, he’ll begin by working to fill key leadership positions and fostering the development of Grenfell Campus on the island’s west coast.

Gary Kachanoski Office of the President Memorial University of Newfoundland St. John’s , NL

This is only a beginning, but one thing is certain: with such fresh vision and energy, anything is possible. P R E S I D E N T ’ S R E P O R T 2 0 1 0 WISH YOU WERE HERE |

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V I TA L S I G N S

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE ENROLMENT 2004 to 2009 (Full-time and part-time) 2009 Total: 16,892 20,000 18,000 16,000 Enrolment

14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 2004

2005

2006

2007

Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate

2008

2009


UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE ENROLMENT BY UNIT Fall 2009 Total enrolment*: 17,378 3,500 398

4 572

2,000 138

2,828

274 1,000

1,226

Undergraduate

19 304

224 245

Me dic ine

Ca mp us ** *

Sc ho ols **

735

Ed uc ati on Un sp ec ifie d/ Ot he r

1,163 66

0

691

Ma rin eI ns titu te

1,243 500

2,243

1,792

Gr en fel l

1,500

287 2,926

Bu Ar sin ts es sA En dm gin ini str ee ati rin on g& Ap pli ed Sc ien ce Int erd isc ipl ina ry

Enrolment

2,500

Sc ien ce

3,000

Fall Semester

Graduate

* Includes full-time and part-time students enrolled in degree programs at the end of regular registration, September 23, 2009. ** Human Kinetics & Recreation, Lifelong Learning, Music, Nursing, Pharmacy and Social Work. *** All students studying at the Corner Brook campus and the Western Regional School of Nursing are included in Grenfell.

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TOTAL RESEARCH FUNDING 2000–01 to 2009–10 100,000 90,000

$ Thousands

80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0

00/01

01/02

02/03

03/04

04/05 Year

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

09/10


NUMBER OF DEGREES*, DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES CONFERRED 2003 to 2009

4,000 3,500

Degrees

3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Year Degrees Diplomas Certificates * Degrees include bachelors, masters, DPhil and doctors of medicine.

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SOURCES OF RESEARCH FUNDING 2005–06 to 2009–10 2009–10 total: $91,263,777 100,000

$ Thousands

75,000

50,000

25,000

0

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

Year Federal gov’t (includes granting councils)

Provincial gov’t – NL

Private sector

Other*

Non-profit

Total

* Other includes individual, provincial government (other), United States government and other.


VALUE AND NUMBER OF ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED* 2004–05 to 2009–10

8,000,000 7,000,000

1,074

1,019 Dollars

6,000,000 857

5,000,000 4,000,000

852

3,000,000 2,000,000

768

701 709

697

750

834

944

817

1,000,000 0

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Entrance scholarships Graduate fellowships * The number of scholarships awarded is listed at the top of each bar.

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PHILANTHROPIC SUPPORT 2009–10 Institutional Support Total ($) (gifts and pledges)

Total donors (#) (gifts and pledges)

Gifts ($)

Donors (#) (gifts only)

Alumni

766,326

2,518

1,094,691

1,861,017

3,663

Friends

458,063

644

4,255,468

4,713,531

725

Groups

Pledges ($)

333,671

98

333,671

98

Corporations

3,995,889

274

7,757,747

11,753,636

308

Foundations

48

1,583,816

46

814,700

2,398,516

Estates

440,202

4

440,202

4

Gifts-in-kind

372,127

128

372,127

128

7,950,094

3,712

13,922,606

21,872,700

4,974

Total


PHILANTHROPIC SUPPORT 2009–10 BY AREA OF DESIGNATION Total philanthropic support: $7,950,094

26.3%

Capital projects

$2,089,285

26.6%

Student support

$2,114,422

13.6%

Research

$1,080,000

0.6% 27.8%

Area of greatest need Faculty/school

4.7%

Gifts-in-kind

0.4%

Other designations

$51,024 $2,212,184 $372,127 $31,052

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PHILANTHROPIC SUPPORT 2005–06 to 2009–10

10,000,000 9,000,000 8,000,000 Dollars

7,000,000 6,000,000 5,000,000 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 0

2005–06

2006–07

Individual

Corporate**

2007–08

2008–09

* Totals include gifts-in-kind. The 2009–10 gifts-in-kind total is $372,127. ** Foundation and group giving is included in corporate support.

2009–10*


HUMAN RESOURCES Full-time and part-time employees March 31, 2009 Employees

Permanent

March 31, 2010

Contractual

Permanent

Contractual

Faculty/instructional staff

1,020

1,047

1,028

1,063

Administrative/technical support staff

1,490

1,474

1,548

1,489

27

10

30

5

Librarians Affiliate organizations*

0

229

0

240

Students

0

2,273

0

2,489

2,537

5,033

2,606

5,286

Total

* Affiliate organizations include separately incorporated entities and agencies.

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LIBRARY HOLDINGS PER STUDENT FOR SELECTED CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES 2009 400

300 250 200 150 100 50

Selected Canadian Universities Source: Maclean’s 2009

W ind so r Da lho us ie Sa int M ar y’s

Ca lg ar y

Ac ad ia

Vi ct or ia

Br un sw ick Sa sk at ch ew an M em or ial

Ne w

Al be rta

0

Q ue en ’s

Holdings per Student

350


TUITION FEES FOR COMPREHENSIVE AND SELECTED ATLANTIC UNIVERSITIES 2009–10 (Full-time Canadian students in an arts program) 6,000

5,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

Ac ad ia

PE I Co nc or di Ne a* w Br un sw ick Da lho St us .F ie ra nc is Xa vie r

Re gi na

Fr as er

Sim on

Vi ct or ia

W at er lo o

Yo rk

0

M em or ial W ind so r Ca rle to n Gu elp h

Tuition Fees ($)

4,000

Comprehensive and Selected Atlantic Universities * Quebec resident tuition fees = $1,968; Canadian resident tuition fees = $5,501. Source: Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada.

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FINANCIALS OPERATING FUND

SPECIAL PURPOSE AND TRUSTS

This is an unrestricted fund used for the university’s

This is a restricted fund with limitations imposed by

primary operating activities.

both external and internal sources. The major component is the endowment fund.

ANCILLARY FUND This is an unrestricted fund used for “sales-produc-

RELATED ENTITIES

ing” or “self-sufficient” activities supplementary to

The university has nine separately incorporated

the university’s primary operating activities.

entities: C-CORE, Genesis Group Inc., Canadian Centre for Fisheries Innovation, Botanical Garden,

PLANT FUND

The Newfoundland Quarterly, Memorial University Recreation Complex Inc., Western Sports and

This is a restricted fund to account for the resources

Entertainment Inc., Edutech Services Inc. and

used in construction, maintenance and renovations.

Campus Childcare Inc.

This fund also accounts for the university’s assets and depreciation.

RESEARCH FUND This is a restricted fund accounting for resources from external granting agencies.


EXPLANATION AND HIGHLIGHTS • The university’s operating budget funds the opera-

• 80 per cent of expenditures in the operating fund

tions of the university, including Grenfell Campus

have been spent in the academic, library and

and the Fisheries and Marine Institute campus.

student services functional areas.

A grant is also provided to Harlow Campus in Essex, England. • The university’s unconsolidated operating fund expenditures for fiscal 2010 were $355,245 million (excluding employee future benefits). • Student fees comprised 16 per cent of total revenue. • The provincial government operating grant increased 12 per cent over fiscal 2009. The increase provided for salary increases and associated benefits, cost of inflation adjustments and strategic initiative funding.

• Library holdings of $6 million have been capitalized in fiscal 2010. • The university’s pooled investment fund had a market value of $81,612 million (book value: $77,088 million) and generated a return of 20.2 per cent. • The university expended $4 million on renovating student residences at the St. John’s campus. • The university provided $3.2 million in undergraduate and graduate scholarships, bursaries and other awards from our endowment funds.

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CONSOLIDATED SCHEDULE OF OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2010 ($ Thousands) Operating fund Government grants

Plant fund

293,876

Student fees

56,883

Other income

11,705

Investment income

Ancillary fund

Research fund 35,803

Special purpose and trusts 14,033

Related entities 4,427

173 13,580

9,535

9,602

2,011

Total 2010

Total 2009

348,139

315,105

57,056

54,788

9,498

17,205

71,125

78,033

11,118

625

13,754

(4,329)

Total revenue

364,475

13,580

9,535

45,405

34,822

22,257

490,074

443,597

Total expenditures

355,245

13,502

8,400

44,150

25,932

21,565

468,794

448,004

9,230

78

1,135

1,255

8,890

692

21,280

(4,407)

(653)

(36,686)

14,789

39

(15,406)

10,382

Current year results Future employee benefits liability*

(36,033)

Per financial statements

(26,803)

78

1,135

1,255

8,890

* Note: As per the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants’ accounting guidelines, the university has included this liability in its financial statements. The university has received prior approval from the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council to exclude from the current year operating results any amounts resulting from the recognition of the liability related to future employee benefits.


UNIVERSITY OPERATIONS REVENUE BY CATEGORY 2009–10

80%

Government grants

16%

Student fees

1%

Investment income

3%

Other income

$294,000,000 $57,000,000 $2,000,000 $12,000,000

Note: Numbers above are rounded to the nearest million.

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UNIVERSITY OPERATIONS EXPENDITURES BY FUNCTION 2009–10

65%

Academic

$254,000,000

4%

Library

$17,000,000

3%

Student services

$10,000,000

7%

Facilities management

$26,000,000

3%

Computing and communications

$12,000,000

8%

Administration

$32,000,000

Other expenditures

$41,000,000

10%

Note: Numbers above are rounded to the nearest million.


UNIVERSITY OPERATIONS OPERATING REVENUE VS. EXPENDITURES ($ Thousands) (At year end)

400,000

$ Thousands

350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0

2005 Revenue

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Expense

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LEADERSHIP UNIVERSITY OFFICERS AND SENIOR ADMINISTRATORS Sept. 1, 2009 – Aug. 31, 2010

OFFICIAL VISITOR Lieutenant-Govenor of Newfoundland and Labrador Hon. Dr. John Crosbie, PC, OC, QC

PRESIDENT AND VICE-CHANCELLOR pro tempore Dr. Christopher Loomis (to June 2010)

CHANCELLOR General Rick J. Hillier (Ret’d)

PRESIDENT AND VICE-CHANCELLOR Dr. Gary Kachanoski (effective July 2010)

CHAIR Board of Regents Robert E. Simmonds, QC

VICE-PRESIDENT (ACADEMIC AND PRO VICE-CHANCELLOR) pro tempore Dr. Reeta C. Tremblay

VICE-CHAIR Board of Regents Eleanor Swanson

VICE-PRESIDENT (RESEARCH) pro tempore Dr. Ray Gosine (to August 2010)


VICE-PRESIDENT (RESEARCH) Dr. Christopher Loomis (effective August 2010)

ASSOCIATE VICE-PRESIDENT (ACADEMIC) Dr. Doreen Neville

VICE-PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE) Kent Decker

ASSOCIATE VICE-PRESIDENT (RESEARCH) Dr. Ray Gosine (acting, effective September 2010)

VICE-PRESIDENT (CORNER BROOK) Dr. Holly Pike (acting)

DEAN Student Affairs and Services Dr. Lilly Walker (to July 2010)

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Fisheries and Marine Institute Glenn Blackwood

DEAN Student Affairs and Services Dr. Rob Shea (effective August 2010)

ASSOCIATE VICE-PRESIDENT (ACADEMIC) Dr. Grant Gardner

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Marketing and Communications Victoria Collins

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DIRECTOR Administration and Finance Grenfell Campus Dennis Waterman

DIRECTOR Centre for Institutional Analysis and Planning Paul Chancey

DIRECTOR Alumni Affairs and Development Dr. Penny Blackwood

DIRECTOR Computing and Communications Graham Mowbray

DIRECTOR Animal Care Services Dr. Lenka Husa

DIRECTOR Co-op Education Dr. Peter Rans

DIRECTOR Athletics Michelle Healey DEAN Faculty of Arts Dr. Noel Roy (acting) DIRECTOR Botanical Garden Dr. Wilf Nicholls DEAN Faculty of Business Administration Dr. Jeff Parsons (acting, to December 2009) Dr. Wilfred Zerbe (effective January 2010) DIRECTOR Career Development and Experiential Learning Lisa Russell (interim, September to December 2009) Jennifer Browne

DIRECTOR Distance Education and Learning Technologies Ann Marie Vaughan DIRECTOR Faculty Relations Morgan Cooper GENERAL COUNSEL Karen Hollett DEAN Faculty of Education Dr. David Dibbon DEAN Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Dr. John Quaicoe (acting) DIRECTOR Enterprise Risk Management David Head DIRECTOR Facilities Management Darrell Miles

DIRECTOR Financial and Administrative Services Deborah Collis DEAN School of Graduate Studies Dr. Noreen Golfman DIRECTOR School of Human Kinetics and Recreation Dr. Antony Card (acting, July 2009 to June 2010; permanent, effective July 2010) DIRECTOR Human Resources Lisa Hollett (to January 2010) Michael Fowler (interim, effective February 2010) DIRECTOR Labrador Institute Dr. Keith Chaulk DIRECTOR The Leslie Harris Centre of Regional Policy Development Dr. Robert Greenwood UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN Lorraine Busby DIRECTOR Division of Lifelong Learning Karen Kennedy DEAN Faculty of Medicine Dr. James Rourke Dr. Sharon Peters (acting, January to April 2010)


DIRECTOR School of Music Dr. Tom Gordon (to June 2010) Dr. Ellen Waterman (effective July 2010) DIRECTOR School of Nursing Dr. Judith McFetridge-Durdle DIRECTOR School of Pharmacy Dr. Linda Hensman EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR President’s Office Margot Brown DIRECTOR Public Affairs Peter Morris UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR Glenn Collins DIRECTOR Office of Research Craig Perchard (acting) DEAN Faculty of Science Dr. Mark Abrahams DIRECTOR School of Social Work Ellen Oliver (acting, to June 2010) Dr. Alean Al-Krenawi (effective July 2010) CHIEF PHYSICIAN Student Health Services Dr. Norman Lee

DIRECTOR Student Success Tom Brophy

DIRECTOR Student Recruitment Shona Perry-Maidment

DIRECTOR Housing, Food and Conference Services Christine Burke

DIRECTOR Technical Services Richard Meaney

DIRECTOR Counselling Centre Dr. Peter Cornish DIRECTOR Finance and Operations Student Affairs Wayne Rose

MANAGING DIRECTOR Canadian Centre for Fisheries Innovation Carey Bonnell DIRECTOR/GENERAL MANAGER Memorial University Recreation Complex Inc. Anne Richardson

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mineral Exploration and Mining Inco Innovation Centre Dr. Lawrence Cochrane

PRESIDENT AND CEO C-CORE Dr. Charles Randell

DIRECTOR Collaborations and Partnerships David Miller

PRESIDENT AND CEO Genesis Group Inc. David King

DIRECTOR Health and Safety Sheila Miller

EDITOR The Newfoundland Quarterly Joan Sullivan

GENERAL MANAGER Harlow Campus Sandra Wright ACTING DIRECTOR International Centre Dr. Anthony Dickinson (to October 2009) Ms. Sonja Knutson (effective June 2010)

GENERAL MANAGER Western Sports and Entertainment Inc. William Smith

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Campus Childcare Inc. Tracy Rose GENERAL MANAGER Edutech Services Inc. Penny Fillier Skinner

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS September 1, 2009 – August 31, 2010 Robert E. Simmonds St. John’s, chair Eleanor Swanson St. John’s, vice-chair General Rick Hillier (Ret’d) Ottawa, chancellor Dr. Gary Kachanoski President and vice-chancellor Dr. Christopher Loomis President and vice-chancellor pro tempore Dr. Reeta C. Tremblay Vice-president (academic) pro tempore Sheila Ashton Corner Brook

Gilbert Bennett St. John’s

Jennifer Guy St. John’s

Roger Bill St. John’s

Jim Keating St. John’s

Julie Browne Calgary

Sarah Ann King Corner Brook

Jerry Byrne St. John’s

Ken Marshall St. John’s

Richard Chislett St. John’s

Bill Matthews St. John’s

Pat Coish-Snow Clarenville

Vinod Patel St. John’s

Mary Cormier Corner Brook

Tony Roche St. John’s

Brian Dalton St. John’s

Kathleen Roul Lawn

Adam Daniels St. John’s

Debbie Singleton Happy Valley-Goose Bay

Michelle Daye Grand Falls – Windsor

Melissa Squarey Corner Brook

Rex Gibbons St. John’s

Donna Stone St. John’s

Martin Gould Plum Point

Auburn Warren St. John’s

Noreen-Greene Fraize St. John’s

Tina Pardy Secretary


SENATE 2009 – 2010 EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Dr. Gary Kachanoski President and chairman Dr. Christopher Loomis President and vice-chancellor pro tempore General Rick Hillier Chancellor Dr. Reeta C. Tremblay Vice-president (academic) pro tempore Dr. Ray Gosine Vice-president (research) pro tempore Dr. Christopher Loomis Vice-president (research) Dr. Holly Pike Vice-president (Corner Brook) (acting) Dr. Mark Abrahams Dean, Faculty of Science Dr. Alean Al-Krenawi Director, School of Social Work Glenn Blackwood Executive Director Fisheries and Marine Institute Lorraine Busby University librarian

Dr. Antony Card Director, School of Human Kinetics and Recreation Candice Ennis Williams Assistant Deputy Minister (for Deputy Minister) Department of Education

Dr. Ellen Waterman Director, School of Music Dr. Wilfred Zerbe Dean Faculty of Business Administration

ELECTED MEMBERS Glenn Collins University registrar and Secretary of the Senate

Dr. Faith Balisch Faculty of Arts, Humanities

Dr. David Dibbon Dean, Faculty of Education

Dr. William Schipper Faculty of Arts, Humanities

Dr. Noreen Golfman Dean, School of Graduate Studies

Dr. Peter Trnka Faculty of Arts, Humanities

Dr. Linda Hensman Director, School of Pharmacy

Prof. Donna Walsh Faculty of Arts, Humanities

Karen Kennedy Director Division of Lifelong Learning

Dr. Erwin Warkentin Faculty of Arts, Humanities

Dr. John Quaicoe Dean, pro tempore Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Prof. Gary Riser Faculty of Arts, Social Sciences Dr. Christopher Sharpe Faculty of Arts, Social Sciences

Dr. James Rourke Dean, Faculty of Medicine

Dr. Dale Foster Faculty of Business Administration

Dr. Noel Roy Acting Dean, Faculty of Arts

Dr. Jim Wyse Faculty of Business Administration

Dr. Lilly Walker Dean, Student Affairs and Services

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Dr. Andrea Rose Faculty of Education

Dr. Adrian Fiech Faculty of Science

Dr. Debbie Kelly School of Pharmacy

Dr. Glyn George Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Dr. Sue Ghazala Faculty of Science

Dr. Dennis Kimberley School of Social Work

Dr. George Jenner Faculty of Science

Dr. Sudhir Abhyankar Grenfell Campus

Dr. Serpil Kocabiyik Faculty of Science

Prof. David Carroll Grenfell Campus

Dr. Paul Marino Faculty of Science

Dr. Paul Wilson Grenfell Campus

Carl Clarke Fisheries and Marine Institute

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Dr. Dennis Peters Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Bert Riggs Library Dr. Jennifer Connor Faculty of Medicine Dr. Jim Connor Faculty of Medicine Dr. Christopher Kovacs Faculty of Medicine Dr. Donald McKay Faculty of Medicine Dr. Karen Mearow Faculty of Medicine Dr. Amin Ali Muhammad Faculty of Medicine Dr. P. Peter Wang Faculty of Medicine Dr. Robert Adamec Faculty of Science Dr. Janet Brunton Faculty of Science

Cyr Couturier Fisheries and Marine Institute Donald Haynes Fisheries and Marine Institute Ray Roche Fisheries and Marine Institute Prof. Vivienne Kuester School of Human Kinetics and Recreation Dr. Jane Leibel School of Music Prof. Marilyn Beaton School of Nursing

Sebastien Despres Kim Keats

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS Brad Evoy George Furey Amber Haighway Amy Hannaford Meghan McCarthy Jessica McCormick Ryan Murphy Terry Randell Eddy St. Coeur Michael Walsh


President's Report 2010 draft:2010 President's Report

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Page 71

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY

With campuses in Newfoundland and Labrador, and in the United Kingdom, Memorial University sends postcards that are picturesque, varied and perhaps somewhat unexpected. Even our dean of Graduate Studies has a blog called Postcards from the Edge. Why? Because Memorial finds its home base here on the edge of the western world, with a unique perspective—a system of campuses, institutes and locations populated by almost 18,000 student explorers and 2,500 intrepid faculty and staff. They are risk takers…bold women and men who solve problems because there is a need to, but who are also curious for curiosity’s sake. They might well draw their inspiration from Kurt Vonnegut: “I want to stay as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can’t see from the centre.” TO TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT MEMORIAL, VISIT WWW.MUN.CA

St. John’s Campus

Marine Institute

Grenfell Campus

Harlow Campus

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C O N TA C T

Want to know more about Memorial University of Newfoundland? Here is a guide to some helpful entry points: General Inquiries tel: 709 864 8000 fax: 709 864 3514 e-mail: info@mun.ca www.mun.ca

Admissions/Student Recruitment tel: 709 864 8896 fax: 709 864 8611 e-mail: becomestudent@mun.ca www.mun.ca

President’s Office tel: 709 864 8212 fax: 709 864 2059 e-mail: president@mun.ca www.mun.ca

Alumni Affairs and Development tel: 709 864 4354 fax: 709 864 2008 e-mail: munalum@mun.ca www.mun.ca/munalum

Division of Marketing and Communications tel: 709 864 8663 fax: 709 864 8699 e-mail: marcomm@mun.ca www.mun.ca/marcomm

Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland Community Education and College Relations tel: 709 637 6208 fax: 709 637 6201 e-mail: pgill@swgc.mun.ca www.swgc.mun.ca

Office of Research tel: 709 864 8251 fax: 709 864 4612 e-mail: research@mun.ca www.mun.ca/research

Marine Institute Corporate Services and External Affairs tel: 709 778 0200 fax: 709 778 0346 e-mail: kim.thornhill@mi.mun.ca www.mi.mun.ca Harlow Campus tel: 011 44 1279 455900 (dialled from Canada) e-mail: hcampus@hcampus.inty.net fax: 011 44 1279 455921 www.mun.ca/harlow


MUN Pres Rep 2010_cover_FA.pdf

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WE T N A W R U O Y . K C A B D FEE

Office of the President, Memorial University of Newfoundland St. John’s, NL A1C 5S7 Canada Tel: 709 864 8212 | Fax: 709 864 2059 president@mun.ca | www.mun.ca/president

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT’S REPORT HIGHLIGHTS 2010

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Pres Report 2010